Autumn 2017 - Graduate Courses

HISTORY 7012 HISTORIOGRAPHY OF MODERN U.S. HISTORY

This readings course introduces graduate students to the major questions, themes, and texts in United States history since 1945.  The readings will include classics in the field and newer works that have changed the ways historians have thought about older topics.  Some of the subjects explored in the class will include histories of sexuality and the family, the Modern Black Freedom Struggle, Native American resistance movements, immigration, the rise of the New Right, and women’s activism. Assigned readings will likely include Storming Caesar’s Palace by Annelise Orlick, All in the Family by Robert Self, Bradley Shreve’s Red Power Rising, and Power Lines by Andrew Needham, and In Struggle by Clayborne Carson. This course is meant to be a sequel to a course on U.S. history prior to World War II. Students do not need to have taken this earlier class to enroll in this seminar, but it will pick up where the earlier class left off.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

12:45-3:30       Wednesday                 Rivers, D.

Prerequisites and Special Comments

Graduate standing.                                                                                                                                                           


HISTORY 7303 COMP HISTORY OF THE AFRICAN DIASPORA & POST-EMANCIPATION, COLONIAL & POST-COLONIAL REALITY    

This second part of the African Diaspora course, deals with the experiences of enslaved Africans during and after the process of emancipation. At the specific level, however, the course will focus on the continent of Africa, the Middle East, and the Indian Ocean. In addition to the fact that these regions have not received sufficient attention in the scholarly literature on the African Diaspora, the course will highlight the similarities and the differences between these areas and the Atlantic world. Topics will include the debate about the slave systems in these societies, the process of emancipation, European abolition and its impact, the policies of European colonial governments towards slavery, local response, the status of former slaves in African and Middle Eastern societies, and the social and cultural legacy of slavery.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

2:20-5:05 pm   Thursday                     Sikainga, A.

Prerequisites and Special Comments

Graduate standing.                                                                                                                                                           


HISTORY 7400 EAST ASIA & THE PRE-MODERN WORLD

This course explores developments in the ecological, scientific and technological history specifically in East Asia.  Beginning two thousand years before the common era, the East Asian societies of China, Korea and Japan pursued technological innovations that were as transformative as those Bacon noted, although he and his contemporaries would have been blind to much of the scientific and technological change that had transformed their environments as well as advanced knowledge.  Efforts to re-engineer and manage nature led to exploration of astronomical phenomenon and the healing powers of medicines in addition to epochal agricultural, engineering and other transformations. 

 Exemplary themes for the course:

  • Using the environment; the environment as resource
  • Reading the environment; predicting and handling natural hazard risk
  • Urbanization and the environment
  • Knowledge networks and transfer, including the “lens” through which Western technologies were viewed
  • Nationalism, war, science and technology

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

12:30-3:15       Wednesday                 Brown, P.

Assigned Readings (exemplary_:

Mark Elvin, Retreat of the Elephants: An Environmental History of China

Francesca Bray, Technology and Gender: Fabrics of Power in Late Imperial China

Ian J. Miller, The Nature of the Beasts: Empire and Exposition at the Tokyo Imperial Zoo

Vaclav Smil and Kazuhiko Kobayashi, Japan's Dietary Transition and Its Impacts (Food, Health, and the Environment)

Assignments:

  • Weekly reading, shared student leadership of discussions of that reading.
  • Two book reviews
  • An historiographic essay on a major theme in the course, or multiple shorter papers on more than one theme.
  • Shorter assignments                                                                                                                          

Prerequisites and Special Comments

Graduate standing. Advanced undergraduates may be admitted with instructor permission.  Consult the professor early.                                                                                                                                                           


HISTORY 7410 STUDIES IN PRE-MODERN CHINESE HISTORY: MAIN HISTORIOGRAPHICAL QUESTIONS

This seminar will explore the most important historiographical debates in the field of premodern Chinese history (from ancient periods to the Qing dynasty). These debates include (but are not limited to): the political, cultural, and socio-economic evolution of the Chines empire; China in the Eurasian context; gender and ethnicity as categories of historical study in the China field; value of the Chinese intellectual and religious history for the history profession; the premodern in the modern.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

4:30-7:15         Wednesday                 Zhang, Y.

Prerequisites and Special Comments

Graduate standing.                                                                                                                                                         


HISTORY 7550 STUDIES IN MILITARY HISTORY

Violence and the First World War

The First World War introduced a level of brutality that has shaped our lives ever since. This graduate seminar explores the different facets of war violence in 1914-1918: violence on the battlefields, violence against civilians, violence of weapons and words. Thinking about the violence of the First World War requires redefining what we commonly call “wartime”: the individual and collective initiations into violence, thresholds of violence and how they were perceived, how forms of violence mutate, the rhythms and modalities of demobilization, the future of violence after the official end of hostilities. Ultimately this reading seminar offers a discussion of how violence was understood, justified and regulated in 1914-1918 and its legacy in 20th Century warfare.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

9:35-12:20       Wednesday                 Cabanes, B.

Assigned Readings:

Weekly readings (TBD) will include recent books reflecting the renewal in the field of World War I studies.

Assignments:

Discussion will be an essential part of this reading seminar. Each student will present a book and lead class discussion TWICE during the semester and write TWO book reviews OR present a book and lead class discussion ONCE during the semester and write THREE book reviews.

Prerequisites and Special Comments

Graduate standing.                                                                                                                                                          


HISTORY 7600 STUDIES IN THE HISTORY OF WOMEN AND GENDER

In the words of women’s labor historian Alice Kessler-Harris, “women have always worked.”  But, it is equally true that much of women’s work has, until fairly recently, gone unrecognized.  The eventual recognition of women’s domestic (reproductive) work for their own families made clear that some women always had two jobs – one paid and one unpaid.  Even women’s volunteer work in the public sphere, a third area of work, was regularly viewed as little more than a way of keeping busy and, often, meddling.  This topics course focuses on the ways women have always worked in American history.  It will pay particular attention to race, class, and ethnicity and time and space.  It will be driven as much by historiography.  And it will assume that one can’t understand women’s work for wages, whether done inside the home or outside of it, cannot be understood fully without considering women’s family lives.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

5:30-8:15 pm   Wednesday                 Shaw, S.

Prerequisites and Special Comments

Graduate standing.                                                                                                                                                           


HISTORY 7600 STUDIES IN THE HISTORY OF WOMEN AND GENDER

Gender, Class and Politics: European Women’s History 18-20th Centuries

This intensive readings course is designed to provide graduate students from a range of academic disciplines with a broad introduction to the history of women and gender in Modern Europe, and to the theoretical approaches and methodologies employed by scholars working in this field.  Our readings will be clustered around a number of topics including cultural constructions of women and gender; female sexuality and life course options; labor and consumption; social movements, and feminism.  Additional topics will be determined by the specific interests of seminar participants.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

7:00-9:45 pm   Thursday                     Soland, B.

Prerequisites and Special Comments

Graduate standing.                                                                                                                                                           


HISTORY 7725 GRADUATE READINGS IN POWER, CULTURE & STATE

During 2017-2018 the Center for Historical Research will offer the first year of a two-year program of lectures, seminars and workshops exploring the theme “You Say You Want a Revolution? Revolutions in Comparative Perspective.”  This colloquium is designed to accompany the CHR program and permit graduate students to investigate the theme in more depth.  Our four broad categories are: Definitions/types of revolutions; Origins of Revolutions; Processes and Experiences of revolutions; and Outcomes of Revolutions.  We aim to engage in a creative reexamination of revolutions past and present with the view that they offer unique opportunities to examine the sources and effects of change and conflict in the human experience.  Another goal is to bring together scholars of various time periods, geographies, and disciplines in a joint intellectual venture and benefit from these comparative perspectives.  We will read and hear from scholars of Africa, Asia, Russia, the Middle East, Latin America, Europe and the U.S., coming from various disciplines and covering material from around the globe and throughout human history.  Many of the readings will be determined by scholars who will be visiting OSU as part of the CHR program for 2017-18, and the colloquium will meet for discussion with these prominent scholars.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

2:30-5:00 pm   Friday                          Newell, M.

Interested students should register for the course in Autumn 2017.  The course runs for the entire academic year 2017-2018 but we will not meet every week; registered students will receive a list of our Friday meeting dates.  Students will receive 3 credit hours of credit for History 7725 in Spring 2018.

Prerequisites and Special Comments

Graduate standing.                                                                                                                                                           


HISTORY 7900 COLLOQUIUM IN THE PHILOSOPHY OF HISTORY & THE HISTORIAN’S SKILLS

The colloquium introduces graduate students to a variety of methods used by historians to approach, discuss and write about the past.  The methods discussed will be broad and eclectic, and will be drawn from multiple historical subfields.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

TBD                 TBD                             TBD

Prerequisites and Special Comments

Graduate standing.                                                                                                                                                         


HISTORY 8010 SEMINAR IN MODERN U.S.  HISTORY

This is a research seminar covering any aspect of U.S. history, 19th and 20th centuries. The focus is on your work - a dissertation chapter, a paper that might be turned into an article – and constructive criticism of the work of your colleagues.  We will meet regularly at the beginning of the semester (see below).  While we will have a few open dates, we will also meet to discuss your prospectus and drafts.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

5:30-8:15         Tuesday                       Baker, P.

Assigned Readings:

To gain familiarity with what might be pretty disparate topics, I will ask you to provide a short reading – an article or chapter – that influenced your thinking or introduces others to your topic.  We will also read and discuss a few papers on research and writing.

Assignments:

Prospectus, introduction, first and final drafts.

Prerequisites and Special Comments

Graduate standing.                                                                                                                                                          


HISTORY 8250 RESEARCH SEMINAR IN MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY

This research/writing seminar provides an opportunity to begin and complete a major research project (such as an M.A. paper, dissertation chapter, or article) in the field of Modern History broadly defined. Our course will begin by examining a selection of writings selected by seminar members to help us conceptualize a viable research topic, identify appropriate sources, and develop methodological approaches to analyze these materials.  The remainder of the course will allow time for research, writing, rewriting, and for engaging with practical issues in academic life. Students will gain the benefit of receiving regular constructive feedback from a supportive and collegial intellectual community. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

TBD                 TBD                             Conklin, A.

Assignments:

15-10 page, double-spaced prospectus/research proposal

2.  Papers 1 and 2 (each approximately 10 pages doubled–spaced):  They will constitute roughly the first third and the second third of your proposed chapter/article/thesis.

3. Draft (approximately 30 pages, double–spaced, made up of Papers 1 and 2 and ten new pages)

4.  Three constructive critiques of your fellow scholars’ works and active participation in class discussion.

Prerequisites and Special Comments

Graduate standing.                                                                                                                                                          


HISTORY 8350 RESEARCH SEMINAR IN ISLAMIC HISTORY:  CHRONICALS (AND OTHER NARRATIVE SOURCES) AS SOURCES FOR ISLAMIC (OR ANY) HISTORY

This course will help graduate students to prepare a research paper, article draft, or dissertation chapter based on narrative sources, above all the chronicle genre, a key type of source in Islamic history.  During the first few weeks, we will read about texts and textuality, then segue into obsessive focus on research projects.  Students will present at least two drafts of their projects in the course of the semester, while reading their classmates’ drafts.  These exercises will improve the finished products while also giving you valuable experience with peer review and formal presentations. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

12:45-3:30       Tuesday                       Hathaway, J. (can be adjusted to suit students’ schedules)

IMPORTANT NOTE:  This course is open to students in any field who work with narrative sources from any period.  It is also ideal for post-generals students who are writing dissertations or trying to develop topics.  If curious, please contact the instructor at hathaway.24@osu.edu.

Assigned Readings:

Several articles, TBA

Classmates’ paper drafts

Assignments:

Regular attendance and active participation

2 presentations of paper or chapter drafts

Responses to classmates’ drafts

Final research paper, article draft, or dissertation chapter

Prerequisites and Special CommentsGraduate standing.

                                                                                                                                                           

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To find course availability and times, please visit the Ohio State Course Catalog and Master Schedule.