Autumn 2018 Undergraduate Courses

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AFRICAN HISTORY


HISTORY 2303 HISTORY OF CONTEMPORARY AFRICA, 1960 – PRESENT

3 Cr. Hrs.

After less than 70 years of colonial rule, most European colonies in Africa gained their independence by the end of the 1960s. Formal independence from European colonial rule implied that Africans assumed full responsibility for their own political and economic destinies. Has that been the case? What happened during this era of formal independence? How did African leaders seek to create stable political systems to promote economic progress in their societies and what difficulties did they encounter? In what ways did the colonial legacy and the new world order that emerged after the Second World War affect the processes of nation-building in Africa? What relationship emerged between Africa and the former colonial rulers on the one hand, and between Africa and the new world powers (the United States and the Soviet Union) on the other? This section of the African civilization survey explores these questions in ways that will help us understand why Africa has continued to struggle to implement viable political stability and sustainable economies. Rather than seeking to provide you with a cohesive body of knowledge, the course will focus on important themes that will give you a broader picture of historical processes, contingencies and outcomes that will help us understand Africa’s predicaments as well as achievements since the 1960s. Students should leave this course with the ability to engage in well-informed discussions about modern Africa and its place in the global system.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
On-line            online                           Kobo, Ousman

Assigned Readings:
None. Open source materials and journal articles.

Assignments:
Online Quizzes
Online Discussion
Analyses of Historical Documents

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Africa, post-1750 for history majors or can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.


HISTORY 3302 NATIONALISM, SOCIALISM, AND REVOLUTION IN AFRICA

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course explores the history of the nationalist and revolutionary movements as well as the socialist regimes in Africa in the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. The course will begin with a discussion of the establishment and the legacy of European colonial rule in Africa, and proceeds to examine the development of African nationalism and decolonization. The course will use a variety of secondary and primary sources as well as films and documentaries to illuminate the complexities and the ideologies that informed the nationalist movements. The nationalist movement produced a number of leaders and political thinkers whose ideas and writings have shaped the nationalist discourse and anti-colonial struggle.  They include figures such as Kwame Nkrumah, Julius Nyerere, Patrice Lumumba, Amilcar Cabral, just to name a few. Moreover, the course will explore the way in which race, ethnicity, gender, and class have shaped nationalist discourse, strategies, and agenda as well as the manner in which conflicts and tensions within the nationalist movement have continued to shape post-colonial states and society in Africa. The last part of the course will focus on the theory and practice of socialism in Africa by looking at specific examples from countries such as Ghana, Tanzania, Guinea, Angola, Mozambique, and Ethiopia. The course will conclude by assessing the experiences and the success and failures of these examples and their impact.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:30     WF                              Sikainga, Ahmad

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Africa, post-1750 for history the major or can fulfill the historical study and global diversity GE requirements.


 

HISTORY 3313 CONFLICT IN THE HORN OF AFRICA

3 Cr. Hrs.

The Horn of Africa refers to the geographical region of northeast Africa, which includes the present-day countries of Somalia, Djibouti, Ethiopia, Eritrea, Sudan, and South Sudan.  This region has been embroiled in interlocking civil wars, ethnic and religious conflicts, territorial disputes, and the disintegration of the nation states.  The main goal of this course is to examine the root causes, the nature, and the impact of these conflicts on local communities as well as their regional and international implications.  The key topics that will be discussed are: the process of state formation and imperial expansion in the nineteenth century, the roots of regional inequalities and marginalization, the advent of European colonial rule and its impact, the post-colonial conflicts and the demands for self-determination in South Sudan and Eritrea, the civil War and the disintegration of Somalia, the rise of Islamism in Sudan and Somalia, the war in Darfur, terrorism and piracy, the emergence of South Sudan as an independent state and its current crises, and the regional and international implications of the Horn of Africa conflicts.  In addition to lectures and discussion, these topics will be illustrated by films and audiovisual materials.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:45-2:05       WF                              Sikainga, Ahmad

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Africa, post-1750 for history the major or can fulfill the historical study and global diversity GE requirements.
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AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY

                                                                                                                                                    

HISTORY 3083 CIVIL RIGHTS AND BLACK POWER MOVEMENT

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course examines the Civil Rights/Black Power Movement. It begins by looking at Black activism and Black life at the start of the 20th century. It continues by examining the development and impact of the mass mobilization efforts of the 1950s and 1960s, from the Montgomery bus boycott and the student sit-ins, to the Freedom Rides and the March on Washington. At the same time, it scrutinizes the grassroots organizing campaigns led by the young people of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). This course concludes by looking at civil rights activism outside the South, evaluating the impact of civil rights legislation, and analyzing the ideological and tactical transition to Black Power. This course employs a grassroots, bottom-up approach to understanding the black freedom struggle. It takes seriously the notion that the driving force behind the movement was every day, ordinary, Black folk, and the skilled African American activists who helped them organize and mobilize.  The goal of this course is to familiarize students with the people (famous, infamous, and forgotten), places, and events of the most significant American social movement of the 20th century. In addition, and arguably most importantly, this course aims to show the process by which seemingly powerless African Americans organized to transform the society in which they lived, and the way white Americans, particularly in the South, responded, i.e. their attempts to preserve the status quo.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:45-2:05       TR                               Jeffries, Hasan

Assignments:
Three exams over the course of the semester; and 10-page analytical essay

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This is a reading intensive course.
This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for history majors or can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.


HISTORY 3085 AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY THROUGH CONTEMPORARY FILM

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course explores the African American experience through the lens of major motion pictures and documentary films.  The aim is for students to gain an understanding of how and why various historical topics have been depicted in movies, and to what extent the film version of particular events reflect reality.  The purpose of the class is to use film to explore and historicize themes such as race and racism, slavery and freedom, oppression and resistance, and to reflect of the meaning of this themes (and films) in today’s society. The films will cover the entirety of the African American experience, from slavery through the present.

This course grapples with a central question: Given the fact that the majority of people in American society rely upon media and film to make sense of the past, to what extent do contemporary films do an adequate job of relaying the “truth” and accuracy of various historical subjects in the African American experience?  As a result, this class examines a variety of topics, including American slavery, African American culture, racial violence, Jim Crow, the civil rights and Black Power movements, and contemporary conflicts between the police and black communities, by examining film that treat these topics in conjunction with historical research.  We will also look closely at a select few recurring issues in films on the African American experience, such as the subordinate role of black women and the use of white characters as the primary narrative vehicles. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:40-3:25       M                                 Jeffries, Hasan

Assigned Readings:
In lieu of an assigned text (although there will be articles, essays, and/or book chapters distributed online), there are weekly documentary films that students are to view prior to class via OSU’s Secured Media Site online streaming service.

Course Format: One film will be watched and discussed, in class, each week. Films will include: 12 Years A Slave; Glory; Mudbound; The Butler; and Fruitvale Station; Black Panther, among others.

Assignments:
Three 7-10-page analytical essay assignments; Group media project.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for history majors.
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AMERICAN HISTORY

                                                                                                                                                    

HISTORY 2001 LAUNCHING AMERICA

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course provides a survey of American history from earliest times to Reconstruction. It covers the social, economic, cultural, political history of the American peoples. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
TBD5               TBD                             TBD

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the historical study GE requirement.  Not open to students that have credit for History 151 or 1151.                                                                                                                                              


HISTORY 2002 MAKING AMERICA MODERN

3 Cr. Hrs.

This class will introduce students to modern United States history from the end of the Civil War to the War on Terror.  

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
TBD                 TBD                             TBD

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the historical study GE requirement.  Not open to students that have credit for History 152 or 1152.                                                                                                                                                    


HISTORY 2015 HISTORY OF AMERICAN CRIMINAL JUSTICE

3 Cr. Hrs.

The history of crime, criminal law, law enforcement, prisons, and juvenile courts.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
TBD                 TBD                             Paxton, S.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for history majors or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.                                                                                                                                                    


HISTORY 2610H INTRODUCTION TO WOMEN & GENDER IN THE U.S.

3 Cr. Hrs.

This honors course surveys the history of women and gender in the United States from pre-European settlement to the present.  The course will examine the experiences of Native, European, African, Mexican, and Asian American women within the contexts of historical change in the U.S.  It will focus on changes in women’s work and the sexual division of labor; in relationships between gender, politics, and the state; in educational and professional opportunities for women; and in women’s family roles and sexuality.  A major goal of the course is to present women’s history both as an integral part of U.S. history and as a unique subject of historical investigation.  Students will learn to think critically about historical arguments as well as to understand the difference that gender makes in history and the way that gender interacts with class, race, ethnicity, and sexuality.  In addition to examining a variety of primary sources including diary excerpts, letters, memoirs, newspaper articles, laws, speeches, and oral histories, we will study recent historical interpretations in essays, historical monographs, biographies, and documentaries.  The class will combine lectures, discussion, films, visuals, and music.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:30       TR                               Flores, Joan

Assigned Readings:
Linda K. Kerber, Jane Sherron De Hart, Cornelia Hughes Dayton, and Judy Tzu-Chun Wu, eds., Women’s America: Refocusing the Past, 8th edition (Oxford University Press, 2016), $48.49. (WA)
Harriet Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (Dover Thrift Edition, 2001), $3.33.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for history majors or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.


HISTORY 2750 NATIVES & NEWCOMERS: IMMIGRATION & MIGRATION IN U.S. HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

The global refugee crisis, the legislative debates on travel bans, and the challenges to DACA and H1-B visa recipients are only a few of the crucial contemporary issues informed by histories of U.S. immigration. These histories are a central starting point for understanding both the controversies of today and the ways people have creatively responded to the legal, economic, social, and cultural pressures they have faced as immigrants to the U.S. The course takes off in the colonial era, first studying the histories of indigeneity, slavery, and colonization that shaped an emerging nation. It then shifts to the great migrations of the 19th century, alternatively analyzing the policies and lived experiences that defined immigrant histories of the period. Finally, as the course travels to the 20th century, we will touch upon the Great Depression, the Hart-Celler Act of 1965, refugee crises, the militarization of the U.S.-Mexico border, and the “War on Terror,” among other developments.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
2:20-3:40         TR                               Flores, Joan

This survey course seeks to familiarize students with the key events and themes in the history of U.S. immigration, with a focus on the intersections of labor, race, ethnicity, and gender. By the end of the course, students will be able to:
 
Pinpoint the major themes and historiographical questions of early twentieth century U.S. immigration history
Understand the complex dynamics between “natives” and “newcomers”
Identify how the dramatic political, economic, and social changes of different period transformed immigration
 
Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group North American, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.
                                                                                                                                                 

HISTORY 3001 AMERICAN POLITICAL HISTORY TO 1877

3 Cr. Hrs.

An overview of the history of American politics from the earliest colonial outposts to Civil War and Reconstruction.  American politics had their origins in the colonial transplantation and transformation of Old World forms on the New World edge of empire, forms reshaped in the Revolution, and routinized in the decades of the early republic.  While its institutions, practices, and responsiveness to public opinion made it the first successful model of a modern democratic republic, the structures of American politics before the Civil War were fundamentally threatened by the uncompromisable questions bound up in racial slavery.   Thus, while we will consider the origins and development of the basic patterns of American self-governance, we will also examine trajectories to and through constitutional crisis.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:35-10:55       WF                              Brooke, John

Assigned Readings [tentative]:
Jack P. Greene, Peripheries & Center: Constitutional Development in the Extended Polities of the British Empire and the United States, 1607-1788.
Jack Rakove, James Madison and the Creation of the American Republic
Harry L. Watson, Liberty and Power: The Politics of Jacksonian America
James Oakes, The Scorpion’s Sting
Eric Foner, A Short History of Reconstruction

Assignments:
Three take-home papers, totaling roughly 20 pages of writing. 

Prerequisites and Special Comments: American or European history background useful. This course fulfills Group North America, pre-1750 and post-1750 for history majors or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.                                                                                                                                               


HISTORY 3005 THE U.S. CONSTITUTION & SOCIETY TO 1877

3 Cr. Hrs.

Examination of the major developments in American constitutional history from the origins of European settlement of what became the USA through the era of Reconstruction.  Emphasis on the origins of the English Common Law, its transmission to the Thirteen Colonies, constitutionalism and the American Revolution, the rise and decline of the Articles of Confederation and the antebellum constitutional system, law and American economic development, the pressures placed on the legal system by the expansion of slavery, the constitutional crisis of the late 1850’s, the emergence of a new constitutional system in the wake of the American Civil War, and the changing legal status of African-Americans in the 1860’s and ‘70’s.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:30     TR                               Stebenne, David

Assigned Readings:
Kermit L. Hall and Timothy S. Huebner, Major Problems in American Constitutional History, 2nd ed., (2009).

Assignments: Active participation in class discussions, and take-home midterm and final examinations.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group North America, pre &post-1750 for history majors or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.                                                                                                                                                    


HISTORY 3012 ANTEBELLUM AMERICA

3 Cr. Hrs.

In this course, we will be discussing the social, economic, cultural, and political history of antebellum America.  We will explore the experiences of ordinary people, such as farmers, shopkeepers, factory workers, as well as famous names, such as Andrew Jackson and Harriet Tubman.  We will also explore large-scale social processes such as the expansion of slavery, the growth of reform movements, and sectionalism in national politics.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:35-10:55       TR                               Cashin, Joan

Assignments: Students will read several monographs; they will write a paper and take one exam.  Students are expected to attend class and meet the course requirements.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for history majors or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.                                                                                                                                                    


HISTORY 3014 GILDED AGE TO PROGRESSIVE ERA, 1877-1920

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course examines American politics and society from the later years of Reconstruction until the U.S. entry in World War I.  This is period historians often overlook, one stuck between the drama of the Civil War and the more familiar developments of the 20th century.  Yet we shouldn’t.  In this period, important things seemed up for grabs, within the power of Americans to manage: how industry would be controlled, the character of race relations, the role of government in shaping society, public morals, and the economy, and America's place in the world. 

We will focus on public life – on politics, social and political movements, economic change, and habits of thought that shaped how Americans responded to change.  We will explore two big themes: the working out of the Reconstruction of the South and the varied effects of rapid industrial development. The trauma of the Civil War and the difficulties of Reconstruction continued to shape American politics and social life. It carried through in arguments about citizenship, what it meant to be an American, and the right to vote. The continuing relevance of Reconstruction issues turned up in the stalemate that characterized late-nineteenth-century-politics.  That stalemate, in turn, conditioned the ability of government to respond to the expansion of industry.  Industrialization also provides the context for understanding the movement of people to and around the United States.  We will examine solutions that various groups of Americans offered to what they saw as the problems of the day, problems that went to the nation's values as well as its economic and social conditions.  How those solutions differed from those offered during the progressive era will concern us in the last third of the course.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
3:55-5:15         TR                               Baker, Paula

Assigned Readings: (Tentative)
Charles Calhoun, The Gilded Age: Perspectives on the Origins of Modern America
Maury Klein, The Genesis of Industrial America, 1870-1920
Eric Rauchway, Murdering McKinley: The Making of Theodore Roosevelt's America
John Milton Cooper, Pivotal Decades: The United States, 1900-1920

Assignments:
Class participation: bonus up to ½ grade
Midterm In-Class Essay: 20%
Final Take-Home Essay: 20%
Paper: 20%
Two Quizzes: 10% each
Two Short In-Class Essays: 10% each

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for history majors or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.                                                                                 


HISTORY 3016 UNITED STATES HISTORY SINCE 1963

3 Cr. Hrs.

In the last sixty-five years the United States has declared “war” on a variety of internal and external problems, including communism, poverty, drugs, AIDS, and terror.  Why have Americans found martial metaphors so appealing?  What, if anything, has abound the country together other than war?  This seminar will attempt to answer these questions by introducing students to some of the major events and trends in United States history since the 1960s.  Over the course of the semester, we will move chronologically and topically to explore some key themes in American politics and culture, including; The Cold War, feminism, civil rights, the Vietnam War, Watergate, the “Reagan revolution,” globalization, and the Obama presidency. Our discussions of these issues should challenge students to think critically about the definition of American national identity and citizenship.  Together, we will examine key primary and secondary sources; compose essays based on the readings, and conduct original historical research.  By the end of the class, students should not only be familiar with significant episodes from the past seventy years, but they also should be able to debate the significance of those events in papers and classroom discussions.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
1:50-2:45         MWF                           Howard, Clayton

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for history majors or can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.                                                             


HISTORY 3030 HISTORY OF OHIO

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will survey the economic, social, and political development of the geographic area that became Ohio from the Native American period to the present. We will explore three themes in particular:  the role of disruptive technology and creative destruction in shaping Ohio’s past; the critical junctures at which Ohio might have become something entirely different from what it became; Ohio’s connection to the wider world through geography, technology, demography, economics, and politics.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
On-line            on-line                         Coil, William R.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.                                                                                                                                                        


HISTORY 3500 U.S. DIPLOMACY INDEPENDENCE TO 1900

3 Cr. Hrs.

Between 1776 and 1920, the United States transformed from a fragile confederacy of bickering states to arguably the most powerful nation on the planet. How did this experiment in democratic republicanism manage to survive amidst hostile empires, and how did it expand its military might, wealth, and culture to become a great power in a little more than a century? This class will seek to answer these broad questions, exploring the foundational concepts of American foreign policy and the ways in which various actors adapted, transformed, balanced, or ultimately discarded them as American self-perception, politics, and security needs changed over time. Specific themes will include the role of international affairs in the formation of the American state, the pursuit of commerce, the impact of slavery and race on foreign relations, expansion and empire, anti-imperialism, and the extension of national interests and security concerns.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:30     WF                              Parrott, Joseph

Assigned Readings:
3-4 books, likely including
Emily Conroy-Krutz, Christian Imperialism
Matthew Karp, This Vast Southern Empire
Erez Manela, The Wilsonian Moment
Additional articles and sources on Carmen

Assignments:
Active Participation
2 Response Papers (3-4 Pages)
3-4 Five Minute In-Class Reading Quizzes
2 Exams

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
Prerequisite or concur: English 1110 or equivalent, and course work in History at the 2000 level, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 583.01. This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill the GE historical study requirement.                                                                                                                                               


HISTORY 3700 AMERICAN ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.                                                                                                           

This course shows what history can teach us about the future survival of humanity on planet Earth. From August to December, we dive deep into the past, examining how Americans have affected the natural environment over time and how nature has shaped the course of human events. You will learn to think like an environmental historian, mastering a historical sub-discipline first developed in the 1970s that places nature at the heart of our national narrative. This course tackles some of the biggest issues hitting headlines today. How bad is climate change? What can we do about it? Are we running out of water? How will we quench our thirst in the years ahead? Looking to the past, we journey across the country (and the globe) to find solutions to these questions and more. You will never look at American history the same way again.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
3:55-5:15         TR                               Elmore, Bart

Assigned Readings:
There are only two assigned books for the course:
T. Steinberg’s Down to Earth: Nature’s Role in American History (Oxford Univ. Press, 2009).
Marl Fiege Republic of Nature: An Environmental History of the United States (University of Washington Press, 2012).
In addition to these readings, the course features a sprinkling of articles from some of today’s top environmental historians. We will also watch a series of films that will help students visualize ecological changes that reshaped America.

Assignments:
In addition to a midterm and a final exam, students will have the opportunity to work on the Columbus Environmental Digital (CED) project. CED tasks students with studying EPA databases, city sustainability reports, and Columbus Dispatch articles to assess the environmental health of various neighborhoods throughout Columbus. Collaborating with Geographic Information Systems (GIS) specialists, Professor Elmore intends to transform these reports into an eye-catching digital map that will be available to the public. This is history in action.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for history majors or can fulfill the historical study GE requirement. 
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ANCIENT HISTORY
 

HISTORY 3210 HISTORY OF ARCHAIC GREECE

3 Cr. Hrs.

This is the first half of a two-course sequence that surveys the history of ancient Greece (the second half will be offered in spring semester). The course examines the formative period of Greek civilization, from the Neolithic era (ca. 7000-3000 BC) all the way down to the year 480 BC.  Our primary focus will be on the period's major political developments: the rise and mysterious demise of the Mycenaean kingdoms of the Late Bronze Age (ca. 1600-1100 BC); the subsequent emergence of small, village-based chiefdoms and, later, the first city-states in the Dark Age (ca. 100-700 BC); the creation of written laws, political institutions, and, ultimately, the world's first citizen-states in the Archaic Age (ca. 700-480 BC); and the momentous wars against the Persian empire in the early fifth century.  Along the way, we will also explore various social and cultural phenomena associated with these political developments.  Here, particular attention will be paid to the many innovations of the Archaic Age in art, architecture, sports, literature, and philosophy, as well as to broader social issues, such as the place of women and slaves in Greek society.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:30     TR                               Anderson, Greg

Assignments: 2 exams and term paper

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for history majors or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.                                                                                                                                                    


HISTORY 3213H SLAVERY IN THE ANCIENT WORLD

3 Cr. Hrs.

Slavery is key to understanding life in the ancient world, because classical Athens and Rome were genuine slave societies.  In what ways was slavery integrated into Greek and Roman family structures, religion, philosophy, and culture?  Was the institution questioned or attacked as immoral?  What caused slave revolts, the most famous being led a gladiator named Spartacus?  How did ancient Jews and early Christians react to slavery?  What legacies from ancient slavery remain with us today?  Attempts to answer these questions have sparked considerable controversy among scholars. This course will introduce the student to this debate, the primary sources, and their difficulties. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:35-10:55       TR                               Harrill, Bert

Assigned Readings:

Apuleius.  The Golden Ass or Metamorphoses.  Trans. by E. J. Kenny.  Penguin Books, 2004.
Bradley, Keith.  Slavery and Society at Rome.  Cambridge University Press, 1994.
duBois, Page.  Slavery: Antiquity and Its Legacy.  Oxford University Press, 2009.
Joshel, Sandra R.  Slavery in the Roman World.  Cambridge University Press, 2010.
Shaw, Brent D.  Spartacus and the Slave Wars.  Bedford/St. Martin’s Press, 2001.
Wrenhaven: Kelly L. Reconstructing the Slave: The Image of the Slave in Ancient Greece. Bloomsbury, 2012.

Assignments

  1. Active class participation, including oral presentations.
  2. Midterm and Final Examinations.
  3. Historical research paper (8-10 pages).

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
Admission to the University Honors or Scholars programs, or permission of the instructor.
This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for history majors.                                                                                                                                            


HISTORY 3216 WAR IN THE ANCIENT MEDITERRANEAN WORLD

3 Cr. Hrs.

An advanced survey of military history from the Bronze Age in Greece (ca. 1200 D.C.) to the fall of the Roman Empire in the West (A.D. 476).  The lectures will proceed chronologically and six interconnected themes will comprise their focus: tactical and technological developments in warfare; military strategy and interstate diplomacy; the reciprocal effects of war and political systems upon one another; the social and economic bases of military activity; conversely, the impact of war on society, particularly its role in the economy and its effect upon the lives of both participants and non-combatants; finally, the military ethos and the ideological role of war.  In addition, students will be introduced to some of the basic problems which historians of the period are currently attempting to solve as well as to some of the most important hypotheses their work has produced.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:30     WF                              Vanderpuy, P.

Assigned Readings (tentative):
Caesar, The Gallic Wars
D. Engles, Alexander the Great & the Logistics of the Macedonian Army.
A. Ferrill, The Fall of the Roman Empire: The Military Explanation
V. Hansen, The Western Way of War.
Herodotus, The Persian Wars
Livy, The War with Hannibal
E. Luttwak, The Grand Strategy of the Roman Empire
Tacitus, The Complete Works
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War and a Xeroxed packet

Assignments:
Students in this course will be required to take a midterm and a final examination and to turn in a term paper, all of which must be completed in order to pass the class.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Group Europe, pre-1750 for history majors or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.                                                                                                                                                  


HISTORY 3219/5229 HISTORICAL JESUS

3 Cr. Hrs.

Jesus Christ is a major religious figure about which there is considerable academic and theological debate.  This course examines this debate and thus explores the problem of how historical facts and religious persuasion are related where a religion, such as Christianity, lays claim to historical truth.  Since the Enlightenment this has been a matter of considerable intellectual and cultural interest.  The basic questions are:  Who was Jesus?  What can we know about him that will satisfy ordinary standards of historical knowledge?  What difference does it make?  Attempts to answer these questions have resulted in what is usually called the "quests" for the "historical Jesus." This course will study those previous quests for the historical Jesus and their analyses of the early Christian Gospels.  Each student will write a final paper arguing for his or her own particular reconstruction of the historical Jesus, using the methods of critical analysis that he or she is learning in the course.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:45-2:05       TR                               Harrill, Bert

Assigned Readings:

1.  Burton H. Throckmorton Jr., Gospel Parallels, 5th revised edition (Thomas Nelson, 1992).
2.  E. P. Sanders, The Historical Figure of Jesus (Penguin Books, 1996).
3.  Paula Fredriksen, Jesus of Nazareth, King of the Jews: A Jewish Life and the Emergence of Early Christianity (Vintage Books, 2000).
4.  Bart D. Ehrman, Jesus: Apocalyptic Prophet of the New Millennium (Oxford University Press, 2001).
5.  David R. Cartlidge and David L. Dungan, eds., Documents and Images for the Study of the Gospels, 3d edition (Fortress Press, 2015).
6.  Joan E. Taylor, ed., Jesus and Brian: Exploring the Historical Jesus and his Times via Monty Python’s Life of Brian (Bloomsbury T&T Clark, 2015).

Assignments:

1.  Class participation
2.  A Midterm and Final Exams
3.  Historical Interpretative Essay (8–10 pages). 

Assignments for History 5229:
Graduate Piggy-Back of HIST 3219.  Students will do all the readings and tests for the undergraduate syllabus––midterm and final exams––plus meet separately in a bi-weekly seminar, and write a research essay of 20 pages.  The research essay can be on any topic, in consultation with the instructor.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Near East, Middle East, pre-1750 for history majors or may fulfill the historical study GE requirement.


                                                                                                                                                           

ASIAN & ISLAMIC HISTORY

                                                                                                                                                    
HISTORY 2351 EARLY ISLAMIC SOCIETY, 610-1258

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will introduce you to the major religious, political, social, and economic structures that developed during the first six centuries of Islam, from its advent around 610 of the Common Era through the Mongol sack of Baghdad in 1258.  We will cover the origins of Islam; the early disputes over the caliphate (leadership of the Muslim community after Muhammad’s death), leading to the Sunni-Shi‘ite division; theological and intellectual developments; mysticism; urban and rural life; and the status of women and non-Muslims.  The principal geographical areas that we will cover are the Middle East, including Iran and Afghanistan, and North Africa. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:30     TR                               Hathaway, Jane

Reading Assignments:
Frederick Mathewson Denny, An Introduction to Islam,4th ed.
Bertold Spuler, The Age of the Caliphs, vol. 1 of The Muslim World
F.E. Peters, compiler A Reader on Classical Islam

Assignments: map exercise, in-class midterm, short paper on primary sources, take-home final.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Near East, Middle East, pre-1750 for the history major or can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.                                                                                                                                               


HISTORY 2353 THE MIDDLE EAST SINCE 1914

3 Cr. Hrs.

An introductory study of the political, social and cultural history and evolution of Islamic civilization since 1914.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
On-line            On-line                        Bolanos, I.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Near East, Middle East, post-1750 for the history major or can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.                                                                                                                                               


HISTORY 2393 CONTEMPORARY INDIA & SOUTH ASIA

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course examines the political, social, economic, and cultural history of the South Asian subcontinent from independence in 1947 to the present.  We will focus on India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka, touching upon other South Asian countries (Nepal, Bhutan) when appropriate.

Many observers have noted the seeming paradoxes of modern India: the world’s largest democracy has also developed an increasingly authoritarian state; the country’s grinding poverty continues amidst the gleaming office parks of the new global economy; powerful movements for social justice contend with the rise of repressive religious nationalisms.  Despite some differences in politics and economy, we may find similar themes and historical forces at work in Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka as well.  Situating South Asian history in its local, regional, and global contexts, this course examines these paradoxes in a survey of the tumultuous events over the last seven decades.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
On-line            on-line                         Sreenivas, Mytheli

Assigned Readings:
TBA: We will use a wide range of materials, including scholarly articles, films, literature, art, journalism and more.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course does not assume prior knowledge about South Asia, and is open to all undergraduate students.
This course fulfills Group Near East, East Asia, Middle East, South or Central Asia Group, post-1750 for history majors or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               


HISTORY 2402 HISTORY OF EAST ASIA IN THE MODERN ERA, 1600-PRESENT

3 Cr. Hrs.

History 2402 will introduce the histories of the societies of East Asia (China, Korea, Japan) starting in about 1600. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
TBD                 TBD                             TBD

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Near East, East Asia, Middle East, South or Central Asia Group, post-1750 for history majors or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.                                                                                                                      


HISTORY 3365 HISTORY OF AFGHANISTAN

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will begin with an introductory survey of Afghanistan’s ethnic landscape, cultural diversity and early history. The focus of the course will then quickly shift to more modern concerns, beginning with the emergence of the Afghan state in the mid-eighteenth century, and Afghanistan’s central role in the “Great Game,” the Anglo-Russian colonial cold war of the nineteenth century. Attention will then turn to Afghanistan’s progressive age, which emerged in the early twentieth century and lasted into the 1970s, as the central government in Kabul struggled to implement a series of educational, social and economic reforms intending to provide the foundation for a modern Afghan society. Afghanistan’s progress in this period was substantial, but it was also ephemeral. In the winter of 1979, the Soviet Union launched a massive invasion of Afghanistan. Soon thereafter, the United States began funding numerous Afghan resistance groups, collectively known as the mujahidin. As the Soviet army withdrew in 1988, the extraordinarily well armed mujahidin factions descended into a protracted civil war that further transformed the country into a poverty-stricken wasteland. In the power vacuum of the 1990s, this nearly forgotten war zone became an incubator for radical Islamist political movements and a safe haven for global terror organizations.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:45-2:05       WF                              Levi, Scott

Assigned Readings: Three books

Assignments: Coursework includes a map quiz, mid-term, research paper and final exam.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Near East; Middle East, post-1750 for history majors or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.                                                                                                                                               


HISTORY 3403 HISTORY OF EARLY MODERN CHINA, 14TH-18TH CENTURIES
(Hybrid Course, 50% online)

3 Cr. Hrs.                                           

This course surveys early-modern Chinese history, roughly 14th-18th century. We begin with the transition from the Mongol Yuan dynasty to the Ming dynasty, and end with the establishment of another “alien dynasty,” the Manchu Qing dynasty. We will look at political institutions and culture, socio-economic changes, the social, cultural and spiritual lives of people of different classes, environmental issues, and gender system during this period. The survey aims to help you understand some of the most important traditions in Chinese imperial history: their origins, how they shaped the course of early-modern China, and how they were contested and modified in new historical conditions, especially in an new era of globalization in trade, culture, and religion as well as climate change. By the end of the course you will form your own views on: 1) What features define a Chinese empire and the premodern Chinese state? 2) How did early-modern patterns of development emerge in China and differ from those of other parts of the world? 3) How did early modern China and its position in the global transformation shape the world that we live in today?
 
This is an intense 7-week hybrid course. You will learn from lectures and readings, but more importantly you learn by “doing”— in a variety of online assignments you will look for and analyze historical information by exploring digital material with traditional print material and studying visual with textual sources. Consider our meeting sessions as a “history lab”: You will receive constructive feedback from the instructor on your work. You will learn by raising and answering questions in a friendly and intellectually stimulating environment. You will work closely with classmates on small projects.  
 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:35-10:55       TR                               Zhang, Ying   

Prerequisites and special comments:
This course fulfills group East Asia, pre-1750 for history the major or can fulfill a GE requirement.                                                                                                                                               


HISTORY 3404 MODERN CHINA 1750 TO 1949

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course provides a general but analytical survey of the history of late imperial China from approximately 1750 to 1949 with emphasis on the late Qing and Republic of China. We will discuss key historical phenomena that have distinguished China’s evolution in the modem period.  This course is organized around the paired themes of non-Chinese attempts to challenger or undermine China’s sovereignty and Chinese responses to those efforts, partly and especially since 1895 to achieve “wealth and power” for their nation.  For this reason, emphasis is placed on political, military, and social (including gender relations) developments, although some attention is also given to economic, cultural and intellectual ones.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
2:20-3:40         TR                               Reed, Christopher

Assigned Readings: 4 books, documentary films.

Assignments: Map assignments, comparison paper, take-home exams.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
There are no prerequisites.  Although not required, the course assumes students have had college-level history courses above the 1000-level.  Familiarity with topics covered in History 2402, “East Asian History since 1600” is useful in a general way but is not required.

This course fulfills Group East Asia, post-1750 for history majors or can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.                                                                                                                                       


HISTORY 3425 HISTORY OF JAPAN BEFORE 1800

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course treats selected topics in the history of Japan from the earliest times to the beginning of the nineteenth century.  It touches on a number of areas of politics, economic development, social trends and elements of the history of science and technology, ideas and religion, samurai, women and the environment. Pre-modern Japanese history shows patterns that continue to find expression in the modern era, even today.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
10:20-11:15     MWF                           Brown, Philip

Assigned Readings: (not complete)
Katsu Kokichi, Musui;s Story.
David Lu, ed., A Documentary History, (selected readings)
Articles

Assignments:
Students will write two papers that build on assigned readings plus a final and midterm exam.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group East Asia, pre-1750 for history majors or can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.
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EUROPEAN HISTORY

                                                                                                                                                   

HISTORY 1211 WESTERN CIVILIZATIONS TO 1600: RISE, COLLAPSE & RECOVERY

3 Cr. Hrs.
This is a second session course.

For better or worse, Western Civilizations have become extremely prominent in the world today – not just in the West but (thanks to Karl Marx and the Internet) also in other parts of the world. How did this process begin? What is distinctive about Western values?  These are two of the questions that this course seeks to answer. In addition, we will examine How Things Happen:

  • Why did the West develop at such an early stage the right to free speech guaranteed in this country by the First Amendment?
  • Why were 50% of all Western populations in this period under the age of 20?
  • How could 167 Spaniards overthrow the Inca Empire, with perhaps 8 million subjects, and go on to dominate much of South America?

The course also offers strategies to identify, among masses of facts, the aberration from the trend, the cause from the contingent, the important from the incidental, and the continuities among the changes.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:30-12:25     MW                             Kyle Shimoda
11:30-12:25    F (in-class recitation)
(Other recitations will be offered on-line)

Assigned Readings:
McKay, Buckler, Hill, Crowston & Wiesner, A history of Western society, 12th edition, vol. I;
Wiesner, Ruff & Wheeler, Discovering the Western Past, 7th edn., vol 1.

Assignments:

  • Read and discuss all assigned readings; attend and participate in all group discussions (15% of total grade)
  • Completion of all assigned recitation exercises (15% of total grade)
  • one mid-term exam taken in a lecture period (15% of total grade)
  • one 5-page term paper (25% of total grade)
  • one take-home final exam (30% of total grade)

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the following GE requirements:  1) “Historical Study,” 2) “Diversity: Global Studies”.


HISTORY HONORS 2204 MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs. 

This course is designed for students in the OSU Honors Program.  Class size is limited to 25.  Non-honors students may enroll if space is available and with permission of the instructor.  The focus of this course is on Europe from the Age of Discovery to globalization (1492-present).  In the 16th century, Europe was still peripheral to much of the world.  By the beginning of the 20th century, however, Euro-American flags and interests dominated much of the globe.  The world today is the product of this transformation.  In this course, we will study one aspect of the creation of the modern world through the many European revolutions and counter-revolutions – intellectual, commercial, industrial, nationalist, imperialist, consumerist, and feminist – that helped to bring it into being.  The first half of the course is devoted to European expansion and internal developments prior to 1800, the second half to European domination and its consequences in the 19th and 20th centuries.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:30     WF                              Conklin, Alice

Assigned Readings:
Levack, Muir and Veldman, The West: Encounters and Transformations, Vol.2 (course textbook)

Primary sources:
René Descartes, The Discourse on Method & Meditations
Françoise de Graffigny, Letters from a Peruvian Woman
Karl Marx, The Communist Manifesto
Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness
Primo Levi, Survival at Auschwitz
Frantz Fanon, Wretched of the Earth

Assignments:
Regular attendance to lectures and participation in discussion, and short written responses to primary sources (20%)
One short paper (30%)
In-class midterm exam (25%)
In-class final exam (25%)

Prerequisites and Special Comments:This course fulfills Group Europe, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.                                                                                                      


HISTORY 2204 MODERN EUROPEAN CIVILIZATIONS

3 Cr. Hrs.

A survey of the most transformative developments of the Western world beginning with the seventeenth-century scientific revolution (Galileo, Newton) that challenged ideas about physics and astronomy that had governed the scientific world for almost two thousand years, followed by a short investigation of the French Revolution of 1789 that ushered in the triumphs and challenges of the ideals of liberty, equality, and fraternity that laid the foundation for modern politics and social relations. We will explore reverberations of those developments in the nineteenth century as dramatized in a masterpiece of the nineteenth-century novel, Emila Zola’s Germinal. That work embodies, and will enable us to discuss conservatism, liberalism, Darwinism, Marxism, and anarchism along with the realist literary style.  The second unit focuses on the causes and results of the World War I that toppled European world supremacy. Those causes include the unification of Germany, which was structured around three aggressive foreign wars, as well as the imperial conquest, domination, and exploitation of countries around the world, especially in Africa. The final section evaluates a psychological analysis of Hitler that explains why Hitler wanted to kill Jews and how he was able to get Germans to help him do it.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
2:20-3:40         TR                               Kern, Stephen

Assigned Readings:

Required Books:

Emile Zola, Germinal
Rudolph Binion, Hitler Among the Germans

On Carmen
Readings by Karl Marx, Sigmund Freud, Jackson Spielvogel, and Ian Kershaw
Diana Hacker, A Pocket Style Manual (selections)

Assignments:
Students will take one in-class test and write two papers on the assigned readings. The papers are 1200 words (4 pages, double spaced). I conduct a week-long writing workshop to help students prepare to write those papers.

Prerequisites and Special Comments
This course fulfills the following GE requirements:  1) “Historical Study,” 2) “Diversity: Global Studies”


HISTORY 2220 INTRODUCTION TO CHRISTIANITY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Ranging from Jesus to Joel Osteen, this course will study how in 2,000 years the messianic beliefs of a small group of Jews transformed into a worldwide religion of amazing diversity.  Our approach will be historical and contextual: how have Christian beliefs, practices, and institutions changed over time and adapted to different cultures?  We will consider major developments in theology (from the Council of Nicaea, to medieval scholasticism, to liberation theology), spirituality (from monasticism, to mysticism, to Pentecostalism), modes of authority (from apostles, to bishops, to televangelists), and social structures (from house assemblies, to an imperial church, to base communities).  Although we will focus on developments in the Mediterranean, Europe, and North America, we will not completely neglect Christianity in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. We will learn that “Christianity” has never been a single monolithic entity, but rather an astonishing collection of individuals and groups creating new and diverse ways of living as followers of Christ.  Lectures on key themes will be supplemented by recitation sections focused on primary sources.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:40-1:35       MW                             Brakke, D.
11:30; 1:50; 3:00 Friday                     (recitations)
*Students must choose one of the recitations on Friday

Assigned Readings (tentative):
John W. Coakley and Andrea Sterk, Readings in World Christian History, Vol. 1: Earliest Christianity to 1453
Peter Feldmeier, The Christian Tradition: A Historical & Theological Introduction
William C. Placher, Readings in the History of Christian Theology, Vol. 2: From the Reformation to the Present (revised edition)

Assignments:
Two hourly tests, two short papers, recitation participation, and a final exam.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Global, pre-1750 for history majors or can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.                                                                                                                                           


HISTORY 2251 EMPIRES & NATIONS IN EASTERN EUROPE, 1500 - PRESENT

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course provides a survey of the history of Eastern Europe from the fifteenth century until the present. We will cover both the Balkans and East-Central Europe, analyzing the larger historical trends in the territories of today’s Greece, Bulgaria, the former Yugoslavia, Albania, Romania, Hungary, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, and Poland. The course is structured around three topics: the imperial expansion of and encounter between the Ottoman, Habsburg and Russian Empires as well as Poland-Lithuania in the early modern period; the creation and evolution of the modern nation-states in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries; and the multiple transitions of Eastern Europe from nation-states to the Soviet bloc to the European Union in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. The purpose is to provide an overview of the area and its peoples and to engage the concepts of empire-, state-, and nation-building in comparative perspective.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:35-10:55       WF                              Dragostinova, Theodora

Assigned Readings (tentative):
Lonnie Johnson, Central Europe: Enemies, Neighbors, Friends, New York: Oxford University Press, 2010.
Mark Mazower, The Balkans: A Short History (Modern Library,2002).
The Turkish Letters of Ogier Ghiselin de Busbecq, Imperial Ambassador at Constantinople, 1554-1562, trans. Edward Forster (Louisiana State University Press, 2005).
Ivo Andric, The Bridge On the Drina, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1977.

Assignments:
Midterm exam 15%
Final exam 25%
One 4-page paper 20%
Weekly discussion points 30%
Attendance 10%

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This class fulfills Group Europe and pre/post-1750 for the history major or can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.                                                                                                                                               


HISTORY 2275 CHILDREN & CHILDHOOD IN THE WESTERN WORLD

3 Cr. Hrs.

While the process of developing from infancy through childhood into adult life is a biological phenomenon, the specific ways in which children have been treated and understood vary enormously across time and place.  In this class we will explore the history of children in the Western World from Antiquity to the present.  How has the role of children in Western culture changed across the centuries?  Have relationships between parents and children changed?  How has the understanding and treatment of children changed?  Ultimately, we will seek to define both changes and continuities in the lives of children in the Western world.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
3:00-5:05         TR                             Soland, Birgitte
This is a hybrid course (taught 50% in class and 50% online).

Assigned Readings: Readings will consist of a mixture of primary and secondary sources.  All readings will be available on Carmen.

Assignments: 2 short papers (3-5 pages) plus final paper (15 Pages)

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group Europe, pre or post-1750 for the history major or can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.                                


HISTORY 2475 THE HOLOCAUST

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will examine the state-sponsored murder of millions of Jews and non-Jews by the Nazis and their collaborators during World War II.  Together we will trace the interrelated individuals, institutions, historical events, and ideologies that allowed for the Holocaust to occur.

To understand the history of the Final Solution, we will begin our study with an analysis of historical factors that predated the Nazi rise to power. After we study the histories of antisemitism and early 20th century German, we will consider how the Nazis assumed and consolidated power during the early 1930s.  The next segment of the class, we will examine the crucial period of 1933-1938, paying close to attention to the erratic anti-Jewish policies of the era and the myriad of Jewish responses to them.  In the third portion of the course, we will explore the Final Solution itself.  Our third section of the course will be devoted to the study of perpetrators, bystanders, and victims during the Holocaust.  Finally, we will consider the Holocaust’s aftermath and legacy among Jews and non-Jews in Germany, Israel, and the United States.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:35-10:55       WF                              Judd, Robin    

Assigned Reading (tentative):
Doris Bergen, War and Genocide:  A Concise History of the Holocaust, Third Edition.
Christopher Browning, Ordinary Men, (sections only)
Marion Kaplan, Between Dignity and Despair (sections only)
Chil Rajchman, The Last Jew of Treblinka: A Memoir

Assignments: Weekly questions, 2 semester exams, final exam.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Europe, post-1750 for the history major or can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.                                                                                                                                               


HISTORY 2500 20TH CENTURY EUROPEAN INTERNATIONAL HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Examines international political, economic, and military relations from the origins of World War I through the breakup of the Soviet Union.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
TBD                 TBD                             Fenton, H.      

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This class fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for the history major or can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.   



HISTORY 3247 MAGIC & WITCHCRAFT

3 Cr. Hrs.
 
The purposes of this course are: to understand the role of magic and witchcraft in early modern society; to learn about early modern European history more generally; to consider what the implications of this history and mindset might be for our own day; and to practice the analytical and communication skills called for in working with both secondary and primary sources. 

Time                      Meeting Days                    Instructor
12:45-2:05            WF                                     Goldish, M.
 
Assigned Readings:
Brian P. Levack, The Witch Hunt in Early Modern Europe, 4th ed. (Routledge)
Keith Thomas, Religion and the Decline of Magic (Oxford and others; any edition)
The Trial of Tempel Anneke, ed., P.A. Morton, trans. B. Dähms (Univ. of Toronto Press)
Articles, documents and supplemental readings through our CARMEN website
 
Prerequisites and Special Comments

This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for the history major or can fulfill a GE requirement. This is a second session course.                                                                                                                                                     


HISTORY 3254 EUROPE SINCE 1950

3 Cr. Hrs.

This class examines the history of Europe, West and East, from 1950 the present by engaging several discreet themes. First, students will learn about the advent of the Cold War and the separation of Europe by an “Iron Curtain” by examining exchanges between East and West after World War II. Second, students will engage the overlapping histories of decolonization and the end of European empires to study European policies outside of Europe from the late 1940s on, complicating ideas of the Cold War as a bipolar conflict between east and west, solely. Third, students will examine demographic changes in Europe associated with the transformation of Europe into a continent of immigration and the arrival of postcolonial and other immigrants in the 1950s and 1960s to work on project of European reconstruction. Fourth, students will explore protest, counterculture, and everyday life in both western and eastern Europe, with a focus on youth movements in comparative perspective. Finally, students will study the history of European integration during and after the Cold war to understand the changing meanings of Europe in that context, as well. Throughout the class, we will pay attention to the contemporary relevance of historical events for Europe today, focusing on conflicting memories of genocide, reconstruction, democracy, and belonging throughout the continent.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:45-2:05       WF                              Dragostinova, Theodora

Assigned Readings:
Tony Judt, Postwar: A History of Europe since 1945 (New York; Penguin, 2006).
Excerpts from monographs, articles and primary sources will be made available on Carmen.

Assignments:
Three 4-page papers: 30%
Weekly discussion posts on assigned readings: 30%
Final research project: 30%
Attendance: 10%

Prerequisites and Special Comments
This course fulfills: Group Europe, post-1750 for history majors or can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.                                                                                                                                               


HISTORY 3260 MODERN BRITISH HISTORY, 1775-1920

3 Cr. Hrs.

This lecture course provides a survey of Britain and the British Empire, from the eighteenth to the early twentieth century.  It covers many dimensions of British history: political, economic, social, religious, medical, technological, and environmental, but its primary focus is social and economic and the bulk of the course covers the nineteenth century, when Britain was at its most economically and militarily powerful.  The central themes of the course are the development of commercial, industrial and urban society; the emergence of the British Empire; British global hegemony; the Irish famine and its aftermath; and the emergence of social and environmental problems which classical liberalism proved unable to resolve. The class explores a series of tensions, particularly those between economic freedom and social protection, which remain central to British (and American) politics.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:35-10:55       WF                              Otter, Chris

Prerequisites and Special Comments
This course fulfills: Group Europe, post-1750 for history majors or can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.                                                                                                                                               


HISTORY 3277 20th CENTURY EUROPEAN THOUGHT AND CULTURE

3 Cr. Hrs.

A survey of the most dynamic period in all of Western cultural history, roughly 1890-1940, which saw a spectrum of revolutionary developments: modern art (Pablo Picasso, Wassily Kandinsky); modern literature (James Joyce, Marcel Proust); relativity and quantum theory (Albert Einstein, Werner Heisenberg); modern music (Arnold Schoenberg, Igor Stavinsky), psychoanalysis (Sigmund Freud); and existential philosophy (Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir).  Smack in the middle was the hugely destructive First World War.

The first part centers on novellas by Joseph Conrad and Thomas Mann that foreshadow the decline of Western Civilization.  The second part covers Friedrich Nietzsche and the “death of God,” my book on the impact of the telephone, wireless, cinema, automobile, airplane on time and space; and Virginia Woolf’s challenge to men and women in her classic feminist manifesto, A Room of One’s Own.  The third part is divided between Freud’s efforts to diagnose and treat mental illness, Sartre’s analysis of what it means to be a human being, and De Beauvoir’s application of that philosophy to help explain why women in her time were “the second sex” and proposal of how to equalize and enhance the humanity of both genders.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
2:20-3:40         WF                              Kern, Stephen

Assigned Readings:
Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness
Thomas Mann, Death in Venice
Friedrich Nietzsche, Nietzsche and the Death of God, ed. by Peter Fritzsche
Stephen Kern, The Culture of Time & Space: 1880-1910
Sigmund Freud, Introductory Lectures on Psychoanalysis (selections)
Virginia Woolf, A Room of One’s Own
Jean-Paul Sartre, The Philosophy of Jean-Paul Sartre (selections)
James Joyce, Ulysses (selections)

Assignments: Students write three papers 4 pages based on the readings and class discussions.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This class fulfills Group Europe, post-1750 for the history major or can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.                                                                                                                                               


HISTORY 3282 HISTORY OF THE SOVIET UNION

3Cr. Hrs.

This course is a survey of the entire Soviet period, from the 1917 Revolution to the demise of the Soviet Union in 1991.  A central theme of this course is the unfulfilled promise of the Revolution and the genesis of the Stalinist dictatorship.  Topics include the Civil War, the New Economic Policy and problems of underdevelopment, collectivization and industrialization, Soviet culture, the delineation of gender roles, the Second World War and its legacy, the Cold War, de-Stalinization, nationality issues, the collapse of Communism, and prospects for Russian democracy.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:30     WF                              Hoffmann, David

Assigned Readings:
Each week there will be reading assignments from a variety of sources, including government documents, memoirs, and novels.  The total amount of reading for the course will be about ten books.

Assignments:
There will be a midterm exam, paper, and final exam.  In addition, students will have short weekly writing assignments on assigned readings.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group Europe, post-1750 for the history major or can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.


HISTORY 3525 19TH CENTURY EUROPEAN INTERNATIONAL HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will examine the political, economic, diplomatic and military relations between and among the Great Powers from the end of the Napoleonic Wars to the outbreak of the First World War.  Starting from the destruction of the eighteenth century “Old Regime” in the aftermath of the French Revolution, we will trace the development of the Great Power system within the context of the foundations of State power.  Over the course of the quarter, we will examine a number of broad topics, including:  (1) the diplomacy of the individual Great Powers; (2) the rise of non-European powers; (3) the military strategies of the Great Powers in peacetime and war; (4) the relationship between continental commitments and world power; (5) the significance of technological advance upon both warfare and the strategic balance; (6) and the relationship between economic stability and diplomacy in the international system.  We will end the quarter by exploring the collapse of the 19th century international system and the origins & outbreak of the First World War.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:30     TR                               Siegel, Jennifer

Assigned Readings: (tentative) - The reading list will include:
Nicolson, Harold.  The Congress of Vienna.
Taylor, A.J.P.  Bismarck.
Tolstoy, Lev.  Sebastopol Sketches.

Assignments:
Weekly readings and class discussions
Midterm and comprehensive final
Three map quizzes
One short analytical paper discussing a primary source. 

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Europe, post-1750 for history majors.                                                                                                                                               


                                                                                                                                               

JEWISH HISTORY

                                                                                                                                                    

HISTORY 2475 THE HOLOCAUST

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will examine the state-sponsored murder of millions of Jews and non-Jews by the Nazis and their collaborators during World War II.  Together we will trace the interrelated individuals, institutions, historical events, and ideologies that allowed the Holocaust to occur.

To understand the history of the Final Solution, we will begin our study with an analysis of historical factors that predated the Nazi rise to power. After we study the histories of antisemitism and early 20th century German, we will consider how the Nazis assumed and consolidated power during the early 1930s.  The next segment of the class, we will examine the crucial period of 1933-1938, paying close to attention to the erratic anti-Jewish policies of the era and the myriad of Jewish responses to them.  In the third portion of the course, we will explore the Final Solution itself.  Our third section of the course will be devoted to the study of perpetrators, bystanders, and victims during the Holocaust.  Finally, we will consider the Holocaust’s aftermath and legacy among Jews and non-Jews in Germany, Israel, and the United States.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:35-10:55       WF                              Judd, Robin    

Assigned Reading (tentative):
Doris Bergen, War and Genocide:  A Concise History of the Holocaust, Third Edition.
Christopher Browning, Ordinary Men, (sections only)
Marion Kaplan, Between Dignity and Despair (sections only)
Chil Rajchman, The Last Jew of Treblinka: A Memoir

Assignments: Weekly questions, 2 semester exams, final exam.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Europe, post-1750 for history majors or can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.                                                                                                                                               

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LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY

                                                                                                                                                    

HISTORY 2110 INTRODUCTION TO NATIVE AMERICAN PEOPLES FROM MESOAMERICA                 

3 Cr. Hrs.                                                                                                                                                                 

This course studies the diverse groups of indigenous peoples who have inhabited the territory of Mesoamerica (Mexico & Central America), from pre-colonial times through the present. Special attention is given to material, economic, and political culture, societal formations, and artistic, intellectual, and spiritual expressions. Transformation and continuity over time are focal points with particular emphasis on the impact of the European presence and the new challenges that modern life, the formation of nation states, and the current globalization processes have posed to this region’s peoples, and how they have coped with such forces.  Whenever possible, this course draws connections and comparisons to what became the U.S. Southwest from the ancient past to the present.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
3:55-5:15         MW                             Duenas, Alcira

Assigned Readings:
Popol Vuh. The Mayan Book of the Down of Life. Translated by Dennis Tedlock. (online)
Matthew Restall and Florine Asselbergs. Invading Guatemala. Spanish, Nahua, and Maya Accounts of the Conquest Wars. 2008
Miguel León-Portilla with a forthword by J. Klor de Alva. The Broken Spears. The Aztec Account of the Conquest of Mexico, 2009.
Additional articles and web sites posted in Carmen

Assignments:
Map Quiz: 5% Class Participation 15%; Comparative Paper: 25%; Mid Term: 20%; Final Exam: Mesoamerican Gallery Project (MGP) 15% + 6 Reading Quizzes: 20%, or 2.5% each.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
English 1110.01 or 1110.02.  This course fulfills Group Latin America, pre/post-1750 for history majors or can fulfill the historical study GE.                                                                                                                                               


                                                                                                                                               

MILITARY HISTORY

                                                                                                                                                           

HISTORY 2550 THE HISTORY OF WAR

3 Cr. Hrs.

The History of War examines the evolution of warfare and its impact on human civilization from antiquity to the present. Although this course deals broadly with global military developments, it places special emphasis on the European and American military heritage and the notion of a Western way of war. The course also examines the impact of societal, cultural, political, organizational, doctrinal, economic, and technological change on the conduct of war as represented in concepts such as the Military Revolution and revolutions in military affairs. The course will evaluate change and compare continuities in warfare over time. This course falls under the GE category of Historical Study and it additionally fulfills the GE Diversity: Global Studies requirement.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:45-2:05       TR                               Mansoor, Peter

Assigned Readings:
Victor Davis Hanson, Carnage and Culture: Landmark Battles in the Rise of Western Power (ISBN 978-0385720380)
John Lynn, Battle: A History of Combat and Culture (ISBN 978-0813333724)
Geoffrey Parker, ed., The Cambridge History of Warfare (ISBN 978-0521618953)

Assignments:
5-6-page review essay
Mid-term examination
Final examination

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for the history major, or it can fulfill the historical study GE.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     


HISTORY 3270 WORLD WAR I

3 Cr. Hrs.

The World War of 1914-1918 was the first of the man-made disasters of the 20th Century. A whole continent was plunged into a new world of mass mobilization, total warfare and violence – often directed expressly at the enemy’s civilian population.  Tracing the Great War from its origins in the summer of 1914 to its aftermath, this class illuminates the global nature of the conflict and explores a variety of topics such as combat experience and battlefield conditions, home front issues, diplomacy and peacemaking.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:35-10:55       TR                               Cabanes, Bruno

Assigned Readings:
Bruno Cabanes, August 1914. France, the Great War and a Month that Changed the World Forever (Yale University Press, 2016)
Michael Neiberg, Fighting the Great War. A Global History, (Harvard University Press, 2006)
Erich Maria Remarque, All Quiet on the Western Front (1929, Ballantine Books, reissue edition, 1987)

Assignments:
Midterm paper (20% of final grade), Quizzes (20%), Midterm exam (25%), Final exam (35%)

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Global, post -1750 for the history major or can fulfill the historical study GE.                                                                                                                                                           


HISTORY 3560 AMERICAN MILITARY HISTORY, 1607-1902

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course describes and analyzes the history of American military policy from the colonial period to the end of the Philippine War. It focuses on the creation of American military institutions, the genesis of policy-making and maintenance of civilian control over that process, the interrelationship between foreign and military policy, the conduct of war, and the influence of American society upon the armed forces as social institutions.

Students will achieve an understanding of the main developments in American military history, the ways in which these developments have reflected or shaped developments in general American history, and the main interpretations advanced by scholars who have studied this subject. They will also hone their skills at critical writing and analysis, and will gain greater insight into the way historians explore the human condition.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
2:20-3:40         TR                               Grimsley, Mark

Assigned Readings:
Allan R. Millett and Peter Maslowski, For the Common Defense: A Military History of the United States of America., Revised & Expanded Edition.
Earl J. Hess, The Rifle Musket in the Civil War.
James M. McPherson, For Cause and Comrades.
Steven E. Woodworth, Beneath a Northern Sky:  The Short History of the Gettysburg Campaign.

Assignments: (tentative)
First midterm examination (25 percent); Second midterm examination (35percent)
Final examination (40 percent).

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
Although there are no prerequisites, a solid grounding in U.S. History is very helpful.
This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for the History major or can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.
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THEMATIC COURSE OFFERINGS

                                                                                                                                                           

HISTORY 2701 HISTORY OF TECHNOLOGY

3 Cr. Hrs.

From fire, stone tools, the wheel and the stirrup and to drones, self-driving cars, social media and automation, human history is inexplicable without understanding technology. This course provides an introductory overview of the multiple ways in which technology has shaped human practices throughout history.

Time                 Meeting Days                Instructor
TBD                  TBD                              Chou, W.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills the Global, post-1750 category for the history major or can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.                                                                                                                                                 


HISTORY 2702 FOOD IN WORLD HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Food is implicated in all dimensions of human existence. It is a biological necessity, without which human beings slowly die. Control over food supplies is a basic function of all organized societies and polities. Shared food traditions and tastes shape cultural identities of particular groups. Human history can be told as a history of how food has been produced, distributed and consumed. This course offers a synoptic, global history of food. It begins with the history of fire and the Neolithic revolution (c.10,000 BCE) and the foundations of agriculture and ends with the recent wave of global “food crises” (late 1940s, early 1970s, early 2000s). In between, it explores the formation of food cultures in Europe, Asia and South America, and development of an integrated world food system from the sixteenth century. It examines the “nutrition transition” – the rise of a food complex built around animal proteins, dairy products, sugar and refined wheat – which began in the west in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries and is currently spreading across much of the rest of the world. It looks at the rise of the modern food industries, agribusiness, the green revolution, industrialized food production, fast food and the development of modern dietary anxieties and pathologies. It also examines the persistence of famines and global hunger over the past two centuries.

Time                 Meeting Days                Instructor
9:35-10:55         TR                                Otter, Chris

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills the Global, post-1750 category for the history major or can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.                                                                                                                                                    


HISTORY 2704 WATER: A HUMAN HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Throughout human history and across this very diverse planet, water defines every aspect of human life: from the molecular, biological, and ecological to the cultural, religious, economic, and political. We live on the “blue planet.” Our bodies are made up primarily of water. Without water, life as we understand it could not exist. Indeed, water stands at the foundation of most of what we do as humans: in irrigation and agriculture; waste and sanitation; drinking and disease; floods and droughts; fishing and other food supply; travel and discovery; scientific study; water pollution and conservation; dam building; in the setting of boundaries and borders; and wars and diplomacy. Water lies at the very heart of almost all world religions (albeit in very different ways). The control of water is at the foundation of the rise and fall of civilizations, with drought and flood perpetual challenges to human life.  Water serves as a source of power (mills, hydro-electric dams), and access to water often defines (or is defined by) social and political power hierarchies. Water plays an important symbolic role in the creation of works of literature, art, music, and architecture, and it serves as a source of human beauty and spiritual tranquility. Thus, to begin to understand ourselves as humans—our bodies, minds, and souls, past and present—we must contemplate our relationship to water.

At the same time, water resources—the need for clean and accessible water supplies for drinking, agriculture, and power production—will likely represent one of the most complicated dilemmas of the twenty-first century. The World Water Forum, for instance, reported recently that one in three people across the planet will not have sufficient access to safe water by 2030. As population grows, glaciers melt, hydrological systems change, and underground aquifers are depleted, many analysts now think that the world will fight over water more than any other resource in the coming decades. The moral and logistical question of how to ration water (who gets access and for what purposes) will be a foundational ethical question of the twenty-first century.

In this class, we will examine a selection of historical moments and themes to explore the relationship between people and water over time and place.  The format of the course will be a combination of lectures, in-class discussions, workshop activities, and presentation of your work to your fellow classmates. 

Time                 Meeting Days                Instructor
11:30-12:25       MW                              Breyfogle, Nick
10:20; 11:30      Friday   recitations
& 12:40           

Assigned Readings:
(This list is tentative and the specific books may change)
Richard White, The Organic Machine: The Remaking of the Columbia River
Graham Swift, Waterland
Mary Lynn Rampolla, A Pocket Guide to Writing in History (8th edition)

* A range of shorter readings available on Carmen

Assignments:
This course requires a few short essays, one take home mid-term exam, a take-home final exam, various other quizzes and brief writing assignments, and active and engaged in-class discussion and activities.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
Coreq or Prereq:  English 1110.xx

For Students Following the Semester Requirements:

This is a GE course.   This course fulfills the following GE requirements: 

  1. "Historical Study,"
  2. "Culture & Ideas or Historical Study,"
  3. Open Option and
  4. “Diversity-Global Studies”

History Minor:   History 2704 counts toward the history minor, which typically requires only four courses to complete and may overlap up to six hours with general education requirements. 

For History Majors:  this course fulfills the following Geographic, Chronological, and Thematic requirements: “Comparative/Transnational/Global” post-1750, ETS and PCS                                                                                                                                                         


HISTORY 2710 HISTORY OF THE CAR

3 Cr. Hrs.

The car has shaped the world we live in today. It is both obvious, as learning to drive is a sign of independence in modern society and car ownership is an often a major mark in one’s life, and less obvious, as ideas of capitalism, technology, and consumerism are inherently linked to its creation and expansion in modern society. This is true not only in the United States but all over the world. The car is often explicitly linked to ideas of modernity and development that have shaped people’s understanding of their nation. This course will examine the development and importance of the car in the 20th century, first in the United States and then examine how its global expansion has come to define global society today.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:35-10:55       WF                              Eaglin, Jennifer

Assigned Readings: (tentative)
Bernhard Rieger, The People’s Car: A Global History of the Volkswagen Beetle (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2013).
Joel Wolfe, Autos and Progress: The Brazilian Search for Modernity (New York: Oxford University Press, 2010).
Additional reading TBD.

Assignments: (tentative)
In-class assignments, two short papers (3-5 pages), a group project, and final paper.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fills the GE Historical Study requirement and fulfills the Global, post-1750 requirement for the history major.                                                                                                                                               


HISTORY 2800 INTRODUCTION TO THE DISCIPLINE OF HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will serve as an introduction to the field of history. How does one do history? This course will introduce students to four key aspects of the historical field: 1. Primary Research; 2. Historical Methodology; 3. Historical Analysis; and 4. Historical Writing. In the course of the semester, we will practice a series of fundamental skills like critical thinking, analytical reading, accurate research, public speaking, peer-editing, and effective writing that are all important to success in the historical field.

This course will focus broadly on environmental history in the 20th century. It will include numerous archival visits to guide students in the development of their own research projects.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:45-2:05       WF                              Eaglin, Jennifer

Assignments:
This class is a participation intensive seminar with multiple in-class writing activities.
Two short papers (3-5 pages)
Group writing assignment with class-presentation
Final prospectus and annotated bibliography (7-10 pages)

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course is required for all students declaring a Major in history, students must earn a “C” to have it count on the history major. It may not be used for the GEC/GE History Study requirement.                                                                                  


HISTORY 2800 INTRODUCTION TO THE DISCIPLINE OF HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will introduce students to historiography and historical methodology – that is, to different interpretations of history and to different methods of studying it.  Among the themes to be covered in the course are gender and history, historical commemorations, and cultural representations of historical events.  Topics will include student unrest in the 1960s, including the feminist movement, the civil rights movement, and the anti-war movement.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
On-line            On-line                        Hoffmann, David                                   

Assigned Readings:
Students will be required to read several articles or a book every week – the equivalent of roughly ten books during the semester.

Assignments:
Students will have weekly written assignments based on the course readings.  These assignments will amount to roughly 7 short papers. In addition, students will be required to participate regularly in online discussions.  They will also conduct historical research which will culminate in 3 longer papers or projects.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
The course is intended primarily for history majors and minors, though it is open to all students.  However, the course does not fulfill any GE requirements, so it should not be taken by students seeking to fulfill the GE historical studies requirement.                                                                                                                                                           


HISTORY 2800 INTRODUCTION TO THE DISCIPLINE OF HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course is designed to introduce undergraduate history majors to the discipline and some of the methods of history.  The successful completion of the course will result in your gaining firsthand knowledge of how historians work.  We will achieve this objective by examining and analyzing historical documents, by reading, studying, and dissecting (critiquing) published historical (and fictional) works, by learning the mechanics of historical production, and by writing historical essays.  

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:45-2:05       TR                               Shaw, Stephanie

The specific topic of this class is Nat Turner’s rebellion.   In 1831, Turner, a Southampton County Virginia slave, led a revolt designed to overthrow the institution of slavery.  The revolt has been reconstructed by historians, fictionalized by novelists, and even translated onto film.  Almost every generation recreates Turner anew.  We will look at available documents on this incident, the different interpretations of them, and draw our own intelligent conclusions about what definitely happened, what probably happened, and what we can never really know.  We will also try to account for the different views that exist and the conclusions that cannot be verified (and were probably false).

The point of these analyses is not simply to know all we can about Turner’s revolt, but to think about the discipline of history.  We will examine other primary documents from the period to aid us in this process as well.  We will read and write book reviews, review historical journals, and spend some time looking at new technologies and resources for conducting historical research.  We will also pay attention to problems and pitfalls of historical research and writing.  In the process, we will look at and think about “driving forces” of history, whether history is objective or subjective, and the role of the historian in history.  We will talk about “good” history and “bad” history, how to use sources, what “facts” are, and whether or not history can be scientific.  Altogether, our goal is to become better historians through critical reading and thoughtful analysis of original and interpreted sources.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course is required for all students declaring a Major in history, students must earn a “C” or higher to have it count on the history major. It may not be used for the GEC/GE Historical Study requirement.                                                               


HISTORY 2800 INTRODUCTION TO THE DISCIPLINE OF HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will introduce you to the methods and analytical approaches that historians use to understand the past.  Through our readings, written assignments, and class discussions, you will learn the skills necessary to succeed in the History major at OSU.  Unlike other courses in the department, we will not focus on one-time period or region, but will examine the methodologies and modes of analysis that are essential to historical thinking overall.

Our topics include: the use and selection of evidence, the interpretation of primary and secondary sources, the methods and ethics of historical reconstruction, and questions of objectivity, truth, and ethical judgment in historical writing.  We will also learn the skills and methods of writing historical essays, including selecting a topic, doing research, taking notes, developing an argument, and organizing evidence.  Throughout, we will pay attention to the broader questions underlying historical studies.  Why should we study history?  How is the present informed by the past?  How do societies use history?  Are those who ignore the past doomed to repeat it?

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:30     TR                               Sreenivas, Mytheli

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course is required for all students declaring a Major in history, students must earn a “C” or higher to have it count on the history major. It may not be used for the GEC/GE Historical Study requirement.

Please contact Professor Sreenivas (Sreenivas.2@osu.edu) if you have questions about readings and assignments.                                                                                                                                                           


HISTORY 2800H INTRODUCTION TO THE DISCIPLINE OF HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will introduce honors students planning to major in history to history as a discipline and a major.  The course is designed to give students practice in the analysis of historical sources and in developing logic and clarity in both written and oral assignments.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:45-2:05       WF                              Stebenne, David

Assigned Readings:
Josephine Tey, The Daughter of Time (1951)
James Romm, Herodotus (1998)
E. H. Carr, What is History? (1961)
David Cannadine, ed., What is History Now? (2002)
Elliott Gorn, Randy Roberts and Terry Bilhartz, Constructing the American Past, 7th ed., Vol. 1 (2011)
Sharlene Sayegh and Eric Altice, History and Theory (2014)

Assignments:
Discussion of the assigned reading; three chapter summaries (précis); book review and oral presentation of the results; journal analysis and oral presentation of the results; history based on primary documents and oral presentation of the results.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course is required for all honors students majoring in history and highly recommended for honors students seeking a minor in history. Other honors students interested in history for its own sake and wanting a better sense of the field are also welcome.                                                                                                                                                           


 

HISTORY 3620 LESBIAN, GAY, BISEXUAL & TRANSGENDER HISTORY IN THE U.S., 1940-2003

3 Cr. Hrs.               

This course offers an overview of LGBT culture and history in the United States from 1940 to the present. We will use a variety of historical and literary sources, including films and sound clips, to examine changes in lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered lives and experiences during the last half of the twentieth century. The course will encourage students to think about intersections of race, sexuality, and class, and how these categories have affected sexual minority communities. The course will also explore the impact that sexual minority communities have had on the law and culture in the United States since World War II.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
2:20-3:40         TR                               Rivers, Daniel

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the North America, post-1750 category for history majors or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.                                                                                                                                                           


HISTORY 3702 DIGITAL HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course is a survey of the ways digital technology is impacting history: from the collection and preservation of primary sources, to the analysis of those documents with the aid of algorithms, to the representation of the past through digital means.  What does it look like when we take our study of the past into the digital realm?  How has the availability of millions of digitized primary and secondary sources impacted our practices?  How has the digital medium altered how we represent the past?  How have data analytics tools helped historians to uncover new patterns in the past? 

This course assumes no prior technical or programming knowledge.  The course is meant to provide a basic grounding in the technological skills needed to present history in digital form. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:30        WF                              Staley, Dave

Assigned Readings:
Graham, Milligan and Weingart, Exploring Big Historical Data: The Historian’s Macroscope

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course is a GE Historical Study course.  This course fulfills group Global, post-1750 for the History major.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         


HISTORY 4010 READINGS IN MODERN U.S. HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This seminar will focus on how and why historians’ interpretations have changed over time and how we might judge conflicting interpretations.

Our subject will be the life and career of Theodore Roosevelt.  A larger-than-life personality, he wrote so much – letters, articles, books – that it’s a wonder he had time to breathe.  He filled every room during his lifetime, wishing to be “the corpse at every funeral, the bride at every wedding, and the baby at every christening,” according to his daughter, Alice, an attention hog herself.  And as an amateur naturalist, cowboy, historian, government official, war hero, President, and noisy ex-President, he left a trail that connects with major debates in U.S. history, including the meanings of Progressive-era reform, imperialism and the place of the U.S. in the world, race and racism, gender and masculinity, and westward expansion.

We will track conflicting and changing interpretations of TR’s life and times.  You will write a series of papers that deal with these debates.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:45-2:05       TR                               Baker, Paula

Assigned Readings:
Edmund Morris, The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt
John Morton Blum, The Republican Roosevelt
Patricia O’Toole, When Trumpets Call
Plus, additional readings available on Carmen

Assignments:
4 papers plus short reaction essays and short in-class essays.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the reading seminar requirement toward a history major for semester students; this fulfills the 598 seminar requirement for quarter students. This course is only open to junior and senior history majors.                                 


HISTORY 4080 READINGS IN AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Topic: Non-Plantation Slavery during the Antebellum Era

 

It is probably the case that when most people think about antebellum slavery, the image of a plantation comes to mind.  It is not an illogical image given the critical participation of slaves in the production of American agricultural products, especially cotton, tobatto, rice, corn, wheat, indigo, hemp, and sugar.  Directly and indirectly, agricultural slave labor generated a substantial (often the largest) portion of wealth in nineteenth century America, but this course take a different tack.  It looks at slavery in non-plantation/agricultural contexts and the slave experience beyond the plantation.  These individuals worked in cities, in mines, in factories, on rivers and in homes.  And they came in contact with urban environments in diverse ways, beyond their efforts to earn a wage.  Thus, the focus here is urban, industrial and commercial slavery.  In particular, we will pay especial attention to the diverse ways historians have discussed these slaves, their lives, and their labors, and how these discussions have changed over the last hundred years.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:45-3:30       Wednesday                 Shaw, Stephanie

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the reading seminar requirement toward a history major for semester students; this fulfills the 598 seminar requirement for quarter students. This course is only open to junior and senior history majors. 
                                                                                                                                                                               


HISTORY 4575 RESEARCH SEMINAR IN MILITARY HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

The First World War

This course is a research seminar that explores and analyzes the history of World War I. Students will read and discuss in class several books, articles and documents related especially to the military, social,  cultural and gendered aspects of the conflict. A research paper, based on significant primary sources, will be the core requirement of the course.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
2:15-5:00         Monday                       Cabanes, Bruno

Assigned Readings:

+ Bruno Cabanes, August 1914. France, the Great War and a Month that Changed the World Forever (Yale University Press, 2016)
 
+ Martha Hanna, Your Death Would be Mine (Harvard University Press, 2006)
 
+ Jennifer Keene, Doughboys. The Great War and the Remaking of America, (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2003)
 
+ Jay Winter, Sites of Memory, Sites of Mourning (Cambridge University Press, 1998)
 

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the seminar requirement toward a history major.  It is a capstone course in historical analysis and writing for senior history majors.   It assumes a basic familiarity with the relevant background at the survey level (e.g. History 2002) and preferably higher-level American history courses.                                                                                                                                                    


HISTORY 4600 SEMINAR IN WOMEN’S HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

New Perspectives on European Women’s History, 1750-1950

This reading seminar focuses on Modern European Women’s history century, exploring the ways in which gender has structured and circumscribed women’s lives from the mid-18th through the mid-20th century. We will begin by examining the impact of political, economic and ideological changes in the 18th century. Subsequently, we will explore gender arrangements in the 19th century, focusing on the lives and experiences of women from a broad range of national, ethnic and class backgrounds. We will also study the rise of women's movements in the second half of the 19th century and their impact on women's legal and political status. Finally, we will examine the role of women and gender in 20th century warfare.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
2:15-5:00         Tuesday                      Soland, Birgitte

Assignments:
Class meetings will be devoted to discussion of writings by historians.  Students should expect approximately 100-150 pages of reading per week.  In addition, each student must prepare a research paper (20-25 pages), which will be due at the end of the semester.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the reading seminar requirement toward a history major for semester students; this fulfills the 598 seminar requirement for quarter students. This course is only open to junior and senior history majors. 


HISTORY 4650 SEMINAR IN WORLD HISTORY   

European Encounters with the Wider World, 1450-1750
 
We will examine original documents as well as articles and books (all in English) about the encounters between the Europeans and the rest of the world from the perspective of both sides: Hernán Cortés and the Aztecs; Vasco da Gama and the seafarers of Malabar; Oda Nobunaga and the Jesuits in Japan; and so on. By comparing contradictory (and often incompatible) accounts of the same events, we will gain a better understanding of both the process of European expansion and the strengths (and limitations) of historical sources
 
Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
5:30-8:25 PM   W                                Parker, Geoffrey

Assigned Readings
1. S. B. Schwartz, ed., Implicit Understandings. Observing, Reporting and Reflecting on the Encounters between Europeans and Other Peoples in the Early Modern Era (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994), chapters assigned week by week
2. Course pack of sources assigned week by week: 
 
Assignments:
1. Two pages of commentary and questions concerning the readings for five of the meetings: 10 pages: 30% of the total grade. 
2. A 20-page paper presenting “symmetrical” documents that examines an encounter between Europeans and “others” between 1400 and 1750 not covered in the coursework.  The topic will be chosen in consultation with the instructor: 40% of the total grade.
3. Attendance at and participation in all weekly meetings of the class: 30% of the total grade.
 
Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the readings seminar requirement for History Majors.
                       

HISTORY 4700 READING SEMINAR IN ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

“Water in Human History”

This course explores the place of water in human history.   Water defines human life, from the molecular to the cultural and political.   We live on the Blue Planet.   Our bodies are made up primarily of water—we are in essence wandering sacks of water.   Without water, life as we understand it would simply cease to exist.   Yet water resources—the need for clean and accessible water supplies for drinking, agriculture, and power production—will likely represent one of the most complicated dilemmas of the twenty-first century.  The World Water Forum, for instance, reported recently that one in three people across the planet will not have sufficient access to safe water by 2025.  Many analysts now think that the world will fight over water more than any other resource in the coming decades.  In this seminar, we will examine a selection of historical moments and themes to explore the relationship between people and water over time and place.  The course will examine such historical topics as:   Water as sacred substance; water as power; the politics of water; irrigation and agriculture; water for waste and sanitation; drinking water and disease; floods and droughts; fishing; travel and discovery; scientific study of water; water pollution and conservation; dam building; and water wars and diplomacy.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:45-3:30       Tuesday                      Breyfogle, Nicholas

Assigned Readings: (This list is a very tentative and the specific books may change)

Richard White, The Organic Machine: The Remaking of the Columbia River
Paolo Squatriti, Water and Society in Early Medieval Italy, AD 400-1000
David Blackbourn, The Conquest of Nature: Water, Landscape, and the Making of Modern Germany
David Pietz, The Yellow River: The Problem of Water in Modern China
Marc Reisner, Cadillac Desert: The American West and its Disappearing Water
Brian Fagan, Elixir: A History of Water and Humankind
Michael Cathcart, The Water Dreamers: The Remarkable History of our Dry Continent
Jean-Pierre Goubert, The Conquest of Water: The Advent of Health in the Industrial Age
David Biggs, Quagmire: Nation-Building and Nature in the Mekong Delta
Mark Carey, In the Shadow of Melting Glaciers: Climate Change and Andean Society
Heather Hoag, Developing the Rivers of East and West Africa: An Environmental History

Assignments:
Grades will be determined based on 1) active class participation, informed in-class discussion of weekly readings, and regular attendance, 2) an in-class presentation; 3) short, weekly written comments on readings; and 4) a final paper on a topic of water history chosen by the student in consultation with the instructor (as part of writing the final paper, students will be asked to submit a bibliography, outline, and rough draft of the paper at different points during the quarter as preparation for the final project. Students will also take part in several peer writing workshops)

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course is designed for junior or senior History majors and fulfills the “Readings Seminar” requirement for the degree in History for Majors that began OSU in the semester system.  It fulfills the 598-seminar requirement for history majors that began OSU in quarters.                                                                                                                                                           


HISTORY 4705 RESEARCH SEMINAR IN ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Students in this course get their hands dirty, digging deep into the past to examine how American businesses have reshaped our natural environment, and, in turn, how natural forces (tornadoes, earthquakes, etc.) have shaped the course of corporate history. Students will learn about the fields of environmental history and business history and complete a research paper (approximately 15-20 pages in length) that examines the relationship between corporations and the natural world.

Throughout the seminar, we will read books by environmental historians and journalists that have investigated some of the biggest businesses the world has ever seen. We will go bananas, learning about the history of Chiquita and the yellow fruit that now colonizes grocery stores. You will read about the astounding story of a Ford factory hidden in a forgotten jungle city.  And you’ll tackle a book that examines the hidden history of the tomato industry. It is going to be a wild journey that takes us to the far corners of the world and back.

The possibilities for research projects are endless. Walmart, McDonalds, Apple . . . the world is biggest brands are all fair game. Come ready to investigate the products and companies that shape the world you know.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
2:15-5:00         Monday                       Elmore, Bart

Assigned Readings:
John Soluri, Banana Cultures: Agriculture, Consumption, and Environmental Change in Honduras and the United States (University of Texas Press, 2009).
Ellen Spears, Baptized in PCBs: Race Pollution and Justice in an All-American Town (UNC Press, 2014).
Greg Grandin, Fordlandia: The Rise and Fall of Henry Ford’s Forgotten Jungle City (Henry Holt and Co., 2010)
Bartow J. Elmore, Citizen Coke: The Making of Coca-Cola Capitalism (W. W. Norton, 2016)
Barry Estabrook, Tomatoland: How Modern Industrial Agriculture Destroyed Our Most Alluring Fruit (Andrews McMeel Publishing, 2012).
Jonathan Joseph Wlasiuk, Refining Nature: Standard Oil and the Limits of Efficiency (Case Western Reserve University, 2011) (dissertation).
Mary Lynn Rampolla, A Pocket Guide to Writing in History (Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2015).

Assignments:
Students will have two major assignments throughout the semester:
First, they will learn how to write an opinion piece (op-ed) for a newspaper, drawing on research they complete for their project. Students can choose to submit their op-ed to a paper of their choosing upon completion.
Second, students will complete a major research paper (15-20 pages in length) that examines the environmental history of one a major corporation.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course is designed for junior or senior History majors and fulfills one of the requirements for the degree in History.

  • For students majoring in history, this course fulfills the requirement for a “Research Seminar.” The course also fulfills the following categories:   post-1750, “Comparative/ global history,” and ETS.
    • This course also fulfills the requirements of the History minor.
  • For quarter students majoring in history, this course fulfills the one requirement for a senior seminar (formerly 598).   

HISTORY 4795 RESEARCH SEMINAR SCIENCE & SOCIETY IN EARLY MODERN EUROPE   

3 Cr. Hrs.

The scientific revolution of the 16th and 17th centuries changed the world forever. It was also deeply connected with changes in culture, religion, politics, philosophy, and economics, among other areas. In this course, we will read primary and secondary sources about the interrelationship between science and European society during this formative era. Each student will also write a research paper in an area of interest to her or him, which relates to this topic. No background in science is necessary for this course.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:35-10:55       WF                              Goldish, Matt                                                                                                                                                

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WOMEN'S HISTORY

 

HISTORY 2610H INTRODUCTION TO WOMEN & GENDER IN THE U.S.

3 Cr. Hrs.

This honors course surveys the history of women and gender in the United States from pre-European settlement to the present.  The course will examine the experiences of Native, European, African, Mexican, and Asian American women within the contexts of historical change in the U.S.  It will focus on changes in women’s work and the sexual division of labor; in relationships between gender, politics, and the state; in educational and professional opportunities for women; and in women’s family roles and sexuality.  A major goal of the course is to present women’s history both as an integral part of U.S. history and as a unique subject of historical investigation.  Students will learn to think critically about historical arguments as well as to understand the difference that gender makes in history and the way that gender interacts with class, race, ethnicity, and sexuality.  In addition to examining a variety of primary sources including diary excerpts, letters, memoirs, newspaper articles, laws, speeches, and oral histories, we will study recent historical interpretations in essays, historical monographs, biographies, and documentaries.  The class will combine lectures, discussion, films, visuals, and music.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:30     TR                               Flores, J.

Assigned Readings:
Linda K. Kerber, Jane Sherron De Hart, Cornelia Hughes Dayton, and Judy Tzu-Chun Wu, eds., Women’s America: Refocusing the Past, 8th edition (Oxford University Press, 2016), $48.49. (WA)
Harriet Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (Dover Thrift Edition, 2001), $3.33.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for history majors or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.                                                                                                                                                    


HISTORY 3612 ASIAN AMERICAN WOMEN: RACE, SEX AND REPRESENTATIONS

3 Cr. Hrs.

Examines the experiences and cultural representations of Asian American women for insight into race, gender, sexuality, and citizenship in U.S. society.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:30     TR                               Parrenas, J.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for history majors or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.
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WORLD HISTORY

                                                                                                                                                    

HISTORY 1681 WORLD HISTORY TO 1500

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course examines the major issues that have shaped the human experience from the beginnings of human civilization (ca. 3500 B.C.E.) to ca. 1500 C.E., when the European voyages of exploration were beginning to tie the world together more tightly than ever before in a new pattern of global interrelatedness.  Before 1500, societies in different parts of the world had far less contact with each other.  In particular, Afro-Eurasia and the Americas remained almost entirely cut off from each other.  For this reason, the main emphasis of History 1681 will be the comparative study of civilizations.  Within that context, religions (belief systems), trade, and technology will be emphasized as factors that differentiated civilizations while also linking different civilizations at regional and hemispheric, if not yet global, levels.

Time               Meeting Days             Instructor
8:00-9:20        TR                              Hathaway, Jane

Assigned Readings:
Richard W. Bulliet, et al., The Earth and Its Peoples:  A Global History, vol. 1,76th ed.
Robert van Gulik, The Lacquer Screen:  A Judge Dee Mystery

Assignments:
“past in the present” paragraph, in-class midterm and final, a paper related to The Lacquer Screen.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
English 1110.xx concurrent or previous; not open to students with credit for History 181 or 2641. This course meets GE Historical survey; Global diversity. This course also fulfills one of the prerequisites for students applying to OSU’s Master’s degree in Education for social studies licensure.                                                                                                                                                     


HISTORY 2231 THE CRUSADES

3 Cr. Hrs.

Examines the various European crusades – in the Holy Land, Spain, Eastern Europe, and southern France, from their origins to the late 15th century.

Time               Meeting Days             Instructor
online              on-line                         Douglas, Sarah

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for the history major or can fulfill the historical study GE


HISTORY 2650 THE WORLD SINCE 1914

3 Cr. Hrs.

The World since 1914 is a course on global history. We will focus on the central themes of global history in the modern world, such as globalization, the rise of mass society, and identity and difference, as well as major events, such as the World Wars, the Great Depression, the Cold War, and decolonization. We will also look at major issues in the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, such as food, health, energy, economic development, and the environment. Much of our class will involve discussion of primary documents and of competing theories about the causes of historical change. But the ultimate goal of the course is civic: to help us understand better the world and its problems, and to think about how we might address those problems better than people have in the past.

Time               Meetings Days             Instructor
11:30-12:25    MW                              Rivers, Daniel
10:20; 11:30   Friday (recitations)
1:50

Assigned Readings: (tentative)
We will read two books, a number of on-line documents, and selections from competing historical interpretations of the past. The following books will be required:
Carter Vaughn Findley and John Alexander Murray Rothney, Twentieth-Century World (7th edition). Wadsworth, 2011. ISBN 13: 978-0-547-21850-2. Paperback.
James H. Overfield, Sources of Twentieth Century Global History. Wadsworth, 2002. ISBN 13: 978-0-395-90407-7. Paperback.

Assignments (tentative)
Quizzes:  There will be five quizzes on the readings in the course.  The quizzes will ask you to report fully and accurately on the content of readings in the course.
Midterm and final examinations:  There will be a midterm examination and a final examination.  The midterm will ask you to write one comprehensive one-hour essay, the final two.
Essay:  You will be asked to write an essay (5 or 6 pages in length) on an aspect of your family’s history over the past 100 years. Each family history should reflect on a major problem in global history.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for the history major or can fulfill the historical study GE.                                                                                                                                                 

 

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To find course availability and times, please visit the Ohio State Course Catalog and Master Schedule.