Autumn 2017 - Undergraduate Courses

 

 

 

AFRICAN HISTORY 
 


HISTORY 3302 NATIONALISM, SOCIALISM, AND REVOLUTION IN AFRICA
3 Cr. Hrs.

This course explores the history of the nationalist and revolutionary movements as well as the socialist regimes in Africa in the twentieth and early twenty first centuries. The course will begin with a discussion of the establishment and the legacy of European colonial rule in Africa, and proceeds to examine the development of African nationalism and decolonization. The course will use a variety of secondary and primary sources as well as films and documentaries to illuminate the complexities and the ideologies that informed the nationalist movements. The nationalist movement produced a number of leaders and political thinkers whose ideas and writings have shaped the nationalist discourse and anti-colonial struggle.  They include figures such as Kwame Nkrumah, Julius Nyerere, Patrice Lumumba, Amilcar Cabral, just to name a few. Moreover, the course will explore the way in which race, ethnicity, gender, and class have shaped nationalist discourse, strategies, and agenda as well as the manner in which conflicts and tensions within the nationalist movement have continued to shape post-colonial states and society in Africa. The last part of the course will focus on the theory and practice of socialism in Africa by looking at specific examples from countries such as Ghana, Tanzania, Guinea, Angola, Mozambique, and Ethiopia. The course will conclude by assessing the experiences and the success and failures of these examples and their impact.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:30     WF                              Sikainga, A.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Africa, post-1750 for history majors and fulfills the historical study and global diversity GE requirements.
 



HISTORY 3307 AFRICAN HEALTH & HEALING
3 Cr. Hrs.

This course explores approaches to health and healing in sub-Saharan Africa over the last 150 years.  By using a historical perspective on health and healing, we see why specific diseases emerge, why they persist, and what their consequences are for African societies.  Diseases we will consider include cholera, sleeping sickness, malaria, tuberculosis, and HIV/AIDS, among others.  The course is also interested in African experiences of being unwell.

While students will gain some biological or technological understanding of diseases and causes of illness, the course focuses on the wider social or economic consequences that promote disease and illness.  By investigating illness, we can consider the ways that different governments (colonial and post-colonial) have attempted to control disease and control the people disease affected; the rise and elaboration of tropical medicine as a field; and the impact of colonial and post-colonial policy on land use, ecology, and human settlement.  In addition, by thinking about health and what makes one healthy, we can find insights into societal values, and look at the overlapping and contradictory therapeutic traditions (grounded in both popular and biomedical treatments) that African people have used to regain health.

This course is an ideal course for students who have an interest in Africa, medicine, public health, colonialism, or post-colonial states.  All students will develop and propose their own research project in the form of a Fulbright grant.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:35-10:55       TR                               McDow, D.

Assigned Readings:
Readings will include historical primary sources, journal articles, and at least two books.
Adam Ashforth, Madumo: A Man Bewitched (2000)
Julie Livingston, Improvising Medicine: An African Oncology Ward in an Emerging Cancer Epidemic (2012)

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Africa, pre & post-1750 for history majors.
 



HISTORY 3312 AFRICA & WWII
3 Cr. Hrs.

The Second World War was pivotal event that transformed and shaped the world as we know it today. The war was fought in different regions and led to unprecedented mobilization of human and natural resources from across the globe, including the continent of Africa. In addition to being a major theatre of military operations, Africa provided vital human and natural resources to the war efforts. This course will shed light on the role of Africans as soldiers and producers, as well as the effects of the war on class, race, and gender relations within the continent. It will also illustrate the importance of the war in provoking crises in colonial empires and transforming the nature of political mobilization across the African continent.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:45-2:05       WF                              Sikainga, A.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Africa, post-1750 for history majors and fulfills the historical study GE requirements
 

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AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY
 

HISTORY 3083 CIVIL RIGHTS AND BLACK POWER MOVEMENT
3 Cr. Hrs.

This course examines the Civil Rights/Black Power Movement. It begins by looking at Black activism and Black life at the start of the 20th century. It continues by examining the development and impact of the mass mobilization efforts of the 1950s and 1960s, from the Montgomery bus boycott and the student sit-ins, to the Freedom Rides and the March on Washington. At the same time, it scrutinizes the grassroots organizing campaigns led by the young people of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). This course concludes by looking at civil rights activism outside the South, evaluating the impact of civil rights legislation, and analyzing the ideological and tactical transition to Black Power. This course employs grassroots, bottom-up approach to understanding the black freedom struggle. It takes seriously the notion that the driving force behind the movement was every day, ordinary, Black folk, and the skilled African American activists who helped them organize and mobilize.  The goal of this course is to familiarize students with the people (famous, infamous, and forgotten), places, and events of the most significant American social movement of the 20th century. In addition, and arguably most importantly, this course aims to show the process by which seemingly powerless African Americans organized to transform the society in which they lived, and the way white Americans, particularly in the South, responded, i.e. their attempts to preserve the status quo.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:45-2:05       TR                               Jeffries, H.

Assignments:
Three exams over the course of the semester; and 10-page analytical essay

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This is a reading intensive course.
This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for the history major.
 



HISTORY 3085 AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY THROUGH CONTEMPORARY FILM
3 Cr. Hrs.

This course explores the African American experience through the lens of major motion pictures and documentary films.  The aim is for students to gain an understanding of how and why various historical topics have been depicted in movies, and to what extent the film version of particular events reflect reality.  The purpose of the class is to use film to explore and historicize themes such as race and racism, slavery and freedom, oppression and resistance, and to reflect of the meaning of this themes (and films) in today’s society. The films will cover the entirety of the African American experience, from slavery through the present.

This course grapples with a central question: Given the fact that the majority of people in American society rely upon media and film to make sense of the past, to what extent do contemporary films do an adequate job of relaying the “truth” and accuracy of various historical subjects in the African American experience?  As a result, this class examines a variety of topics, including American slavery, African American culture, racial violence, Jim Crow, the civil rights and Black Power movements, and contemporary conflicts between the police and black communities, by examining film that treat these topics in conjunction with historical research.  We will also look closely at a select few recurring issues in films on the African American experience, such as the subordinate role of black women and the use of white characters as the primary narrative vehicles. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:40-3:25       M                                 Jeffries, H.

Assigned Readings:
In lieu of an assigned text (although there will be articles, essays, and/or book chapters distributed online), there are weekly documentary films that students are to view prior to class via OSU’s Secured Media Site online streaming service.

Course Format: One film will be watched and discussed, in class, each week. Films will include: 12 Years A Slave; Glory; Life; Fences; The Butler; and Fruitvale Station, among others.

Assignments:
Three 7-10-page analytical essay assignments; Group media project.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for the history major.

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AMERICAN HISTORY
 


HISTORY 2001 LAUNCHING AMERICA
3 Cr. Hrs.

The course takes an intermediate-level approach to American history in its wider Atlantic context from the late Middle Ages to the era of Civil War and Reconstruction.  It is constructed around three interwoven themes:  1) the collision of European, African, and Native American cultures; 2) the development of American political institutions and culture; 3) the question of whether the promise of equality in the American republic applies to all Americans or only a portion.  Although the course is primarily a broad overview of American history from 1500 through 1877, in order to provide a better sense of history as an intellectual discipline we will explore one particular topic in depth, namely the role of religion in American society during this period.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:40-1:35       MW                             Grimsley, M.
11:30; 12:40    F (recitations)
3:00

Assigned Readings:
Gary B. Nash et al., The American People. Volume 1. (tentative)
Edmund S. Morgan, The Puritan Dilemma: The Story of John Winthrop, 3rd ed.
Steven E. Woodworth, While God Is Marching On: The Religious World of Civil War Soldiers.

Assignments:
Two midterm examinations
Final examination

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
English 1110.01/02 either previous or concurrently. Not open to students with credit for History 151 or 1151.  This course fulfills Group North America, pre-1750 for history majors.
 



HISTORY HONORS 2001 LAUNCHING AMERICA
3 Cr. Hrs.

A survey of American history from the Age of Encounter to the Reconstruction period, this course covers the social, economic, cultural, political, and diplomatic history of the American peoples.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:35-10:55       WF                              Irwin, R.

Assigned Readings:
G. Nash, et al., The American People, Vol. I.
Additional course materials, including documents, available on Carmen.

Assignments:
Evaluation will be based on participation (including written responses to assigned readings), quizzes, two papers and a final exam.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
Honors standing or permission of the instructor required.  Not open to students with credit for History 151 or 1151. General Education: Historical Study, Culture and Ideas, and Social Diversity in the United States.  Eligible for credit toward minors and majors (pre- and post-1750, North America) in history.
 



HISTORY 2002 MAKING AMERICA MODERN
3 Cr. Hrs.

From the aftermath of the Civil War to the 2000s, this course offers a sweeping survey of American history since 1865. The story of America that unfolds is one of perpetual contest between competing cultures, political factions, and institutions, each struggling to define the meaning of freedom and citizenship within the United States and beyond its borders. It is a story filled with contradictions, one featuring moments when economic progress coincided with egregious violations of social justice and progressive reform melded with retrogressive repression. Our primary objectives in this course are the following: to identify key moments when Americans sought to reconcile competing visions of democracy and to catalog the key figures and social and political conflicts that helped shape modern America.
Throughout the semester, you will come to know personalities from the past by reading letters, speeches, and book excerpts from specific time periods. You will also have the opportunity to watch YouTube clips featuring historical footage and radio recordings of key historical moments. Students in the course will evaluate and interpret these primary sources each week and construct historical insights to share with fellow students in discussion section. Often the readings, videos, and radio recordings for the week will offer insights into contemporary issues we face today. Through short essays, each student will make connections between key historical events in the past and present-day issues facing our nation.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
10:20-11:15     MW                             Elmore, B.
10:20; 11:30    F (recitations)
1:50

Assigned Readings:
Eric Foner, Give Me Liberty! (Volume II)

Assignments:
Midterm/Final
Three short papers (500 words each)
Discussion and participation

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group N. American, post-1750 for history majors.


 

HISTORY 2040 AGRICULTURE AND RURAL AMERICA
3 Cr. Hrs.

Especially in the years before the 1920s, the history of rural America was the history of America.  The rural majority produced the cash crops that floated the American economy.  The conflict over slavery – the Southern agricultural workforce and the plantation economy it supported – led to civil war.  The 19th-century revolutions in transportation and industrial expansion fueled westward agricultural expansion, increased productivity, and inspired political turmoil over railroad rates, credit, and currency.  Well into the 20th century, the representatives from the agricultural South and West shaped national policy, especially its public welfare provisions.  More recently agriculture has again been at the center of national debates about labor, food safety, and the environment.  The history of agriculture is important in its own right, but is also a good introduction to major themes and debates in American history.

This course covers a lot of ground: it’s a survey of the economic, social and political history of agriculture and the countryside in the United States from the pre-Columbian period to the present.  But we will focus our attention on a number of key issues -- labor, abundance, political activism, public policy, and technology – and trace their interactions and change over time.  We will analyze changes in both agriculture as an industry and in farm households and communities.  A paper (choice of topics) will allow you to develop a topic in greater detail.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
2:20-3:40         TR                               Baker, P.

Assigned Readings:
David B. Danbom, Born in the Country: A History of Rural America
Paul K. Conklin, A Revolution Down on the Farm: The Transformation of Agriculture since 1929
Articles and documents posted on Carmen.

Assignments:
Midterm exam: 20%
Final exam: 20%
Paper:  20%
Two quizzes: 10% each
Two in-class essays 10%

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for history majors.
 



HISTORY 2066 HISTORY OF MEDICINE IN FILM
3 Cr. Hrs.

In this course, we explore the social and cultural history of 20th and early 21st century American medicine through the depiction of health care practitioners and health care systems in Hollywood movies. We use films as our central primary source, watching approximately one a week through the semester. Readings from a variety of secondary and primary sources help us to put these films into their historical contexts.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
5:30-8:15         W                                 Lawrence, S.

Assigned Films:
Assigned films (available through OSU on-line streaming)
Frankenstein  1931
Arrowsmith  1931
The Secret of Dr. Kildare  1939
Welcome Stranger  1947
No Way Out  1950
The Interns  1962
M.A.S.H.  1970
The Hospital  1971
Coma  1978
Whose Life Is It Anyway?  1981
The Doctor  1991
John Q 2002
Contagion  2011

Assignments:
Two five page essays
A take-home midterm
Final exam

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
There are no books to purchase for this course.  Readings will be available via the OSU Library system or in pdf files on Carmen.
This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for history majors.
 



HISTORY 2610 INTRODUCTION TO WOMEN & GENDER IN THE U.S.
3 Cr. Hrs.

This course surveys the history of women and gender in the United States from pre-European settlement to the present.  The course will examine the experiences of Native, European, African, Mexican, and Asian American women within the contexts of historical change in the U.S.  It will focus on changes in women’s work and the sexual division of labor; in relationships between gender, politics, and the state; in educational and professional opportunities for women; and in women’s family roles and sexuality.  A major goal of the course is to present women’s history both as an integral part of U.S. history and its unique subject of historical investigation.  Students will learn to think critically about historical arguments as well as to understand the difference that gender makes in history and the way that gender interacts with class, race, ethnicity, and sexuality.  In addition to examining a variety of primary sources including diary excerpts, letters, newspaper articles, laws, and speeches, we will study recent historical interpretations in essays, historical monographs, biographies, and documentaries.  The class will combine lectures, discussion, films, visuals, and music.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:40-1:35       MW                             Marino, K.
10:20; 12:40    Friday (recitations)
1:50                Friday (recitation)

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for history majors.
 



HISTORY 3001 AMERICAN POLITICAL HISTORY TO 1877
3 Cr. Hrs.

An overview of the history of American politics from the earliest colonial outposts to Civil War and Reconstruction.  American politics had their origins in the colonial transplantation and transformation of Old World forms on the New World edge of empire, forms reshaped in the Revolution, and routinized in the decades of the early republic.  While its institutions, practices, and responsiveness to public opinion made it the first successful model of a modern democratic republic, the structures of American politics before the Civil War were fundamentally threatened by the uncompromisable questions bound up in racial slavery.   Thus, while we will consider the origins and development of the basic patterns of American self-governance, we will also examine trajectories to and through constitutional crisis.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:35-10:55       WF                              Brooke, J.

Assigned Readings [tentative]:
Jack P. Greene, Peripheries & Center: Constitutional Development in the Extended Polities
of the British Empire and the United States, 1607-1788.
Jack Rakove, James Madison and the Creation of the American Republic
Harry L. Watson, Liberty and Power: The Politics of Jacksonian America
James Oakes, The Scorpion’s Sting
Eric Foner, A Short History of Reconstruction
Other readings will be made available on Carmen

Assignments:
Three take-home papers, totaling roughly 20 pages of writing. 

Prerequisites and Special Comments: American or European history background useful. This course fulfills Group North America, pre-1750 for history majors.
 



HISTORY 3013 CIVIL WAR AND RECONSTRUCTION
3 Cr. Hrs.

In this course we will discuss the origins of War, which side won and why, and various attempts to remake Southern society during the Reconstruction era.  We will describe the experiences of Northerners, Southerners, and Westerners, including ordinary people (soldiers, slaves, farmers, women) as well as famous generals and politicians.  Although this course includes military history, that is not the primary focus of the course.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:35-10:05       TR                               Cashin, J.

Assigned Readings: Several monographs on the period.

Assignments:
Students will write one paper, take a final exam, and discuss the monographs in class.   Students are expected to attend class on a regular basis.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for history majors.      
 



HISTORY 3014 GILDED AGE TO PROGRESSIVE ERA, 1877-1920
3 Cr. Hrs.

Advanced study of U.S. social, political, cultural, foreign policy history from 1877-1920: Industrialization; immigration; urbanization; populism; Spanish-American War; progressivism; WWI. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
10:20-11:15     MWF                           Steigerwald, D.

Assigned Readings:
Michael McGerr, A Fierce Discontent
Jane Addams, Twenty Years at Hull House
Anzia Yezieska, Bread Givers
Jennifer Keene, Doughboys, the Great War, and the Remaking of Modern America

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for history majors.      
 



HISTORY 3015 FROM THE NEW ERA TO THE NEW FRONTIER: THE UNITED STATES, 1921-1963
3 Cr. Hrs.                    

Examination of the major political, economic, social and cultural changes in the USA from the end of World War I through the early 1960’s.  Emphasis on economy and culture in the 1920’s, the Great Depression and New Deal reform in the 1930’s, World War II, the Cold War and the rise and decline of the 1950’s system.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:30     TR                               Stebenne, D.

Assigned Readings:
Robert Lynd & Helen Merrill Lynd, Middletown: A Study in Modern American Culture, (1929) chaps. I-XII.
William Leuchtenburg, Franklin D. Roosevelt and the New Deal (1963), chaps. 3-13
John Hersey, Hiroshima (1985 ed.)
Melvyn P. Leffler, The Specter of Communism (1994), chaps. 1-4
Alan Ehrenhalt, The Lost City: Discovering the Forgotten Virtues of Community in the
Chicago of the 1950’s (1995)
Betty Freidan, The Feminine Mystique (2001 ed.)

Assignments: A midterm, a final and a short (5-7 page) paper based on the assigned reading.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
History 1152 or H1152 strongly recommended.  Students planning to pursue a Master’s in Education should note that this course satisfies one of the course requirements in history. This course fulfills Group North America, post 1750 for history majors.
 



HISTORY 3030 HISTORY OF OHIO
3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will survey the economic, social, and political development of the geographic area that became Ohio from the Native American period to the present. We will explore three themes in particular:  the role of disruptive technology and creative destruction in shaping Ohio’s past; the critical junctures at which Ohio might have become something entirely different than what it became; Ohio’s connection to the wider world through geography, technology, demography, economics, and politics.  Specific topics will include the technological development of Native American civilizations; the international conflict to define and control the region; the role of technology in shaping the state; the role of Ohioans in the world's most important reform movements; the rise and fall of particular Ohio cities as a way to understand national and international economic, social, and political trends; and the challenges/opportunities of the global economy of the late 20th/early 21st century.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
On-line            on-line                         Coil, W.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for history majors.      
 



HISTORY 3040 THE AMERICAN CITY
3 Cr. Hrs.

This class will explore the history of American cities and suburbs in modern U.S. history, with a particular emphasis on the second half of the twentieth century.  Topics will include debates over the government’s role in housing, racial segregation, consumerism, and youth culture, and the history of sexuality. Some of the questions we will ask include: Did the same policies that created the suburbs also create the urban crisis?  What is an “authentic” place and how have middle-class ideas about “realness” shaped urban life?  Course assignments will include extensive reading and writing.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
1:50-2:45         MWF                           Howard, C.

Assigned Readings:
2-3 books plus articles on Carmen and several films.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for history majors.      
 



HISTORY 3701 HISTORY OF AMERICAN MEDICINE
3 Cr. Hrs.

From the early colonial period to the present, American medicine has been full of tensions between the comforts of traditional practices (whether Old World or New World) and the tantalizing promises of new discoveries and reform, both personal and social, through health.  We explore these tensions through intensive reading and discussion, along with opportunities for students to pursue individual and group projects of particular interest to them.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:30     WF                              Lawrence, S.

Assigned Readings:
John Burnham, Health Care in America.
Additional primary and secondary source readings will be available on Carmen.

Assignments:
First week: diagnosing diseases - essay
Civil War case history analysis
Research proposal and bibliography
Final reflection essay
Midterm exam
Final Exam

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for history majors.     

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ANCIENT HISTORY
 

HISTORY 2201 ANCIENT GREECE & ROME
3 Cr. Hrs.

This class is an introduction to the history of the Ancient Mediterranean Civilizations of Greece and Rome.  It provides a background of the chronological development of ancient Greek and Roman civilizations and then focuses on the broad issues of state-formation, politics, gender, warfare, tyranny, monotheism, and the environment over a period of some two thousand years, allowing students the opportunity to deal with these issues in several historical contexts over the whole of the course.  The course concludes with a consideration of the importance of Greek and Roman history in the modern world and the ways in which it is perceived and used today. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
Online              online                           Gregory, T.

Assigned Readings:
The textbook for the class is Ralph W. Mathisen, Ancient Mediterranean Civilizations from Prehistory to 640 C.E., 2nd edition Oxford University Press 2014 ISBN 9780199384457, paperback, along with a wealthy collection of primary historical sources that are provided in the online material of the class.

Assignments:
All assignments are carried out and submitted online without a need to come to campus. Students are divided into small groups for online graded weekly discussion and quizzes roughly every other week.  Beyond this students will have a choice of three other graded assignments that can include short papers and/or exams.
Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This class includes a wealth of images and short videos, most of which have been produced by the instructor in order to provide students with a good sense of the geography and the culture of the area around the Mediterranean Sea.
This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for history majors.
 



HISTORY 3210 HISTORY OF ARCHAIC GREECE
3 Cr. Hrs.

This is the first half of a two-course sequence that surveys the history of ancient Greece (the second half will be offered in spring semester). The course examines the formative period of Greek civilization, from the Neolithic era (ca. 7000-3000 BC) all the way down to the year 480 BC.  Our primary focus will be on the period's major political developments: the rise and mysterious demise of the Mycenaean kingdoms of the Late Bronze Age (ca. 1600-1100 BC); the subsequent emergence of small, village-based chiefdoms and, later, the first city-states in the Dark Age (ca. 100-700 BC); the creation of written laws, political institutions, and, ultimately, the world's first citizen-states in the Archaic Age (ca. 700-480 BC); and the momentous wars against the Persian empire in the early fifth century.  Along the way, we will also explore various social and cultural phenomena associated with these political developments.  Here, particular attention will be paid to the many innovations of the Archaic Age in art, architecture, sports, literature, and philosophy, as well as to broader social issues, such as the place of women and slaves in Greek society.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:30     TR                               Anderson, G

Assignments:
2 exams and term paper

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for history majors.
 



HISTORY 3218 PAUL AND HIS INFLUENCE IN EARLY CHRISTIANITY
3 Cr. Hrs.                               

This course investigates the Apostle Paul through a historical and critical study of his own letters and the later legends that grew up around the figure.  Special attention is given to the significance of Paul's life and the competing ways its story was retold, appropriated, or resisted in late antiquity.  Our historical approach means attention to the cultural and religious context of ancient Judaism, Hellenistic culture, and the Roman imperial society in which Paul lived and wrote.  Topics include Paul's creation of a new social world for his congregations, the conflicts that he aimed to solve in those nascent communities, and influential writers (ancient, medieval, and modern) on Paul as a Christian apostle.  The student will study the Pauline literature closely and will be exposed to important secondary treatments of Paul, including areas of controversy in the interpretation of his life and thought.  The course presupposes no prior coursework on the Bible or in the academic study of religion.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:45-2:05      TR                               Harrill, B.

Assigned Readings:
The Writings of St. Paul, 2d ed., edited by Wayne A. Meeks and John Fitzgerald (Norton Critical Editions, Norton Co., 2007).

Assignments:
Midterm, paper, and final examination.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Global, pre-1750 for history majors.
 



HISTORY 3220 THE RISE OF ROME
3 Cr. Hrs.

This course offers an advanced survey of Roman history during the early and middle Republican eras, ca.753-134 B.C.  It examines the processes by which the Republic grew from a minor power in central Italy to Mediterranean hegemon as well as the consequences

of that growth from a variety of perspectives: military, diplomatic, political, social, economic, artistic, and intellectual.  In addition, students will be introduced to some of the basic problems that historians of the period are currently attempting to solve as well as to some of the most important hypotheses their work has produced.  In the process, students will become acquainted with certain of the principal research tools and techniques that ancient historians have developed to aid them in their investigations.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:45-2:05       WF                              Rosenstein, N.

Assigned Readings (tentative):
Selections from Polybius, Livy, Plutarch, and other ancient sources (heavy at times).

Assignments (tentative):
Midterm, Final, Paper. 

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for history majors.
 



HISTORY 3225 THE EARLY BYZANTINE EMPIRE
3 Cr. Hrs.

This course is designed as an introduction to early Byzantine civilization and history, A.D. 330-ca. 1000.  In it we will trace the transformation of the ancient world and the emergence of a distinctly medieval Byzantine civilization.  We will observe the growth and triumph of Christianity and its transformation into a world religion.  We will seek to understand Byzantine civilization through the eyes of the Byzantines themselves, examining their values and comparing them with those of our own.  In this regard, we will seek to gain insight into the religious sensitivities of the Byzantines and how Byzantine Christianity expressed important transcendent ideas.  We will also investigate relations between Byzantium and its neighbors and pay special attention to the military developments that influenced the course of history in this crucial period.  The Byzantine Empire represents a fascinating, although little-known chapter in human history.  This course is designed to explore some aspects of that civilization and to expose you to challenging new ideas.  An understanding of Byzantine history has special importance in today's world since it was played out in the vortex that gave rise to the current disputes between Arabs, Jews, and Christians and it represents the cultural heritage of many Americans with heritage in the Middle East, the Mediterranean area, and Eastern Europe. A feature of the class is the wealth of videos and photographs that the instructor will display, hoping to make the Byzantine world (its landscape and people) come to life on the screen of your computer or mobile device.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
On-line            on-line                         Gregory, T.

Assigned Readings:
The main textbook is Timothy E. Gregory, A History of Byzantium, 2nd edition, Wiley Publishers, along with a wealthy collection of primary historical sources that are provided in the online material of the class.
Assignments:
All assignments are carried out and submitted online without a need to come to campus.  Students are divided into small groups for online graded weekly discussion and quizzes about every other week.  Beyond this students will have a choice of three other graded assignments that can include short papers and/or exams.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills group Europe, pre-1750 for history majors.
This class includes a wealth of images and short videos, most of which have been produced by the instructor in order to provide students with a good sense of the geography and the culture of the area of the eastern Mediterranean.

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ASIAN & ISLAMIC HISTORY
 

HISTORY 2352 OTTOMAN EMPIRE, 1300-1800
3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will get you excited about one of History’s great empires, and certainly on eof the greatest Islamic empires in history; the Ottoman Empire, which ruled most of the Middle East and the Balkans for over a millennium before its collapse following World War I.  You can’t truly understand the modern Middle East or Balkans without knowing about the Ottoman Empire. We’ll start with the Ottomans’ humble beginnings as a tiny principality in what is now northwestern Turkey ca. 1300 and continue through the glory days of the 16th century, the terrible crisis of the 17th century, the “Tulip Era” in the 18th century, through to the empire’s early attempts at westernizing reform at the end of the 18th century.  The core of the course will center on Nobel Prize-winning author Orhan Pamuk’s novel My Name Is Red, which weaves a tale of murder among miniature-painters in late 16th-century Istanbul, just as the era of crisis was beginning. You will craft a final paper tracing the “life-history” of one of the novel’s characters, using the character as a lens through which to explore key features of Ottoman society. Group discussions will reinforce the trends and themes that appear in the novel and in Ottoman history more generally. The course is taught by a tenured faculty member who is one of the world’s leading experts on the subject.  

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
8:00-9:20         TR                               Hathaway, J.

Assigned Readings:
Douglas A. Howard, A History of the Ottoman Empire (Cambridge, 2017)
Orhan Pamuk, My Name Is Red
various excerpts from primary and secondary sources

Assignments:
in-class midterm, paper related to My Name Is Red, take-home final, participation in group discussions

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills GE Historical study and fulfills Group Middle East, pre-1750 for history majors.
 



HISTORY 2393 CONTEMPORARY INDIA & SOUTH ASIA
3 Cr. Hrs.

What is the place of India in our globalizing world?  Many observers have noted the seeming paradoxes of modern India: the world’s largest democracy has also developed an increasingly authoritarian state; the country’s grinding poverty continues amidst the gleaming office parks of the new global economy; powerful movements for social justice contend with the rise of repressive religious nationalisms.  Despite some differences in politics and economy, we may find similar themes and historical forces at work in Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka as well.  Situating South Asian history in its local, regional, and global contexts, this course examines these paradoxes in a survey of the tumultuous events since independence in 1947. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:45-2:05       WF                              Sreenivas, M.

Assigned Readings:
We will utilize a wide range of course materials, including movies, literature, scholarly articles, social media, and more.  Specific readings TBA.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Near East, East Asia, Middle East, South or Central Asia Group, post-1750 for history majors.
 



HISTORY 2401 HISTORY OF EAST ASIA IN THE PRE-MODERN ERA
3 Cr. Hrs.

Simply put, in this course we will explore one question together: How were the civilizations of China, Korea, and Japan connected but different in the pre-modern period (to 1800)?

History 2401 is an introduction to the societies and cultures of pre‑modern China, Korea, and Japan, the countries that make up the geographical and cultural unit of East Asia. One goal of this course is to consider what is distinctive about "East Asian civilization." A second goal is the study of the relationship between the evolution of China, Korea, and Japan as distinct cultures themselves. We will examine how Korea and Japan, despite considerable linguistic, intellectual, and political borrowing from China, diverged from the Chinese pattern of development to form cultures with their own very distinctive artistic and literary traditions, political organizations, and social and economic structures. We also consider how Korea and Japan influenced Chinese civilization as well. The course will end with exploring China, Korea, and Japan in their encounters with the West. 

The lectures are devoted to the major themes and developments of Chinese, Korean, and Japanese political systems, thought and religious belief, art and literature, and society. Discussions (recitation) allow us to examine historical sources together to deepen our understanding of the issues covered in the lectures. The students have the option of paricipating in the recitation session online.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
8:00-8:55         MW                             Zhang, Y.
8:00-8:55         Friday (recitation)
On-line            recitation

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
No prior knowledge in any of the East Asian languages is required.  This course fulfills Group East Asia, pre-1750 for history majors.


HISTORY 3365 HISTORY OF AFGHANISTAN
3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will begin with an introductory survey of Afghanistan’s ethnic landscape, cultural diversity and early history. The focus of the course will then quickly shift to more modern concerns, beginning with the emergence of the Afghan state in the mid-eighteenth century, and Afghanistan’s central role in the “Great Game,” the Anglo-Russian colonial cold war of the nineteenth century. Attention will then turn to Afghanistan’s progressive age, which emerged in the early twentieth century and lasted into the 1970s, as the central government in Kabul struggled to implement a series of educational, social and economic reforms intending to provide the foundation for a modern Afghan society. Afghanistan’s progress in this period was substantial, but it was also ephemeral. In the winter of 1979, the Soviet Union launched a massive invasion of Afghanistan. Soon thereafter the United States began funding numerous Afghan resistance groups, collectively known as the mujahidin. As the Soviet army withdrew in 1988, the extraordinarily well-armed mujahidin factions descended into a protracted civil war that further transformed the country into a poverty-stricken wasteland. In the power vacuum of the 1990s, this nearly forgotten war zone became an incubator for radical Islamist political movements and a safe haven for global terror organizations.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:30     WF                              Levi, S.

Assigned Readings: Three books

Assignments: Coursework includes a map quiz, mid-term, research paper and final exam.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Near East; Middle East, post-1750 for history majors.
 



HISTORY 3376 THE SILK ROAD: COMMERCE & CULTURE IN EURASIA, 1000-1500
3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will introduce students to the great commercial and cultural exchanges that took place in Central Asia—at the heart of the Eurasian landmass—from antiquity to the modern age.  It is be grounded in a survey of the geography, environmental factors, indigenous cultures and economies of the Chinese, Indian, European, Iranian, and broader Islamic civilizations in order to analyze the nature and mechanisms of the trade and artistic, religious, cultural, scientific and technological exchanges that took place along the routes known since the late nineteenth century as the “Silk Road.”  As these exchanges occurred along the monsoon-driven sea-lanes as well as over the more famous Central Asian caravan routes, both sea and land routes comprise the “Silk Road(s)” of this particular course.  The course will focus on major themes, not chronologies of dynastic, administrative or military history.  The study of these commercial and cultural exchanges charts vibrant links among dynamic, sophisticated civilizations that are often, and incorrectly, believed to have developed in isolation prior to European expansion into Asia.  Considerable attention will be directed to the merchant groups, soldiers, state actors, and pastoral-nomadic peoples who mediated these exchanges

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
2:20-3:40         WF                              Levi, S.

Assigned Readings:
Four books

Assignments:
Coursework includes a map quiz, mid-term, research paper and final exam.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group, Near East, Middle East, pre-1750 for history majors.
 



HISTORY 3404 MODERN CHINA 1750 TO 1949
3 Cr. Hrs.

This course provides a general but analytical survey of the history of late imperial China from 1750 to 1949 with emphasis on the late Qing and Republic of China. After a brief introduction to China's geography, languages, and cultural background, we will discuss key historical phenomena that have distinguished China’s evolution in the modern period. This course is organized around the paired themes of non-Chinese attempts to challenger or undermine China’s sovereignty and Chinese responses to those efforts, partly and especially since 1895 to achieve “wealth and power” for their nation.  For this reason, emphasis is placed on political, military, and social (including gender relations) developments, although some attention is also given to economic, cultural and intellectual ones.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
2:20-3:40         TR                               Reed, C.

Assigned Readings: 4 books, documentary films.

Assignments: Map assignments, comparison paper, take-home exams.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group East Asia, post-1750 for history majors.
 



HISTORY 3425 HISTORY OF JAPAN BEFORE 1800
3 Cr. Hrs.

This course treats the history of Japan from the earliest times to the beginning of the nineteenth century.  It touches on a number of areas of politics, economic development, social trends and elements of the history of science and technology, ideas and religion, samurai, women and the environment. Pre-modern Japanese history shows patterns that continue to find expression in the modern era, even today.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
10:20-11:15     MWF                           Brown, P.

Assigned Readings:
Katsu Kokichi, Musui;s Story.
David Lu, ed., A Documentary History, (selected readings)
Articles
Assignments:
Students will write two papers that build on assigned readings.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group East Asia, pre-1750 for history majors.

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EUROPEAN HISTORY
 


HISTORY 1211 WESTERN CIVILIZATIONS TO 1600: RISE, COLLAPSE & RECOVERY
3 Cr. Hrs.

For better or worse, Western Civilizations have become extremely prominent in the world today – not just in the West but (thanks to Karl Marx and the Internet) also in other parts of the world. How did this process begin? What is distinctive about Western values?  These are two of the questions that this course seeks to answer. In addition, we will examine How Things Happen:

  • Why did the West develop at such an early stage the right to free speech guaranteed in this country by the First Amendment?
  • Why were 50% of all Western populations in this period under the age of 20?
  • How could 167 Spaniards overthrow the Inca Empire, with perhaps 8 million subjects, and go on to dominate much of South America?

The course also offers strategies to identify, among masses of facts, the aberration from the trend, the cause from the contingent, the important from the incidental, and the continuities among the changes.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:30-12:25     MW                             Parker, G.
11:30-12:25    F (in-class recitation)
(Other recitations will be offered on-line)

Assigned Readings:
McKay, Buckler, Hill, Crowston & Wiesner, A history of Western society, 10th edition, vol. I;
Wiesner, Ruff & Wheeler, Discovering the Western Past, 6th edn., vol 1.

Assignments:

  • Read and discuss all assigned readings; attend and participate in all group discussions (15% of total grade)
  • Completion of all assigned recitation exercises (15% of total grade)
  • one mid-term exam taken in a lecture period (15% of total grade)
  • one 5-page term paper (25% of total grade)
  • one take-home final exam (30% of total grade)

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the following GE requirements:  1) “Historical Study,” 2) “Diversity: Global Studies”.
This course is open to Seniors only, except with Instructor Permission.
 



HISTORY 2202 INTRODUCTION TO MEDIEVAL HISTORY
3 Cr. Hrs.

The Popular Middle Ages.  This course offers an introduction to Medieval History through the use and critique of popular representations of the period and its people in modern media (including film, television, and historical fiction). We will pair these popular interpretations with the traditional sources of the academic study of the Middle Ages.  Students will learn the basics of Medieval political, social and religious history through both contemporary and modern representations. One highlight of the course is a three-day in-class simulation of the arrival of the Black Death in fourteenth-century Europe and the social transformations that followed it.  An engaging (and fun!) way to fulfill the GE requirement in Historical Study.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
TR                   3:55-5:15                     Beach, A.

Assigned Readings:
Historical Fiction:
Bernard Cornwell, The Last Kingdom
Lucy Pick, Pilgrimage
Connie Willis, The Doomsday Book
Primary Sources:
Aberth, The Black Death
The Vikings, a Reader
Selected primary sources on Christianity, Judaism, and Islam in the Middle Ages

Assignments:
3 Film Critiques
3 Short Writing Assignments
2 Midterm exams
1 Final exam

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for history majors.
 



HISTORY 2204 MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY
3 Cr. Hrs.

This class introduces students to the political, social, and cultural developments that made the fabric of modern Europe. The course adopts a broad understanding of European history, examining developments on the peripheries of Europe and the European colonies overseas. We will explore the main features of the modern period, including the emergence of different models of state- and nation-building in Europe; the birth of representative politics and democratic institutions; scientific innovation, industrialization, and the new technologies; the ideologies of modernity such as conservatism, liberalism, socialism, and nationalism; the effects of European colonialism and imperialism; the new social classes and changing gender roles; the triumph of the nation-state and the limits of self-determination in the interwar period; the challenges to the democratic order and experiments in socialism and fascism; the Holocaust and ethnic cleansing; the divided world during the Cold War and the overthrow of the communist regimes; and decolonization and globalization. Combining a survey textbook with primary sources and fiction, students will learn and debate about the historical trends that created the modern European state, society, and culture.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:45-2:05       WF                              Dragostinova, T.

Assigned readings:
Brian P. Levack et al, The West: Encounters & Transformations, Vol. II: Since 1550, 5th ed.
Others readings to be announced.

Assignments:
Midterm: 15%
Two short papers: 30% (15% each)
Final: 25%
In-class quizzes 10%
Participation and discussion (including weekly responses): 20%

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the Historical study GE and fulfills Group Europe, post-1750 for history majors.
 



HISTORY 2220 INTRODUCTION TO CHRISTIANITY
3 Cr. Hrs.

Ranging from Jesus to Joel Osteen, this course will study how in 2,000 years the messianic beliefs of a small group of Jews transformed into a worldwide religion of amazing diversity.  Our approach will be historical and contextual: how have Christian beliefs, practices, and institutions changed over time and adapted to different cultures?  We will consider major developments in theology (from the Council of Nicaea, to medieval scholasticism, to liberation theology), spirituality (from monasticism, to mysticism, to tent meetings), modes of authority (from apostles, to bishops, to televangelists), and social structures (from house assemblies, to an imperial church, to base communities).  We will learn that “Christianity” has never been a single monolithic entity, but rather an astonishing collection of individuals and groups creating new and diverse ways of living as followers of Christ.  Lectures on key themes will be supplemented by recitation sections focused on primary sources.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
1:50-2:45         MW                             Brakke, D.
11:30; 1:50; 3:00 Friday                      (recitations)
*Students must choose one of the recitations on Friday

Assigned Readings (tentative):
John W. Coakley and Andrea Sterk, Readings in World Christian History, Vol. 1: Earliest Christianity to 1453
Peter Feldmeier, The Christian Tradition: A Historical & Theological Introduction
William C. Placher, Readings in the History of Christian Theology, Vol. 2: From the Reformation to the Present

Assignments:
Two hourly tests, two short papers, recitation participation, and a final exam.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Global, pre-1750 for history majors.


HISTORY 2240 ELIZABETHAN ENGLAND
3 Cr. Hrs.

The Elizabethan Age was an era of contradictions.  On the surface, England progressed boldly into the modern era with the formation of an ever-increasing empire.  The English excelled in pageantry, diplomacy, humanist writing, and poetic escapades.  Below the surface, England was simmering with tensions. Henry VIII’s rule had left the English with an economy on the brink of disaster, a religious crisis further exacerbated by the reforms of Edward VI and his sister Bloody Mary, a precarious relationship with Continental Europe (especially those pesky Spaniards!), not to mention a thriving witch craze and episodic outbreaks of bubonic plague. All of this at a time when England was forced to deal with the reality of a woman on the throne; even worse, a woman who refused to marry and produce an heir for the continued prosperity of the realm because it would mean giving up the right to rule.  This course will examine the following subjects: Henry VIII and the Tudor legacy; Elizabeth the queen, the person, and the mask; the Elizabethan stage, with a particular emphasis on Shakespeare and Marlow; the Great Fire of London and its rebuilding; plague and public health measures; the role of women in society; the emergence of the Anglican church; the witch craze; English colonialism; the Spanish armada, and relationships with both Continental Europe and England’s Celtic neighbors. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:35-10:55       WF                              Butler, S.

Assigned Readings:
Most readings will appear as pdfs on Carmen.  You will need to purchase:

  • Christopher Haigh, Elizabeth I: Profiles in Power, 2nd edition (Harlow: Pearson, 1998). ISBN 0-582-43754-7. Amazon: $22.49 (new, paperback).

Assignments:
This course will have a short assignment tied to the Haigh book, and a research paper. 
Breakdown of grades:
Participation                10%
Reading responses     25%
Haig assignment         15%
Research paper          25%
Mid-term exam           10%
Final exam                  15%    

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for history majors.
 



HISTORY 2475 THE HOLOCAUST
3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will examine the state-sponsored murder of millions of Jews and non-Jews by the Nazis and their collaborators during World War II.  Together we will trace the interrelated individuals, institutions, historical events, and ideologies that allowed for the Holocaust to occur.

This class does not focus only on the Final Solution.  Instead, in the first part of the course, we will analyze important historical factors that occurred before the Nazi rise to power.  In the next segment of the class, we will examine the crucial period of 1933-1938, paying close to attention to the erratic anti-Jewish policies of the era and the myriad of Jewish responses to them.  In the third portion of the course, we will explore the Final Solution itself.  Next we will study the perpetrators, bystanders, and victims during the Shoah.  Finally, we will consider the Holocaust’s aftermath and legacy among Jews and non-Jews in Germany, Israel, and the United States.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:35-10:55       TR                               Judd, R.         

Assigned Reading (tentative):
Doris Bergen, War and Genocide:  A Concise History of the Holocaust
Christopher Browning, Ordinary Man
Art Spiegelman, Maus I and II
Sarah Wildmann, Paper Love (selections)
Ivan Jablonka, A History of the Grandparents I Never Had (selections)
Selection of primary and secondary sources (online)

Assignments:
Quizzes, midterm, paper, final exam.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Europe, post-1750 for history majors.
 



HISTORY 3230 HISTORY OF MEDIEVAL CHRISTIANITY
3 Cr. Hrs.

This course offers an in-depth exploration of the development of the beliefs, practices, and institutions of Christianity from the fourth to the sixteenth century.  By reading a wide range of primary sources, created both within and outside the emerging medieval Church, we will step into a fascinating world of saints and heretics, nuns and monks, scholars, pilgrims and crusaders. Key themes include the notion of Christian kingship, the appropriate use of coercive power by Christian rulers and the Church, the monastic quest for perfection, lay piety and popular belief (as opposed to official church teachings and doctrine), the ‘problem’ of unbelief, and interactions with Jews and Muslims.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:45-2:05       TR                               Beach, A.

Assigned Readings:
Augustine, Confessions.
The Rule of Saint Benedict.
R.I. Moore, The Origins of a Persecuting Society.
Selected primary sources

Assignments:
Short ‘response papers’ that focus on primary sources for discussion
Midterm Exam
Final Exam
Critical Evaluation of R.I. Moore, Origins of a Persecuting Society.
Digital storytelling project (with option to work in pairs)
Prerequisites and Special Comments: Group B, pre-1750.
 



HISTORY 3235 MEDIEVAL EUROPE I
3 Cr. Hrs.

This course examines Europe during a key period of change and transition.  Beginning with late antiquity, the course will compare the very different trajectories of the eastern and western Roman Empire.  Then, focusing primarily on the post-Roman West, we shall explore several key strands in the history of early medieval Europe including: the emergence of new political and social formations, with a particular focus on the post-Roman barbarian kingdoms; religious development, especially the challenges of Christian conversion and the growth of monasticism and clerical life; and the rise of Islam; economic and environmental changes and their impact on everyday life; and the cultural contributions of early medieval men and women (e.g. manuscript production; philosophy and theology).

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:45-2:05       WF                              Sessa, T.        

Assignments:
Quizzes, essay exams, research paper on a medieval object.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for history majors.
 



HISTORY 3245 THE REFORMATION
3 Cr. Hrs.

October 31, 2017 marks the 500th anniversary of Martin Luther’s posting of The 95 Theses, which launched the Reformation era in Europe. During the following decades, European Christians fought bitterly over the most basic questions of their faith: What is sin?  How are people saved?  What is the nature of religious authority?  How can ordinary people experience God?  What are the sacraments, and how do they work?  The divisions and reform movements that divided and rejuvenated the Roman Catholic Church make the century after 1517 one of the most fascinating and perplexing eras in the history of Christianity.  Although we will not neglect social and political developments, this course will focus on the religious history of sixteenth-century Europe — the teachings and practices of the Lutheran, Anabaptist, Calvinist, Anglican, and Catholic reformers.  We will study their roots in the medieval Church, especially in the thought of Augustine of Hippo, and consider what the diverse reform movements (both Protestant and Catholic) shared as well as how they differed.  The rapid religious changes of this tumultuous century set the stage for new forms of Christianity and “secularism” in the modern West.  Previous study of Christian history (e.g., 2220, 3229, 3230) will be helpful, but is not required.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:30     WF                              Brakke, D.

Assigned Readings:
Denis Janz, A Reformation Reader: Primary Texts with Introductions (2nd ed.)
Carter Lindberg, The European Reformations (2nd ed.)
Carlo Ginzburg, The Cheese and the Worms: The Cosmos of a Sixteenth-Century Miller (2013 ed.)

Assignments
Attendance and participation, two short papers, midterm examination, and final examination.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for history majors.
 



HISTORY 3247 MAGIC & WITCHCRAFT
3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will examine magical beliefs and practices from the high middle ages to the early modern era, focusing primarily on Western society, but acknowledging that faith in magic is a universal feature of human experience – all human societies at one point in time or another have espoused a belief in the efficacy of magic.  Magical practices have typically fulfilled specific, shared goals and thus a study of these practices offer up a fascinating lens through which to analyze cultures.  First, magic and its relationship to the supernatural provide explanations for the way the world works (why do we have earthquakes?  famines?  hurricanes?) and it offers a basic moral view of the cosmos (why does evil exist? Why would a good god create evil? What happens to evil people? Why do bad things happen to good people?).   Second, magic empowers its adherents, offering them a way to take control of their lives in a world that often appears cruel and unforgiving.  Third, beliefs about magic also act as a vehicle of oppression.  Juxtaposed against an increasingly strong adherence to faith or science, magic and its advocates are “othered” in an attempt to establish rigid conformity to normative views.  The gendering of magic during the medieval period, or the focus on magic in the third world today are just two examples of the process in which magical belief leads to demonization. This course will cover a broad variety of topics within this rubric and chronology:   the ancient origins of magical belief, medical magic, the thin line between magic and miracle, magic at the universities, magic in law, heresy and popular magic, magic and mysticism, demon possession and the ability to see demons, the rise of the devil, the development of demonology, the witch craze, magic and economics in the early modern world.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:45-2:05       WF                              Butler, S.

Assigned Readings:
Most readings will be journal articles that appear in pdfs on Carmen.  You will need to purchase the following books (all of which can also be found in used copies on Amazon):

  • Alain Boureau, Satan the Heretic: The Birth of Demonology in the Medieval West, trans. Teresa Lavender Fagan (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2006; repr. 2013). ISBN: 978-0-226-10026-5. Amazon: $23.00 (new, paperback)
  • Carlo Ginzburg, Witchcraft & Agrarian Cults in the Sixteenth & Seventeenth Centuries, with a new preface, trans. John and Anne Tedeschi (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2013). ISBN 978-4214-0992-4. Amazon: $25.95 (new, paperback)
  • Andrew Colin Gow, Robert B. Desjardins, François V. Pageau (trans. and ed.), The Arras Witch Treatises (University Park: The Pennsylvania State University Press, 2016). ISBN: 978-0-271-07128-2. Amazon: $24.95 (new, paperback)

Assignments:
Students will have two short assignments (5 pages each) relating to the Boureau and Ginzburg books.  There will also be a creative assignment, in which students have to create and present a magic aid that adheres to the medieval rules of magic to the class.
Breakdown of Grade: 
Participation                                        15%
Reading responses                             20%
Boureau assignment                           15%
Ginzburg assignment                          15%
“Doing Magic” presentation                10%    
Mid-term exam                                   10%
Final exam                                          15%

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
No prerequisites – just a love of magic!
This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for history majors.
 



HISTORY 3249 EARLY MODERN EUROPE, 1560-1778
3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will focus on the social, cultural, and political history of Europe from the late-sixteenth-century wars of religion to the social transformation of the late eighteenth century on the eve of the French Revolution. History 3249 is designed as an upper-division course on the history of late Sixteenth, Seventeenth- and Eighteenth-Century Europe. Through course lectures, small-group discussions, primary source analysis, secondary source readings, and written responses, this course will provide students with intellectual tools and information with which to make sense of this period. We will pay particular attention to the role of religion in society, the way global trade and empire shaped European daily life and culture, and the impact of the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment.
This course will also introduce students to new approaches to the study of Early Modern Europe, especially Digital Humanities approaches to study social networks in local and global contexts, and information networks that shaped the development of the public sphere.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:45-2:05       TR                               Bond, E.

Assigned Readings:
Benjamin Kaplan, Divided by Faith, Religious Conflict and the Practice of Toleration in Early Modern Europe, Harvard University Press, 2010, ISBN 9780674034730
Michael Kwass, Contraband, Louis Mandrin and the Making of a Global Underground, Harvard University Press, 2014, ISBN 9780674726833

Emma Rothschild, The Inner Life of Empires, Princeton University Press, 2012, ISBN 9780691156125
Natalie Zemon Davis, Women on the Margins, Belknap Press, 1997, ISBN 9780674955219
Additional articles and primary sources to be assigned

Assignments:
Short weekly discussion preparation responses.
One Essay
Midterm and Final Exams

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for history majors.
 



HISTORY 3276 EUROPEAN THOUGHT & CULTURE 19TH CENTURY
3 Cr. Hrs.

A survey of cultural developments during a dynamic period of war and revolution when artists and intellectuals transformed ideas that held the world together--ideas about the power and dangers of science, the value and disappointments of religion, the conflict between conservatism and liberalism, the prospect of socialism and anarchism, the possibilities of democracy, the challenges of capitalism and class conflict, and dramas of love and death. The course begins with the foundations of Ancient Judaism and Christianity, the transformative thought of Descartes and Newton, and the bold philosophy of the Enlightenment. Then it concentrates on the mysteries of Romanticism (Mary Shelley), the unnerving breakthroughs of Realism (Flaubert and Dostoevsky), and the collective impacts of Darwinism, Marxism, utilitarianism, and naturalism. It concludes with Friedrich Nietzsche’s warnings about the threat of nihilism; his provocative critiques of Christianity, egalitarianism, and democracy; and his celebration of excellence and art, culminating in his positive philosophy of the superman. Students will get a concise introduction to some masterpieces of science, social science, literature, and the arts as well as specific guidelines to improve their writing skills.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
2:20-3:40         TR                               Kern, S.

Assigned Readings:
Mary Shelley, Frankenstein
Karl Marx, The Communist Manifesto
Gustave Flaubert, “A Simple Heart”
Fyodor Dostoevsky, Notes from the Underground
Friedrich Nietzsche, Thus Spoke Zarathustra
Diana Hacker, A Pocket Style Manual
 
Assignments:
Lectures and discussions of assigned texts. Students will write three short papers on assigned topics based on the readings and class discussions.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Europe, post-1750 for history majors.

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JEWISH HISTORY
 

HISTORY 2452 MODERN JEWISH HISTORY, 1700 TO PRESENT
3 Cr. Hrs.

Studying modern Jewish history is a way for any student to ask deep questions about what it means to be alive today. Judaism is an ancient religion but the changes of modernity have radically transformed the way that Jews have thought about their own past and the way they connect to developments taking place around them. Studying this history helps us all to think about our relationship to our families, our communities and the states in which we live. How do we deal with situations in which we are made to feel like an outsider, or worse? What is our stance towards cultural, religious or other traditions that we may have inherited from our families or communities? This course investigates the very many ways in which Jews have answered these existential questions in the past three centuries with an eye to pushing all of us to examine our own responses to these existential challenges of modernity. It will examine modern Jewish history from the dawn of modernity to the present. In it we will examine the social, economic, political, and intellectual forces that shaped Jewish experiences across the globe, including in Europe the United States, Latin America, and the Middle East.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
2:20-3:40         TR                               Kaye, A.

Assigned Readings:
History of the Jews in Modern Times. Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press, 2001.
The Jew in the Modern World: A Documentary History. 3rd edition. New York: Oxford University Press, 2010.
Selected articles

Assignments:
Mid-term, Final and various small assignments in-class or at home.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Europe, post-1750 for history majors.
 



HISTORY  2455 JEWS IN AMERICAN FILM
3 Cr. Hrs.

Jews and Jewish life have often been depicted in American television and film.  We will watch a number of films about Jews and Jewish life while reading about those same topics in primary and secondary historical sources.  We will then analyze the depiction of Jews and Judaism in the films and discuss how that depiction compares with the historical reality.  This will be accomplished through class discussion as well as through reflective writing.  We will come out of the course with both content knowledge (modern Jewish history, Jewish culture, Christian-Jewish relations) and skills (watching film and television critically; detecting attitudes and biases in writing as well as film; writing and speaking articulately about our observations).

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:10-11:55       W                                 Goldish, M.

Assigned Readings:
Hasia Diner, A New Promised Land: History of Jews in America
Elie Wiesel, Night, trans. Marion Wiesel
Documents and supplemental readings through our CARMEN website

Assignments:
Quizzes, short paper and a final examination.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for history majors.
 



HISTORY 2475 THE HOLOCAUST
3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will examine the state-sponsored murder of millions of Jews and non-Jews by the Nazis and their collaborators during World War II.  Together we will trace the interrelated individuals, institutions, historical events, and ideologies that allowed for the Holocaust to occur.

This class does not focus only on the Final Solution.  Instead, in the first part of the course, we will analyze important historical factors that occurred before the Nazi rise to power.  In the next segment of the class, we will examine the crucial period of 1933-1938, paying close to attention to the erratic anti-Jewish policies of the era and the myriad of Jewish responses to them.  In the third portion of the course, we will explore the Final Solution itself.  Next we will study the perpetrators, bystanders, and victims during the Shoah.  Finally, we will consider the Holocaust’s aftermath and legacy among Jews and non-Jews in Germany, Israel, and the United States.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:35-10:55       TR                               Judd, R.         

Assigned Reading:
Doris Bergen, War and Genocide:  A Concise History of the Holocaust
Christopher Browning, Ordinary Man
Art Spiegelman, Maus I and II
Sarah Wildmann, Paper Love (selections)
Ivan Jablonka, A History of the Grandparents I Never Had (selections)
Selection of primary and secondary sources (online)

Assignments:
Quizzes, midterm, paper, final exam.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Europe, post-1750 for history majors.

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LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY
 

HISTORY 3106 HISTORY OF MEXICO
3 Cr. Hrs.

Mexico faces many crucial issues today: drug cartels and drug trafficking, immigration, NAFTA, the role of the United States, neo-liberal reforms and oil, the distrust of Mexico’s ruling party, and many others.  Although these important topics are relatively recent, their historical context can be located throughout several centuries of struggle.
         
HIST 3106 analyzes Mexico’s dynamic and exciting history from the pre-Conquest era to the present. Throughout the semester we will examine patterns of conflict and negotiation, including the great Mexican Revolution, which shaped Mexico’s historical future until today. In addition to a study of Mexico’s politics, we also will emphasis the ways in which everyday people participated in and influenced cultural and political events. Issues of gender and the role of women, race and ethnicity will be emphasized in the lectures, as will Mexico’s transcultural interactions and conflicts. Additionally, the course will explore Mexico’s rich culture, including movies, literature, and artists, such as the painters Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera.

Several themes considered during the course are: 1. The diversity of Mexico’s pre-Columbian indigenous societies; 2. The Conquest; 3. The complex interactions between the Spaniards and the indigenous populations of Mexico; 4. The colonial era, including the development of colonial political, economic, and social systems; 5. The Independence movements; 6. The 19th century breakdown into chaos; 7. The modernizing “Porfirian” dictatorship; 8. The Mexican Revolution; 9.  Mexico’s dynamic art scene; 10. The rise of the country’s one-party state, the Institutional Revolutionary Party (P.R.I.); 11. The 1968 student movements; 12. The post-1968 political, social and economic struggles; 13. Mexico’s ongoing struggles for just economic development, and the continuing movement for inclusion by Mexico’s indigenous population; 14. Mexico’s border with the United States, including the movement of peoples; 15. Mexico’s current critical issues, including the “drug wars” and immigration.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:35-10:55       TR                               Smith, S.

Assigned Readings: TBA

Assignments:
Midterm, final and a paper.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Group Latin America, pre/post-1750 for history majors.

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MILITARY HISTORY
 

HISTORY 2500 20TH CENTURY INTERNATIONAL HISTORY
3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will examine the political, economic, and military relations between the major countries of the world from the origins of the First World War to the breakup of the Soviet Union. 
The first half of the course will take us to the end of the Second World War.  Starting from the collapse of the nineteenth century international system in 1914, we will examine the reasons why the system that was constructed to replace it failed in 1939.  We will explore from a multinational perspective the ways in which the dominant nation-states competed for both power and security in what was perceived to be the new world order.  We will seek to understand the ways in which the Great Powers attempted to balance their national needs for economic and military security with their desires for international prominence and stability.  In addition to the causes and courses of the two world wars that bookend and shape this period, we will examine a number of broad topics in this semester.  They will include: (1) the rise of anti-imperialism in the 20s and 30s; (2) the successes and failures of international communism; (3) the globalization of the post-war economy; (4) the evolution of US hegemony in the Western Hemisphere; and (5) the rise of Japan.
The second half of the course will trace the Cold War from beginning to end.  Starting from the foundations of the Cold War in the wartime alliances and conduct of the Second World War, we will look at the origins of the Cold War in Europe and Asia.  We will trace the expansion of the Cold War from its origins in Europe to its extension to the peripheral states in Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East.  Some further themes that we will cover will include: (1) the importance of the proxy conflicts as both Cold War front lines and Cold War determinants; (2) decolonization and the end of the modern European empires; (3) the rise of China and the significance of Sino-Soviet competition; (4) the nuclear age and the arms race; (5) the end of the Cold War and the collapse of the Soviet Union; and (6) the struggle to construct the post-Cold War international order.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:30     TR                               Siegel, J.

Assigned Readings:
The reading will include several of the following:
Koestler, Arthur.  Darkness at Noon.
Neiberg, Michael S., ed.  The World War I Reader.
Troung Nhu Tang, A Vietcong Memoir.
Walker, J. Samuel. Prompt and Utter Destruction: Truman and the use of atomic bombs against Japan.

Assignments:
Weekly readings and class discussions.
Midterm and comprehensive final.
Four map quizzes.
One or two short analytical papers based on the assigned readings. 

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for history majors.
 



HISTORY 2550 THE HISTORY OF WAR
5 Cr. Hrs.

This course is an introduction to the salient concepts and problems involved in the study of military history. It also addresses the effect of war on human society and development and examines the significance of war in human culture. Although it examines war from prehistoric times to the present, the course is thematic rather than chronological — less a survey of wars and military developments per se than a survey of the main concepts involved in studying war.  In addition to such topics as the nature of war, the causes of war, and the development of warfare, we will also examine the “warrior code” as understood in various cultures (Greek, Roman, Norse, Japanese, Native American, etc.).
Students will achieve an understanding of the causes and consequences of war, as well as how various societies — past and present, western and nonwestern — have understood and practiced war. They will also hone their skills at critical writing and analysis, and will gain greater insight into the way historians explore the human condition.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:45-2:05       TR                               Grimsley, M.

Assigned Readings:
Wayne E. Lee, Waging War: Conflict, Culture, and Innovation in World History.
Shannon E. French, The Code of the Warrior: Exploring Warrior Values Past and Present.
Victor Davis Hanson, Carnage and Culture: Landmark Battles in the Rise of Western Power.

Assignments: The course grade is based on two midterm examinations and a final examination. Each of these will have an in class and a take home portion.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
There are no prerequisites, but a solid grounding in Western Civilization or World History is very helpful.  This course fulfills Group Global, post -1750 for history majors.
 



HISTORY 3552 WAR IN WORLD HISTORY, 1900 - PRESENT
3 Cr. Hrs.       

This course is a global history of war in the 20th century, from trench warfare to ethnic cleansing, as well as its effects on individuals and entire societies.  It covers events such as World War I, the Spanish Civil War, World War II, the Korean War and the Vietnam War, and topics such as the experience of captivity, sexual violence in wartime, children in war, or genocide.  We will pay special attention to the blurring of distinction between combatants and non-combatants, as well as the experiences of ordinary men and women who lived through the wars of the 20th century.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:35-10:55       TR                               Cabanes, B.

Assigned Readings:
Primo Levi, Survival in Auschwitz
Anonymous, A Women in Berlin
Henri Alleg, The Question
Jean Hatzfeld, Machete Season, The Killers in Rwanda Speak

Assignments:
The final grade in the course will be an average of the four grades given for: a short 1000-word paper (20%), the mid-term examination (25%), lecture Quick Writes/Quizzes (20%); the final examination (35%).

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for history majors.
 



HISTORY 3561 AMERICAN MILITARY POLICY, 1914 - PRESENT
3 Cr. Hrs.

This course examines the history of American military policy from the aftermath of the Spanish-American War through the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq after the terrorist attack on the U.S. homeland on 9/11/2001.  The course will focus on the interrelationship of foreign and military policy, the conduct of war, the genesis of national security policy and civilian control of the decision-making process, the experience of American service members at war, and the influence of American society upon the armed forces as social institutions. The course covers U.S. participation in World War I, the interwar period, World War II, the Cold War, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, the Gulf War, and the ongoing wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.  Through readings, lectures and in-class discussion, the class will study the growth of the United States and its armed forces from insular nation to global superpower.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:30     TR                               Mansoor, P.

Assigned Readings:
- Allan R. Millett and Peter Maslowski, For the Common Defense:  A Military History of the United States of America
- West Point History of Warfare, online only. selected chapters
- George Wilson, If you Survive
- Karl Marlantes, What It I Like to Go to War
- Peter Mansoor, Baghdad at Sunrise.

Assignments: In-class mid-term and final examinations and Three review essays (2-3 pages each).

 Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for history majors.

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THEMATIC COURSE OFFERINGS
 

HISTORY  2455 JEWS IN AMERICAN FILM
3 Cr. Hrs.

Jews and Jewish life have often been depicted in American television and film.  We will watch a number of films about Jews and Jewish life while reading about those same topics in primary and secondary historical sources.  We will then analyze the depiction of Jews and Judaism in the films and discuss how that depiction compares with the historical reality.  This will be accomplished through class discussion as well as through reflective writing.  We will come out of the course with both content knowledge (modern Jewish history, Jewish culture, Christian-Jewish relations) and skills (watching film and television critically; detecting attitudes and biases in writing as well as film; writing and speaking articulately about our observations).

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:10-11:55       W                                 Goldish, M.

Assigned Readings:
Hasia Diner, A New Promised Land: History of Jews in America
Elie Wiesel, Night, trans. Marion Wiesel
Documents and supplemental readings through our CARMEN website

Assignments:
Quizzes, short paper and a final examination.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for history majors.
 



HISTORY 2680 IT’S THE END OF THE WORLD! APOCALYPTICISM IN CHRISTIANITY, JUDAISM AND ISLAM
3 Cr. Hrs.           

Just as Christianity, Judaism and Islam believe that there was a specific beginning to the world in time, they have also believed that the world will come to an end at some specific time.  Our course will explore how this event – generally understood to be preceded by enormous wars and disasters as well as the judgment of people and a reckoning of their deeds – was imagined over two millennia by Christians, Jews and Muslims.  The journey will take us from ancient Judea to modern Latin America, and from the biblical prophets to the imams of ISIS, with many stops in between.  Our reading will include samples from fictional bestsellers about the apocalypse as well as primary and secondary historical works.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
4:10-6:55         W                                 Goldish, M.

Assigned Reading:
The Continuum History of Apocalypticism, ed. B. McGinn and J.J. Collins
Jean-Pierre Filiu, Apocalypse in Islam

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Global, pre-1750 for history majors.
 



HISTORY 2710 HISTORY OF THE CAR
3 Cr. Hrs.

The car has shaped the world we live in today. It is both obvious, as learning to drive is a sign of independence in modern society and car ownership is an often a major mark in one’s life, and less obvious, as ideas of capitalism, technology, and consumerism are inherently linked to its creation and expansion in modern society. This is true not only in the United States but all over the world. The car is often explicitly linked to ideas of modernity and development that have shaped people’s understanding of their nation. This course will examine the development and importance of the car in the 20th century, first in the United States and then examine how its global expansion has come to define global society today.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:35-10:55       WF                              Eaglin, J.

Assigned Readings: (tentative)
Bernhard Rieger, The People’s Car: A Global History of the Volkswagen Beetle (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2013).
Joel Wolfe, Autos and Progress: The Brazilian Search for Modernity (New York: Oxford University Press, 2010).
Additional reading TBD.

Assignments: (tentative)
In-class assignments, two short papers (3-5 pages), a group project, and final paper.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fills the GE Historical Study requirement and fulfills the Global, post-1750 requirement for the history major.
 



HISTORY 2800 INTRODUCTION TO THE DISCIPLINE OF HISTORY
3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will introduce students to the historical method, that is, how historians write history.  We will focus on a specific issue, Abraham Lincoln and the Emancipation Proclamation.  The class will discuss the debate among scholars on this topic.  Students will also explore primary sources created by historical figures who lived through the Civil War, such as journalists, soldiers, slaves, and politicians.  We will examine newspapers, military records, narratives from ex-slaves, memoirs by ex-soldiers, and political cartoons.  We will discuss the different perspectives these historical figures had on Lincoln and Emancipation.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:45-2:05       TR                               Cashin, J.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course is required for all students declaring a Major in history, students must earn a “C” or higher to have it count on the history major. It may not be used for the GEC/GE Historical Study requirement.
 



HISTORY HONORS 2800 INTRODUCTION TO THE DISCIPLINE OF HISTORY
3 Cr. Hrs.

This course is designed for Honors history majors. History 2800 introduces history majors to the field of history, and particularly to the historian’s craft. We will look at the different purposes for studying history, a wide array of sources that are used in examining the past, and the diverse approaches to the past that historians embrace. Because the best way to learn what historians do is to practice the craft ourselves, we will spend the semester focusing on a global history that is, in fact, close at hand: that of “Ohio and the World.” Our readings will highlight related global and local developments six different dates: 1753, 1803, 1853, 1903, 1953, and 2003. Topics include European settlement of the Ohio frontier and the French-Indian War, German immigrants’ participation in the American Civil War, Karl Marx’s visit to Ohio, Civil Rights struggles at Kent State but also in Paris and Berlin, and more recent ties between Japan and Ohio manufacturing. We will use a combination of primary sources (archives, newspapers, images, political treatises, and maps) available in local museums, the OSU rare book room and archives, the Billy Ireland Cartoon Library, and the Ohio History Connection, as well as secondary sources.
Class attendance will be required. As a seminar, all students will be expected to participate regularly in class discussions. Participation in discussions will count for 25 percent of the final grade.

Time               Meetings Days             Instructor9
9:35-10:55      TR                                Conklin, A.

Assigned Readings:
Geoffrey Parker, Richard Sisson, William Russell Coil, ed. Ohio and the World, 1753-2053
Diana Hacker, A Pocket Style Manual
Course packet of materials

Assignments:
Students will be required to complete eight short writing assignments, and one longer research project on Ohio and the World. They will also be assigned a class presentation.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: 
Honors standing or permission of the instructor.
This course is required for all students declaring a Major in history.
 



HISTORY 2800 INTRODUCTION TO THE DISCIPLINE OF HISTORY
3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will serve as an introduction to the field of history. How does one do history? This course will introduce students to four key aspects of the historical field: 1. Primary Research; 2. Historical Methodology; 3. Historical Analysis; and 4. Historical Writing. In the course of the semester, we will practice a series of fundamental skills like critical thinking, analytical reading, accurate research, public speaking, peer-editing, and effective writing that are all important to success in the historical field.

This course will focus broadly on the history of Ohio and the environmental transformation of the Midwest in the 20th century. It will include numerous archival visits to guide students in the development of their own research projects.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:45-2:05       WF                              Eaglin, J.

Assigned Readings:
Mary Lynn Rampolla, A Pocket Guide to Writing in History, 7th Edition (New York: Bedford/St. Martins, 2009).
Christian Warren, Brush with Death: A Social History of Lead Poisoning (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2000).

Assignments:
This class is a participation intensive seminar with multiple in-class writing activities.
Two short papers (3-5 pages)
Group writing assignment with class-presentation
Final prospectus and annotated bibliography (7-10 pages)

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course is required for all students declaring a Major in history, students must earn a “C” to have it count on the history major. It may not be used for the GEC/GE History Study requirement.
 



HISTORY 2800 INTRODUCTION TO THE DISCIPLINE OF HISTORY
3 Cr. Hrs.

This course prepares the student to become an undergraduate history major by investigating the methods and analytical approaches historians use in order to understand the past.  Unlike other history classes, this course does not treat a specific topic or period in history, but rather focuses on historical methodology.  It considers some of the problems we face in interpreting sources, assessing arguments, and presenting our research to others.  A series of exercises will give you practical, hands-on training as well as some more theoretical knowledge about the study of the past in more depth: an early crisis among believers of Jesus in the first century; the puzzling case of a missing and returned soldier in sixteenth-century France; and how a massive slave revolt by the Roman gladiator Spartacus gave rise to a legend.

Time               Meetings Days             Instructor
9:35-10:55      TR                                Harrill, B.

Assigned Readings:
Conal Foray and Michael J. Salevouris, The Methods and Skills of History (3d edition)
John Lewish Gaddis, The Landscape of History: How Historians Map the Past
Natalie Zemon David, The Return of Martin Guerre.
Brent D. Shaw, Spartacus and the Slave Wars: A Brief History with Documents

Assignments:
Exercises from Furay and Salevouris, short written assignments (e.g., précis, a book review, an annotated bibliography), and in-class presentations.  The proposal and dossier for a research paper will be in lieu of a final examination.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course is required for all students declaring a Major in History; students must earn a C or higher to have it count on the Major.  It may not be used for the GE Historical Study requirement.
 



HISTORY 2800 INTRODUCTION TO THE DISCIPLINE OF HISTORY
3 Cr. Hrs.

This course introduces students to the discipline of history by analyzing in detail three approaches to history based on three highly influential theories about human experience generally—Marxism, psychoanalysis, and phenomenology. The power of these theories derives from the fact that they are grounded in universal aspects of human experience--bodily needs and labor (Marx), sexuality and unconscious mental processes (Freud), and time and space (phenomenology); although all of these universal features also vary historically. To understand the interaction between theory and practice students will read and analyze these theories at their source and then critically evaluate one extended application of them in contemporary historical works—one of which is my own. In addition, students will also read critical appraisals of these approaches to round out the three reading assignments that are the subject of the three assigned papers (1500 words or five pages each). I also run a week-long writing workshop that clarifies mechanics of writing to be used and refined in these papers.

Time               Meetings Days             Instructor
2:20-3:40        WF                               Kern, S.

Assigned Readings:
George Lefebvre, The Coming of the French Revolution (Princeton University Press)
Rudolph Binion, Hitler Among the Germans (Northern Illinois University Press)
Stephen Kern, The Culture of Time and Space: 1880-1918 (Harvard University Press)
Selected readings by Marx, Freud, and phenomenology as well as criticisms of the three applications of these theories by Lefebvre, Binion, and Kern (Carmen)

Assignments:
Attendance and participation in discussion of primary and secondary sources.
Three papers.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course is required for all History Majors and must earn a C or higher to have it count on the Major.  It may not be used for the GE Historical Study requirement.
 



HISTORY 2800 INTRODUCTION TO THE DISCIPLINE OF HISTORY
3 Cr. Hrs.

This course is designed to introduce you to what historians do and how they do it. Unlike other history classes, this course does not treat a specific topic or period in history, but rather focuses on historical methodology. 

Some of the issues we will explore include:

*What are some of the methods historians use to explore the past?
*What constitutes an historical source?
*How do we collect, select, and evaluate historical evidence, and what kinds of evidence best answer certain kinds of questions?
*What are the best ways to present our data and interpretations?
*Can historians be objective?  What sorts of professional ethics and considerations guide the conscientious historian?
*What is the difference between history and opinion?
*Is the writing of history a science or an art?
*How does the present shape our understanding of the past?

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:35-10:55       WF                              Sessa, T.

Assigned Readings:
Required texts:
1. Natalie Zemon Davis, The Return of Martin Guerre (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1983)
2. Mary Lynn Rampolla, A Pocket Guide to Writing in History (Boston, MA: St. Martin’s Press, 2006, Fifth Edition or 2011, Sixth Edition)

Assignments: Requirements: oral presentations and written assignments.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course is required for all students declaring a Major in History. Students must earn a C or higher to have it count on the Major. It may not be used for the GE Historical Study requirement.
 



HISTORY 2800 INTRODUCTION TO THE DISCIPLINE OF HISTORY
3 Cr. Hrs.

This course is designed to introduce undergraduate history majors to the discipline and some of the methods of history.  The successful completion of the course will result in your gaining firsthand knowledge of how historians work.  We will achieve this objective by examining and analyzing historical documents, by reading, studying, and dissecting (critiquing) published historical (and fictional) works, by learning the mechanics of historical production, and by writing historical essays.  

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
2:20-3:40         TR                               Shaw, S.

The specific topic of this class is Nat Turner’s rebellion.   In 1831, Turner, a Southampton County Virginia slave, led a revolt designed to overthrow the institution of slavery.  The revolt has been reconstructed by historians, fictionalized by novelists, and even translated onto film.  Almost every generation recreates Turner anew.  We will look at available documents on this incident, the different interpretations of them, and draw our own intelligent conclusions about what definitely happened, what probably happened, and what we can never really know.  We will also try to account for the different views that exist and the conclusions that cannot be verified (and were probably false). 
The point of these analyses is not simply to know all we can about Turner’s revolt, but to think about the discipline of history.  We will examine other primary documents from the period to aid us in this process as well.  We will read and write book reviews, review historical journals, and spend some time looking at new technologies and resources for conducting historical research.  We will also pay attention to problems and pitfalls of historical research and writing.  In the process, we will look at and think about “driving forces” of history, whether history is objective or subjective, and the role of the historian in history.  We will talk about “good” history and “bad” history, how to use sources, what “facts” are, and whether or not history can be scientific.  Altogether, our goal is to become better historians through critical reading and thoughtful analysis of original and interpreted sources.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course is required for all students declaring a Major in history, students must earn a “C” or higher to have it count on the history major. It may not be used for the GEC/GE Historical Study requirement.
 



HISTORY 3620 LESBIAN, GAY, BISEXUAL & TRANSGENDER HISTORY IN THE U.S., 1940-2003
3 Cr. Hrs.                

This course offers an overview of LGBT culture and history in the United States from 1940 to the present. We will use a variety of historical and literary sources, including films and sound clips, to examine changes in lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered lives and experiences during the last half of the twentieth century. The course will encourage students to think about intersections of race, sexuality, and class, and how these categories have affected sexual minority communities. The course will also explore the impact that sexual minority communities have had on the law and culture in the United States since World War II.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:45-2:05       TR                               Rivers, D.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the North America, post-1750 category for history majors.
 



HISTORY 3675 HOW TO STAGE A REVOLUTION
3 Cr. Hrs.

What defines a revolution? Why do revolutions occur and what makes people decide to rebel at a particular moment in time?  Are ideas an important cause or should we look to material factors, such as economic shifts, climate change, and population booms demography to explain the timing of revolutions? How do people overthrow their rulers? How do planners mobilize the masses?  How do revolutionaries establish new governments and how does leadership of these movements change over time? Do radical upheavals require bloodshed, violence, or even terror?  How have revolutionaries attempted to establish their ideals and realize their goals? How do revolutions interact with culture and art? When are revolutions over and how do we measure their success or failure? Are colonial wars of liberation different from other types of revolutions from within?

To answer these questions, we will look at several attempted socio-political transformations across more than four centuries to understand the meaning of revolution and evaluate its impact.  By the end of the course, students will be able to offer reasons why some revolutions succeed and others fail, why some depart from their original aims and what the definitions of revolutionary success are.  They will learn how to find, read and analyze primary and secondary materials and construct models and arguments about the nature of revolutions.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:30     WF                              Newell, M.

Assigned Readings:
Past readings have included articles and books by historians, political scientists, sociologists, and art historians, as well as primary source materials.  Expect to read the equivalent of six books.

Assignments:
Students will write complete two short reaction papers and several in-class writing assignments based on the readings, a midterm, and a final paper/project of 15 pp.  Students will also be expected to participate actively in class discussions.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course will be taught in conjunction with the first year of a two-year program on Revolution in Historical Perspective sponsored by the Center for Historical Research, which will bring experts on revolution from the U.S. and the world to campus for talks, seminars, and films.  Students will be expected to attend as many of these events as possible.
This course fulfills group Global, post-1750 for History majors.
 



HISTORY 3680 RELIGION & LAW IN COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVE
3 Cr. Hrs.

These days, it is almost impossible to go online or watch TV without learning about a conflict at the intersection of religion and law: Should yoga or creationism be taught in public schools? Should religious symbols be displayed in public? Should same sex marriage be legal? Should corporations be required to provide their employees with access to contraception? These conflicts raise critical questions about the meaning of secularism and religious freedom; about religion’s proper place in American life; and about how we understand what it means to be an American.


Yet as contentious as these questions are in the contemporary United States, they have been addressed in different ways in other times and places. In this course, we will develop tools for thinking critically about these issues by adopting a comparative, interdisciplinary approach. Drawing on concrete cases, historical studies, and theoretical literature, we will explore how the relationship between religion and law has been configured differently in different liberal democracies and what this might mean for contemporary debates.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:35-10:55       TR                               Kaye, A.

Assigned Readings:

  1. Philip Hamburger Separation of Church and State (Harvard University Press, 2009).
  2. Brian Leiter Why Tolerate Religion? (Princeton University Press, 2014).
  3. Ahmet T. Kuru Secularism and State Policies Toward Religion: The United States, France, and Turkey (Cambridge; New York: Cambridge University Press., 2009).
  4. Winnifred Fallers Sullivan A Ministry of Presence: chaplaincy, Spiritual Care, and the Law (Chicago; London: The University of Chicago Press, 2014).

Readings will include case law and other legal materials, as well as academic writings by religion scholars, political scientists, historians, anthropologists, sociologists, philosophers, and others.

Assignments:

Presentations; collaborative blog; final paper

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This class fulfills Groups Europe & North America, post-1750. There are no prerequisites for this course.
 



HISTORY 3702 DIGITAL HISTORY
3 Cr.Hrs.

This course is a survey of the ways digital technology is impacting history: from the collection and preservation of primary sources, to the analysis of those documents with the aid of algorithms, to the representation of the past through digital means.  What does it look like when we take our study of the past into the digital realm?  How has the availability of millions of digitized primary and secondary sources impacted our practices?  How has the digital medium altered how we represent the past?  How have data analytics tools helped historians to uncover new patterns in the past? 
This course will be organized as a lecture-based course—where I’ll present basic ideas and concepts—a seminar—where we will read and reflect upon important works in digital history—as well as a studio course—in which we will engage in the process of creating digital history.  As a final deliverable, students will employ an application to create a digital project. 
This course assumes no prior technical or programming knowledge.  The course is meant to provide a basic grounding in the technological skills needed to present history in digital form. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:30     WF                              Staley, D.

Assigned Readings:
Graham, Milligan and Weingart, Exploring Big Historical Data: The Historian’s Macroscope

Assignments:
1) Attendance:  worth 10% of the final grade. 
2) Class participation: worth 25% of the final grade. 
3) Blog posts: worth 20% of the final grade:
4) Workshop participation: 20% of the final grade. 
5) Final project: 25% of the final grade. 

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course is a GE Historical Study course.  This course fulfills group Global, post-1750 for History majors.
 



HISTORY 3706 COCA-COLA GLOBALIZATION: THE HISTORY OF AMERICAN BUSINESS & GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE, 1800-TODAY
3 Cr. Hrs.                   

This 3000-level undergraduate course offers an introduction to the fields of environmental history and business history. Coca-Cola Globalization is organized chronologically, beginning with the industrial revolution of the early nineteenth century and ending in the twenty-first century.  It chronicles the rise of some of America’s biggest multinational corporations and examines how these firms, working with governments and other institutions, shaped global ecological change between 1800 and 2016.  It also considers the social and political responses to these environmental changes.

The questions we will ask in this course are not simple, and they will require us to re-imagine well-told stories from a new, ecological perspective.  How did Coca-Cola acquire the natural resources it needed to end up all over the world? Can history tell us whether global climate change is real? Are Californians going to run out of water? We will deal with these and other intriguing questions as we explore the history of America in the world through the lens of environmental history.

Time               Meetings Days             Instructor
11:10-12:30    TR                                Elmore, B.

Assigned Readings: TBA (likely three books)

Assignments:
Midterm/Final
Research paper for the Columbus Environmental Digital project (CED)
Participation in discussion

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for history majors.
 



HISTORY 4010 READINGS IN MODERN U.S. HISTORY
3 Cr. Hrs.

Sex, Youth and Moral Panic

In the early twenty-first century, conflicts over sexuality, race, drugs, and gender are central components of U.S. politics and culture.  From the Daily Show to presidential campaigns, concerns about issues such as sex and violence in the media, same-sex marriage, or crime

have periodically divided and united different groups of Americans.  This class will explore the origins of these debates, moving from the early twentieth century to the present.  In particular, we will discuss the powerful role of the market in shaping Americans’ cultural identities and producing “moral panics” over youth and family.  We will cover topics such as racial segregation, the entertainment industry, youth culture, gay and lesbian life, dating, pornography, drug prohibition, and social conservatism.  Over the course of the semester, we will ask: Why have Americans periodically expressed chronic anxiety about children and youth?  Are these concerns entirely new and what are their root origins?  How has Americans’ understanding of sexuality and race changed over time?

This course is an upper-level seminar, designed to encourage critical analysis of scholarly articles and books and primary source research.  Like all 4000-level courses, this seminar is reading and writing intensive, and students should come to class prepared to discuss their work.  By the end of the semester, they should be able to explain the role of race, gender, sexuality, and the market in perpetuating some of the nation’s “culture wars,” think critically about scholarly texts, and write papers that analyze primary sources about race, gender, and sexuality.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:35-12:20       M                                 Howard, C.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the reading seminar requirement toward a history major for semester students; this fulfills the 598 seminar requirement for quarter students. This course is only open to junior and senior history majors.  
 



HISTORY 4210 READINGS IN GREEK HISTORY
3 Cr. Hrs.

The World of Classical Athens


This is a seminar-style course for undergraduates that focuses on the politics and culture of ancient Athens, the largest and most powerful of all Greek city-states during the classical period.  It offers students the chance to pursue a more advanced level of enquiry into Greek history through close reading of a variety of primary and secondary texts, giving them a fuller sense of how scholars reconstruct the past from often scanty and problematic literary and archaeological evidence.  Employing a synoptic approach, the course will explore the interfaces between democracy, class, religion, literature, art, architecture, and military practices in classical Athens.  It is especially interested in tracing the formation of those shared beliefs, values, and cultural assumptions that distinguished the Athenians from other Greeks.  What, in short, did it mean to be an "Athenian"?  Along the way, a number of other significant issues and questions will also be raised: how and when did the Athenian state become "democratic"? how did the democracy work? in what sense did "the people" really "rule"?  what does the Parthenon "mean"? what were the functions of tragedy and comedy in Athenian society? how "progressive" or "enlightened" was Athenian society?

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
2:20-5:05         Tuesday                      Anderson, G.

Assignments: participation in in-class discussion of readings; in-class presentation; research paper.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the reading seminar requirement toward a history major for semester students; this fulfills the 598 seminar requirement for quarter students. This course is only open to junior and senior history majors.  
 



HISTORY 4250H READINGS IN MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY
3 Cr. Hrs.

Migration, Mobility, and Refugee Politics, 1933-Present

Questions concerning asylum and refugee protection feature prominently in contemporary politics. This seminar aims to help students develop a better understanding of the contemporary immigration debates by studying the historical factors that have shaped it.

In our study of the history of mobility and migration in Europe, we will begin our examination with the Nazi rise to power and the forced migrations and mass movements during World War II.  We will then shift our discussion to the immediate post war period and the historical challenges posed by millions of Displaced Persons.  The final third of the seminar will consider the evolving international legal framework for the protection of migrants and the global impact of migration.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
1:30-4:20         M                                 Judd, R.

Assigned Readings (Tentative):
Leo Spitzer, Hotel Bolivia
Deborah Dwork, Flight from the Reich
Marion Kaplan, Dominican Haven
Sarah Wildmann, Paper Love

Assignments: Weekly readings, 4 short resp. papers, annotated bibliography; final assignment

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the reading seminar requirement toward a history major for semester students; this fulfills the 598 seminar requirement for quarter students. This honors section is open to students with honors standing, non-honors students must receive permission to enroll.
 



HISTORY 4400 READINGS IN CHINESE HISTORY
3 Cr. Hrs.

The (Second) Sino-Japanese War, 1937-45

In July 1937, soldiers of the Imperial Japanese Army were involved in what initially seemed to be a minor military skirmish with Republican Chinese soldiers at the Marco Polo Bridge near Beijing.  Since the 19th century, Japanese and other foreign troops had frequently used such events to provide their political leaders at home with rationales to send reinforcements to China.  This time, however, what the Japanese call “The China Incident” grew into a protracted eight-year continental war in which the Japanese goals of establishing an anti-Communist East Asian order, creating “civilization,” a reformed economy, and a stable new Chinese government that was friendly to Japan became ever-more elusive.  In their desperation to end the war by imposing a full embargo on Chiang Kai-shek’s alleged pro-Communist wartime government holed up in Chongqing, the Japanese eventually attacked and invaded the US-controlled Philippines, British-controlled Hong Kong, all of Southeast Asia from French Indochina to Thailand, British Malaya and Burma, the Dutch East Indies, and even parts of Australia.  They also attacked the American-controlled, pre-statehood territory of Hawaii.  In the process, the Japanese added to the China Incident what they call the Pacific War (1941-45) and what the West calls World War II; behind it all, however, the Sino-Japanese War (1937-45) churned on unceasingly and remained the justification for all of Japan’s “sideshows.”

This course taught by a modern Chinese history specialist, will examine the Sino-Japanese War from Chinese and Japanese political, economic, military, and civilian perspectives.  Like all 4000-level courses, we will emphasize reading, discussion, and research rather than lectures.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
2:20-3:40         WF                              Reed, C.

Assigned Readings:
Selections from 4 books, a novel, and additional shorter readings.

Assignments:
Maps and writing assignments to help each student understand the war and write a final paper on it.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the READINGS seminar requirement for History Majors.

Special Comments:  Although not required, some background in East Asian history, particularly History 2401 or 2402, as well as some knowledge of World War II, will be useful in a general way.  Students should note that this is a course on the Sino-Japanese War (Japan vs. China), not on the Pacific War (Japan vs. the Rest), and their self-selected papers must reflect that fact.
 



HISTORY 4525 RESEARCH SEMINAR IN INTERNATIONAL HISTORY
3 Cr. Hrs.

The Diplomacy of the First World War

This course will examine the diplomacy of the First World War from its origins, through the conduct of the war and the construction of the postwar order.  The First World War can be seen as the defining moment of the twentieth century–a military and economic disaster from which Europe never fully recovered, thus setting the stage for the ongoing conflict of World War II and the Cold War which dominated the last century.  It will be our undertaking to explore how Europe came to be at war in August 1914.  We will examine how the diplomatic efforts of both sides during the war to gain and appease allies impacted the conduct of the war and shaped the postwar climate.  And we will investigate the attempts to construct a new world order through the postwar peacemaking.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
2:20-5:05         Tuesday                      Siegel, J.

Assigned Readings: (tentative)
The reading list will include several of the following:
Boghardt, Thomas.  The Zimmerman Telegram: Intelligence, Diplomacy, and America’s Entry into World War I.
Fromkin, David.  A Peace to End All Peace:  The Fall of the Ottoman Empire and the Creation of the Modern Middle East.
den Hertog,Johan and Samuel Kruizinga, eds., Caught in the Middle: Neutrals, Neutrality and the First World War.
Horn, Martin.  Britain, France, and the Financing of the First World War. 
Howard, Michael.  The First World War. A Very Short Introduction.
MacMillan, Margaret, Paris, 1919.
Mulligan, William. The Origins of the First World War.

Assignments: (tentative)
One in-class presentation on the author(s) of the week, placing the week’s reading within its historiographical context.
One book review of William Mulligan’s Origins of the First World War.
One 4-6-page document analysis paper.
One research paper, approximately 15-20 pages in length.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the research seminar requirement toward a history major for semester students; this fulfills the 598 seminar requirement for quarter students.
 



HISTORY 4650 SEMINAR IN WORLD/GLOBAL/TRANSNATIONAL HISTORY
3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will acquaint student with the literature on global mobility, using a variety of case studies from different geographical locations (Europe, Africa, the Middle East, East Asia, and the Americas) to chart the multiple meanings of human mobility in the modern period. In the first half of the semester, students will examine a number of scholarly works, fictional accounts, media reports, and digital resources that offer different perspectives on migrations in a global context. In the second half, each student will choose a topic to explore in more details and write a final historiographical paper on it.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:35-12:20       W                                 Dragostinova, T.

Assigned Readings: (tentative; please contact instructor to confirm)
The Oxford Handbook of Refugee and Forced Migration Studies. Oxford, 2016). [selected chapters accessed using the OSU Library website]
The Encyclopedia of Global Human Migration. Wiley Blackwell, 2013). [selected chapters accessed using the OSU Library website]
Gatrell, Peter. The Making of the Modern Refugee. Oxfort, 2015.
Ngai, Mae. Impossible Subjects: Illegal Aliens & the Making of Modern America. Princeton, 2014.
Rawlence, Ben. City of Thorns: Nine Lives in the World’s Largest Refugee Camp. Picador, 2016.
Gyasi, Yaa. Homegoing. A Novel. Knopf, 2016.
Kapllani, Gazmend. A Short Border Handbook. Granta, 2011.

Assignments:
Two short papers on the assigned readings: 20%
Annotated bibliographies and footnote exercises: 10%
Final 16-to-18-page paper: 60% (executed in multiple stages)
Weekly participation and discussion: 10%

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills the READING seminar requirement for History Majors.
 



HISTORY 4675 RESEARCH SEMINAR IN WORLD HISTORY
3 Cr. Hrs.

European Encounters with the Wider World, 1450-1750
We will examine original documents as well as articles and books (all in English) about the encounters between the Europeans and the rest of the world from the perspective of both sides: Hernán Cortés and the Aztecs; Vasco da Gama and the seafarers of Malabar; Oda Nobunaga and the Jesuits in Japan; and so on. By comparing contradictory (and often incompatible) accounts of the same events, we will gain a better understanding of both the process of European expansion and the strengths (and limitations) of historical sources.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
5:30-8:25 pm   Monday                       Parker, G.

Assigned Readings:
1. S. B. Schwartz, ed., Implicit Understandings. Observing, Reporting and Reflecting on the Encounters between Europeans and Other Peoples in the Early Modern Era (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994), chapters assigned week by week
2. Course pack of sources assigned week by week:

Assignments:
1. Two pages of commentary and questions concerning the readings for five of the meetings: 10 pages: 30% of the total grade.
2. A 25-page paper presenting “symmetrical” documents that examines an encounter between Europeans and “others” between 1400 and 1750 not covered in the coursework.  The topic will be chosen in consultation with the instructor: 50% of the total grade.
3. Attendance at and participation in all weekly meetings of the class: 20% of the total grade.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills the RESEARCH seminar requirement for History Majors.
 


HISTORY4705 RESEARCH SEMINAR IN THE HISTORY OF ENVIRONMENT, TECHNOLOGY & SCIENCE
3 Cr. Hrs.             

History and Future

The goal of this course will be to apply the historical method to the study of the future.  Future scenarios are used by businesses and other organizations as a tool for strategic planning, and it turns out that historians, by virtue of their method, make very good futurists/scenarists.  Students will first consider the history of technology, so that we might then write “the next chapter” in that history.  Students will then reacquaint themselves with the techniques historians use to research and represent the past: locating evidence, drawing inferences from evidence, contextualizing evidence, writing narrative representations based on that evidence, and entering into a larger discussion about those representations.  Students will then use these same techniques to represent the future.  Specifically, students will write a 25-30-page set of well-researched scenarios that describe possible futures of technology, including but not limited to artificial intelligence, robotics, gene editing, geoengineering, or universal translation.  Students will have the opportunity to present their research to a meeting of Columbus Futurists. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:30-10:55       TR                               Staley, D.

Assigned Readings:
Daniel R. Headrick, Technology: A World History, 978-0195338218
John Lewis Gaddis, The Landscape of the Past 978-0195171570
Peter Schwartz, The Art of the Long View: Planning for the Future in an Uncertain World
978-0385267328
Mary Lynn Rampolla, A Pocket Guide to Writing in History 8th ed. 978-1457690884
articles made available on Carmen

Assignments:
Attendance 10%
Class participation: 25%
Weekly written readings summaries 25%
Final research paper: 40%

Prerequisites and Special Comments
This course fulfills the RESEARCH seminar requirement for history majors.
 



HISTORY 4795 RESEARCH SEMINAR IN HISTORY
3 Cr. Hrs.

The History of the Body

The “body” has a history. In the first half of this course, we will explore the diverse ways that people in the past understood and experienced their own bodies. To do this, we will read not only works by historians, but also those by anthropologists and critical theorists. We will discuss what it means for the body to be “culturally constructed” and to be a site for the operation of political and scientific power. We will roam rather broadly through time and space, from classical Chinese thought to postmodern cyborgs. Early on, students will choose a topic for their research project and will work to prepare a bibliography of primary and secondary sources that will demonstrate that they will be able to do the research and writing for a substantial (15-20 pages) paper. We will devote the second half of the course to the research and writing process.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
2:20-3:40         WF                              Lawrence, S.

Assigned Readings:
Foucault, Michel. Discipline and Punish. The Birth of the Prison (1977)
Kuriyama, Shigehisa. The Expressiveness of the Body and the Divergence of Greek and Chinese Medicine (1999).
Strathern, Andrew J. Body Thoughts (1996)

Assignments:
Discussion and participation                           20%
Preliminary bibliography                                 10%
Progress reports                                               5%
Research prospectus                                      15%
First draft of research paper                           15%
Final research paper                                       35%

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the research seminar requirement toward a history major.

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WOMEN'S HISTORY
 

HISTORY 2610 INTRODUCTION TO WOMEN & GENDER IN THE U.S.

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course surveys the history of women and gender in the United States from pre-European settlement to the present.  The course will examine the experiences of Native, European, African, Mexican, and Asian American women within the contexts of historical change in the U.S.  It will focus on changes in women’s work and the sexual division of labor; in relationships between gender, politics, and the state; in educational and professional opportunities for women; and in women’s family roles and sexuality.  A major goal of the course is to present women’s history both as an integral part of U.S. history and its unique subject of historical investigation.  Students will learn to think critically about historical arguments as well as to understand the difference that gender makes in history and the way that gender interacts with class, race, ethnicity, and sexuality.  In addition to examining a variety of primary sources including diary excerpts, letters, newspaper articles, laws, and speeches, we will study recent historical interpretations in essays, historical monographs, biographies, and documentaries.  The class will combine lectures, discussion, films, visuals, and music.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:40-1:35       MW                             Marino, K.
10:20; 12:40    Friday (recitations)
1:50                Friday (recitation)

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for history majors.                                                                                                                                                    



HISTORY 3642 WOMEN IN MODERN EUROPE FROM THE 18TH CENTURY TO THE PRESENT
3 Cr. Hrs.                 

This course is designed as an introduction to the history of European women from the mid-18th century to the late-20th century.  Several themes will be central to the course.  We will investigate changing ideas about women and the ways in which these ideas influence women’s lives.  We will study the processes of industrial expansion and economic change and the impact of these developments on women’s social and economic position.  We will explore the political reorganization of Europe over the course of these centuries, and we will examine how women strove to shape and improve their lives under changing circumstances.  We will also concentrate on how relationships between women and men developed, and how beliefs about gender changed.  Finally, we will look at how economic position, religion, sexuality, marital status, regional and national differences influenced women’s experiences.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:30     TR                               Soland, B.

Assigned Readings:
The readings for this course include a broad selection of primary and secondary sources.  All readings will be made available on Carmen.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Europe, post-1750 for history majors.      



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To find course availability and times, please visit the Ohio State Course Catalog and Master Schedule.