Autumn 2019 Undergraduate Courses

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AFRICAN HISTORY

                                                                                                                                                    

HISTORY 2302 HISTORY OF MODERN AFRICA, 1800-1960

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course examines major political, social, and economic developments in Africa from 1800 to 1960.  This was one of the most pivotal periods in the history of Africa for it witnessed European colonization of the continent as well as the rise of African nationalism and the end of colonial rule.  The course will begin with a discussion of the conditions in Africa during the nineteenth century and proceeds to examine European colonial conquest and African response, colonial economic and social policies, the transformation of African societies under colonial rule, African nationalism and decolonization, and the legacy of European colonial rule in Africa.  In addition to regular lectures and discussion sections, these topics will be illuminated by films and other audiovisual materials

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:35     TR                               Sikainga, Ahmad

Assigned Readings:
Robert Harms, Africa in Global History, 2018.
Ada Boahen, African Perspectives on European Colonialism
Dennis Laumann, Colonial Africa: 1884-1994, 1st edition

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Africa, post-1750 for the history major or can fulfill a GE requirement.                                                                                                                                               


HISTORY 3304 HISTORY OF ISLAM IN AFRICA

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course explores the development and expansion of Islam in Africa from about the 8th century CE to the present.  It will address historical contingencies that account for Islam's local receptivity as well as its dynamic interactions with local cultures, politics, traditional religions, Christianity and European colonialism.  While the Islamization of Africa is important for understanding African history, the Africanization of Islam is equally important. Consequently, we will seek to understand the dialectical relationship between Islam and African religious and cultural expressions, especially how Islam transformed and was transformed by indigenous religious knowledge, cultures and polity. We will further analyze how African Muslims reconstructed and asserted their religious identities by localizing Islamic intellectual traditions, healing practices, music, arts, cultural norms and formal and informal religious festivals.  We will also examine current issues in contemporary African Muslim societies such as internal debates about spiritual purity such as between members of Sufi brotherhoods and their opponents, the Salafi, the complex relationship between Islam and the secular state, Islam and socio-economic developments, and Muslims engagements with people of other faiths. Rather than homogenizing Islam in Africa, we will explore diverse religious practices across time and space even as we pay attention to common denominators and patterns. By the end of the semester, students should be able to appreciate Islam’s common framework as well as its diversity and dynamics within that larger framework. In particular, students should be able to explain the nuances of religious affiliations, cooperation and conflicts, and to understand the difference between religious politics and faith. Graded assignments will include a midterm exam, quizzes, discussions and a final paper.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
On-line            On-line                        Kobo, Ousman

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Africa, pre-1750 for history majors or a GE requirement.                                                                                                                                                           


HISTORY 3307 AFRICAN HEALTH & HEALING

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course explores approaches to health and healing in sub-Saharan Africa over the last 150 years.  By using a historical perspective on health and healing, we see why specific diseases emerge, why they persist, and what their consequences are for African societies.  Diseases we will consider include cholera, sleeping sickness, malaria, tuberculosis, and HIV/AIDS, among others.  The course is also interested in African experiences of being unwell.

While students will gain some biological or technological understanding of diseases and causes of illness, the course focuses on the wider social or economic consequences that promote disease and illness.  By investigating illness, we can consider the ways that different governments (colonial and post-colonial) have attempted to control disease and control the people disease affected; the rise and elaboration of tropical medicine as a field; and the impact of colonial and post-colonial policy on land use, ecology, and human settlement.  In addition, by thinking about health and what makes one healthy, we can find insights into societal values, and look at the overlapping and contradictory therapeutic traditions (grounded in both popular and biomedical treatments) that African people have used to regain health.

This course is an ideal course for students who have an interest in Africa, medicine, public health, colonialism, or post-colonial states.  All students will develop and propose their own research project in the form of a Fulbright grant.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:35-10:55       TR                               McDow, D.

Assigned Readings:
Readings will include historical primary sources, journal articles, and at least two books.
Adam Ashforth, Madumo: A Man Bewitched (2000)
Julie Livingston, Improvising Medicine: An African Oncology Ward in an Emerging Cancer Epidemic (2012)

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Africa, pre & post-1750 for history majors.                                                                                                                                                         


HISTORY 3312 AFRICA & WWII

3 Cr. Hrs.

The Second World War was pivotal event that transformed and shaped the world as we know it today. The war was fought in different regions and led to unprecedented mobilization of human and natural resources from across the globe, including the continent of Africa. In addition to being a major theatre of military operations, Africa provided vital human and natural resources to the war efforts. This course will shed light on the role of Africans as soldiers and producers, as well as the effects of the war on class, race, and gender relations within the continent. It will also illustrate the importance of the war in provoking crises in colonial empires and transforming the nature of political mobilization across the African continent.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:45-2:05       TR                               Sikainga, Ahmad

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Africa, post-1750 for history majors or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.                                                                                                                                                          


HISTORY 3314 FROM RUBBER TO COLTAN: VIOLENCE & EXPLOITATION IN CENTRAL AFRICA

3 Cr. Hrs.                    

What does your cellphone have to do with conflict central Africa? And what did the rubber boom of the late 19th century have to do with colonial violence in the same region? And how are these related? This course will help you understand how the past has shaped the present in central Africa, and how global economic systems are connected to localized violence.

The Great Lakes region in Central Africa is home to some of the world’s most prized economic resources. Based on an economy ravaged by the slave trade, a 19th century colonial extractive system emerged that focused first on ivory, later on rubber, and expanded in the 20th century to include diamonds, copper, gold, uranium, and lately coltan, crucial for the development of cellphone and computer technology. After a tumultuous decolonization, the region became home to some of the more violent conflicts of the past decades, including the Rwanda Genocide and the ongoing conflict in Eastern Congo.

This course will explore how the histories of economic exploitation, political authoritarianism, and the supposedly ethnic conflict in this region are intertwined, and how seemingly local conflicts have global roots. The first two modules of this course focus on the colonial history of the area, which was colonized in the late 19th century by the Belgian king Leopold II (Congo), Germany (Rwanda, Burundi, Tanzania) and the UK (Uganda). We will investigate how economic exploitation took shape during the colonial era, how local people experienced colonialism, and how colonialism shaped ethnic conflicts and political systems.

The second part of the course will focus on the post-colonial history of the region, starting with the reign of the military dictator Mobutu and the continued economic exploitation of the Congo, to the Rwanda genocide, the UN missions in the region, the Great War of Africa, and the continuing conflicts in eastern Congo. We will explore the role of conflict minerals, international media reporting on the conflict (particularly on the violence against women), and the role of guerrilla groups such as M23 and the Kony soldiers in the conflict.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
3:55-5:15         TR                               Van Beurden, Sara

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Africa, post-1750 for history majors or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement and global diversity.

Please Note: History 3314 is a new course which may not appear in the master schedule for autumn 2019, we hope it will be approved soon. 

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AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY

                                                                                                                                                           

HISTORY 3083 CIVIL RIGHTS AND BLACK POWER MOVEMENTS

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course examines the Civil Rights/Black Power Movement.  It beings by looking at Black activism and Black life at the start of the 20th century.  It continues by examining the development and impact of the mass mobilization efforts of the 1950s and 1960s from the Montgomery bus boycott and the student sit-ins, to the Freedom Rides and the March on Washington. At the same time, it scrutinizes the grassroots organizing campaigns led by the young people of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC).  This course concludes by looking at civil rights activism outside the South, evaluating the impact of civil rights legislation, and analyzing the ideological and tactical transition to Black Power.  This course employs a grassroots, bottom-up approach to understanding the black freedom struggle.  It takes seriously the notion that the driving force behind the movement was every day, ordinary, Black folk, and the skilled African American activists who helped them organize and mobilize.  The goal of this course is to familiarize students with the people (famous, infamous, and forgotten), places, and events of the most significant American social movement of the 20th century.  In addition, and arguably most importantly, this course aims to show the process by which seemingly powerless African Americans organized to transform the society in which they lived, and the way white Americans, particularly in the South, responded, i.e. their attempts to preserve the status quo.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:45-2:05       TR                               Jeffries, Hasan

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This is a reading intensive course. This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for history the history major or can fulfill a GE requirement.                                                                                                                                               


HISTORY 3085 AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY THROUGH CONTEMPORARY FILM

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course explores the African American experience through the lens of major motion pictures and documentary films.  The aim is for students to gain an understanding of how and why various historical topics have been depicted in movies, and to what extent the film version of particular events reflect reality. The purpose of the class is to use film to explore and historicize themes such as race and racism, slavery and freedom, oppression and resistance, and to reflect of the meaning of this themes (& films) in today’s society. The films will cover the entirety of the African American experience, from slavery through the present.

This course grapples with a central question: Given the fact that the majority of people in American society rely upon media and film to make sense of the past, to what extent do contemporary films do an adequate job of relaying the “truth” and accuracy of various historical subjects in the African American experience?  As a result, this class examines a variety of topics, including American slavery, African American culture, racial violence, Jim Crow, the civil rights and Black Power movements, and contemporary conflicts between the police and black communities, by examining film that treat these topics in conjunction with historical research.  We will also look closely at a select few recurring issues in films on the African American experience, such as the subordinate role of black women and the use of white characters as the primary narrative vehicles. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:30-2:15       Wednesday                 Jeffries, Hasan

Assigned Readings: In lieu of an assigned text  there will be articles, essays, and/or book chapters distributed online), there are weekly documentary films that students are to view prior to class via OSU’s Secured Media Site online streaming service.

Course Format: One film will be watched and discussed, in class, each week. Films will include: 12 Years A Slave; Glory; Mudbound; The Butler; and Fruitvale Station; Black Panther, among others.

Assignments: Three 7-10-page analytical essay assignments; Group media project.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.

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AMERICAN HISTORY

                                                                                                                                                    

HISTORY 1151 AMERICAN HISTORY TO 1877

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course provides a survey of American history from the Age of Encounter to the Reconstruction period.  It covers the social, economic, cultural, political, and diplomatic history of the American peoples. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
On-line            On-line                        Wood, J.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the historical study GE requirement.  Not open to students that have credit for History 151 or 2001.                                                                                                                                                  


HISTORY 1152 AMERICAN HISTORY 1877- PRESENT

3 Cr. Hrs.

From the aftermath of the Civil War to the 2000s, this course offers a sweeping survey of American history since 1865.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
On-line            On-line                        Vrevich, K.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the historical study GE requirement.  Not open to students that have credit for History 152 or 2002.                                                                                                                                                    


HISTORY 2002 MAKING AMERICA MODERN

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course explores the history of the United States from the 1870s to the present. Through a combination of primary and secondary documents and films, we will look at how the United States went from being an emerging industrial nation to a major global superpower, and how its citizens negotiated and influenced this transformation. The course begins and ends in periods of large-scale social protest, and the importance of mass social movements in the U.S., and their relationship to the state, will be a recurring theme in the class. Throughout the course we will ask how major economic, military, and political events, such as the Great Depression and the Second World War, affected people living in the U.S. differently based on categories of race, class, gender, and sexuality. Important topics will include: the relationship between industrial capitalism and the era of reform from 1890 to 1920; the ways in which U.S. foreign policy decisions were connected to domestic affairs; and the effects of the modern African American Freedom Struggle on social changes in the 1950s and 1960s.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
10:20-11:15     MW                             Rivers, Daniel
9:10; 10:20; 12:40   Friday (recitations)

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement. Not open to students with credit for History 152 or 1152. 



HISTORY 2010 HISTORY OF AMERICAN CAPITALISM

3 Cr. Hrs.

This 2000-level course offers an introduction to the history of American capitalism. We start with the theoretical foundations of American capitalism first penned in the eighteenth century (before the modern corporation first appeared on the American landscape), and trace the rise of various firms throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We will talk about businesses in divergent industries, from beverage companies such as Coca-Cola to computer powerhouses like Apple. The course concludes with reflections on the future sustainability of capitalist enterprises. Our goal is to identify key patterns in the development of American capitalism and to think about how economic changes transformed society, politics, and the environment in the United States.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:35-10:55       TR                               Elmore, Bart

Assigned Readings:
Louis Hyman and Ed Baptist, American Capitalism: A Reader (Simon and Schuster, 2014) (eBook available online for $9.99).
John Cassidy, Dot.Con: The Greatest Story Ever Sold (HarperCollins, 2002).
Naomi Klein, This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. The Climate (Simon & Schuster, 2014).

Assignments:
Rust Belt Corporate History Project (paper)
Midterm/Final

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.                                                                                                                                                  


HISTORY 2040 AGRICULTURE AND RURAL AMERICA

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course is a broad survey of the economic, social and political history of agriculture and the countryside in the United States from the pre-Columbian period to the present.  Especially in the years before the 1920s, the history of rural America is the history of America.  The rural majority produced the cash crops that floated the American economy.  The conflict over slavery – the Southern agricultural workforce and the plantation economy it supported – led to the civil war.  The 19th century revolutions in transportation and industrial expansion fueled westward agricultural expansion, increased productivity, and political turmoil over railroad rates, credit and currency.  More recently, agriculture has again been at the center of national debates about labor, food safety and the environment.  The history of agriculture is important in its own right, but it also introduces major themes and debates in American history.

Since this is a survey, we will cover a lot of ground but focus our attention on a number of key issues – labor, abundance, public policy, and technology – and trace their interactions and change over time.  We will analyze changes in both agriculture as an industry and in farm households and communities.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:45-2:05       TR                               Baker, Paula

Assigned Readings:
In addition to articles and primary source material posted on Carmen we will read one book:
David B. Danbom, Born in the Country: A History of Rural America (3rd edition)

Assignments:
4 quizzes, 2 in-class essays, final, and one short paper on documents of your choosing.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for history majors or can fulfill a GE requirement.                                                                                                                                                   


HISTORY 2610H INTRODUCTION TO WOMEN & GENDER IN THE U.S.

3 Cr. Hrs.

This honors course surveys the history of women and gender in the United States. The course will examine the experiences of Native, European, African, Mexican, and Asian American women within the contexts of historical change in the U.S. 

A major goal of the course is to present women's history both as an integral part of U.S. history and as a unique subject of historical investigation. What can be learned about other areas of American history—immigration, citizenship, racialization, formal politics—by examining women and gender? How does an examination of gender and women in history alter the historical questions we ask? Students will learn to think critically about historical arguments as well as to understand the difference that gender makes in history and the way that gender interacts with class, race, ethnicity, and sexuality.

In particular, the course aims to enlighten students on three major areas of women’s/gender history:

  • Sexuality and ideals of “womanhood”: How, when, and why did race- and class-specific ideals of womanhood change?
  • Activism, legal reform and politics: How, when, and why did American women gain full citizenship? How did different groups of women participate in and shape U.S. politics before and after suffrage?
  • Gendered archives: how do we access women’s history? How do we recreate the silenced perspective of certain women throughout history? What perspectives can different sources offer us?

Students will gain hands-on experience visiting several different historical archives and museums on campus. Students will also do their own original historical research, utilizing a range of primary sources. We will practice a series of fundamental skills including critical thinking, analytical reading, accurate research, public speaking, and effective writing.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:30     TR                               Flores, Joan

Assigned Readings:
Linda K. Kerber, Jane Sherron De Hart, Cornelia Hughes Dayton & Judy Tzu-Chun Wu, eds., Women’s America: Refocusing the Past, 8th ed. (Oxford Univ Press, 2016), required

Assignments:
Primary source analysis, short essay, museum response, final visual project.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for history majors or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement and the GE social diversity requirement.                                                                                                                                     


HISTORY 3014 GILDED AGE TO PROGRESSIVE ERA, 1877-1920

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course examines American politics and society from the later years of Reconstruction until the U.S. entry in World War I.  This is period historians often overlook, one stuck between the drama of the Civil War and the more familiar developments of the 20th century.  Yet we should not.  In this period, important things seemed up for grabs, within the power of Americans to manage: how industry would be controlled, the character of race relations, the role of government in shaping society, public morals, the economy, and America's place in the world. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
On-line            on-line                         Wood, J.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement. Not open to students with credit for History 151 or 2001.


HISTORY 3015 FROM THE NEW ERA TO THE NEW FRONTIER: THE UNITED STATES 1921-1963

3 Cr. Hrs.                    

Examination of the major political, economic, social and cultural changes in the USA from the end of World War I through the early 1960’s.  Emphasis on economy and culture in the 1920’s, the Great Depression and New Deal reform in the 1930’s, World War II, the Cold War and the rise and decline of the 1950’s system.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:30     TR                               Stebenne, David

Assigned Readings:
Robert Lynd & Helen Merrill Lynd, Middletown: A Study in Modern American Culture, (1929) chaps. I-XII.
William Leuchtenburg, Franklin D. Roosevelt and the New Deal (1963), chaps. 3-13
John Hersey, Hiroshima (1985 ed.)
Melvyn P. Leffler, The Specter of Communism (1994), chaps. 1-4
Alan Ehrenhalt, The Lost City: Discovering the Forgotten Virtues of Community in the Chicago of the 1950’s (1995)
James Baldwin, The Fire Next Time (1992 ed.)

Assignments: A midterm, a final and a short (5-7 page) paper based on the assigned reading.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
History 1152 or H1152 strongly recommended.  Students planning to pursue a Master’s in Education should note that this course satisfies one of the course requirements in history. This course fulfills Group North America, post 1750 for history majors or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.                                                                                                                                               


HISTORY 3017 THE 1960S

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will examine that tumultuous period, which we know as “The Sixties.”  We will consider as broad themes the rise and fall of Cold War liberalism; the Black Freedom struggle and American race relations; the Vietnam War and American society; American culture in the Age of Aquarius; and, finally, the rise of contemporary conservatism and the so-called white backlash.

In the midst of these broad themes, we will have time to consider many other important ingredients of the period, including the radical student movement; the urban crisis; the technological-consumer society; the sexual revolutions; among many others. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:30-12:25     MWF                           Steigerwald, David

Assigned Readings: (Don’t purchase until confirmed)
Mark H. Lytle, America’s Uncivil Wars
Assorted Primary Source Readings

Assignments:
One large research/writing project on the topics provided.  Papers will require at least two additional books and suggested primary sources.
Six Carmen quizzes

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for the history major or can fulfill a GE requirement.                                                                                                                                             


HISTORY 3030 HISTORY OF OHIO

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will survey the economic, social, and political development of the geographic area that became Ohio from the Native American period to the present. We will explore three themes in particular:  the role of disruptive technology and creative destruction in shaping Ohio’s past; the critical junctures at which Ohio might have become something entirely different from what it became; Ohio’s connection to the wider world through geography, technology, demography, economics, and politics.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
On-line            on-line                         Coil, William R.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.                                                                                                                                                      


HISTORY 3040 THE AMERICAN CITY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Since World War II, suburban growth has dramatically reshaped the ways Americans have related to their government, the physical environment, and to one another.  In this era, many Americans have championed suburbs as important symbols of economic success, sites of marital bliss, and “safe” spaces to raise a family.  At the same time, many critics have derided them as places full of unhappy marriages and overly materialistic, conformity-driven people.  This class will explore the social, cultural, and political history of U.S. suburbs and cities since 1945, and it will pay particular attention to the ways in which Americans have made sense of suburbanization. Topics will include the debates over the government’s role in housing, racial segregation and the “urban crisis,” youth culture, the War on Drugs, gentrification, Wal-Mart and the “new economy,” immigrant suburbs, and the 2008 economic crash. 

This is an upper-level history class, and it will require a significant amount of reading and writing.  Students will be asked to read several scholarly histories of the suburbs; examine numerous primary documents, including films; write several take-home essays; and think critically about the ways in which Americans have thought about cities and suburbs since World War II.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
1:50-2:45         MWF                           Howard, Clay

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for history the major or can fulfill a GE requirement.                                                                                                                                                   


HISTORY 3080 HISTORY OF SLAVERY IN THE U.S.

3 Cr. Hrs.       

In this course we will discuss the history of slavery in North America from the colonial era to the Civil War.  We will include material on bondage in other societies, but the focus will be on African-American slavery in what is now the United States.  We will explore various aspects of the slave experience, such as work, religion, family life, resistance, and rebellion.  We will also discuss free blacks, people of mixed race, yeoman whites, and slave owners, as well as the significance of slavery as a culture, economic, and political issues.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:35-10:55       TR                               Cashin, Joan

Assignments: Students will read several monographs, write several short papers, and take one exam.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for history majors.                                                                                                                                                                          


HISTORY 3501 U.S. DIPLOMACY, 1920-PRESENT

3 Cr. Hrs.

Since 1920, the United States has played a dominant role in international affairs due to its massive economy, unrivaled military, and global cultural influence. Historians have often referred to this era as “the American century,” a term coined by Time Magazine publisher Henry Luce in February of 1941. However, Luce’s editorial was as much a call to action as it was an accurate description: as late as 1941, the nation was still debating its desired role in world affairs. Far from a dedicated superpower, the United States was and remains a country whose foreign relations are hotly contested. The nation has struggled to discern a consistent path between opposing tendencies of democracy, empire, isolationism, internationalism, national security, and the role of defense in daily life. At the same time, many countries have militantly resisted projections of American power.

In this course, we will explore a sampling of these contests and the sometimes contradictory foreign policies they produced. While focusing on the specific policy history of the United States, we will also assess the impact American actions have had across the globe, foreign responses to the United States, the changing contexts that transformed official thinking, and the decentralization of the international system. The course will ultimately seek to have you engage directly with the ways U.S. foreign policymaking has affected and responded to global and domestic events, and what this means for the future of American foreign affairs. 

Please note, this is an upper level history course and will require your active engagement with a larger amount of regular weekly reading and viewing assignments.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:30      WF                              Parrott, Joe

Assigned Readings:
2-3 books, which may include Promised Land, Crusader State (McDougall), Envisioning the Arab Future (Citino), Reclaiming American Virtue (Keys)
2-3 Films, which may include Dr. Strangelove (1964) and Red Dawn (1984)
Additional articles available through Carmen and Primary sources

Assignments: Active Participation/In-class assignments; 1 Response Paper; 1 Midterm
1 Final Paper

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 or it can fulfill the historical study GE. 

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ANCIENT HISTORY


HISTORY 2201 ANCIENT GREECE & ROME

3 Cr. Hrs.

This class is an introduction to the history of the Ancient Mediterranean Civilizations of Greece and Rome.  It provides a background of the chronological development of ancient Greek and Roman civilizations and then focuses on the broad issues of state-formation, politics, gender, warfare, tyranny, monotheism, and the environment over a period of some two thousand years.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
Online              online                           Vanderpuy, P.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.                                                                                                                                                   


HISTORY 2213 THE ANCIENT MEDITERRANEAN CITY

3 Cr. Hrs.

What was it like to live in ancient Rome, Athens, or Jerusalem?  Where did people shop, sleep, worship their gods, use the toilet, find clean water, settle a dispute, and enjoy entertainment?  And how did living in a major Egyptian metropolis, such as Alexandria, compare to life in a rural village, like Theadelphia?  In this course, we will examine the spaces and experiences of urban life in the ancient Mediterranean world.  Taking a wide sweep of history – from 500 BC to AD 500 – the class explores the changing history of urban life and space, from the heyday of Athenian democracy to the end of the Roman Empire.  In addition to appreciating the great achievements of ancient Mediterranean urbanism, the class will also consider how cities responded to environmental and man-made crises, such as earthquakes, fire, war, and economic downturns.  Students will explore the ancient Mediterranean city through a range of primary sources, including texts (in English translation) and archaeological remains. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:45-2:05       TR                               Sessa, Tina

Assignments: 3 midterms and a short research paper.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.                                                                                                                                                           


HISTORY 3210 HISTORY OF ARCHAIC GREECE

3 Cr. Hrs.

This is the first half of a two-course sequence that surveys the history of ancient Greece (the second half will be offered in spring semester). The course examines the formative period of Greek civilization, from the Neolithic era (ca. 7000-3000 BC) all the way down to the year 480 BC.  Our primary focus will be on the period's major political developments: the rise and mysterious demise of the Mycenaean kingdoms of the Late Bronze Age (ca. 1600-1100 BC); the subsequent emergence of small, village-based chiefdoms and, later, the first city-states in the Dark Age (ca. 100-700 BC); the creation of written laws, political institutions, and, ultimately, the world's first citizen-states in the Archaic Age (ca. 700-480 BC); and the momentous wars against the Persian empire in the early fifth century.  Along the way, we will also explore various social and cultural phenomena associated with these political developments.  Here, particular attention will be paid to the many innovations of the Archaic Age in art, architecture, sports, literature, and philosophy, as well as to broader social issues, such as the place of women and slaves in Greek society.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:30     TR                               Anderson, Greg

Assignments: 2 exams and term paper

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for history majors or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.                                                                                                                                                    


HISTORY 3215 SEX & GENDER IN THE ANCIENT WORLD

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course explores the history of sex and gender in ancient Greece and Rome, from ca. 750 BC to 200 CE.  It introduces students to the roles of men and women in ancient Mediterranean society; to the household as a social unit, an economic center, and a physical space; to ancient ideals of femininity and masculinity; and to ancient views on a variety of sexual practices that were commonplace in ancient Greece and Rome. The class also aims to teach students how to understand the complex relationship between rhetorical constructions of gender and sexuality in (largely male-authored) literature and more representative social experiences of sex and gender.  The course is divided thematically into four units: “Concepts and Sources,” “Perceptions, Cultural Expectations, Stereotypes,” “Experiencing Sex and Gender in Social Life,” and “The Body, Gender, and Sexuality.”  Students are expected to master all four units, as the class builds cumulatively over the course of the semester.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:35-10:55       TR                               Sessa, Tina

Assignments: Two midterms, 2 short essays, and a research paper.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group Global, pre-1750 for history majors or it can fulfill a GE requirement.                                                                                                                                                   


HISTORY 3216 WAR IN THE ANCIENT MEDITERRANEAN WORLD

3 Cr. Hrs.

An advanced survey of military history from the Bronze Age in Greece (ca. 1200 D.C.) to the fall of the Roman Empire in the West (A.D. 476).  The lectures will proceed chronologically and six interconnected themes will comprise their focus: tactical and technological developments in warfare; military strategy & interstate diplomacy; the reciprocal effects of war and political systems upon one another; the social and economic bases of military activity; conversely, the impact of war on society, particularly its role in the economy & its effect upon the lives of both participants and non-combatants; finally, the military ethos and the ideological role of war. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
Online              online                           Vanderpuy, P.

Assigned Readings (tentative):
Caesar, The Gallic Wars
D. Engles, Alexander the Great & the Logistics of the Macedonian Army
A. Ferrill, The Fall of the Roman Empire: The Military Explanation
V. Hansen, The Western Way of War 
Herodotus, The Persian Wars
E. Luttwak, The Grand Strategy of the Roman Empire
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War and a Xeroxed packet

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Group Europe, pre-1750 for history majors or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.

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ASIAN & ISLAMIC HISTORY

                                                                                                                                                    

HISTORY 2352 OTTOMAN EMPIRE, 1300-1800

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will get you excited about one of History’s great empires, and certainly one of the greatest Islamic empires in history; the Ottoman Empire, which ruled most of the Middle East and the Balkans for over a millennium before its collapse following World War I.  You can’t truly understand the modern Middle East or Balkans without knowing about the Ottoman Empire. We’ll start with the Ottomans’ humble beginnings as a tiny principality in what is now northwestern Turkey ca. 1300 and continue through the glory days of the 16th century, the terrible crisis of the 17th century, the “Tulip Era” in the 18th century, through to the empire’s early attempts at westernizing reform at the end of the 18th century.  The core of the course will center on Nobel Prize-winning author Orhan Pamuk’s novel My Name Is Red, which weaves a tale of murder among miniature-painters in late 16th-century Istanbul, just as the era of crisis was beginning. You will craft a final paper tracing the “life-history” of one of the novel’s characters, using the character as a lens through which to explore key features of Ottoman society. Group discussions will reinforce the trends and themes that appear in the novel and in Ottoman history more generally. The course is taught by a tenured faculty member who is one of the world’s leading experts on the subject.  

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:30     TR                               Hathaway, Jane

Assigned Readings:
Douglas A. Howard, A History of the Ottoman Empire (Cambridge, 2017)
Orhan Pamuk, My Name Is Red
various excerpts from primary and secondary sources

Assignments:
in-class midterm, paper related to My Name Is Red, take-home final, participation in group discussions

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills GE Historical study and fulfills Group Middle East, pre-1750 for the history major.                                                                                                                                               


HISTORY 2353 THE MIDDLE EAST IN THE 20TH CENTURY

3 Cr. Hrs.

An introductory study of the political, social and cultural history and evolution of Islamic civilization since 1914. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
On-line            on-line                         Ozturk, D.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Near East, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.                                                                                                                                              


HISTORY 2393 CONTEMPORARY INDIA & SOUTH ASIA

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course examines the political, social, economic, and cultural history of the South Asian subcontinent from independence in 1947 to the present.  We will focus on India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh, and touch on other South Asian countries (Sri Lanka, Nepal, Bhutan) when appropriate.

Many observers have noted the seeming paradoxes of modern India: the world’s largest democracy has also developed an increasingly authoritarian state; the country’s grinding poverty continues amidst the gleaming office parks of the new global economy; powerful movements for social justice contend with the rise of repressive religious nationalisms.  Despite some differences in politics and economy, we may find similar themes and historical forces at work in Pakistan and Bangladesh as well.  Situating South Asian history in its local, regional, and global contexts, this course examines these paradoxes in a survey of the tumultuous events over the last seven decades.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
On-line            on-line                         Sreenivas, Mytheli

Assigned Readings:
TBA: We will use a wide range of materials, including scholarly articles, films, literature, art, journalism and more.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course does not assume prior knowledge about South Asia, and is open to all undergraduate students.
This course fulfills Group Near East, East Asia, Middle East, South or Central Asia Group, post-1750 for history majors or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.                                                                                                                      


HISTORY 2401 HISTORY OF EAST ASIA IN THE PRE-MODERN ERA

3 Cr. Hrs.

Simply put, in this course we will explore one question together: How were the civilizations of China, Korea, and Japan connected but different in the pre-modern period (to 1800)?

History 2401 is an introduction to the societies and cultures of pre‑modern China, Korea, and Japan, the countries that make up the geographical and cultural unit of East Asia. One goal of this course is to consider what is distinctive about "East Asian civilization." A second goal is the study of the relationship between the evolution of China, Korea, and Japan as distinct cultures themselves. We will examine how Korea and Japan, despite considerable linguistic, intellectual, and political borrowing from China, diverged from the Chinese pattern of development to form cultures with their own very distinctive artistic and literary traditions, political organizations, and social and economic structures. We also consider how Korea and Japan influenced Chinese civilization as well. The course will end with exploring China, Korea, and Japan in their encounters with the West.

In this online course,  you will have the opportunity to eplore digital material and interactive exercises with historical material.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
On-line            On-line                        Zhang, Ying

Assignments:
Online lecture segments; visual material and analysis; team work and online discussion about historical material.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group East Asia, pre-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.                                                                                                                                                   


HISTORY 2402 HISTORY OF EAST ASIA IN THE MODERN ERA

3 Cr. Hrs.

History 2402 will introduce the histories of the societies of East Asia (China, Korea, Japan) starting in about 1600. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
3:55-5:15         WF                              Barnes, M.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group East Asia, post-1750 for history the history major or it can fulfill the historical study GE.                                                                                                                                                    


HISTORY 3375 THE MONGOL WORLD EMPIRE: CENTRAL EURASIA, 1000-1500

3 Cr. Hrs.

At the beginning of the thirteenth century, a small and relatively obscure nomadic people emerged from their isolated homeland in the steppe north of China to forge what would quickly become the largest contiguous empire in the history of the world.  While the Mongol Empire is long gone, it had a profound and undeniable impact on the trajectory of world history.  The destruction of the Mongol conquests was overwhelming, but that relatively short period of trauma was followed by a lengthy recovery under the Pax-Mongolica: the Mongol Peace.  For several decades, Eurasia witnessed an unprecedented rise in the movement of people and a corresponding rise in the transcontinental exchange of commodities, scientific knowledge, religious and cultural traditions, and even disease pathogens.  This course will introduce students to the social, cultural and political history of medieval Central Eurasia, paying special attention to the quite regular, occasionally turbulent, but never dull interactions of pastoral-nomadic and sedentary peoples. 

 Time               Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:30     WF                              Levi, Scott

Assigned Readings: Four books.

Assignments: Course work includes a map quiz, midterm, paper assignment and a final exam.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group NE, (specifically Central Asia) pre-1750 for history the major or it can fulfill the historical study GE.                                                                                                                                 


HISTORY 3404 MODERN CHINA 1750 TO 1949

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course provides a general but analytical survey of the history of China from approximately 1750 to 1949 with emphasis on the late Qing and Republic of China. After a brief introduction to China’s geography, languages, and cultural background, we will discuss key historical phenomena that have distinguished China’s evolution in the modem period.  The course is organized around the paired themes of non-Chinese attempts to challenge or undermine China’s sovereignty and Chinese responses to those efforts, partly and especially since 1895 to achieve “wealth and power” for their nation.  For this reason, emphasis is placed on political, military, and social (including gender relations) developments, although some attention is also given to economic, cultural and intellectual ones.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
2:20-3:40         TR                               Reed, Christopher

Assigned Readings: 4 books, documentary films.

Assignments: Map assignments, comparison paper, take-home exams.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
There are no prerequisites.  Although not required, the course assumes students have had college-level history courses above the 1000-level.  Familiarity with topics covered in History 2402, “East Asian History since 1600” is useful in a general way but is not required.

This course fulfills Group East Asia, post-1750 for history majors or can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.                                                                                                                                              


HISTORY 3411 GENDER AND SEXUALITY IN CHINESE HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This class introduces students to historical developments in gender and sexuality in Chinese history (ancient period to 1950s). Through a few central topics, we will look into a cluster of interlocking questions: gendered aspects of the political system; changes and continuities in the Confucian gender system; the intersection of gender, sexuality, ethnicity, religion, and class; meanings of liberation, oppression, victim, and agency; the politics of writing women’s history in transcultural and global contexts; the discourse of and about Chinese masculinity; gender and science, etc. We will also think about how our own gender politics and temporal location shape our reading of the history of Chinese women, as well as how a gendered approach changes the way we examine historical evidence and interpret historical events.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:35-10:55       Weds                           Zhang, Ying

*This is a hybrid course

Assignments:
In this hybrid class, students will learn by “doing.” The course is comprised of the following components:
1) Online lectures, their topics already listed in this syllabus, provide useful background information. It is recommended that students watch them before doing the reading assignments.
2) Exercises with reading assignments (including online visual material) allow students to cultivate analytical and presentation skills.
3) In-class lectures and discussion are opportunities for the instructor and students to work closely in person on historical examples. In-class lectures will be posted on Carmen after class.
4) Short written assignments (including informal writings and visual presentations) help students improve their ability to articulate sophisticated ideas.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: 
This course fulfills Group East Asia, pre or post-1750 for history majors or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.


HISTORY 3425 HISTORY OF JAPAN BEFORE 1800

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course treats selected topics in the history of Japan from the earliest times to the beginning of the nineteenth century.  It touches on a number of areas of politics, economic development, social trends and elements of the history of science and technology, ideas and religion, samurai, women and the environment. Pre-modern Japanese history shows patterns that continue to find expression in the modern era, even today.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
10:20-11:15     MWF                           Brown, Philip

Assigned Readings: (not complete)
Katsu Kokichi, Musui;s Story.
David Lu, ed., A Documentary History, (selected readings)
Articles

Assignments:
Students will write two papers that build on assigned readings.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group East Asia, pre-1750 for history majors or can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.


HISTORY 3426 HISTORY OF MODERN JAPAN

3 Cr. Hrs.                                                                                                           

This course treats major elements of Japanese history in the 19th to 21st centuries: political developments over three different regimes (late pre-modern, pre-WWII and post-War), socio-cultural transformation, and international contexts. Several themes are emphasized: changing relations between local communities and their governments; commercialization and industrialization of the economy; imperialism (Western and Japanese) and its outcomes; the development of science and technology in Japan; and the environmental contexts of Japanese history.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:40-1:35       MWF                           Brown, Phil

Assigned Readings:
Gordon, Andrew, A Modern History of Japan: From Tokugawa Times to the Present
Nakazawa, Kieji, Barefoot Gen: A Cartoon Story of Hiroshima, Vol. I
Terasaki, Gwen, A Bridge to the Sun: A Memoir of Love and War
Tsutsui, William, Godzilla on My Mind: Fifty Years of the King of Monsters
Other books selected by students from a list of possibilities
Several additional articles.

Assignments:
Book review
Course paper employing Nakazawa, Terasaki and/or Tsutsui (no other research required)
Final
Midterm

Prerequisites and Special Comments: 
This course fulfills Group East Asia, post-1750 for history majors or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.

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EUROPEAN HISTORY

 

HISTORY 1211 WESTERN CIVILIZATION TO THE 17TH CENTURY

3 Cr. Hrs.

 Ancient Civilizations (Near East, Greece, Rome) barbarian invasions, medieval civilizations (Byzantium, Islam, Europe); Renaissance and Reformation.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
On-line            On-line                        Shimoda, K.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the historical study GE requirement.  Not open to students that have credit for History 111 or 2201; 2202; 2203 or 2205.                                                                                                                                                   


HISTORY 1212 WESTERN CIVILIZATION 17TH CENTURY TO THE PRESENT

3 Cr.  Hrs.

Political, scientific, and industrial revolutions, nationalism, the two World Wars; the decline of empires; the Cold War.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
On-line            On-line                        Douglas, Sarah

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the historical study GE requirement.  Not open to students that have credit for History 112; 2202; 2203; 2204 or 2205.                                                                                                                                                         


HISTORY 2204 MODERN EUROPEAN CIVILIZATIONS

3 Cr. Hrs.

A survey of the most transformative developments of the Western world beginning with a short investigation of the French Revolution of 1789 that laid the foundation for modern politics and social relations. As a first assignment, students will explore reverberations of those developments in the nineteenth century as dramatized in Emile Zola’s literary masterpiece, Germinal. That work embodies, and will enable us to discuss the Industrial Revolution, conservatism, liberalism, Darwinism, Marxism, and anarchism along with the realist literary style.  The second is on World War I that toppled European world supremacy and ushered in the modern world. The final section evaluates a psychological analysis of Hitler that explains why Hitler wanted to kill Jews and how he was able to get Germans to help him do it.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
2:20-3:40         WF                              Kern, Stephen

Assigned Readings:
Emile Zola, Germinal
Rudolph Binion, Hitler Among the Germans

On Carmen
Selections from Karl Marx, Sigmund Freud, Ian Kershaw and Diana Hacker

Assignments:
Students will take one in-class test and write two four-page papers on the assigned readings. I conduct a week-long writing workshop to help students prepare to write those papers.

Prerequisites and Special Comments
This course fulfills the following GE requirements:  1) “Historical Study,” 2) “Diversity: Global Studies”


HISTORY 2206 INTRODUCTION TO THE HISTORY OF PARIS

3 Cr. Hrs.

The History of Paris is an introductory survey course on the history of Paris from its earliest human settlement to the present day. Moving chronologically through time, we will learn about the history of the people and events that have shaped the Paris we know today. Throughout the semester, we will return to two themes.  First, we study the human stories that have shaped Parisian events and history. This course begins with the fact that there is not now nor was there in the past a singular, typical Parisian. From the Romans, to the Vikings, to the present day, Parisian history has been shaped by those born outside the city. After all, they constitute the majority of Parisians. This course will study how the history of Paris is shaped by a history of human movement and migration. Second, we consider how the stories about a place and its significance have shaped the ways people understand the city. Baron de Pöllnitz wrote in 1732, “Paris has been described so much and one has heard it talked about so much, that most people know what the city looks like without ever having seen it.” We will examine stories of the city, from historical chronicles to literary works to film, in order to understand how stories about a place shape the collective memory of its residents. By studying the people of Paris and the stories about the city, we will seek to understand both changes and continuities in the history of the city.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:35-10:55       TR                               Bond, Elizabeth

Assigned Readings:
Colin Jones, Paris:  Biography of a City, Penguin:  2004.
Selected primary sources will be available via Carmen.

Assignments:
Short Essay: The way that people have experienced the city of Paris is shaped by the stories that are told about it. In this essay, evaluate one such story. Each student will choose a film, novel, comic book, or memoir set in Paris to study.
Take-Home Exams: Respond to lecture and course readings by synthesizing major trends at three key points in the semester.
Podcast Final Project:  In small groups, write and present a 5-minute podcast on the history of a Parisian neighborhood. The group will choose one theme to study—music, food, visual art, sports, nightlife, religion, architecture, business, etc.—everything has a history.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Europe, post-1750 for the history major or can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.

Please Note: History 2206 is a new course which may not appear in the master schedule for autumn 2019, we hope it will be approved soon.  If you would like to be notified when the course is approved, please email indicating your interest to bond.282@osu.edu.                                                                                                                                              


HISTORY 2220 INTRODUCTION TO CHRISTIANITY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Introduces students to the historical study of Christianity as a religious tradition.

 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:30     WF                               Brakke, D.


HISTORY 2220 INTRODUCTION TO CHRISTIANITY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Introduces students to the historical study of Christianity as a religious tradition.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
8:00-9:20         WF                              Beshay, M.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Global, pre-1750 for history majors or can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.


HISTORY 2250 EMPIRES & NATIONS IN WESTERN EUROPE, 1500 – PRESENT

3 Cr. Hrs.

Comparative study of the Modern European Overseas Empires from the “age of discovery” to the postcolonial present.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:35-10:55       WF                              Awasthi, A.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Global, pre or post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.


HISTORY 2475 THE HOLOCAUST

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will examine the state-sponsored murder of millions of Jews and non-Jews by the Nazis and their collaborators during World War II.  Together we will trace the interrelated individuals, institutions, historical events, and ideologies that allowed for the Holocaust to occur.

To understand the history of the Final Solution, we will begin our study with an analysis of historical factors that predated the Nazi rise to power. After we study the histories of antisemitism and early 20th century German, we will consider how the Nazis assumed and consolidated power during the early 1930s.  The next segment of the class, we will examine the crucial period of 1933-1938, paying close to attention to the erratic anti-Jewish policies of the era and the myriad of Jewish responses to them.  In the third portion of the course, we will explore the Final Solution itself.  Our third section of the course will be devoted to the study of perpetrators, bystanders, and victims during the Holocaust.  Finally, we will consider the Holocaust’s aftermath and legacy among Jews and non-Jews in Germany, Israel, and the United States.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:35-10:55       WF                              Judd, Robin    

Assigned Reading (tentative):
Doris Bergen, War and Genocide:  A Concise History of the Holocaust, Third Edition.
Christopher Browning, Ordinary Men, (sections only)
Marion Kaplan, Between Dignity and Despair (sections only)
Chil Rajchman, The Last Jew of Treblinka: A Memoir

Assignments: Weekly questions, 2 semester exams, final exam.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Europe, post-1750 for the history major or can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.                                                                                                                                               


HISTORY 2500 20TH CENTURY INTERNATIONAL HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Examines international political, economic and military relations from the origins of World War I through the breakup of the Soviet Union.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:10-10:05       MWF                           Schoof, M.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for history majors or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.                                                                                                                                              


HISTORY 3229 HISTORY OF EARLY CHRISTIANITY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
2:20-3:40         WF                              Brakke, D.

 


This course surveys the development of medieval society from the fourth to the twelfth century.  We will study the complex and interacting historical factors that led to the decline of the Roman Empire and the birth of “Europe” from a variety of perspectives.  Topics will include invasion and migration, developments in religious thought and institutions, and encounters with people and societies in a global frame. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
2:20-3:40         TR                               Beach, Alison

Assignments:
Requirements are a midterm examination, a final examination, several map quizzes, short weekly written responses to the course readings, and a media-based “object project” on an object of medieval material culture of the student’s choosing.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 3246 TUDOR & STUART BRITAIN, 1485-1714

3 Cr. Hrs.

The Tudor-Stuart era is one of immense change in British society.  Britain left behind the Middle Ages and embraced the modern era, but what that entailed was a great deal of crisis and upheaval. This course will analyze some of the following themes and events: changes in what it means to be a king and ideas about the state (especially with respect to Henry VIII, Elizabeth I and James VI and I); the Reformation and the emergence of the Anglican church; the emergence of poor law, heresy laws, and new methods of punishment; the Elizabethan stage; the Great Fire of London and its rebuilding; bubonic plague and public health measures; Parliament’s rise in power; witch-hunts, the witch-craze, and new science; Quakers, Shakers, Ranters, Puritans; Levellers, Diggers, and other early socialists; the English Civil War; the Scottish Presbyterian movement; Thomas Hobbes, Robert Filmer, John Locke, and exactly what did happen in the Garden of Eden; early modern environmentalism; John Milton;  the changing place of women; a world turned upside down!; Jacobites and the Glorious Revolution.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:35-10:55       WF                              Butler, Sara

Assigned Readings:

  • Carole Levin, The Heart and Stomach of a King: Elizabeth I and the Politics of Sex and Power, 2nd edition (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2013).
  • Robert Bucholz and Newton Key, Early Modern England, 1485-1714: A Narrative History, 2nd ed. (Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, 2009).
  • Robert Bucholz and Newton Key, Sources and Debates in English History, 1485-1714, 2nd ed. (Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, 2009).

Assignments:

  • Participation                                                    10%    
  • Reading responses                                         20%
  • Mid-term Exam                                               10%
  • Final Exam                                                      15%
  • Elizabeth Paper                                               20%
  • Research Essay                                              25%

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.                                                                                                                                            


HISTORY 3249 EARLY MODERN EUROPE, 1560-1778

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will focus on the social, cultural, and political history of Europe from the late-sixteenth-century wars of religion to the social transformation of the late eighteenth century on the eve of the French Revolution. History 3249 is designed as an upper-division course on the history of late Sixteenth, Seventeenth- and Eighteenth-Century Europe. Through course lectures, small-group discussions, primary source analysis, secondary source readings, and written responses, this course will provide students with intellectual tools and information with which to make sense of this period. We will pay particular attention to the role of religion in society, the way global trade and empire shaped European daily life and culture, and the impact of the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment. This course will also introduce students to new approaches to the study of Early Modern Europe, especially Digital Humanities approaches to study social networks in local and global contexts, & information networks that shaped the development of the public sphere.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:45-2:05       TR                               Bond, Elizabeth

Assigned Readings:
Benjamin Kaplan, Divided by Faith, Religious Conflict and the Practice of Toleration in Early Modern Europe, Harvard University Press, 2010, ISBN 9780674034730
Michael Kwass, Contraband, Louis Mandrin and the Making of a Global Underground, Harvard University Press, 2014, ISBN 9780674726833
Emma Rothschild, The Inner Life of Empires, Princeton University Press, 2012, ISBN 9780691156125
Natalie Zemon Davis, Women on the Margins, Belknap Press, 1997, ISBN 9780674955219
Additional articles and primary sources to be assigned

Assignments:
Short weekly discussion preparation responses.
One Essay
Midterm and Final Exams

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for history majors.


HISTORY 3254 EUROPE SINCE 1950

3 Cr. Hrs.

This upper-level course explores the post-World War II history of Europe through the examination of several discreet themes as manifested in both Western and Eastern Europe: the rebuilding of the continent after the war; the emergence of the Cold War in Europe; the end of European empires and the Cold War in the Third World; daily life, consumerism, and popular culture; protest movements and youth counterculture; European economic and political integration; immigration and evolving ideas of race and difference in Europe. Each student will choose a topic to explore in more detail in a final research project.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:45-2:05       WF                              Dragostinova, Theodora

Assigned Readings: Possible books for this class include (the list will be finalized later):
Heda Margolius Kovaly, Under a Cruel Star: Life in Prague, 1941-1968 (Homes & Meier, 1997).
Peter Schneider, The Wall Jumper: A Berlin Story (University of Chicago Press, 1998).
Dacia Maraini, Woman at War (Italica Press, 2008).
Kapka Kassabova, Border: A Journey to the Edge of Europe (Graywolf Press, 2017).
Ivan Krastev, After Europe (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2017).
There will be no textbook for this class, but I recommend the following text: Tony Judt, Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945 (Penguin, 2006).
Additional chapters will be made available on Carmen and films made available through the Secured Media Library.

Assignments:

  • Short response papers posted on Carmen: 25%
  • Two take-home exams: 30% (15% each)
  • One 3-page film reflection: 10%
  • Final research project: 25% (proposal 5%; final project 20%)
  • Discussion and attendance: 10%

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills: Group Europe, post-1750 for history majors or can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.                                                                                                                                               


HISTORY 3277 20th CENTURY EUROPEAN THOUGHT AND CULTURE

3 Cr. Hrs.

A survey of the most dynamic period in all of Western cultural history, roughly 1890-1940, which saw revolutionary developments in philosophy (Friedrich Nietzsche, Jean-Paul Sartre); art (Pablo Picasso, Wassily Kandinsky); literature (James Joyce, Marcel Proust); relativity and quantum theory (Albert Einstein, Werner Heisenberg); music (Arnold Schoenberg, Igor Stavinsky), psychiatry (Sigmund Freud, Carl Jung); and feminism (Simone de Beauvoir, Virginia Woolf). Smack in the middle was the hugely destructive First World War.

The first part centers on short novels by Joseph Conrad and Thomas Mann that foreshadow the decline of Western Civilization.  The second part covers Nietzsche and the “death of God,” my book on the impact of the telephone, cinema, automobile, airplane on time and space; and Woolf’s challenge to men and women in her classic feminist manifesto, A Room of One’s Own.  The third part is divided between Freud’s efforts to diagnose and treat mental illness, Sartre’s analysis of what it means to be a human being, and De Beauvoir’s application of his philosophy to help explain why women in her time were “the second sex” and how to equalize the rights and enhance the humanity of all human beings.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:30     TR                               Kern, Stephen

Assigned Readings:
Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness
Thomas Mann, Death in Venice
Friedrich Nietzsche, Nietzsche and the Death of God, ed. by Peter Fritzsche
Stephen Kern, The Culture of Time & Space: 1880-1910
Sigmund Freud, Introductory Lectures on Psychoanalysis (selections)
Virginia Woolf, A Room of One’s Own
Jean-Paul Sartre, The Philosophy of Jean-Paul Sartre (selections)
James Joyce, Ulysses (selections)

Assignments: Students write three papers 5 pages based on the readings and class discussions.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This class fulfills Group Europe, post-1750 for the history major or can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.                                                                                                                                              


HISTORY 3282 HISTORY OF THE SOVIET UNION

3Cr. Hrs.

This course is a survey of the entire Soviet period, from the 1917 Revolution to the demise of the Soviet Union in 1991.  A central theme of this course is the unfulfilled promise of the Revolution and the genesis of the Stalinist dictatorship.  Topics include the Civil War, the New Economic Policy and problems of underdevelopment, collectivization and industrialization, Soviet culture, the delineation of gender roles, the Second World War and its legacy, the Cold War, de-Stalinization, nationality issues, the collapse of Communism, and prospects for Russian democracy.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:30     WF                              Hoffmann, David

Assigned Readings:
Each week there will be reading assignments from a variety of sources, including government documents, memoirs, and novels.  The total amount of reading for the course will be about ten books.

Assignments: There will be a midterm exam, paper, and final exam.  In addition, students will have short weekly writing assignments on assigned readings.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group Europe, post-1750 for the history major or can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.                                                                                                                                              


HISTORY 3590 WARS OF EMPIRE: EUROPE’S “SMALL WARS” OF THE 19th & 20th CENTURIES 

3 Cr.  Hrs.                   

In the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Europe’s empires expanded madly.  In 1800, Europe and its possessions covered approximately 55% of the globe; in 1878, 67%; and in 1914, Europe and its possessions covered 84.4% of the globe.  This grand burst of imperial expansion was only achieved through great military effort.   The wars of empire through which the modern European empires “pacified” the regions they conquered were considered to be “Small Wars,” because they were felt to be conflicts that were imbalanced, with well-trained, well-equipped regular troops on one side, and what one military theorist called “savages and semi-civilized races” on the other.  In these military clashes of civilization vs. semi-civilization, “civilized” Europe was expected to easily triumph.

History tells a different tale, however.  Time and time again, Europe’s great empires found themselves challenged and thwarted on the battlefields of Asia and Africa.  This course will examine the means, methods, challenges and results of Europe’s military encounters with the indigenous forces who sought to push back the tide of imperial conquest.  We will look at a number of examples from the histories of the British, French, and Russian and Italian Empires, discussing both the military and imperial contexts of these struggles.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:30     TR                               Siegel, Jennifer

Assigned Readings (tentative):
The reading may include:
Baumann, Robert F. Russian-Soviet Unconventional Wars in the Caucasus, Central Asia And Afghanistan.
Callwell, Col. C.E. Small Wars, Their Principles and Practice (1899)
Fraser, George MacDonald, Flashman

Assignments:
Weekly readings and class discussions
In-class Midterm and take home final
Map quizzes
Two short papers.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.

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JEWISH HISTORY

                                                                                                                                                    

HISTORY 2475 THE HOLOCAUST

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will examine the state-sponsored murder of millions of Jews and non-Jews by the Nazis and their collaborators during World War II.  Together we will trace the interrelated individuals, institutions, historical events, and ideologies that allowed the Holocaust to occur.

To understand the history of the Final Solution, we will begin our study with an analysis of historical factors that predated the Nazi rise to power. After we study the histories of antisemitism and early 20th century German, we will consider how the Nazis assumed and consolidated power during the early 1930s.  The next segment of the class, we will examine the crucial period of 1933-1938, paying close to attention to the erratic anti-Jewish policies of the era and the myriad of Jewish responses to them.  In the third portion of the course, we will explore the Final Solution itself.  Our third section of the course will be devoted to the study of perpetrators, bystanders, and victims during the Holocaust.  Finally, we will consider the Holocaust’s aftermath and legacy among Jews and non-Jews in Germany, Israel, and the United States.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:35-10:55       WF                              Judd, Robin    

Assigned Reading (tentative):
Doris Bergen, War and Genocide:  A Concise History of the Holocaust, Third Edition.
Christopher Browning, Ordinary Men, (sections only)
Marion Kaplan, Between Dignity and Despair (sections only)
Chil Rajchman, The Last Jew of Treblinka: A Memoir

Assignments: Weekly questions, 2 semester exams, final exam.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Europe, post-1750 for history majors or can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.                                                                                                                                                   


HISTORY 3470 MESSIAHS & MESSIANISM IN JEWISH HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will deal with the idea of messiah in Judaism and the ways in which Jewish messiahs, messianic speculation and messianic ideas over the course of 2,000 years have acted as agents of change.  Topics covered will include Christianity, Talmudic messianism, medieval and modern movements, and major historiographical debates on the topic.

Time               Meeting Days              Instructor
12:45-2:05       WF                              Goldish, Matt

Assigned Readings (tentative):
Harris Lenowitz, The Jewish Messiahs, From the Galilee to Crown Heights
Marc Saperstein, ed., Essential Papers on Messianic Movements & Personalities in Jewish History
Additional material on Carmen.

Assignments:
Quizzes
Papers
Final exam

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Global, pre & post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.

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LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY


HISTORY 3106 HISTORY OF MEXICO

3 Cr. Hrs.

Mexico faces many crucial issues today: immigration, drug cartels, economic and trade issues, the role of the United States and others.  Although these topics are relatively recent, their historical context can be located throughout several centuries of struggle.         

HIST 3106 analyzes Mexico’s dynamic and exciting history from the pre-Conquest era to the present. Throughout the semester we will examine patterns of conflict and negotiation, including the great Mexican Revolution, which shaped Mexico’s historical legacies.  In addition to a study of Mexico’s politics, we also will explore the ways in which everyday people participated in and influenced cultural and political events. The role of women, race and ethnicity will be analyzed in the lectures, as will Mexico’s transcultural interactions and conflicts. Additionally, the course will explore Mexico’s rich culture, including movies, literature, and artists.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
On-line            on-line                         Smith, Stephanie

Assigned Readings: TBA

Assignments: TBA

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Latin America, pre/post-1750 for history majors or it can fulfill the historical study GE.

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MILITARY HISTORY

                                                                                                                                                           

HISTORY 2550 HISTORY OF WAR

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course is an introduction to the salient concepts and problems involved in the study of military history.  It also addresses the effect of war on human society and development and examines the significance of war in human culture.  Although it examines war from prehistoric times to the present, the course is thematic rather than strictly chronological -- less a survey of wars and military developments per se than a survey of the major concepts involved in the study of war.  In addition to such topics as the nature of war, the causes of war, and the development of warfare, we will also examine the “warrior code” as understood in various cultures (Greek, Roman, Norse, Japanese, Native American, etc.).

Students will achieve an understanding of the causes, conduct, and consequences of war, as well as how various societies—past and present, western and nonwestern—have understood and practiced war.  They will also hone their skills at critical writing and analysis, and gain greater insight into the way historians explore the human condition.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:45-2:05       TR                               Grimsley, Mark

Assigned Readings:
Wayne E. Lee, Waging War:  Conflict, Culture, and Innovation in World History.
Shannon E. French, The Code of the Warrior:  Exploring Warrior Values Past and Present.
Victor Davis Hanson, Carnage and Culture:  Landmark Battles in the Rise of Western Power.

Assignments:
The course grade is based on two midterm examinations and a final examination.  Each of these will have an in class and a take home portion. 

Prerequisites and Special Comments
This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for the history major, or it can fulfill the historical study GE. There are no prerequisites, but a solid grounding in Western Civilization or World History is very helpful.                                                           


HISTORY 2550 HISTORY OF WAR

3 Cr. Hrs.

A survey of the main concepts and issues involved in the study of war in world perspective, using case studies from prehistoric times to the present.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
On-line            on-line                         Douglas, Sarah

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the historical study GE & Group Global, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.                                                                                                       


HISTORY 3552 WAR IN WORLD HISTORY, 1900 - PRESENT

3 Cr. Hrs.       

This lecture course investigates the changing nature of war in the 20th Century, from trench warfare to ethnic cleansing, as well as its effects on individuals and societies.  It covers events such as World War I, the Spanish Civil War, World War II, the Korean War and the Vietnam War, and topics such as the experience of captivity, sexual violence in wartime, children in war, or genocide.  We will pay special attention to the blurring of distinction between combatants and non-combatants, as well as the experiences of ordinary men and women who lived through the wars of the 20th Century.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:35-10:55       TR                               Cabanes, Bruno

Assigned Readings:
Primo Levi, Survival in Auschwitz
Anonymous, A Women in Berlin
Henri Alleg, The Question

Assignments:
The final grade in the course will be an average of the four grades given for: a short 2000-word paper (20%), the mid-term examination (25%), lecture Quick Writes/Quizzes (20%); the final examination (35%).

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for the history major, or it can fulfill the historical study GE.                                                                                                                                                          


HISTORY 3561 AMERICAN MILITARY POLICY, 1914 - PRESENT

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course examines American military history from the aftermath of the Spanish-American War through the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq after the terrorist attack on the U.S. homeland on 9/11/2001.  The course will focus on the interrelationship of foreign and military policy, the conduct of war, the genesis of national security policy and civilian control of the decision-making process, the experience of American service members at war, and the influence of American society upon the armed forces as social institutions. The course covers U.S. participation in World War I, the interwar period, World War II, the Cold War, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, the Gulf War, and the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.  Through readings, lectures and in-class discussion, the class will study the growth of the United States and its armed forces from insular nation to global superpower.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:30     WF                              Mansoor, P.

Assigned Readings:
- Allan R. Millett and Peter Maslowski, For the Common Defense:  A Military History of the United States of America
- West Point History of Warfare, online only. selected chapters
- George Wilson, If you Survive
- Karl Marlantes, What It I Like to Go to War
- Peter Mansoor, Baghdad at Sunrise.

Assignments: In-class mid-term and final examinations and Three review essays (2-3 pages each).

Prerequisites and Special Comments:  This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for history majors or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.                                                                                                                                      


HISTORY 3575 THE KOREAN WAR

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course examines the course of the Korean War. It focuses on the global roots of the war, situating the conflict within the context of instability in East Asia reaching back to the 19th century. The course will also review how the war was at times both a civil war and an international war. Using oral histories and other texts, readings underscore the experience of the war for both civilians and combatants. While recovering these voices, lectures and discussions will touch on key operations in the war and the ways in which the Korean War shaped the Cold War and post-Cold War world.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
Online              online                           Matusheski, Z.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.

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NATIVE AMERICAN HISTORY

                                                                                                                                                           

HISTORY 2070 INTRODUCTION TO NATIVE AMERICAN HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

History of Native Americans from pre-contact times to the present.

Time    Meeting Days  Instructor
Online  online   Lopez, D.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills North America, post-1750 for the history major or it can satisfy the GE requirement for Historical Studies.                                                                                                                                                           


HISTORY 2750 NATIVES & NEWCOMERS: IMMIGRATION & MIGRATION IN U.S. HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

General survey of immigration history in the U.S. from precolonial times to the present.

Time    Meeting Days  Instructor
3:55-5:15         WF      Haydar, M.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills North America, post-1750 for the history major or can satisfy the GE requirement for Historical Studies.                                                                                                                                                          


HISTORY 3070 NATIVE AMERICAN HISTORY TO REMOVAL, 1100-1820

3 Cr. Hrs.

Themes:  In this lecture and discussion course, we will explore the major issues and events in Native American History from the era before European invasion and colonization through the early 1820s.  First, we will examine the variety of indigenous cultures in pre-contact North America.  Next, we will assess the impact of English, Spanish, and French colonization on Native Americans, with a focus on the Indians’ cultural and strategic responses.  In addition, we will explore the consequences of the French and Indian War and American Revolution for Native Americans, as well as the effects of U.S. Indian policy during the Early Republic era. 

Objectives:  In lectures, readings, and discussion, students will consider how Native Americans experienced these enormous economic, demographic, cultural and political challenges, and what kinds of strategies for survival they employed.

Aside from mastering issues of content, this course will help students develop their skills in historical writing and research through the critical consideration of primary and secondary works.  Some of the questions we will consider include, how do authors reconstruct the experience of people who left little in the way of written records, except those produced by often hostile and incomprehending Euro-Americans?  Is it even possible to recapture the Indians’ culture at a particular moment in the past?  What do scholars in fields such as anthropology, epidemiology, and environmental studies have to offer historians?  What did it mean to be “Indian” at different points in time—to Indians themselves and to the Euro-Americans who interacted with them?  Is American Indian history a story of decline and destruction, persistence and resistance, acculturation, ethnogenesis, or some combination?  Students will apply their skills and insights by completing a research paper of their own.

Time    Meeting Days  Instructor
11:10-12:30     WF      Newell, Margaret

Assigned Readings:
In the past I have used the following books, but check before purchasing any books as readings are subject to change.

William Cronon, Changes in the Land
Gregory Dowd, War Under Heaven
Joshua Piker, The Four Deaths of Acorn Whistler
R. David Edmunds, The Shawnee Prophet
Pekka Hamalainen, Comanche Empire
Theda Perdue, Cherokee Women

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills North America, pre or post-1750 for the history major or can satisfy the GE requirement for Historical Studies, Global Studies, and/or Social Diversity in the U.S.

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THEMATIC COURSE OFFERINGS

                                                                                                                                                           

HISTORY 2630 HISTORY OF MODERN SEXUALITY

3 Cr. Hrs.

In-depth analysis of particular topics in the history of modern sexualities throughout the world.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
3:55-5:15         TR                               Arenberg, Marc

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.                                                                                                                                                          


HISTORY 2680 IT’S THE END OF THE WORLD! APOCALYPTICISM IN CHRISTIANITY, JUDAISM AND ISLAM

3 Cr. Hrs.           

The purposes of this course are:  to learn about the origins and history of apocalyptic thinking; to understand something of the deep human impetus to prepare for the world’s end; to consider the impact of apocalyptic thinking in our own world; and to practice the analytical and communications skills called for in working with both secondary and primary sources.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:35-10:55       WF                              Goldish, Matt

Assigned Reading: (These will almost certainly change but it will give you the idea)
The Continuum History of Apocalypticism, ed. B. McGinn and J.J. Collins
Jean-Pierre Filiu, Apocalypse in Islam
Documents and supplemental readings through our CARMEN website

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
Be prepared to read, write and talk, the material is amazing! This course fulfills Group Global, pre-1750 for history majors.                                                                                                                                                          


HISTORY 2703 HEALTH AND DISEASE IN HUMAN HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This class provides a wide-ranging, introductory survey of the history of health and disease, ranging from the infectious disease in early human communities to today’s emerging epidemics and health risks. We will study major epidemics – plague, cholera, influenza – as well as the various transitions leading to the rise of non-communicable diseases – cancer, heart disease, diabetes – as major killers in the developed world. The course will also investigate the history of other types of bodily and psychological affliction, including disability, the effects of war and violence, occupational and environmental health, and mental health. Finally, the course is not simply about various types of disease. It is also about how different societies have conceptualized and encouraged practices designed to improve health. We will spend a considerable amount of time on public health schemes, as well as practices like washing, diet, drinking, cleaning, and physical fitness.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:35-10:55       WF                              Otter, Chris

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fills the GE Historical Study requirement and fulfills the Global, post-1750 requirement for the history major.                                                                                                                                                                      


HISTORY 2704 WATER: A HUMAN HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Water is a miraculous molecule: it is the only molecule that occurs naturally in all three states of matter (solid, liquid, gas). The human body is, on average, 65% water. About 71% of the Earth’s surface is covered in water. Without water on our “blue planet” life as we understand it could not exist. Water shapes life from the molecular and biological level to the national and even the geopolitical level, yet far too often we take this marvelous substance for granted. In this course, we will dispel this false assumption.
 
Taking a thematic approach that environmental history so usefully affords us, in this course we will examine the human use and understanding of water from the ancient past to the present day, using a series of case studies from around the globe. We will examine how water has been used in irrigation and the development of civilization and how humans have sought to manipulate (control) water as a source of power. We will examine the how water is essential to the development of cities, and how cities have faced the infrastructural challenge of ensuring access to clean drinking water. We will study how water is a carrier of disease and pollution. We will study how water has become a commodity and a vital component part of modern economic systems, especially food systems. We will look at oceans, which are often ignored in traditional geographically-bound histories. We will explore the various ways in which water has distinct cultural meanings around the world. Finally, we will examine how global climate change is impacting the human relationship with water today.
 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
Online              Online                          Harris, James

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This is a GE course.   This course fulfills the following GE requirements: 

  1. "Historical Study,"
  2. "Culture & Ideas or Historical Study,"
  3.  Global diversity

History Minor:   History 2704 counts toward the history minor, which typically requires only four courses to complete and may overlap up to six hours with general education requirements. 

For History Majors:  this course fulfills the following Geographic, Chronological, and Thematic requirements: “Comparative/Transnational/Global” post-1750, ETS and PCS                                                                                                                  


HISTORY 2800 INTRODUCTION TO THE DISCIPLINE OF HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course is designed to introduce undergraduates to the historical method, that is, how historians write history.  We will learn how to distinguish between primary and secondary sources, and we will examine important events in historical context.  We will concentrate on a specific issue, dissent during the Civil War.  We will explore opposition to the war effort in both the North and the South, in addition to the larger role that dissent played in the war’s outcome.    

Time               Meetings Days             Instructor
12:45-2:05      TR                                Cashin, Joan

Assigned Readings:
Students will read a textbook, two monographs, and a variety of documents generated by nineteenth-century Americans.  These documents can be found online, such as newspapers, located at Ohio State University Library; Official Records of the War, at Cornell University; Documenting the American South, at University of North Carolina. 

Assignments:
Students will also write three short papers on different aspects of wartime dissent.    

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course is required for all students declaring a Major in history, students must earn a “C” or higher to have it count on the history major. It may not be used for the GEC/GE Historical Study requirement.


HISTORY 2800 INTRODUCTION TO THE DISCIPLINE OF HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course is designed for History majors. History 2800 introduces history majors to the field of history, and particularly to the historian’s craft. We will look at the different purposes for studying history, a wide array of sources that are used in examining the past, and the diverse approaches to the past that historians embrace. Because the best way to learn what historians do is to practice the craft ourselves, we will spend the semester focusing on a global history that is, in fact, close at hand: that of “Ohio and the World.” Our readings will highlight related global and local developments six different dates: 1753, 1803, 1853, 1903, 1953, and 2003. Topics include European settlement of the Ohio frontier and the French-Indian War, German immigrants’ participation in the American Civil War, Karl Marx’s visit to Ohio, Civil Rights struggles at Kent State but also in Paris and Berlin, and more recent ties between Japan and Ohio manufacturing. We will use a combination of primary sources (archives, newspapers, images, political treatises, and maps) available in local museums, the OSU rare book room and archives, the Billy Ireland Cartoon Library, and the Ohio History Connection, as well as secondary sources.

Class attendance will be required. As a seminar, all students will be expected to participate regularly in class discussions. Participation in discussions will count for 25 percent of the final grade.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:30     TR                               Conklin, Alice

Assigned Readings:
Geoffrey Parker, Richard Sisson, William Russell Coil, ed. Ohio and the World, 1753-2053
Diana Hacker, A Pocket Style Manual
Course packet of materials

Assignments:
Students will be required to complete six short writing assignments, and one longer research project on Ohio and the World. They will also be assigned a class presentation.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course is required for all students declaring a Major in history and it doesn’t count toward a GE requirement.                                                                                                                                                          


HISTORY 2800 INTRODUCTION TO THE DISCIPLINE OF HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will introduce students to historiography and historical methodology – that is, to different interpretations of history and to different methods of studying it.  Among the themes to be covered in the course are gender and history, historical commemorations, and cultural representations of historical events.  Topics will include student unrest in the 1960s, including the feminist movement, the civil rights movement, and the anti-war movement.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
On-line            On-line                        Hoffmann, David

Assigned Readings:
Students will be required to read several articles or a book every week – the equivalent of roughly ten books during the semester.

Assignments:
Students will have weekly written assignments based on the course readings.  These assignments will amount to roughly 7 short papers. In addition, students will be required to participate regularly in online discussions.  They will also conduct historical research, which will culminate in 3 longer papers or projects.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
The course is intended primarily for history majors and minors, though it is open to all students.  However, the course does not fulfill any GE requirements, so it should not be taken by students seeking to fulfill the GE historical studies requirement.                                                                                                                                                           


HISTORY 2800 INTRODUCTION TO THE DISCIPLINE OF HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

The specific topic of this class is Nat Turner’s rebellion.   In 1831, Turner, a Southampton County Virginia slave, led a revolt intending to overthrow the institution of slavery.  Dozens of white people were killed, and dozens of slaves and free black people were as well. The revolt has been reconstructed by historians, fictionalized by novelists, and even translated onto film.  Almost every generation recreates Nat Turner.  We will look at available documents related to this rebellion, different interpretations of them, and draw our own intelligent conclusions about what definitely happened, what probably happened, and what we can never really know.  Ultimately, each of those things determines how and what we must (or are able to) write.  We will also examine the evolution of the scholarship on the revolt and try to account for the differences in the work over time.  Thus, we will also be looking at historiography—the evolution of the history of the event.  The point of these analyses is not simply to know all we can about Turner’s revolt, but to think about the discipline of history and the various ways history is made and how historians work

In the process, we will look at and think about “driving forces” of history, whether history is objective or subjective, and the role of the historian in history.  We will talk about “good” history and “bad” history, how to use sources, what “facts” are, and whether or not history can be scientific.  Altogether, our goal is to become better historians through critical reading and thoughtful analyses of original and interpreted sources.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:30     TR                               Shaw, Stephanie

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course is required for all students declaring a Major in history, students must earn a “C” or higher to have it count on the history major. It may not be used for the GEC/GE Historical Study requirement.                                                               


HISTORY 2800 INTRODUCTION TO THE DISCIPLINE OF HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course is designed as an introduction to the study of history, and to the concepts and skills necessary to study the past.  Our concern throughout the course will be to examine critically the nature of history as a discipline and the writing of history as an academic project. Through readings, discussions, in-class activities, and written assignments, we will explore the purposes of studying history, the types of sources available to reconstruct the past and different methods and approaches for examining and interpreting history.

Unlike other history courses, this course does not treat a specific topic or period; instead, it focuses on historical methodology and philosophy.  In addition, we will practice a series of fundamental skills, including critical thinking, analytical reading, accurate research, public speaking and effective writing, all critical to your success as a history major.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:30-2:30       Wednesday                 Soland, Birgitte                                   

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
The course is intended primarily for history majors and minors, though it is open to all students.  However, the course does not fulfill any GE requirements, so it should not be taken by students seeking to fulfill the GE historical studies requirement.                                                                                                                                                           


HISTORY 2800 INTRODUCTION TO THE DISCIPLINE OF HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course, designed for students planning to major in history, presents some of the main elements of historical methodology: how historians do their work. We shall study how historians gather information, organize and analyze their data, and write up their research and conclusions. In short, we will learn how history is produced. Students will gather experience in dealing with primary and secondary historical sources, interpreting events within their historical context, and developing a comparative understanding of historical phenomenon. This is a required course for all History majors.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:35-10:55       TR                               Staley, David

Assigned Readings:
John Tosh, The Pursuit of History, 6th edition
Getz & Clarke, Abina and the Important Men, 2nd ed.
Jo Guldi & David Armitage, The History Manifesto

Assignments:
1) Attendance: worth 10% of final grade.
2) Participation: worth 25% of final grade
3) Creating an archive: worth 15% of the final grade
4) History and Wikipedia 15% of the final grade
5) Primary source exercise: worth 15% of the final grade
6) Final essay worth 20% of the final grade

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course is required for all students declaring a Major in History. Students must earn a C or higher to have it count on the Major. It may not be used for GE requirements.


HISTORY 2800H INTRODUCTION TO THE DISCIPLINE OF HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will introduce honors students planning to major in history to history as a discipline and a major.  The course is designed to give students practice in the analysis of historical sources and in developing logic and clarity in both written and oral assignments.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:45-2:05       WF                              Stebenne, David

Assigned Readings:
Josephine Tey, The Daughter of Time (1951)
James Romm, Herodotus (1998)
E. H. Carr, What is History? (1961)
David Cannadine, ed., What is History Now? (2002)
Elliott Gorn, Randy Roberts and Terry Bilhartz, Constructing the American Past, 7th ed., Vol. 1 (2011)
Sharlene Sayegh and Eric Altice, History and Theory (2014)

Assignments:
Discussion of the assigned reading; three chapter summaries (précis); book review and oral presentation of the results; journal analysis and oral presentation of the results; history based on primary documents and oral presentation of the results.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course is required for all honors students majoring in history and highly recommended for honors students seeking a minor in history. Other honors students interested in history for its own sake and wanting a better sense of the field are also welcome.


HISTORY 3191 HISTORICAL INTERNSHIP

3 Cr. Hrs.

In this course, you will have the opportunity to choose from a range of internship possibilities at nearby historical or history-related institutions.  You will earn credit for your semester-long work experience and will have the chance to reflect on what you’re learning about history, skills, professional expectations, and future career directions.  By the end of the course, you should have a better sense of who you are and who you want to become in the future as a contributor to the work force.

Time               Meetings Days             Instructor
ARR               ARR                             Irwin, Ray

Assigned Readings: Selected readings will be posted on CARMEN.

Assignments:
Written assignment request;
At least 20 hours of work at an internship site;
Discussion posts;
Active participation (class meetings arranged);
Presentation about your internship and your semester’s work;
Final paper (1,000- 1,500 words).

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
Enrollment limited to history majors with ranks 2, 3, or 4 and 3.0 minimum GPA.                                                                                                                                                           


HISTORY 3702 DIGITAL HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course is a survey of the ways digital technology is impacting history: from the collection and preservation of primary sources, to the analysis of those documents with the aid of algorithms, to the representation of the past through digital means.  What does it look like when we take our study of the past into the digital realm?  How has the availability of millions of digitized primary and secondary sources impacted our practices?  How has the digital medium altered how we represent the past?  How have data analytics tools helped historians to uncover new patterns in the past? 

This course will be organized as a lecture-based-course—where ‘ll present basic ideas and concepts—a seminar—where we will read and reflect upon important works in digital history—as well as a studio course—in which we will engage in the process of creating digital history.

This course assumes no prior technical or programming knowledge.  The course is meant to provide a basic grounding in the technological skills needed to present history in digital form. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:30     WF                              Staley, Dave

Assigned Readings:
Graham, Milligan and Weingart, Exploring Big Historical Data: The Historian’s Macroscope

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course is a GE Historical Study course.  This course fulfills group Global, post-1750 for the History major.                                                                                                                                                           


HISTORY 4010 READINGS IN MODERN U.S. HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Sexual Revolutions in the United States

Many Americans associate the 1960s and 1970s as an era of sexual freedom and the 1980s as a period of sexual conservatism.  Time magazine, for example, used similar images of Adam and Eve when it announced a “sex explosion” in 1969 and again when it declared “The Revolution is Over” in 1984.  Many historians have analyzed the history of sexuality in the second half of the twentieth century and have raised numerous important questions about it.  How much really changed during the sexual revolution?  Was there a “revolution” at all?  If there was a sexual revolution, when did it begin and end?  Who resisted it and did it have any lasting effects on American culture?  Students in this class will learn how some historians have tried to answer these questions and conduct their own secondary source research on the sexual revolution.  We will explore topics such as the history of marriage, LGBT life and politics, feminism, contraception, consumer culture, and the Religious Right.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:35-10:55       WF                              Howard, Clay

Assignments:
This is an upper-level seminar on the reading and writing of history.  Students in this course should expect to do relatively large amounts of reading.  The class will require several writing assignments, including book reviews and a final historiographical essay on a topic of the student’s choosing.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course is designed for junior and senior History majors and fulfills the Readings Seminar requirement for History Majors that began OSU in semesters and it fulfills the 598 seminar requirement for those history majors that began OSU in quarters.                                                                                                                                                           


HISTORY 4015 RESEARCH SEMINAR IN MODERN U.S. HISTORY: THE SIXTIES

3 Cr. Hrs.

This class will concentrate primarily on the United States during the tumultuous period known as “The Sixties.”  We will define the period loosely, not so much by temporal boundaries as by historical streams.  Those streams included vast and profound cultural change; generational conflict; artistic rebellions; technological transformation; anti-colonial nationalism; the Cold War; the Black Liberation Struggle; and the rise of modern conservatism. It would not take much for us to whip up a dozen more topics.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
2:20-3:40         WF                              Steigerwald, David

Assigned Reading:
Mark Lytle, America’s Uncivil Wars
Weekly Primary Source Readings

Assignments:
Weekly reading and class discussion
Research projects: We are lucky to have a virtually unlimited supply of primary-source material at our disposal, which will allow students to delve deeply into practically any topic that catches their interest.  Students will include several secondary sources on their topic of choice and then load up on the primary sources.  The end result will be an original essay, roughly twenty to twenty-five pages in length that demonstrates a solid grasp of the given topic.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the research seminar requirement toward a history major for semester students; this fulfills the 598 seminar requirement for quarter students. This course is only open to junior and senior history majors.  


HISTORY 4080 READING SEMINAR IN AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

The Progressive Era in American history, roughly 1890 to 1920, is generally characterized as a period of major changes in American social, political, and economic life.  Americans were becoming increasingly urban; urban areas became more industrial and more socio-culturally diverse; and politics became more complex.  The seemingly rapid and sometimes haphazard changes that accompanied (sometimes spawned and sometimes resulted from) this reorganization also led to major reform movements in many areas of life—in some ways, the most significant characteristic of the era.   Reformers believed that whether in politics, public health, child welfare, government, housing, urban development, work, or any other area of life, the problems generated by rapid urbanization, industrialization, and immigration could be addressed and corrected.  People from all walks of life went to work in ways they thought would improve society.  Implicit in the social/cultural construct of what scholars have labeled “the Progressive Era” is the idea of progress, modernization, and improvement. 

But the same period in African-American history has been labeled “the Nadir”—the lowest point in the history of American race relations.  It was a period of increasing segregation, discrimination and racial terror, symbolized most especially by lynching and race riots involving white attacks on black communities and individuals.  Despite those horrors, it was also a period of intense and successful organizing and advancements among black Americans:  black clubs, beneficial, and benevolent societies were formed; the NAACP, the Urban League, The Negro Business League, the National Association of Colored Women were a few of the national organizations that worked for the advancement of the race.  Major businesses were formed, some of which still survive.  And these institutions, along with black migration from the country to the city and from the South to the North and West contributed to the creation of a racial/cultural identity that would undergird the Harlem Renaissance and shape a black political consciousness that would lead to the beginning of the modern Civil Rights Movement.

This readings course is a study of the history of that rich, interesting, and complex period in African-American history.  It is designed to assist those preparing fields in African-American and American history, along with those who are simply intellectually curious. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
2:15-5:00         Thursday                     Shaw, Stephanie

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course is designed for junior and senior History majors and fulfills the Readings Seminar requirement for History Majors that began OSU in semesters and it fulfills the 598 seminar requirement for those history majors that began OSU in quarters. This course is cross-listed with History 5080, open to graduate students.


HISTORY 4210 READINGS IN GREEK HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

The World of Classical Athens

This is a seminar-style course for undergraduates that focuses on the politics and culture of ancient Athens, the largest and most powerful of all Greek city-states during the classical period.  It offers students the chance to pursue a more advanced level of enquiry into Greek history through close reading of a variety of primary and secondary texts, giving them a fuller sense of how scholars reconstruct the past from often scanty and problematic literary and archaeological evidence.  Employing a synoptic approach, the course will explore the interfaces between democracy, class, religion, literature, art, architecture, and military practices in classical Athens.  It is especially interested in tracing the formation of those shared beliefs, values, and cultural assumptions that distinguished the Athenians from other Greeks.  What, in short, did it mean to be an "Athenian"?  Along the way, a number of other significant issues and questions will also be raised: how and when did the Athenian state become "democratic"? How did the democracy work? In what sense did "the people" really "rule"?  What does the Parthenon "mean"? What were the functions of tragedy and comedy in Athenian society? How "progressive" or "enlightened" was Athenian society?

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
2:15-5:00         Tuesday                      Anderson, Greg

Assignments: participation in in-class discussion of readings; in-class presentation; research paper.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the reading seminar requirement toward a history major for semester students; this fulfills the 598 seminar requirement for quarter students. This course is only open to junior and senior history majors.                                 


HISTORY 4525 RESEARCH SEMINAR IN INTERNATIONAL HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

The Diplomacy of the First World War

This course will examine the diplomacy of the First World War from its origins, through the conduct of the war and the construction of the postwar order.  The First World War can be seen as the defining moment of the twentieth century–a military and economic disaster from which Europe never fully recovered, thus setting the stage for the ongoing conflict of World War II and the Cold War which dominated the last century.  It will be our undertaking to explore how Europe came to be at war in August 1914.  We will examine how the diplomatic efforts of both sides during the war to gain and appease allies impacted the conduct of the war and shaped the postwar climate.  And we will investigate the attempts to construct a new world order through the postwar peacemaking.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
2:15-5:00         Tuesday                      Siegel, Jennifer

Assigned Readings: (tentative)
The reading list will include several of the following:
Boghardt, Thomas.  The Zimmerman Telegram:  Intelligence, Diplomacy, and America’s Entry into World War I.
Fromkin, David.  A Peace to End All Peace:  The Fall of the Ottoman Empire and the Creation of the Modern Middle East.
den Hertog, Johan and Samuël Kruizinga, eds.  Caught in the Middle:  Neutrals, Neutrality and the First World War.
Horn, Martin.  Britain, France, and the Financing of the First World War.
Howard, Michael.  The First World War.  A Very Short Introduction.
MacMillan, Margaret.  Paris, 1919.
Mulligan, William.  The Origins of the First World War.

Assignments:  (tentative)
One in-class presentation on the author(s) of the week, placing the week’s reading within its historiographical context.
One book review of William Mulligan’s Origins of the First World War.
One 4-6 page document analysis paper.
One research paper, approximately 15-20 pages in length.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the research seminar requirement toward a history major for semester students; this fulfills the 598 seminar requirement for quarter students. This course is only open to junior and senior history majors.                               


HISTORY 4575 RESEARCH SEMINAR IN MILITARY HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

The First World War

This course is a seminar that explores and analyzes the history of World War I.  Students will read and discuss in class several books, articles and documents related especially to the military, social, cultural and gendered aspects of the conflict.  A research paper, based on significant primary sources, will be the core requirement of the course.

Time               Meeting Days              Instructor
9:35-12:20       Wednesday                 Cabanes, Bruno

Assigned Readings:
Bruno Cabanes, August 1914, France, the Great War and a Month that Changes the World Forever
Martha Hanna, Your Death Would be Mine
Jennifer Keene, Doughboys. The Great War and the Remaking of America
Jay Winter, Sites of Memory, Sites of Mourning

Assignments:

The final grade in the course will be an average of the three grades given for regular and intensive participation (10%), leading the group discussion (20%), an annotated bibliography (10%); an oral report on the research project (10%); a final research paper (50%).

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the reading seminar requirement toward a history major for semester students; this fulfills the 598 seminar requirement for quarter students. This course is only open to junior and senior history majors.                                 


HISTORY 4600 READING SEMINAR IN WOMEN’S HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Women’s Liberation Movements across the “Second Wave”

Female-Identified Activism in the Black, Chicana, and American Indian Nationalist Movements, Women’s Liberation Movements, and LGBT Freedom Struggle

This women’s history course will explore feminist organizing, including transwomen’s organizing, across a range of social justice movements in the postwar era, here roughly 1950 through the present. The history of childhood and the family, civil rights organizing through female-centered networks, and queer challenges to normative femininities and feminist organizing will all be themes highlighted during the semester. Through weekly readings of roughly one hundred pages a week, students will engage with women’s history across a range of chronological topics within the history of women and political action in the United States following the Second World War:  the roots of the modern Black Freedom Struggle and the Civil Rights organizing of the 1950s and early 1960s; federal changes in employment law and the founding of The National Organization for Women to fight for these changes to be enforced; the emergence of radical Women’s Liberation groups in the late 1960s; and the organizing of female-identified individuals in the modern LGBT Freedom Struggle, including both lesbian feminism and trans female organizing.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
2:15-5:00         Thursday                     Rivers, Daniel

Assigned readings include: (sample)
Excerpts from Ruth Rosen, The World Split Open
Elaine Tyler May, “Cold War Minnesota,” Minnesota History, Vol. 61, No. 5, Minnesota's Greatest Generation (spring, 2009), pp. 218-229
Stephanie Gilmore and Elizabeth Kaminski, A Part and Apart: Lesbian and Straight Feminist Activists Negotiate Identity in a Second Wave Organization Journal of the History of Sexuality, Vol. 16, No. 1 (Jan., 2007), pp. 95-113
Excerpts from Dayo Gore, Radicalism at the Crossroads: African American Women Activists in the Cold War
Ericka Huggins and Angela D. LeBlanc-Ernest, “Revolutionary Women, Revolutionary Education The Black Panther Party’s Oakland Community School,” in Want to Start a Revolution ed. Gore, Theoharis, and Woodard
Lesbian Land, ed. Joyce Cheney (A 1985 collection of essays from lesbian feminist communes across the country). We will use this as a primary document to explore the movement in-depth and work across primary and secondary sources as historians.

Assignments:
As this is a readings-heavy course, the assignments are short and require close engagement with the assigned course readings. Any primary source analysis will also be short assignments and involve close analysis of one or two primary sources. Graded assignments will include: two short 5-page papers, a group in-class presentation, and short (2-3 page) weekly writing assignments.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the reading seminar requirement toward a history major for semester students; this fulfills the 598 seminar requirement for quarter students. This course is only open to junior and senior history majors.  


HISTORY 4705 RESEARCH SEMINAR IN HISTORY OF TECHNOLOGY

3 Cr. Hrs.

In this course we will throw ourselves into the exciting history of how technology and technological change influences our daily lives and some of the consequences this have led to over time. You will learn more about history of technology during seminars and in class you will learn to apply several historical research methods, such as oral history, microhistory, and source criticism, in order to complete a research paper (15-20 pages in length). In the paper you will have to examine, from a personal point of view, a specific technology and how it has changed and developed over a few generations. You will, for instance, have to interview older family members, dig in (digital) archives and analyze secondary sources. The possibilities for research projects are endless. You can for example write about how aspects of media, communication, travel or housework have changed from when your grandparents were young until today. We live in an ever-changing human made world, now you have the chance to reflect on it.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
2:15-5:00         Mondays                     Viklund, Roine

Assigned Readings (This list is tentative and the specific books may change):
Collins, Harry and Pinch, Trevor (2014). The Golem at Large: What You Should Know about Technology (2014) Cambridge University Press
Diamond, Jared M. (2017). Guns, germs, and steel: the fates of human societies. Twentieth anniversary edition New York: W.W. Norton & Company
Hughes, Thomas Parker (1983). Networks of power: electrification in Western society, 1880-1930. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Univ.Press
Noble, David (2011). Forces of Production: A Social History of Industrial Automation. New York: Routledge
Ritchie, Donald A. (red.) (2011). The Oxford handbook of oral history. New York: Oxford University Press
Rothschild, Joan (red.) (1983). Machina ex dea: feminist perspectives on technology. New York: Pergamon
Schwartz Cowan, Ruth and Hersch, Matthew H. (2018). A Social History of American Technology 2nd Edition, Oxford University Press
Rampolla, Mary Lynn (2015). A Pocket Guide to Writing in History (Bedford/St. Martin’s,).

Assignments:
Students will have two major assignments throughout the semester:
First, students will complete a major research paper (15-20 pages in length) that examines a personal aspect of technological change.
Second, students will present the research paper in class as a blog, film, vlog, podcast or traditional power-point presentation.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the reading seminar requirement toward a history major for semester students; this fulfills the 598 seminar requirement for quarter students. This course is only open to junior and senior history majors.

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WOMEN'S HISTORY

 

HISTORY 2610H INTRODUCTION TO WOMEN & GENDER IN THE U.S.

3 Cr. Hrs.

This honors course surveys the history of women and gender in the United States. The course will examine the experiences of Native, European, African, Mexican, and Asian American women within the contexts of historical change in the U.S. 

A major goal of the course is to present women's history both as an integral part of U.S. history and as a unique subject of historical investigation. What can be learned about other areas of American history—immigration, citizenship, racialization, formal politics—by examining women and gender? How does an examination of gender and women in history alter the historical questions we ask? Students will learn to think critically about historical arguments as well as to understand the difference that gender makes in history and the way that gender interacts with class, race, ethnicity, and sexuality.

In particular, the course aims to enlighten students on three major areas of women’s/gender history:

  • Sexuality and ideals of “womanhood”: How, when, and why did race- and class-specific ideals of womanhood change?
  • Activism, legal reform and politics: How, when, and why did American women gain full citizenship? How did different groups of women participate in and shape U.S. politics before and after suffrage?
  • Gendered archives: how do we access women’s history? How do we recreate the silenced perspective of certain women throughout history? What perspectives can different sources offer us?

Students will gain hands-on experience visiting several different historical archives and museums on campus. Students will also do their own original historical research, utilizing a range of primary sources. We will practice a series of fundamental skills including critical thinking, analytical reading, accurate research, public speaking, and effective writing.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:30     TR                               Flores, Joan

Assigned Readings:
Linda K. Kerber, Jane Sherron De Hart, Cornelia Hughes Dayton & Judy Tzu-Chun Wu, eds., Women’s America: Refocusing the Past, 8th ed. (Oxford Univ Press, 2016), required

Assignments:
Primary source analysis, short essay, museum response, final visual project.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for history majors or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement and the GE social diversity requirement.                                                                                                                                                    


HISTORY 3640 MEDIEVAL WOMEN: POWER; PIETY AND PRODUCTION

3 Cr. Hrs.

The goal of this class is to explore the changes in women’s rights and roles in medieval society over the course of the high and late Middle Ages (covering the period of roughly 1050-1500) from a comparative perspective. Discussions will focus on female agency, especially: the gap between prescription and reality; the difficulty of being categorized as either an “Eve,” or a “Mary” (especially when it is all too easy to become a “Mary Magdalene”); women’s contributions to medieval society; ideas and attitudes about women. Discussion topics include: the barbarian legacy, ideas about women (from the church to anatomy), women and property law, marriage and sexuality, women and the church, education and literacy, gendered space, rebellious women, queens and royal dowagers, and single women. We will also spend a lot of time talking about famous medieval women in order to become aware that history is not just a catalog of the events of great men – women have also contributed substantially to the world in which we live.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
2:20-3:40         WF                              Butler, Sara

Assigned Readings:
Theresa Earenfight, Queenship and Power: Queenship in Medieval Europe (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013).
The rest of the readings for the course will be journal articles posted to Carmen/Canvas.

Assignments:
Participation:                           15%
Book Assignment                    15%
Biography: a) ORAL:              10%
                  b) WRITTEN:        25%
Reading responses:                25%
Final Exam                             10%

Biography:
Each student will be given the opportunity to choose an historical figure during the first week of classes. Here are the options to choose from:

  • Alice Kyteler –first woman to be accused of being a “witch” (in the early modern sense)
  • Christine de Pisan / Pizan – a writer for hire
  • Heloise –intellectual with a famous set of letters to philosopher-husband, Peter Abelard
  • Isabella d’Este – an art patron
  • Joan of Arc – a cross-dressing savior
  • Margery Kempe – the first woman to write an autobiography in English
  • Marguerite de Porete – a condemned heretic
  • Marie de France – a woman writer
  • Mary Magdalene – companion to Jesus with an interesting medieval story
  • Pope Joan – a woman who dressed as a man, became pope, then was outed
  • Queen Blanche of Castile – m. to King Louis VIII of France, regent twice
  • Queen Eleanor of Aquitaine – m. to king of France & king of England
  • Queen Isabel la Catolica of Spain – initiated the Spanish Inquisition
  • St Bridget of Sweden – mystic and ascetic, founded the Brigittine nunneries
  • St Catherine of Siena – mystic and ascetic, believed she was literally married to Christ
  • St Clare of Assisi – founded the order of the Poor Clares, companion to St Francis
  • St Hildegard of Bingen – intellectual, writer, mystic, physician, rebel
  • St Julian of Norwich – anchoress, writer, advisor
  • The Paston Women – an English gentry family who left behind a lot of letters
  • The Virgin Mary – Queen of Heaven
  • Trotula of Salerno – a physician and author of a medieval treatise on health of women

Students will prepare an oral presentation with PowerPoint for a class presentation, and do a 10-12 page written biography.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.


HISTORY 3642 WOMEN IN MODERN EUROPE FROM THE 18TH CENTURY TO THE PRESENT

3 Cr. Hrs.                 

This course is designed as an introduction to the history of European women from the late eighteenth century to the mid-twentieth century.  Because there is much material to cover, my approach will necessarily be selective – emphasizing some events and developments while leaving out other things also important to the history of women. Several themes will be central to the course.  We will study the processes of industrial expansion and economic change and the impact of these developments on women’s social and economic position.  We will explore the political reorganization of Europe over the course of these centuries, and we will examine how women strove to shape and improve their lives under changing circumstances.  We will also concentrate on how relationships between women and men developed, and how beliefs about gender changed.  Finally, we will look at how economic position, religion, sexuality, marital status, regional and national differences influenced women’s experiences.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:30     TR                               Soland, Birgitte

Assignments:
Midterm paper and take-home final exam.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Europe, post-1750 for the history major or can fulfill a GE requirement.

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WORLD HISTORY
                                                                                                                                                

HISTORY 1681 WORLD HISTORY TO 1500

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course examines the major issues that have shaped the human experience from the beginnings of human civilization (ca. 3500 B.C.E.) to ca. 1500 C.E., when the European voyages of exploration were beginning to tie the world together more tightly than ever before in a new pattern of global interrelatedness.  Before 1500, societies in different parts of the world had far less contact with each other.  In particular, Afro-Eurasia and the Americas remained almost entirely cut off from each other.  For this reason, the main emphasis of History 1681 will be the comparative study of civilizations.  Within that context, religions (belief systems), trade, and technology will be emphasized as factors that differentiated civilizations while also linking different civilizations at regional and hemispheric, if not yet global, levels.

Time               Meeting Days             Instructor
8:00-9:20        TR                              Hathaway, Jane

Assigned Readings:
Richard W. Bulliet, et al., The Earth and Its Peoples:  A Global History, vol. 1,7th ed.
Robert van Gulik, The Lacquer Screen:  A Judge Dee Mystery

Assignments:
“past in the present” paragraph, in-class midterm and final, a paper related to The Chinese Lake Murders.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the GE Historical survey; Global diversity.                                                                                                                                                     


HISTORY 1682 WORLD HISTORY FROM 1500 TO THE PRESENT

3 Cr. Hrs.

Survey of the human community, with an emphasis on its increasing global integration, from the first European voyages of exploration through the present.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
4:10-5:05         MWF                           Murtha, C.
On-line            On-line                        Bolanos, I.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the historical study GE requirement.  Not open to students that have credit for History 182 or 2642.


HISTORY 2650 THE WORLD SINCE 1914

3 Cr. Hrs.

The World since 1914 is a course on global history. We will focus on central themes of global history in the modern world, including nationalism, globalization, feminisms, the rise of mass society, race and ethnicity, as well as major events, such as the World Wars, the Great Depression, the Cold War, and decolonization. We will also look at scientific and material issues in the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, such as food, health, energy, economic development, and the environment.  Throughout the course we will ask questions about the ways that national and international politics and change affect people across the globe and explore competing theories about the causes of historical change. Readings for the class will include both textbook or other secondary readings, as well as primary documents.

Time               Meetings Days             Instructor
12:40-1:35      MW                              Rivers, Daniel
10:20; 12:40   Friday (recitations)
1:50

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for the history major or can fulfill the historical study GE.


HISTORY 2700 GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT

3 Cr. Hrs.

In this course, we explore how humans have shaped the environment and how the environment has shaped human history from prehistory to the present.  Our topics will range from fire to deforestation to climate change.  Students will learn the essential background to major environmental issues and consider how history might (or might not) help us confront present environmental challenges.

Time               Meetings Days             Instructor
online              online                            White, Sam

Assigned Readings:
The course has one required textbook
J. R. McNeill and Peter Engelke, The Great Acceleration: An Environmental History of the Anthropocene since 1945 (Cambridge, MA: Harvard Belknap, 2016).
All other course readings will be posted to Carmen.

Assignments:
Regular short quizzes and exams, weekly recitation activities, and a final paper.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course may be taken to fulfill historical study, social science, or global studies GE requirements.  This course may be counted as Group Global, and either pre- or post-1750 for the major in history.  This course has been recommended for students pursuing degrees in SENR, but students in all degree programs are welcome.

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