Autumn 2020 Undergraduate Courses

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the class meeting methods (ONLINE, in-person or hybrid) may be changing. Please visit the Registrar's Course LIstings web site for the most up-to-date information. We apologize for the inconvenience.

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AFRICAN HISTORY

                                                                                                                                                    

HISTORY 2301 AFRICAN PEOPLES AND EMPIRES

3 Cr. Hrs.                                                                                               

Was Mansa Munsa, ruler of the Mali Empire in the 14 th century, the richest person in history? Come and find out by learning about the deep history of the African continent. Debunking the myth that the African continent lacks history, we explore a variety of pre-colonial cultures and societies and the impact they had upon other cultures in the world.  In addition, we will investigate the different ways in which historians have thought about the pre-colonial history of Africa, and which topics are the subject of debate. This course also introduces students to the use and analysis of primary sources and maps.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

ONLINE              ONLINE                           Van Beurden, Sara

Assigned Readings:

Textbook: Robert Harms, Africa in Global History (Norton, 2018)

D.T. Niane, Sundiata. An Epic of Old Mali. (Longman African Writers, 1965/2006)

Zora Neal Hurston, Barracoon: the Story of the Last “Black Cargo (Amistad Press, 2017)

Additional ONLINE sources and readings on Carmen

Assignments: Map quiz, midterm, final, reading quizzes, response papers, discussion board

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group Africa, pre-1750 for the History major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


                                                                                                                                                    

HISTORY 3302 NATIONALISM, SOCIALISM, AND REVOLUTION IN AFRICA

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course explores the history of the nationalist and revolutionary movements as well as the socialist regimes in Africa in the twentieth and early twenty first centuries. The course will begin with a discussion of the establishment and the legacy of European colonial rule in Africa, and proceeds to examine the development of African nationalism and decolonization. The nationalist movements in Africa produced important leaders and political thinkers whose ideas and writings have shaped the nationalist discourse and anti-colonial struggle.  They include figures such as Kwame Nkrumah, Julius Nyerere, Patrice Lumumba, Amilcar Cabral, just to name a few. Moreover, the course will explore the way in which race, ethnicity, gender, and class have shaped nationalist discourse, strategies, and agenda as well as the manner in which conflicts and tensions within the nationalist movement have continued to shape post-colonial states and society in Africa. A major part of the course will focus on the theory and practice of socialism as well as success and failures of the socialist experience in Africa by looking at specific examples from countries such as Tanzania, Ethiopia, Burkina Faso, Angola and Mozambique.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

ONLINE             ONLINE                          Sikainga, Ahmad

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Africa, post-1750 for history the major or can fulfill the historical study and global diversity GE requirements.


                                                                                                                                               

HISTORY 3307 AFRICAN HEALTH & HEALING

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course explores approaches to health and healing in sub-Saharan Africa over the last 150 years.  By using a historical perspective on health and healing, we see why specific diseases emerge, why they persist, and what their consequences are for African societies.  Diseases we will consider include cholera, sleeping sickness, malaria, tuberculosis, and HIV/AIDS, among others.  The course is also interested in African experiences of being unwell.

While students will gain some biological or technological understanding of diseases and causes of illness, the course focuses on the wider social or economic consequences that promote disease and illness.  By investigating illness, we can consider the ways that different governments (colonial and post-colonial) have attempted to control disease and control the people disease affected; the rise and elaboration of tropical medicine as a field; and the impact of colonial and post-colonial policy on land use, ecology, and human settlement.  In addition, by thinking about health and what makes one healthy, we can find insights into societal values, and look at the overlapping and contradictory therapeutic traditions (grounded in both popular and biomedical treatments) that African people have used to regain health.

This course is an ideal course for students who have an interest in Africa, medicine, public health, colonialism, or post-colonial states.  All students will develop and propose their own research project in the form of a Fulbright grant.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

9:35-10:55       WF                              McDow, D.

Assigned Readings:

Readings will include historical primary sources, journal articles, and at least two books.

Assignments:

Required coursework includes map quizzes, short writing assignments, a midterm examination, a final examination, and a research project.  This course is interactive and requires regular attendance.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:This course fulfills Group Africa, pre & post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.

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AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY

                                                                                                                                          

HISTORY 2080 AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY TO 1877

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course examines the history of black Americans from the beginning of the African slave trade to just after the Civil War.  Obviously, slavery will be an important part of this class.  We will look at diverse sites of slavery, beginning in the early years and in the North when and where small farm and town/city slaves were the norm.  Our examination of plantation slavery recognizes the changes in that system as the nation evolved from “a society with slaves” into “a slave society,” and we will follow that expansion of slavery westward (across the mountains) and southward (into the Deep South and across the Gulf states).  We begin with the assumption that slavery was chosen as a labor system, not inevitable, and, that once chosen, had to be maintained, thus becoming a social and political system as well as an economic system.  We will also pay attention to free black people in the North and the South, their diverse efforts to live as free people, and their relationship to those who remained enslaved.  Our most important objective is to see and understand how black people—slave and free—lived.  We will also study their interior worlds of family, work, community, and culture and the ways they sought to an often succeeded in shaping a life and a lifestyle that constantly resisted external systems of domination.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

2:20-3:40         TR
ONLINE              ONLINE                        Shaw, Stephanie

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group North America, pre-1750 for history the history major or can fulfill a GE requirement.


                                                                                                                                               

HISTORY 3083 CIVIL RIGHTS AND BLACK POWER MOVEMENTS

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course examines the Civil Rights/Black Power Movement. It begins by looking at Black activism and Black life at the start of the 20 th century. It continues by examining the development and impact of the mass mobilization efforts of the 1950s and 1960s, from the Montgomery bus boycott and the student sit-ins, to the Freedom Rides and the March on Washington. At the same time, it scrutinizes the grassroots organizing campaigns led by the young people of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). This course concludes by looking at civil rights activism outside the South, evaluating the impact of civil rights legislation, and analyzing the ideological and tactical transition to Black Power. This course employs a grassroots, bottom-up approach to understanding the black freedom struggle. It takes seriously the notion that the driving force behind the movement was every day, ordinary, Black folk, and the skilled African American activists who helped them organize and mobilize.  The goal of this course is to familiarize students with the people (famous, infamous, and forgotten), places, and events of the most significant American social movement of the 20 th century. In addition, and arguably most importantly, this course aims to show the process by which seemingly powerless African Americans organized to transform the society in which they lived, and the way white Americans, particularly in the South, responded, i.e. their attempts to preserve the status quo.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

12:45-2:05       TR
ONLINE                                              Jeffries, Hasan

Assignments:

Three exams over the course of the semester; and 10-page analytical essay.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This is a reading intensive course. This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for history the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


                                                                                                                                               

HISTORY 3089 STUDIES IN AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

To commemorate the 50 th anniversary of Ohio State’s Office of Diversity and Inclusion (ODI), this course will examine the Black experience in America from 1970 through 2020 through the prism of the experiences of African Americans – students, student-athletes, faculty, staff, and administers - at Ohio State over the same period.  This course will explore critical aspects of the African American experience in each decade every three weeks, starting with the campus wide student protests in the 1970s, and concluding with the presidential election of 2020. The course will be lecture and discussion driven, but once a month, in lieu of class, there will be a public facing panel comprised of key figures in Ohio State’s history who will share first hand experiences and provide important insight into the black experience on campus over the last half century.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

11:10-12:30     TR
ONLINE                                             Jeffries, Hasan

Assigned Readings: To Be Announced.

Assignments:

2-3 written reflections on presentations by guest panelists; 7-10 page final paper; 1 midterm; 1 final exam.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Attendance required.

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AMERICAN HISTORY

                                                                                                                                                    

HISTORY 1151 AMERICAN HISTORY TO 1877

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course provides a survey of American history from the Age of Encounter to the Reconstruction period.  It covers the social, economic, cultural, political, and diplomatic history of the American peoples. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

ONLINE            ONLINE                        Wood, J.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills the historical study GE requirement.  Not open to students that have credit for History 151 or 2001.


                                                                                                                                                    

HISTORY 1152 AMERICAN HISTORY 1877- PRESENT

3 Cr. Hrs.

From the aftermath of the Civil War to the 2000s, this course offers a sweeping survey of American history since 1865.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

ONLINE                                              Schoof, M.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills the historical study GE requirement.  Not open to students that have credit for History 152 or 2002.


                                                                                                                                                    

HISTORY 2001 LAUNCHING AMERICA, AMERICAN HISTORY TO 1877

3 Cr. Hrs.

Launching America is an intermediate-level overview of American history from its origins in scattered colonial settlements through the American Revolution to the American Civil War and its aftermath.  Throughout the course, we examine the American story in its wider Atlantic context, focusing on the central problems of power and democracy among a diversity of peoples.  Sketching the larger patterns of American history, we engage with historians’ efforts to understand and interpret the meaning of this past, and introduce some of the key approaches to historical study.  

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

11:30-12:25     MW (Lectures)            Brooke, John
9:10-10:05      Friday (recitations)
10:20-11:15    Friday (recitations)
12:40-1:35      Friday (recitations)

Assigned Readings:

Foner, Give Me Liberty: An American History, Vol 1 SEAGULL EDITION ISBN-13: 978-0393920307

Rice, Tales from a Revolution: Bacon's Rebellion and the Transformation of Early America ISBN-13: 978-0195386943

Ellis, Founding Brothers the Revolutionary Generation ISBN-13: 978-0375705243

Murphy, The Jerry Rescue: The Fugitive Slave Law, Northern Rights, and the American Sectional Crisis   ISBN-13: 978-0199913602

Documents to be posted on Carmen

Assignments:

Quizzes in section,

Midterm,

Three short essays

Final

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

English 1110.01/02 either previous or concurrently. Not open to students with credit for History 151 or 1151.  This course fulfills Group North America, pre-1750 for history majors or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


                                                                                                                                                    

HISTORY 2002 MAKING AMERICA MODERN

3 Cr. Hrs.

From the aftermath of the Civil War to the 2000s, this course offers a sweeping survey of American history since 1865. The story of America that unfolds is one of perpetual contest between competing cultures, political factions, and institutions, each struggling to define the meaning of freedom and citizenship within the United States and beyond its borders. It is a story filled with contradictions, one featuring moments when economic progress coincided with egregious violations of social justice and progressive reform melded with retrogressive repression. Our primary objectives in this course are the following: to identify key moments when Americans sought to reconcile competing visions of democracy and to catalog the key figures and social and political conflicts that helped shape modern America.

Throughout the semester, you will come to know personalities from the past by reading letters, speeches, and book excerpts from specific time periods. You will also have the opportunity to watch YouTube clips featuring historical footage and radio recordings of key historical moments. Students in the course will evaluate and interpret these primary sources each week and construct historical insights to share with fellow students in discussion section. Often the readings, videos, and radio recordings for the week will offer insights into contemporary issues we face today. Through short essays, each student will make connections between key historical events in the past and present-day issues facing our nation.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

9:10-10:05      MW (Lecture)
9:10-10:05      F (Recitation)
10:20-11:15    F (Recitation)
12:40-1:35      F (Recitation)

ONLINE                                              Rivers, Daniel

Assigned Readings:

Eric Foner, Give Me Liberty! and primary sources available on Canvas.

Assignments:

Midterm/Final; three short papers and discussion section participation is essential as well.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group North American, post-1750 for history majors or can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.


                                                                                                                                               

HISTORY 2002H MAKING AMERICA MODERN (HONORS)

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course is designed for students in the OSU Honors Program.  Class size is limited to 25.  Non-honors students may enroll if space is available and with permission of the instructor.  This course explores the political and cultural changes in the United States from the end of the Civil War to 2008. Through a combination of primary and secondary documents and films, we will look at how the United States went from being an emerging industrial nation to a major global superpower and how its citizens negotiated and influenced this transformation. The course takes us through several periods of large-scale social protest, and the importance of mass social movements in the U.S. and their relationship to the state will be a recurring theme in the class. Throughout the course, we will ask how major economic and military events, such as the Great Depression and the Second World War, affected people living in the U.S. differently based on categories of race, class, gender, and sexuality. Important topics will include the relationship between industrial capitalism and the era of reform from 1890 to 1920; the ways in which U.S. foreign policy decisions were connected to domestic affairs; and the effects of the modern African American Freedom Struggle on social change in the 1950s and 1960s.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

11:10-12:30     TR                               Irwin, Ray

Assigned Readings:

  • Eric Foner, Give Me Liberty. Seagull 6 th Ed., Volume 2 (textbook)
  • Ralph Ellison, Invisible Man
  • Audre Lorde, Zami
  • Thomas Sugrue, “Crabgrass-Roots Politics: Race, Rights, and the Reaction against Liberalism in the Urban North, 1940-1964”
  • Richard White, “Information, Markets, and Corruption: Transcontinental Railroads in the Gilded Age”
  • Elizabeth Kennedy and Madeline Davis, “I Could Hardly Wait to Get Back to That Bar: Lesbian Bar Culture in Buffalo in the 1930s and 1940s”

Assignments:

Two 6-8 pg. papers, in-class midterm and final during finals week, in-class presentation

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group North American, post-1750 for history majors or can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   

HISTORY 2015 HISTORY OF AMERICAN CRIMINAL JUSTICE

3 Cr. Hrs.

The history of crime, criminal law, law enforcement, prisons and juvenile courts.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

8:00-8:55         MWF                           Meier, D.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

HISTORY 2752 SOCIAL REFORMS MOVEMENTS IN U.S. HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Explores organized movements for social change from 1830s to 1970s, including antislavery, women’s rights, temperance, utopias, Populists, Progressives, African-American, American Indian and Chicano rights.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

ONLINE                                              Teague, G.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.


                                                                                                                                                    

HISTORY 3003 AMERICAN PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course traces the history of American presidential elections because they are interesting, because they are sometimes vitally important, and because they help us understand changing political practices and expectations for government.  It’s a seven-week sprint covering events over a more than 200-year span. While we will focus on a few elections in some detail, time constraints dictate an organizational scheme that can guide us through elections from Washington’s to the present. I’ve organized elections around the rules of the game.  The rules sometimes are formal -- which Americans had the right to vote, for example.   But they are also a mix of law and custom that determine how campaigns were financed and run, and how candidates were nominated, for example.  The rules reflected both the political calculations of ambitious politicians and parties and political, economic, and cultural change.  The rules also have shaped the candidates we get to choose among.

For all of this discussion of change, we will also note some constants.  Nasty campaigns have been the rule, not a recent development.  Media – from print to radio to television to Twitter – has always mattered in elections.  Candidates and parties have communicated to voters through mass media; sometimes the media has been independent but often not.  Candidates typically balance unity (above partisan statesmanship) and partisanship, which reflects a wider public desire for both unity and party victory.  In some ways, our current political climate is not so strange.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

3:55-6:40         TR                               Baker, Paula

( This is a 7 week session 1 class.)

Assigned Readings:

Gil Troy, See How They Ran: The Changing Role of the Presidential Candidate, revised and expanded edition, 1996

Additional material (articles, chapters, and documents) on Carmen

Assignments: 3 quizzes, 3 in-class essays, 2 short document papers, final

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for history majors or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


                                                                                                                                                    

HISTORY 3005 THE U.S. CONSTITUTION & SOCIETY TO 1877

3 Cr. Hrs.

Examination of the major developments in American constitutional history from the origins of European settlement of what became the USA through the era of Reconstruction.  Emphasis on the origins of the English Common Law, its transmission to the Thirteen Colonies, constitutionalism and the American Revolution, the rise and decline of the Articles of Confederation and the antebellum constitutional system, law and American economic development, the pressures placed on the legal system by the expansion of slavery, the constitutional crisis of the late 1850’s, the emergence of a new constitutional system in the wake of the American Civil War, and the changing legal status of African-Americans in the 1860’s and ‘70’s.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

11:10-12:30     TR                               Stebenne, David

Assigned Readings:

Kermit L. Hall and Timothy S. Huebner, Major Problems in American Constitutional History, 2 nd ed., (2009).

Assignments: Active participation in class discussions, and take-home midterm and final examinations.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group North America, pre or post-1750 for history majors or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.


                                                                                                                                                    

HISTORY 3011 American Revolution and New Nation, 1760-1787

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will examine the social, economic, cultural, and political changes in 18th century America that culminated in revolution and the creation of the republic. In addition to studying key events and themes, we will examine the ways that historians have interpreted the causes and consequences of the Revolution.  Students will complete a research project using 18 th century newspapers.  Ultimately, this class should enhance your analytical reading, writing and research skills, as well as your understanding of this crucial era in American and world history.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

12:45-2:05       TR                               Newell, Margaret

Assigned Readings are subject to change, but may include some of the following:

David Hackett Fischer, Washington’s Crossing (Oxford)

Woody Holton, Forced Founders (North Carolina)

Gordon S. Wood, The Creation of the American Republic (OIEAHC)

Rosemarie Zagarri, Revolutionary Backlash

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

History 1151 or equivalent recommended.  This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


                                                                                                                                               

HISTORY 3012 ANTEBELLUM AMERICA

3 Cr. Hrs.

In this course, we will be discussing the social, economic, cultural, and political history of antebellum America.  We will explore the experiences of ordinary people, such as farmers, shopkeepers, factory workers, as well as famous names, such as Andrew Jackson and Harriet Tubman.  We will also explore large-scale social processes such as the expansion of slavery, the growth of reform movements, and sectionalism in national politics.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

ONLINE                                              Cashin, Joan

Assignments: Students will read several monographs; they will write a paper and take one exam.  Students are expected to attend class and meet the course requirements.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for history majors or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.


                                                                                                                                                    

HISTORY 3014 GILDED AGE TO PROGRESSIVE ERA, 1877-1920

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course examines American politics and society from the later years of Reconstruction until the U.S. entry in World War I.  This is period historians often overlook, one stuck between the drama of the Civil War and the more familiar developments of the 20 th century.  Yet we should not.  In this period, important things seemed up for grabs, within the power of Americans to manage: how industry would be controlled, the character of race relations, the role of government in shaping society, public morals, the economy, and America's place in the world. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

ONLINE            ONLINE                         Wood, Josh

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement. Not open to students with credit for History 151 or 2001.


                                                                                                                                                    

HISTORY 3015 FROM THE NEW ERA TO THE NEW FRONTIER: THE UNITED STATES

3 Cr. Hrs.                    1921-1963

History 3015, “From the New Era to the New Frontier,” considers the United States from 1920 to 1963, essentially America through the Modern Age.  We will ponder modernity at its broadest through examining the following issues: technological and economic change; the rise of a bureaucratic society, public and private; urbanization and suburbanization; cultural modernism and the rise of commercialized culture; persistent ethno-racial conflict that ensued finally in the Civil Rights movement, and the rise of the United States as the world’s foremost power.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

11:30-12:25     MWF                           Steigerwald, David

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for history majors or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.


                                                                                                                                                    

HISTORY 3030 HISTORY OF OHIO

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will survey the economic, social, and political development of the geographic area that became Ohio from the Native American period to the present. We will explore three themes in particular:  the role of disruptive technology and creative destruction in shaping Ohio’s past; the critical junctures at which Ohio might have become something entirely different from what it became; Ohio’s connection to the wider world through geography, technology, demography, economics, and politics.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

ONLINE            ONLINE                         Coil, William R.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement. 


  

HISTORY 3620 LESBIAN, GAY, BISEXUAL & TRANSGENDER HISTORY IN THE U.S. 1940-2003

3 Cr. Hrs.                

This course offers an overview of LGBT culture and history in the United States from 1940 to the present. We will use a variety of historical and literary sources, including films and sound clips, to examine changes in lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered lives and experiences during the last half of the twentieth century. The course will encourage students to think about intersections of race, sexuality, and class, and how these categories have affected sexual minority communities. The course will also explore the impact that sexual minority communities have had on the law and culture in the United States since World War II.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

12:45-2:05       TR                               Rivers, Daniel
ONLINE

Assigned Readings:

Excerpts from (among others):

  • John D’Emilio, Sexual Politics, Sexual Communities: The Making of a Homosexual Minority in the United States, 1940-1970 (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1983),
  • Lillian Faderman, Odd Girls and Twilight Lovers: A History of Lesbian Life in Twentieth Century America (New York: Columbia University Press, 1991)
  • Joanne Meyerowitz, How Sex Changed: A History of Transsexuality in the United States (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2002)
  • Susan Stryker, Transgender History (Emeryville, CA: Seal Press, 2008)
  • Clare Hemmings, Bisexual Spaces: A Geography of Sexuality and Gender (New York: Routledge, 2002)

As well as:

  • Primary documents from post-WWII LGBT history including lesbian feminist and gay liberation flyers and periodicals, oral histories with lesbians, gay men, and trans men and women from the 1950s and 1960s, bisexual and pansexual periodicals from the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s, videotaped interviews with transgender men and women, and much more

Assignments:

Two 5-7 double-spaced papers, in-class midterm and final, and several discussion posts

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills the North America, post-1750 category for history majors or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.

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ANCIENT HISTORY

                                                                                                                                                    

HISTORY 2201 ANCIENT GREECE & ROME

3 Cr. Hrs.

This class is an introduction to the history of the Ancient Mediterranean Civilizations of Greece and Rome.  It provides a background of the chronological development of ancient Greek and Roman civilizations and then focuses on the broad issues of state-formation, politics, gender, warfare, tyranny, monotheism, and the environment over a period of some two thousand years.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

ONLINE              ONLINE                           Vanderpuy, Peter

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


  

HISTORY 2210: CLASSICAL ARCHAEOLOGY

Introduction to the principles, methods, and history of archaeological investigation in the ancient Greek and Roman world, illustrated through a selection of major classical sites. Not open to students with credit for 306, Clas 2301 (240), or HistArt 2301 (306).
 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

ONLINE              ONLINE                          Shimoda, Kyle
 
Prerequisites and Special Comments:
 
This course fulfills GE cultures and ideas and historical study and diversity global studies course. Cross-listed in Clas 2301 and HistArt 2301.


                                                                                                                                                 

HISTORY 3213H SLAVERY IN THE ANCIENT WORLD

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course examines slavery as an institution and an ideology of classical Greece and Rome, including its importance in the ancient family, economy, and culture.  Why did the massive slave revolt by the Roman gladiator Spartacus in Italy give rise to a modern legend?  How did ancient thinking about slaves reflect what the master class saw in themselves?  Was the legal institution ever questioned as immoral, esp. in the Bible?  How do we write a history of ancient slavery when the surviving primary evidence reflects the views of masters, not slaves?  Such questions inspire the goals of this course to uncover the disturbingly unseen and invisible ways that slavery in classical antiquity has left its mark on Western culture.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

9:35-10:55       TR                               Harrill, Bert

Assigned Readings:

Apuleius.  The Golden Ass or Metamorphoses.  Trans. by E. J. Kenny.  Penguin Books, 2004.

Bradley, Keith.  Slavery and Society at Rome.  Cambridge University Press, 1994.

Joshel, Sandra R.  Slavery in the Roman World.  Cambridge University Press, 2010.

Petronius. The Satyricon. Translated by J. P. Sullivan.  Penguin Books, 2011

Shaw, Brent D.  Spartacus and the Slave Wars.  Bedford/St. Martin’s Press, 2001.

Wrenhaven: Kelly L. Reconstructing the Slave: The Image of the Slave in Ancient Greece. Bloomsbury, 2012.

A copy of the Bible.

Assignments

1.  Attendance, daily preparation for class, active participation in discussion.

2.  Midterm Examination.

3.  Research Paper (10–12 pages), including its in-class oral presentation. 

4.  Initiating a Seminar.  A brief presentation that summarizes the main point of the assigned readings.  The day’s leader will be selected at random.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

Admission to the University Honors or Scholars programs, or permission of the instructor.

This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for history majors.


                                                                                                                                               

HISTORY 3218 PAUL AND HIS INFLUENCE IN EARLY CHRISTIANITY

3 Cr. Hrs.                                                                                                                                                                              

An investigation of the Apostle Paul through a historical, critical study of his own letters and the later legends that grew up around the figure.  We look at the significance of Paul's life and the competing ways its story was retold, appropriated, or resisted in late antiquity.  How did Paul create a new religious and social world for his congregations?  What were the conflicts that he aimed to resolve in those nascent communities?  And what kinds of trouble did Paul create for his later interpreters (ancient, medieval, and modern)?  Asking such answers involves careful study of the past context of ancient Judaism, Hellenistic culture, and the Roman imperial society in which Paul lived and wrote.  We will touch on areas of controversy today, so be prepared. The course presupposes no prior coursework on the Bible or in the academic study of religion.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

12:45-2:05       TR                               Harrill, Bert

Assigned Readings:

1.   The New Oxford Annotated Study Bible (Oxford University Press, 2018)  

2.   The Writings of St. Paul, 2nd edition, ed.Wayne A. Meeks and John T. Fitzgerald (W. W. Norton, 2007).

3.  Wayne A. Meeks, The First Urban Christians, 2d Edition (Yale University Press, 2003).

4.  J. Albert Harrill, Paul the Apostle: His Life and Legacy in Their Roman Contexts (Cambridge University Press, 2015).

Assignments:

Two papers, midterm and final examinations.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Global, pre-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill the historical study GE.


                                                                                                                                                    

HISTORY 5229 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ANCIENT CHRISTIANITY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Graduate/Honors Piggy-Back of HIST 3218.   Students will do all the readings and tests for the undergraduate syllabus––midterm and final exams––plus write a research essay of 20 pages.  The research essay can be on any topic, in consultation with the instructor.

An investigation of the Apostle Paul through a historical, critical study of his own letters and the later legends that grew up around the figure.  We look at the significance of Paul's life and the competing ways its story was retold, appropriated, or resisted in late antiquity.  How did Paul create a new religious and social world for his congregations?  What were the conflicts that he aimed to resolve in those nascent communities?  And what kinds of trouble did Paul create for his later interpreters (ancient, medieval, and modern)?  Asking such answers involves careful study of the past context of ancient Judaism, Hellenistic culture, and the Roman imperial society in which Paul lived and wrote.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

12:45-2:05       TR                               Harrill, Bert

Assigned Readings:

1.   The Writings of St. Paul, 2nd ed., W. A. Meeks and J. T. Fitzgerald (W. W. Norton, 2007).

2.  W. A. Meeks, The First Urban Christians, 2d Edition (Yale University Press, 2003).

3.  J. A.Harrill, Paul the Apostle: His Life and Legacy in Their Roman Contexts (Cambridge University Press, 2015).

4.  M. M. Mitchell, Paul, the Corinthians and the Birth of Hermeneutics (Cambridge University Press, 2010)

5.  D. B. Martin, The Corinthian Body (Yale University Press, 1995)

6.  P. Fredriksen, Paul: The Pagans’ Apostle (Yale University Press, 2017).

Assignments:

1.  Research paper

2.  Midterm and Final examinations

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

Any 3000 level history course; Honors or Graduate standing or permission of the instructor.

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ASIAN & ISLAMIC HISTORY

                                                                                                                                                    

HISTORY 2351 EARLY ISLAMIC SOCIETY, 610-1258

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course provides an overview of the history early Islamic societies from 610 to 1258, including the rise and spread of Islam, the Islamic empire under the Umayyad and Abbasid caliphs, and the emergence of regional Islamic states from Afghanistan and eastern Iran to North Africa and Spain.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

12:45-2:05       TR                               Anthony, Sean

Assigned Readings:

Donner, Fred M. Muhammad and the Believers. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2012.

Kennedy, Hugh. The Caliphate: The History of an Idea. New York: Basic Books, 2016.

Assignments:

Readings, primary source analysis essays

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Near East, Middle East, pre-1750 for the history major or can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.


                                                                                                                                               

HISTORY 2352 THE OTTOMAN EMPIRE, 1300-1800

3 Cr. Hrs.

Studies the political, economic, social and cultural power of the Ottoman Empire from its origins, through the highpoint of its geopolitical power in the 16 th century, to its further evolution through the opening of the period of European imperialism, and will examine the Ottoman Empire as a case from which to study the developmental dynamics of patrimonial sociopolitical systems.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

ONLINE              ONLINE                           Whitehead, C.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Near East, Middle East, post-1750 for the history major or can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.


                                                                                                                                               

HISTORY 2353 THE MIDDLE EAST SINCE 1914

3 Cr.  Hrs.

An introductory study of the political, social, and cultural history and evolution of Islamic civilization since 1914.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

ONLINE              ONLINE                           Haydar, M.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Near East, Middle East, post-1750 for the history major or can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.


                                                                                                                                               

HISTORY 2375 ISLAMIC CENTRAL ASIA

3 Cr. Hrs.

Introductory survey of the political, cultural, religious and economic  history of Islamic central Asia from the eighth century Arab conquests to the nineteenth century Russian colonial era.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

3:55-5:15         WF                              Khaliyarov, A.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Near East, Middle East, pre-1750 for the history major or can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.


                                                                                                                                               

HISTORY 2401 HISTORY OF EAST ASIA IN THE PRE-MODERN ERA

3 Cr. Hrs.

History 2401 is an introduction to the societies and cultures of pre‑modern China, Korea, and Japan, the countries that make up the geographical and cultural unit of East Asia. One goal of this course is to consider what is distinctive about "East Asian civilization." A second goal is the study of the relationship between the evolution of China, Korea, and Japan as distinct cultures themselves. We will examine how Korea and Japan, despite considerable linguistic, intellectual, and political borrowing from China, diverged from the Chinese pattern of development to form cultures with their own very distinctive artistic and literary traditions, political organizations, and social and economic structures. We also consider how Korea and Japan influenced Chinese civilization as well. The course will end with exploring China, Korea, and Japan in their encounters with the West.

This ONLINE class encourages the students to “learn by doing” rather than passively receiving information from lectures. Hence, the weekly lecture segments are shorter than those for a conventional class. Instead, students will learn to practice the skills of a historian by completing assignments and team projects. 

Collaborating with classmates and interacting with the instructors in productive and positive ways is an important part of the experience in this ONLINE class.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

ONLINE            ONLINE                        Zhang, Ying

Assigned Readings: Textbook

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group East Asia, pre-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.


                                                                                                                                                    

HISTORY 2402 HISTORY OF EAST ASIA IN THE MODERN ERA, 1600-PRESENT

3 Cr. Hrs.

History 2402 introduces the histories of the societies of East Asia (China, Korea, Japan) starting in about 1600.  To a higher degree than History 2401, which is useful but certainly not required preparation, History 2402 is organized on a 3-way comparative model (“how do China, Japan, or Korea compare to each other in our historical period?”); one of our goals Is to learn to think comparatively about history and societies.  We will survey key historical phenomena (covering political, military, social and intellectual themes) that have distinguished each country in the modern period.  For most of the semester, the course will be organized chronologically and thematically.  In addition to providing a basic narrative of East Asian Civilization since 1600, the course will introduce students to important written and film sources and to historical writing.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

11:10-12:30     WF                              Reed, Chris
ONLINE

Assigned Reading: A textbook, a monograph, primary sources, short films.

Assignments: TBA, similar to other courses at this level.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

No prerequisites. This course fulfills Group East Asia, post-1750 for history majors.

Special Note:  History 2401 is NOT a prerequisite for History 2402. 


                                                                                                                                               

HISTORY 3365 HISTORY OF AFGHANISTAN

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will address Afghan society, its historical foundations, and the challenges that confront it.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

ONLINE              ONLINE                           Hunt, Catalina

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group East Asia, post-1750 for history majors or can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.


                                                                                                                                               

HISTORY 3404 MODERN CHINA 1750 TO 1949

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course provides a general but analytical survey of the social, political, and intellectual history of China from approximately 1750 to 1949.  After a brief introduction to China’s geography, languages, and cultural background, we will discuss key historical phenomena that have distinguished Chinese society in the modem period.  For most of the semester, the course is organized chronologically and thematically and seeks a balance between detailed examination of particular periods and exploration of patterns of continuity and change across historical periods.  When appropriate, comparative historical perspectives will be suggested.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

2:20-3:40         TR                               Reed, Christopher
ONLINE

Assigned Readings: 4 books, documentary films.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

There are no prerequisites.  Although not required, the course assumes students have had college-level history courses above the 1000-level.  Familiarity with topics covered in History 2402, “East Asian History since 1600” is useful in a general way but is not required.

This course fulfills Group East Asia, post-1750 for history majors or can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.

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EUROPEAN HISTORY

                          

HISTORY 1211 WESTERN CIVILIZATION TO THE 17 TH CENTURY

3 Cr. Hrs.

 Ancient Civilizations (Near East, Greece, Rome) barbarian invasions, medieval civilizations (Byzantium, Islam, Europe); Renaissance and Reformation.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

ONLINE            ONLINE                        Vanderpuy, P.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills the historical study GE requirement.  Not open to students that have credit for History 111 or 2201; 2202; 2203 or 2205.


                                                                                                                                                    

HISTORY 1212 WESTERN CIVILIZATION 17 TH CENTURY TO THE PRESENT

3 Cr.  Hrs.

Political, scientific, and industrial revolutions, nationalism, the two World Wars; the decline of empires; the Cold War.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

ONLINE            ONLINE                        Douglas, Sarah

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills the historical study GE requirement.  Not open to students that have credit for History 112; 2202; 2203; 2204 or 2205.


HISTORY 1212 WESTERN CIVILIZATION 17 TH CENTURY TO THE PRESENT

3 Cr.  Hrs.

Political, scientific, and industrial revolutions, nationalism, the two World Wars; the decline of empires; the Cold War.

Time                 Meeting Days               Instructor

ONLINE                                               Powell, Julie

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills the historical study GE requirement.  Not open to students that have credit for History 112; 2202; 2203; 2204 or 2205.



HISTORY 2202: INTRODUCTION TO MEDIEVAL HISTORY

Survey of medieval history from the late Roman Empire to the early sixteenth century. Sometimes this course is offered in a distance-only format. Not open to students with credit for 1211.

Time                 Meeting Days               Instructor

ONLINE                                              Shimoda, Kyle

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills the  GE requirements for historical study and diversity global studies.


                                                                                                                                                   

HISTORY 2204H MODERN EUROPEAN CIVILIZATIONS

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course is designed for students in the OSU Honors Program.  Class size is limited to 25.This is a survey of the most transformative developments of the Western world beginning with a short investigation of the French Revolution of 1789 that laid the foundation for modern politics and social relations. As a first assignment, students will explore reverberations of those developments in the nineteenth century as dramatized in Emile Zola’s literary masterpiece, Germinal. That work embodies, and will enable us to discuss the Industrial Revolution, conservatism, liberalism, Darwinism, Marxism, and anarchism along with the realist literary style.  The second is on World War I that toppled European world supremacy and ushered in the modern world. The final section evaluates a psychological analysis of Hitler that explains why Hitler wanted to kill Jews and how he was able to get Germans to help him do it.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

2:20-3:40         TR                               Kern, Stephen
ONLINE

Assigned Readings:

Emile Zola, Germinal

Rudolph Binion, Hitler Among the Germans

On Carmen

Selections from Karl Marx, Sigmund Freud, Ian Kershaw and Diana Hacker

Assignments:

Students will take one in-class test and write two four-page papers on the assigned readings. I conduct a week-long writing workshop to help students prepare to write those papers.

Prerequisites and Special Comments

This course fulfills the following GE requirements:  1) “Historical Study,” 2) “Diversity: Global Studies”


                                                                                                                                                    

HISTORY 2220 INTRODUCTION TO CHRISTIANITY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Ranging from Jesus to Joel Osteen, this course will study how in 2,000 years the messianic beliefs of a small group of Jews transformed into a worldwide religion of amazing diversity. Our approach will be historical and contextual: How have Christian beliefs, practices, and institutions changed over time and adapted to different cultures?  We will consider major developments in theology (from the Council of Nicaea, to medieval scholasticism, to liberation theology), spirituality (from monasticism, to mysticism, to tent meetings), modes of authority (from apostles, to bishops, to televangelists), and social structures (from house assemblies, to an imperial church, to base communities). We will cover the histories and characteristics of the major forms of Christianity: Roman Catholicism, Eastern Orthodoxy, Protestantism, and Pentecostalism. “Christianity” has never been a single monolithic entity, but rather an astonishing collection of individuals and groups creating new and diverse ways of living as followers of Christ. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

10:20-11:15     MWF                           Brakke, David

Assigned Readings (tentative):

Peter Feldmeier, The Christian Tradition: A Historical & Theological Introduction

C. Douglas Weaver and Rady Roldán-Figueroa, Exploring Christian Heritage: A Reader in History &Theology, 2 nd edition

Plus readings from the Bible and additional sources on Carmen

Assignments: Two unit tests, three short papers, participation, and a final exam.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:  This course fulfills Group Global, pre-1750 for history majors or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.


                                                                                                                                                    

HISTORY 2270 LOVE IN THE MODERN WESTERN WORLD      

3 Cr. Hrs.

Love is a source of intriguing debates about gender roles, courtship practices, and marriage. This course will respond to the following questions: What were ancient Jewish and Christian ideas about love, and how did those legacies play out in Western history? Why does no major love story until the twentieth century focus on the love of a married couple? Were the Victorians sexually repressed, and if so, how did it influence the way they loved? Why are women's faces featured in courtship imagery, while men are in profile and off center? How has modern feminism shaped love? How have automobiles, telephones, movies, television, the Internet, and search engines shaped love?

Is it conceivable that love becomes more humanizing across history? Or have we rather lost something along the way? How does reading about love affect how one loves? How have psychoanalytic psychiatry and existentialist philosophy influenced love? What do we know about sexuality and love that our parents and grandparents did not? In light of the fact that the past century has brought about major changes in the social, economic, educational, political, medical, and legal status of women, how have those changes affected love? How do wars affect love?

The readings will be primarily on three historically distinctive novels about love from 1847, 1920, and 1992. Students also read selections from Simone de Beauvoir's classic statement of existential feminism, chapters from my book on the subject, and a few pages by Sigmund Freud. We will also interpret images of love in art and listen to the famous romantic love duet from Richard Wagner’s opera Tristan and Isolde. Lectures will cover the history of love since antiquity, although the readings and the three assigned papers will concentrate on the last two centuries.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

2:20-3:40         WF                              Kern, Stephen

ONLINE

Assigned Readings:

Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre

D. H. Lawrence, Women in Love

Carol Shields, The Republic of Love

Simone de Beauvoir, The Second Sex (selections).

Stephen Kern, The Culture of Love: Victorians to Moderns

Sigmund Freud, Introductory Lectures On Psychoanalysis (selections)

Zoe Lewis, “Madonna Syndrome: I should have ditched feminism for love, children, and baking” (handout)

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Europe, post-1750 for history majors or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.


                                                                                                                                               

HISTORY 3229 HISTORY OF EARLY CHRISTIANITY (5212 graduate section)

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course surveys the history and literature of ancient Christianity from its origins as a Jewish sect in Palestine to its establishment as the official religion of the Roman Empire in the fifth century.  Topics include persecution and martyrdom, scripture, Gnosticism, theological controversies over the Trinity and the nature of Christ, Constantine and the establishment of catholic orthodoxy, the rise of monasticism, and important figures such as Origen and Augustine. The course will emphasize the variety of early Christian groups and will provide a good foundation for the study of Christianity in any later period. This course is something of a sequel to History 2221 (Introduction to the New Testament”), but no previous study of ancient history or of Christianity is assumed. The format is primarily lecture.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

11:10-12:30     TR                               Brakke, David

Assigned Readings:

Bart Ehrman, ed., After the New Testament: A Reader in Early Christianity

Bart Ehrman and Andrew Jacobs, eds., Christianity in Late Antiquity, 300 – 450 C.E.: A Reader

Plus readings from the New Testament

Assignments: Two hourly tests, three short papers, and a final examination.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Global, pre-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement. This course is cross-listed as History 5212, advanced undergraduates may enroll with permission of the instructor.


                                                                                                                                               

HISTORY 3232 SOLVING CRIME IN MEDIEVAL EUROPE

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course explores the interaction between the development of criminal law and social change in the late medieval period ( c. 1100-1550) from a comparative perspective, examining primarily the English common law, but also the continental courts of law. Classes will be organized thematically such as: the passing of the trial by ordeal and its replacements; law enforcement; forensic medicine; jurisdictional competition; revenge; homicide and self-killing; women as victims and perpetrators; sex crimes; clerical criminals, treason; domestic violence; sanctuary, and fear-mongering.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

9:35-10:55       WF                              Butler, Sara    

Assigned Readings:

Most of the readings will be from journal articles found on Carmen. Only one book will need to be purchased:

Robert Bartlett, The Hanged Man: A Story of Miracle, Memory, and Colonialism in the  Middle Ages (Princeton, 2004).

Select Readings from Carmen:

  • Daniel Lord Smail, “Violence and Predation in Late Medieval Mediterranean Europe”
  • Katherine Royer, “The Body in Parts: Reading the Execution Ritual in Late Medieval England”
  • William Ian Miller, “In Defense of Revenge”
  • Valentin Groebner, “Losing Face, Saving Face: Noses and Honor in the Late Medieval Town”
  • Helmut Puff, “Localizing Sodomy: the ‘Priest and Sodomite’ in Pre-Reformation Germany and Switzerland”
  • François Soyer, “Living in Fear of Revenge: Religious Minorities and their Right to Bear Arms in 15 th-Century Portugal”

Assignments:

Grade Breakdown:

Reading Responses   30%

Book Review               15%

Research Essay         30%

Final Exam                 25%

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for the history major or can fulfill the historical study GE.


                                                                                                                                               

HISTORY 3247 MAGIC & WITCHCRAFT

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will examine magical beliefs and practices from the high middle ages to the early modern era, focusing primarily on Western society, but acknowledging that faith in magic is a universal feature of human experience – all human societies at one point in time or another have espoused a belief in the efficacy of magic.  Magical practices have typically fulfilled specific, shared goals and thus a study of these practices offer up a fascinating lens through which to analyze cultures.  First, magic and its relationship to the supernatural provide explanations for the way the world works (why do we have earthquakes?  famines?  hurricanes?) and it offers a basic moral view of the cosmos (why does evil exist? Why would a good god create evil? What happens to evil people? Why do bad things happen to good people?).   Second, magic empowers its adherents, offering them a way to take control of their lives in a world that often appears cruel and unforgiving.  Third, beliefs about magic also act as a vehicle of oppression.  Juxtaposed against an increasingly strong adherence to faith or science, magic and its advocates are “othered” in an attempt to establish rigid conformity to normative views.  The gendering of magic during the medieval period, or the focus on magic in the third world today are just two examples of the process in which magical belief leads to demonization. This course will cover a broad variety of topics within this rubric and chronology:   the ancient origins of magical belief, medical magic, the thin line between magic and miracle, magic at the universities, magic in law, heresy and popular magic, magic and mysticism, demon possession and the ability to see demons, the rise of the devil, the development of demonology, the witch craze, magic and economics in the early modern world.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

2:20-3:40         WF                              Butler, Sara

Assigned Readings:

Most readings will be journal articles that appear in pdfs on Carmen.  You will need to purchase the following books (all of which can also be found in used copies on Amazon):

  • Carlo Ginzburg, Witchcraft & Agrarian Cults in the Sixteenth & Seventeenth Centuries, with a new preface, trans. John and Anne Tedeschi (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2013). ISBN 978-4214-0992-4. Amazon: $25.95 (new, paperback)
  • Andrew Colin Gow, Robert B. Desjardins, François V. Pageau (trans. and ed.), The Arras Witch Treatises (University Park: The Pennsylvania State University Press, 2016). ISBN: 978-0-271-07128-2. Amazon: $24.95 (new, paperback)

Assignments:

Students will have two short assignments (5 pages each) relating to the Boureau and Ginzburg books.  There will also be a creative assignment, in which students have to create and present a magic aid that adheres to the medieval rules of magic to the class.

Breakdown of Grade: 

Participation                                        15%

Reading responses                             20%

Boureau assignment                           15%

Ginzburg assignment                          15%

“Doing Magic” presentation                 10%    

Mid-term exam                                   10%

Final exam                                          15%

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

No prerequisites – just a love of magic!

This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for the history major.


 

HISTORY 3253 20 TH CENTURY EUROPE TO 1950

3 Cr.  Hrs.

Examination of the major historical events and issues from approximately 1900 to 1950.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

Onine              ONLINE                           Powell, J.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group Europe, post-1750 for history majors or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.


                                                                                                                                               

HISTORY 3254 EUROPE SINCE 1950

3 Cr. Hrs.

This upper-level course explores the post-World War II history of Europe through the examination of several discreet themes as manifested in both Western and Eastern Europe: the rebuilding of the continent after the war; the emergence of the Cold War in Europe; the end of European empires and the Cold War in the Third World; daily life, consumerism, and popular culture; protest movements and youth counterculture; European economic and political integration; immigration and evolving ideas of race and difference in Europe.

Each student will choose a topic to explore in more detail in a final research project.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

12:45-2:05       WF                              Dragostinova, Theodora

Assigned Readings: Possible books for this class include (the list will be finalized later):

Peter Schneider, The Wall Jumper: A Berlin Story (University of Chicago Press, 1998).

Buchi Emecheta, Second-Class Citizen (George Braziller, 1983).

Luisa Passerini, An Autobiography of a Generation: Italy, 1968 (Wesleyan University Press, 1996).

Kapka Kassabova, Border: A Journey to the Edge of Europe (Graywolf Press, 2017).

Additional chapters will be made available on Carmen and films made available through the Secured Media Library.

Assignments:

  • Weekly response papers posted on Carmen: 30%
  • Two 5-page take-home essay exams: 30% (15% each)
  • Final Research project: 20% (proposal 5%; final project submission 15%)
  • Attendance 10%
  • Paticipation: 10%

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group Europe, post-1750 for history majors or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          

HISTORY 3263 TWENTIETH CENTURY FRANCE AT WAR

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course explores France’s experience of three major wars: the Great War from 1914 to 1918, much of which was fought on French soil; the Second World War, during which France was occupied by Hitler’s Germany; and the Algerian War, when the French army and settlers fought to maintain the overseas territory called “French Algeria” against an anti-colonial uprising. We will look at how each of these wars had an impact on civilians as well as soldiers, the moral dilemmas they posed, and the legacies they left up to the present. Using a variety of primary and secondary sources, we will also consider how these wars have been represented by historians as well as in fiction and film.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

11:10-12:30     WF                               Conklin, Alice 

Assigned Readings:

Henri Barbusse, Under Fire (Penguin Classics edition)

Irène Némirovsky, Suite Française

Alice Conklin, Sarah Fishman, and Robert Zaretsky, France and its Empire since 1870

There will also be a primary document and media packages (available on Carmen).

Films to be screened include Army of the Shadows (1969), Days of Glory (2006), Battle of Algiers (1967)

Assignments:

2 short essays (40%) and two midterms (30%) and one final exam (20%)  Class participation (based on attendance and in-class discussion): 10%

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group Europe, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


 

HISTORY 3711 SCIENCE AND SOCIETY IN EARLY MODERN EUROPE

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will deal with the scientific revolutions of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.  We will discuss changing ideas in astronomy and physics, but also in technology, chemistry, cosmography, medicine, and other areas.  The focus of the course will be on the interactions between science and society.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

12:45-2:05       TR                               Goldish, Matthew

Assigned Readings:

Readings will consist of a textbook, a book of primary sources, and possibly one or two further small monographs or some articles.

Assignments:

Grades will be based on quizzes, exams, and a paper.  No background knowledge is necessary.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills group Europe, pre-1750 for the history major or can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.


                                                                                                                                               

HISTORY 5212 HISTORY OF EARLY CHRISTIANITY (graduate section of History 3229)

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course surveys the history and literature of ancient Christianity from its origins as a Jewish sect in Palestine to its establishment as the official religion of the Roman Empire in the fifth century.  Topics include persecution and martyrdom, scripture, Gnosticism, theological controversies over the Trinity and the nature of Christ, Constantine and the establishment of catholic orthodoxy, the rise of monasticism, and important figures such as Origen and Augustine. The course will emphasize the variety of early Christian groups and will provide a good foundation for the study of Christianity in any later period. This course is something of a sequel to History 2221 (Introduction to the New Testament”), but no previous study of ancient history or of Christianity is assumed. The format is primarily lecture.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

11:10-12:30     TR                               Brakke, David

Assigned Readings:

Bart Ehrman, ed., After the New Testament: A Reader in Early Christianity

Bart Ehrman and Andrew Jacobs, eds., Christianity in Late Antiquity, 300 – 450 C.E.: A Reader

Plus readings from the New Testament

Assignments: Two hourly tests, three short papers, and a final examination.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Global, pre-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement. This graduate course is the advanced version of History 3229, undergraduates may enroll with permission of the instructor.

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JEWISH HISTORY

                                                                                                                                                    

HISTORY 2452 MODERN JEWISH HISTORY, 1750-PRESENT

3 Cr. Hrs.

Jewish history is transnational and global. It is the story of a group of people who have been – and are -- held together by ethnic identity, cultural heritage, and/or religious tradition. In the modern era, Jews lived throughout much of the world, participating in global trends but also, having separate experiences as Jews. This course examines the range of negotiations Jews have had with each other and with the societies in which they have lived. It studies debates about what it meant to be a Jew at different times and places in history.  This course begins at the end of the 18 th century, when rapidly changing European societies considered questions of Jewish emancipation and ends with contemporary debates about “who is a Jew.”

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

9:35-10:55       TR                               Judd, Robin

Assigned Readings:

Paul Mendes-Flohr and Jehudah Reinharz, The Jew in the Modern World 

Bintel Brief

Sarah Stein, Family Papers: A Sephardic Journey though the Twentieth Century

Assignments:

Weekly discussion posts, midterm exam, final exam, story board project

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


                                                                                                                                                    

HISTORY 2453 HISTORY OF ZIONISM AND MODERN ISRAEL

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course explores the history of the Jewish state from the rise of the Zionist movement to the present. It begins by examining the social and ideological roots of Zionism in late 19th-century Europe, proceeds with the development of the Jewish community in Palestine under Ottoman and British rule, and then turns to the period following the establishment of the State of Israel in 1948. Among the issues to be discussed are Jewish-Arab relations, immigration, the encounter between European and Middle Eastern Jews, the creation of a new Hebrew identity, the interaction between religion and state, and the impact of the Holocaust. Course materials include secondary historical sources, a variety of primary documents, short stories and films.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

11:10-12:30     WF                              Yehudai, Ori

Assigned Readings:

Main textbook: Anita Shapira, Israel: A History (Brandeis University Press, 2012)

Itamar Rabinovich and Jehuda Reinharz, eds., Israel in the Middle East: Documents and Readings on Society, Politics, and Foreign Relations.

Assignments:

Attendance and participation

Book review

Midterm exam

Final exam

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Near Eastern, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.

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LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY

                                                                                                                                                    

HISTORY 2115 WOMEN AND GENDER IN LATIN AMERICA

3 Cr. Hrs.

With a focus on women’s lives, this course will examine the role of gender in the history of Latin America.  Using the lens of gender to understand religious, political, economic, and cultural change and continuity from the colonial era to the present helps us understand both men and women’s diverse experiences and participation in this history. Race, religion, class and geography also shape people’s lives, and we will pay careful attention to the wide range of circumstances and forces that shape the way people have made history what it was and history has made people who they are.  We will read and talk about the era of European colonization of Native Americans and enslavement of Africans; the enormous transformations that took place between the sixteenth and nineteenth centuries; the chaotic and volatile development of independent nations in the nineteenth century; and radical changes the 20 th century brought throughout the region—all from the perspective of the history of women and gender.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

2:20-3:40         TR                               Delgado, Jessica

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Latin America, pre or post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.   


                                                                                                                                                    

HISTORY 2125 THE HISTORY OF LATIN AMERICA THROUGH FILM

3 Cr. Hrs.

Latin American history from the pre-colonial era to the present as depicted in film, including the analysis of colonialism, revolutions, society, women, and current events. Sometimes this course is offered in a distance-only format.

Time                 Meeting Days               Instructor

ONLINE                                               Smith, Stephanie

Prerequisites and Special Comments: GE historical study and diversity global studies course.

 


HISTORY 3106 HISTORY OF MEXICO

3 Cr. Hrs.

Mexico faces many crucial issues today: immigration, drug cartels, economic and trade issues, the role of the United States, internal political conflicts and others.  Although these topics are relatively recent, their historical context can be located throughout several centuries of struggle. HIST 3106 analyzes Mexico’s dynamic history from the pre-Conquest era to the present. Throughout the semester, we will examine patterns of conflict and negotiation, including the great Mexican Revolution, which shaped Mexico’s historical legacies.  In addition to a study of Mexico’s politics, we also will explore the ways in which everyday people participated in and influenced cultural and political events. The role of women, race and ethnicity, and class will be analyzed in the lectures, as will Mexico’s transcultural interactions and conflicts. Additionally, the course will explore Mexico’s rich culture, including movies, literature, and artists.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

ONLINE                                               Smith, Stephanie

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Latin America, pre/post-1750 for history majors or it can fulfill the historical study GE.

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MILITARY HISTORY

                                                                                                                                             

HISTORY 2550 HISTORY OF WAR

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course is an introduction to the salient concepts and problems involved in the study of military history.  It also addresses the effect of war on human society and development and examines the significance of war in human culture.  Although it examines war from prehistoric times to the present, the course is thematic rather than strictly chronological -- less a survey of wars and military developments per se than a survey of the major concepts involved in the study of war.  In addition to such topics as the nature of war, the causes of war, and the development of warfare, we will also examine the “warrior code” as understood in various cultures (Greek, Roman, Norse, Japanese, Native American, etc.).

Students will achieve an understanding of the causes, conduct, and consequences of war, as well as how various societies—past and present, western and nonwestern—have understood and practiced war.  They will also hone their skills at critical writing and analysis, and gain greater insight into the way historians explore the human condition.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

12:45-2:05       TR                               Grimsley, Mark
ONLINE

Assigned Readings:

Wayne E. Lee, Waging War:  Conflict, Culture, and Innovation in World History.

Shannon E. French, The Code of the Warrior:  Exploring Warrior Values Past and Present.

Victor Davis Hanson, Carnage and Culture:  Landmark Battles in the Rise of Western Power.


Assignments:

The course grade is based on two midterm examinations and a final examination.  Each of these will have an in class and a take home portion. 

Prerequisites and Special Comments

This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for the history major, or it can fulfill the historical study GE. There are no prerequisites, but a solid grounding in Western Civilization or World History is very helpful.


                                                                                                                                               

HISTORY 2550 HISTORY OF WAR

3 Cr. Hrs.

A survey of the main concepts and issues involved in the study of war in world perspective, using case studies from prehistoric times to the present.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

ONLINE             ONLINE                         Douglas, Sarah

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills the historical study GE & Group Global, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.


                                                                                                                                               

HISTORY 3550 WAR IN WORLD HISTORY, 500-1650

3 Cr. Hrs.

Socially sanctioned armed conflict is a hallmark of the human experience.  Some historians argue that war is a universal and ancestral aspect of human nature while others believe it is only a result of specific socio-cultural or ecological circumstances.  To address this debate. This course will examine warfare on a global scale from 500-165-, focusing on attitudes to war in different ages, how war shaped societies, the impact of technology, the nature of armies, and what it was like to serve in them.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

ONLINE              ONLINE                           Douglas, Sarah

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Global, pre-1750 for the history major, or it can fulfill the historical study GE.


                                                                                                                                               

HISTORY 3552 WAR IN WORLD HISTORY, 1900 - PRESENT

3 Cr. Hrs.       

The Experience of War in the 20 th Century

The past hundred years changed the nature of war. Industrial warfare and global conflicts led to an inexorable intensification of violence. From trench warfare in World War I to ethnic cleansing in the 1990s, the total number of deaths caused by or associated with war has been estimated at the equivalent of 10% of the world’s population in 1913. In the course of the century, the burden of war shifted increasingly from armed forces to civilians, to the point where non-combatants now comprise some 80 or 90% of war victims. This lecture course investigates the blurring of distinction between combatants and non-combatants, as well as the experiences of ordinary men and women who lived through the wars of the 20 th Century. It covers events such as World War I, the Spanish Civil War, World War II, the Korean War and the Vietnam War, and topics such as the experience of captivity, sexual violence in wartime, children in war, or genocide.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

9:35-10:55       TR                               Cabanes, Bruno

Assigned Readings:

Primo Levi, Survival in Auschwitz

Anonymous, A Women in Berlin

Henri Alleg, The Question

Jean Hatzfeld, Machete Season. The Killers in Rwanda Speak

Assignments:

The final grade in the course will be an average of the four grades given for: a short 2000-word paper (20%), the mid-term examination (25%), lecture Quick Writes/Quizzes (20%); the final examination (35%).

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for the history major, or it can fulfill the historical study GE.


                                                                                                                                               

HISTORY 3580 THE VIETNAM WAR

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will study the Vietnam War, and America’s role in it, from a broad perspective.  Although we will consider the military aspect of the struggle, we will study the political, social, and international context of the war as well.  Among other topics, the class will examine the long-term causes of the war and the immediate Cold War context in which it was fought; we will study the anti-war movement and the larger domestic consequences of the war; we will contemplate the impact of diplomacy, domestic politics, and intelligence on the course of the war; we will look at the war from the perspective of the former communist bloc states; and we will consider the legacy of the war for both the United States and Southeast Asia.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

ONLINE            ONLINE                         Matusheski, Z.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for the History major or can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.


                                                                                                                                               

HISTORY 3590 WARS OF EMPIRE

3 Cr. Hrs.

In the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Europe’s empires expanded madly.  In 1800, Europe and its possessions covered approximately 55% of the globe; in 1878, 67%; and in 1914, Europe and its possessions covered 84.4% of the globe.  This grand burst of imperial expansion was only achieved through great military effort.  The wars of empire through which the modern European empires “pacified” the regions they conquered were considered to be “Small Wars,” because they were felt to be conflicts that were imbalanced, with well-trained, well-equipped regular troops on one side, and what one military theorist called “savages and semi-civilised races” on the other.  In these military clashes of civilization vs. semi-civilization, “civilized” Europe was expected to easily triumph.

History tells a different tale, however.  Time and time again, Europe’s great empires found themselves challenged and thwarted on the battlefields of Asia and Africa.  This course will examine the means, methods, challenges and results of Europe’s military encounters with the indigenous forces who sought to push back the tide of imperial conquest.  We will look at a number of examples from the histories of the British, French, Russian and Italian Empires, discussing both the military and imperial contexts of these struggles.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

11:10-12:30     TR                               Siegel, Jennifer
ONLINE

Assigned Readings: (tentative)

The reading list may include:

Baumann, Robert F.  Russian-Soviet Unconventional Wars in the Caucasus, Central Asia, and Afghanistan.

Callwell, Col. C.E.  Small Wars.  Their Principles and Practice.

Fraser, George MacDonald.  Flashman.

Assigned Films: (tentative)

“Khartoum”

“Zulu”

“Prisoner of the Mountains”

Assignments:

Weekly readings and class discussions

In class midterm and take home final

Map quizzes

Two short papers

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills group Global, post-1750 for the history major, or it can fulfill a GE requirement.

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THEMATIC COURSE OFFERINGS

                                                                                                                                                    

HISTORY 2701 HISTORY OF TECHNOLOGY

3 Cr. Hrs.

From fire, the wheel and the stirrup and to drones, iPhones and the Anthropocene, human history is inexplicable without understanding technology. This course provides an introductory overview of the multiple ways in which technology has shaped human practices throughout history. It has two halves: the first half, running up to week 5, offers a history of technology from medieval China to the second Industrial Revolution of the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. The second half explores numerous themes in the history of technology, including war, gender, disaster, culture and the environment. Although the bulk of the course focuses on developments in Europe and the US, a global focus is maintained throughout.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

ONLINE                                              Powell, Julie

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill the historical study GE.


                                                                                                                                                    

HISTORY 2703: HISTORY OF PUBLIC HEALTH, MEDICINE AND DISEASE

HISTORY 2704 WATER: A HUMAN HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Water is a miraculous molecule: it is the only molecule that occurs naturally in all three states of matter (solid, liquid, gas). The human body is, on average, 65% water. About 71% of the Earth’s surface is covered in water.  Without water on our “blue planet” life as we understand it could not exist. Water shapes life from the molecular and biological level to the national and even the geopolitical level, yet far too often we take this marvelous substance for granted. In this course, we will dispel this false assumption.

Taking a thematic approach that environmental history so usefully affords us, in this course we will examine the human use and understanding of water from the ancient past to the present day, using a series of case studies from around the globe. We will examine how water has been used in irrigation and the development of civilization and how humans have sought to manipulate (control) water as a source of power. We will examine the how water is essential to the development of cities, and how cities have faced the infrastructural challenge of ensuring access to clean drinking water. We will study how water is a carrier of disease and pollution. We will study how water has become a commodity and a vital component part of modern economic systems, especially food systems. We will look at oceans, which are often ignored in traditional geographically-bound histories. We will explore the various ways in which water has distinct cultural meanings around the world. Finally, we will examine how global climate change is impacting the human relationship with water today.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

ONLINE              ONLINE                          Harris, James

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This is a GE course .   This course fulfills the following GE requirements: 

  1. "Historical Study," 2. "Culture & Ideas or 3. Open options,"  Global diversity

History Minor:   History 2704 counts toward the history minor, which typically requires only four courses to complete and may overlap up to six hours with general education requirements. 

For History Majors :  this course fulfills the following Geographic, Chronological, and Thematic requirements: “Comparative/Transnational/Global” post-1750, ETS and PCS


                                                                                                                                               

HISTORY 2710 HISTORY OF THE CAR

3 Cr. Hrs.

The car has shaped the world we live in today. It is both obvious, as learning to drive is a sign of independence in modern society and car ownership is an often a major mark in one’s life, and less obvious, as ideas of capitalism, technology, and consumerism are inherently linked to its creation and expansion in modern society. This is true not only in the United States but all over the world. The car is often explicitly linked to ideas of modernity and development that have shaped people’s understanding of their nation. This course will examine the development and importance of the car in the 20 th century, first in the United States and then examine how its global expansion has come to define global society today.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

9:35-10:55       TR                               Eaglin, Jennifer
ONLINE

Assigned Readings:

TBD

Assignments: (tentative)

In-class assignments, two short papers (3-5 pages), a group project, and final paper.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fills the GE Historical Study requirement and fulfills the Global, post-1750 requirement for the history major.


                                                                                                                                               

HISTORY 2800 INTRODUCTION TO THE DISCIPLINE OF HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course is designed to introduce undergraduates to the historical method, that is, how historians write history.  We will learn how to distinguish between primary and secondary sources, and we will examine important events in historical context.  We will concentrate on a specific issue, dissent during the Civil War.  We will explore opposition to the war effort in both the North and the South, in addition to the larger role that dissent played in the war’s outcome.  

Time               Meetings Days             Instructor

12:45-2:05      TR                                Cashin, Joan
ONLINE

Assigned Readings:

Students will read a textbook, two monographs, and a variety of documents generated by nineteenth-century Americans.  These documents can be found ONLINE, such as newspapers, located at Ohio State University Library; Official Records of the Civil War, at Cornell University; Documenting the American South, at University of North Carolina. 

Assignments:

Students will also write three short papers on different aspects of wartime dissent.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course is required for all students declaring a Major in history, students must earn a “C” or higher to have it count on the history major. It may not be used for the GEC/GE Historical Study requirement.


 

HISTORY 2800H INTRODUCTION TO THE DISCIPLINE OF HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

THIS CLASS HAS A STRICT NO-ELECTRONICS POLICY.

What It’s About

This course is designed for honors history majors. While this is a course on historical method, our actual focus will be on the nuts and bolts of reading and writing history at the undergraduate level. The goal is for students to come out with the skills to do excellent work in future history classes: to analyze many types of documents and situations skillfully, to organize ideas in a powerful way, and to present them persuasively orally as well as in writing. To this end, each class will focus on specific analytical, reading or writing skills and other important principles for doing history. The reading was selected to be interesting, but more specifically to offer concrete examples of primary and secondary sources on which to practice. Our topic for this purpose is the Salem witch trials of 1692.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

2:20-3:40         TR                               Goldish, Matthew

Assigned Reading:

Richard Godbeer, The Salem Witch Hunt (available through B&N or ONLINE retailers; one copy is on reserve)

Additional primary and secondary sources will be supplied on CARMEN. In addition, each student will select and read a secondary study as the semester progresses.

BRING THE BOOK TO CLASS EVERY DAY! Failure to do so could affect the success of your work.

Assignments:

Grading

Quizzes                                   12 given, 2 lowest dropped                 50%

Oral expertise preparation                                                                  5%

Small essays                                                                                       2 @ 5 points each10%

Bibliography                                                                                        5%

Essay draft                                                                                          10%

Essay final                                                                                          20%

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course is required for all History Majors and must earn a C or higher to have it count on the Major.  This Honors version of History 2800 is open to honors students and non-honors students with permission of the instructor.


 

HISTORY 2800 INTRODUCTION TO THE DISCIPLINE OF HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

How do historians study the past? This course introduces students to the methods and disciplines of historical inquiries.  Through readings, discussions, documentaries, films, and archival materials, students will be introduced to the methods and disciplines of historical inquiries.  We will explore, for example, the ways in which historians use written, oral, archival and archeological sources to develop historical arguments.  We will also explore the strengths and weaknesses of each of these sources.  By the end of the semester, I expect students to have acquired adequate skills for analyzing, developing and presenting historical arguments appropriate for undergraduate history majors. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

ONLINE            ONLINE                        Kobo, Ousman                                   

Assigned Readings: (tentative)u

Conal Furya and Michael Salevouris, The Methods and Skills of History.

Assignments: (tentative)

A precis; a book review; a bibliography and a final paper.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

The course is intended primarily for history majors and minors, though it is open to all students.  However, the course does not fulfill any GE requirements, so it should not be taken by students seeking to fulfill the GE historical studies requirement.


 

HISTORY 2800* INTRODUCTION TO THE DISCIPLINE OF HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course is designed to introduce you to what historians do and how they do it. Unlike other history classes, this course does not treat a specific topic or period in history, but rather focuses on historical methodology. 

Some of the issues we will explore include:

            *What are some of the methods historians use to explore the past?

*What constitutes an historical source?

*How do we collect, select, and evaluate historical evidence, and what kinds of evidence best answer certain kinds of questions?

*What are the best ways to present our data and interpretations?

*Can historians be objective?  What sorts of professional ethics and considerations guide the conscientious historian?

*What is the difference between history and opinion?

*Is the writing of history a science or an art?

*How does the present shape our understanding of the past?

Time                Meeting Days             Instructor

9:35-10:55       TR                               Sessa, Tina

Assignments:

Assignments include a library exercise, oral presentations, a critical review essay, and a short research essay based on primary sources.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course is required for all students declaring a Major in History. Students must earn a C or higher to have it count on the Major. It may not be used for the GE Historical Study requirement.


 

HISTORY 2800 INTRODUCTION TO THE DISCIPLINE OF HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

The specific topic of this class is Nat Turner’s rebellion.   In 1831, Turner, a Southampton County Virginia slave, led a revolt intending to overthrow the institution of slavery.  Dozens of white people were killed, and dozens of slaves and free black people were as well. The revolt has been reconstructed by historians, fictionalized by novelists, and even translated onto film.  Almost every generation recreates Nat Turner.  We will look at available documents related to this rebellion, different interpretations of them, and draw our own intelligent conclusions about what definitely happened, what probably happened, and what we can never really know.  Ultimately, each of those things determines how and what we must (or are able to) write.  We will also examine the evolution of the scholarship on the revolt and try to account for the differences in the work over time.  Thus, we will also be looking at historiography—the evolution of the history of the event.  The point of these analyses is not simply to know all we can about Turner’s revolt, but to think about the discipline of history and the various ways history is made and how historians work

In the process, we will look at and think about “driving forces” of history, whether history is objective or subjective, and the role of the historian in history.  We will talk about “good” history and “bad” history, how to use sources, what “facts” are, and whether or not history can be scientific.  Altogether, our goal is to become better historians through critical reading and thoughtful analyses of original and interpreted sources.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

11:10-12:30     TR                               Shaw, Stephanie
ONLINE

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course is required for all students declaring a Major in history, students must earn a “C” or higher to have it count on the history major. It may not be used for the GEC/GE Historical Study requirement.


      

HISTORY 2800 INTRODUCTION TO THE DISCIPLINE OF HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course is an introduction to the study of history, and to the concepts and skills necessary to study the past. Our concern throughout the course will be to examine critically the nature of history as a discipline and the writing of history as an academic project.  Through readings, discussions, in-class activities, and written assignments, we will explore the purposes of studying history, the types of sources available to reconstruct the past, and different methods and approaches for examining and interpreting history.

Unlike other history courses, this course does not treat a specific topic or period; instead it focuses on historical methodology.  We will practice a series of fundamental skills, including critical thinking, analytical reading, accurate research, public speaking, and effective writing, all critical for your success in the history major, and for life and work beyond your undergraduate years. 

Time                Meeting Days          Instructor

11:10-12:30     WF                              Sreenivas, Mytheli

Assignments:

Our assignments will focus on the research and writing skills necessary for the history major, and in your college course work overall.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course is required for all students declaring a Major in history, students must earn a “C” or higher to have it count on the history major. It may not be used for the GEC/GE Historical Study requirement.

Please contact Professor Sreenivas (Sreenivas.2@osu.edu) if you have questions about readings and assignments.


 

HISTORY 3702 DIGITAL HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course is a survey of the ways digital technology is impacting history: from the collection and preservation of primary sources, to the analysis of those documents with the aid of algorithms, to the representation of the past through digital means.  What does it look like when we take our study of the past into the digital realm?  How has the availability of millions of digitized primary and secondary sources impacted our practices?  How has the digital medium altered how we represent the past?  How have data analytics tools helped historians to uncover new patterns in the past? 

This course will be organized as an ONLINE studio based-course, one in which we will engage in the process of creating many forms of digital history.  As a final deliverable, students will reflect on digital history as a set of approaches to studying the past.

This course assumes no prior technical or programming knowledge, and is meant to provide a basic grounding in the theoretical and technological skills needed to present history in digital form. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

ONLINE              ONLINE                           Staley, Dave

Assigned Readings:

Graham, Milligan and Weingart, Exploring Big Historical Data: The Historian’s Macroscope

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course is a GE Historical Study course.  This course fulfills group Global, post-1750 for the History major.

 


 

HISTORY 3680 RELIGION & LAW IN COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVE

3 Cr. Hrs.

These days, it is almost impossible to go ONLINE or watch TV without learning about a conflict at the intersection of religion and law: Should yoga or creationism be taught in public schools? Should religious symbols be displayed in public? Should same sex marriage be legal? These conflicts raise critical questions about the meaning of secularism and religious freedom; about religion’s proper place in American life; and about how we understand what it means to be an American.

Yet as contentious as these questions are in the contemporary United States, they have been addressed in different ways in other times and places.  In this course, we will develop tools for thinking critically about these issues by adopting a comparative, interdisciplinary approach.  Drawing on concrete cases, historical studies, and theoretical literature, we will explore how the relationship between religion and law has been configured differently in different liberal democracies and what this might mean for contemporary debates.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

2:20-3:40         TR                               Weiner, I.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills group Europe and North America, post-1750 for the History major.

 


 

HISTORY 3708 VACCINES: A GLOBAL HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Infectious diseases have profoundly affected human history. The discovery and use of vaccines reshaped the experience and effects of these diseases, including contributing to a rapid decline in morbidity and mortality in the 20th and 21st centuries. Empirical development of the first vaccines spurred significant scientific changes in our knowledge of human and animal immune systems, leading to the creation of yet more vaccines. From their very first use, however, vaccines have spurred controversies and resistance. They have also been big business. In this course, team-taught between the departments of history and the college of pharmacy, we explore their complex history and science.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

MW                 9:35-10:55                   Harris, James and Summers, K.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course is a GE Historical Study course.  This course fulfills group Global, post-1750 for the History major.


 

HISTORY 4015 SEMINAR IN MODERN U.S. HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

History 4015 will concentrate primarily on the United States during the tumultuous period known as “The Sixties.”  We will define the period loosely, not so much by temporal boundaries as by historical streams. Those streams included vast and profound cultural change; generational conflict; artistic rebellions; technological transformation; anti-colonial nationalism; the Cold War; the Black Liberation Struggle; and the rise of modern conservatism.  It would not take much for us to whip up a dozen more topics.

Time                Meeting Days             Instructor

2:15-5:00         Thursday                     Steigerwald, David

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course is designed for junior and senior History majors and fulfills the seminar requirement for History Majors.

 


 

HISTORY 4015H HONORS SEMINAR IN MODERN U.S.  HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

The “Fifties”: Life in the United States, 1948-1963

An examination of American life during the immediate post-World-War-II period.  Emphasis on the creation of a large military establishment and collective security agreements such as NATO, Cold War conflicts (most notably in Korea) and the U.S.-Soviet arms race, moderate (Eisenhower-era) conservatism, mass suburbanization, the baby boom, the re-emphasis on domesticity for women, the advent of television, the revival of mainstream religion, the Beats and other dissenters against the Fifties’ system, and the other forces (economic, political, social and cultural) that eventually undermined the stability of the Fifties’ system, such as superpower confrontations in the Third World, environmental pollution and the increasing challenge to segregation in law and everyday life.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

9:35-12:20       Monday                       Stebenne, David

Assigned Readings:

Weekly reading assignments delve into the above topics in depth; approximately 125-150 pages per week.

Assignments:

Attendance at, and lively participation in, all class meetings; a 3-5-page research paper prospectus; and a first draft and a final draft of a 20-page research paper.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

Open to honors students only, other students with permission of the instructor.  This course fulfills the seminar requirement for the history major.


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  


HISTORY 4255 SEMINAR IN MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Borders, Nations, Citizenship, and Belonging in Modern Europe

This class will study the history of modern Europe through the prism of state- and nation-building. Examining work on both Western and Eastern Europe as well as the western European empires, students will learn about the evolution of ideas of nation, borders, passports, citizenship, and belonging in the long twentieth century. Some topics include: the rise of nationalism; the invention of the passport; the emergence of the concept of citizenship; empire, colonial migrations, and national identity; the “minority question” in interwar Europe; refugees and forced migrations during the wars; postcolonial and labor migrations after WWII; and changing ideas of citizenship and belonging after the end of the Cold War.

After reviewing the relevant literature in the first half of the semester, during the second half of the seminar each student will write a historiographical or research paper on one case study of his/her choice. The students will make extensive use of the OSU Library print and electronic resources and visit the library for presentations and hands- on experiences on how to use these resources in historical research.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

9:35-12:20       Wednesday                 Dragostinova, Theodora

Assigned Readings:

Some possible readings include (the list will be finalized later):

John Torpey, The Invention of the Passport: Surveillance, Citizenship, and the State (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000).

Roberta Pergher, Mussolini's Nation-Empire: Sovereignty and Settlement in Italy's Borderlands, 1922-1943 (Cambridge University Press, 2017).

Brendan Karch, Nation and Loyalty in a German-Polish Borderland: Upper Silesia, 1848-1960 (Cambridge University Press, 2018).

Wendy Webster, Englishness and Empire, 1939-1965 (NY: Oxford University Press, 2007).

John Bowen, Why the French Don’t Like Headscarves: Islam, the State, and Public Space (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2008).

Rita Chin, The Crisis of Multiculturalism in Europe: A History (Princeton University Press, 2017).

Ivan Krastev, After Europe (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2017).

Assignments:

Short papers and bibliographies: 20%

Discussion and participation: 30%

Final long 20-page paper: 50%

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills the seminar requirement for the history major.

This class has an embedded Honors section. Honors students will have two choices for an extra assignment, to be discussed individually with the instructor: 1) to reflect on an additional novel and film of their choice; or 2) to write a policy memo on a current issue through a survey of contemporary media and/or poll.


 

HISTORY 4255 SEMINAR IN MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Seminar in on the Culture of World War I

This course explores what is arguably the most dynamic and creative period in the entirety of Western cultural history, roughly 1890-1930, which ironically straddles one of the most destructive wars in history, World War I (1914-1918). We will investigate some essential causes of the war, its course, and its effects, focusing in particular on the disastrous Battle of the Somme and the concluding Treaty of Versailles. To explain this great irony we will explore how leading artists and writers treated the war indirectly even as it transformed their life. That dynamic is evident in the work of cubist and abstract artists as well as literary figures such as Virginia Woolf, James Joyce, and T. S. Eliot. When asked why he did not include any war poetry in an anthology of English poetry that he edited in 1936, Yeats replied: “Some blunderer has driven his car on to the wrong side of the road—that is all.”

 Time               Meeting Days              Instructor

2:15-5:00         Monday                       Kern, Stephen
ONLINE

Assigned Readings (tentative):

Michael Howard, The First World War

Paul Fussell, The First World War in Modern Memory

Modris Eckstins, Rites of Spring: The Great War and the Birth of the Modern Age

Virginia Woolf Mrs. Dalloway

T. S. Eliot, The Waste Land

Stephen Kern, The Modernist Novel (selections)

Assignments: Discussion of the assigned readings, two short papers on those readings, and a final research paper—an analysis of some recent interpretations of the culture of the war years.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills the seminar requirement toward a history major for semester students; this fulfills the 598 seminar requirement for quarter students. This course is only open to junior and senior history majors.  


 

HISTORY 4410 SEMINAR IN CHINESE HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

The (Second) Sino-Japanese War, 1937-45

In July 1937, soldiers of the Imperial Japanese Army were involved in what initially seemed to be a minor military skirmish with Republican Chinese soldiers at the Marco Polo Bridge near Beijing. Since the 19th century, Japanese and other foreign troops had frequently used such events to provide their political leaders at home with rationales to send reinforcements to China. This time, however, what the Japanese called “The China Incident” grew into a protracted eight-year continental war in which the Japanese goals of establishing an anti-Communist East Asian order, creating “civilization,” a reformed economy, and a stable new Chinese government that was friendly to Japan became ever-more elusive. In their desperation to end the war by imposing a full embargo on Chiang Kai-shek’s alleged pro-Communist wartime government holed up in Chongqing (Chungking), the Japanese eventually invaded the US-controlled Philippines, British-controlled Hong Kong, all of Southeast Asia from French Indochina to Thailand, British Malaya, Burma, and India, the Dutch East Indies, and even parts of Australia. They also attacked the American-controlled, pre-statehood territory of Hawaii. In the process, the Japanese added to the China Incident what they call the Pacific War (1941-45) and what the West calls World War II; behind it all, however, the Sino-Japanese War (1937-45) churned on unceasingly and remained the justification for all of Japan’s “sideshows.”

This course, taught by a modern Chinese history specialist, will examine the Sino-Japanese War from Chinese and Japanese political, economic, military, and civilian perspectives. Like all 4000-level course, this one will emphasize reading, discussion, and research rather than lectures.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

2:20-3:40         WF                              Reed, Chris
ONLINE

Assigned Readings: probably 3-4 monographs and additional shorter readings

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills the seminar requirement toward a history major for semester students. Other students may enroll with the permission of the instructor. 

Special Comments: No prerequisites. This course is self-contained and does not presume any background. Although not required, some background in East Asian history, particularly History 2401 or 2402 or 3404, as well as some knowledge of World War II can be useful. Students should note that this is a course on the Sino-Japanese War (Japan vs. China), not on the Pacific War (Japan vs. the Rest), and their final self-chosen research papers must reflect that fact.


 

HISTORY 4475 SEMINAR IN JEWISH HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

The Holocaust

The Holocaust remains a touchstone in debates about human rights, democracy, and historical memory. This seminar places the history of National Socialist Germany in its European and global contexts. We will focus on the history of the attempted annihilation of European Jews and study the targeting of the Roma people and thousands of other individuals marked as enemies of the Nazi state.

The seminar will focus on some of the most contentious questions concerning the history of the Holocaust: Why did the Nazi Party come to power in Germany? Who supported the regime? What characterized the Nazi state? What roles did antisemitism, racism, homophobia, and ableism play in politics and ordinary life before 1939? What constitutes "collaboration" or "resistance" in the context of total war and genocide? How did gender, sexuality, class, disability, and ethnicity shape victims' experiences of, and responses to, Nazi persecution? How do we understand the United States’ role in the Holocaust? What role should survivor testimony play in studying the Holocaust?

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

1:30-4:15         Tuesday                      Judd, Robin

Assigned Readings (TENTATIVE):

Gotz Aly, Europe Against the Jews

Michael Dobbs, The Unwanted: America, Auschwitz, and a Village Caught in Between

Robert Gellately, Hitler’s True Believers

Marion Kaplan, Hitler’s Jewish Refugees: Hope and Anxiety in Portugal

Edith Perl, Not Even a Number

Tentative Assignments:

Weekly discussion posts, book review, annotated bibliography, final paper

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills the seminar requirement for History Majors.


 

HISTORY 4575 SEMINAR IN MILITARY HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Life and Death in World War

This seminar explores and analyzes the human experience of World War I. Students will read and discuss books, articles and documents related especially to the military, social, cultural and gendered aspects of the conflict. Primary sources and secondary literature will be approached as windows into the experiences of soldiers and civilians in a time of total war. A research paper, based on significant primary sources, will be the core requirement of the course.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

9:35-12:20       Wednesday                 Cabanes, Bruno

Assigned Readings:

Bruno Cabanes, August 1914, France, the Great War and a Month that Changes the World Forever

Martha Hanna, Your Death Would be Mine

Jennifer Keene, Doughboys. The Great War and the Remaking of America

Jay Winter, Sites of Memory, Sites of Mourning

Assignments:

The final grade in the course will be an average of the six grades given for book presentation and leading group discussion (20%); regular and intensive participation in class discussions (10%), leading the group discussion (10%), an annotated bibliography (10%); first draft of final paper (10%); oral report (10%); a final research paper (40%).

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills the seminar requirement toward a history major. This course is only open to junior and senior history majors. 


 

HISTORY 4705 SEMINAR IN ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.                                                                      

The field of Latin American history has a rich environmental history. From its colonial history to today, Latin America has experienced dramatic environmental change behind extractive export-commodity economies, like silver in Mexico, bananas in Central America to sugarcane and coffee in Brazil. Beyond commodity extraction, control of land has been an essential part of social and political conflict in the past and the present. The politicization of the environment in recent years is part of an important part of a broader approach to Latin American history as well. This course will introduce students to different methodological approaches to environmental history in Latin America and provides specific examples of the way environmental history has shaped Latin America today.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

12:45-3:30       Wednesday                 Eaglin, Jennifer
ONLINE

Assignments: Book reviews, research paper, presentations

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

English 1110.01 previous or concurrent; and a 3000 level history course. This course fulfills the seminar requirement toward a history major. This course is only open to junior and senior history majors.

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WOMEN'S HISTORY

 

HISTORY 2115 WOMEN AND GENDER IN LATIN AMERICA

3 Cr. Hrs.

With a focus on women’s lives, this course will examine the role of gender in the history of Latin America.  Using the lens of gender to understand religious, political, economic, and cultural change and continuity from the colonial era to the present helps us understand both men and women’s diverse experiences and participation in this history. Race, religion, class and geography also shape people’s lives, and we will pay careful attention to the wide range of circumstances and forces that shape the way people have made history what it was and history has made people who they are.  We will read and talk about the era of European colonization of Native Americans and enslavement of Africans; the enormous transformations that took place between the sixteenth and nineteenth centuries; the chaotic and volatile development of independent nations in the nineteenth century; and radical changes the 20th century brought throughout the region—all from the perspective of the history of women and gender.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

2:20-3:40         TR                               Delgado, Jessica

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Latin America, pre or post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.  


 

HISTORY 3620 LESBIAN, GAY, BISEXUAL & TRANSGENDER HISTORY IN THE U.S. 1940-2003

3 Cr. Hrs.                

This course offers an overview of LGBT culture and history in the United States from 1940 to the present. We will use a variety of historical and literary sources, including films and sound clips, to examine changes in lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered lives and experiences during the last half of the twentieth century. The course will encourage students to think about intersections of race, sexuality, and class, and how these categories have affected sexual minority communities. The course will also explore the impact that sexual minority communities have had on the law and culture in the United States since World War II.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

12:45-2:05       TR                               Rivers, Daniel
ONLINE

Assigned Readings:

Excerpts from (among others):

  • John D’Emilio, Sexual Politics, Sexual Communities: The Making of a Homosexual Minority in the United States, 1940-1970 (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1983),
  • Lillian Faderman, Odd Girls and Twilight Lovers: A History of Lesbian Life in Twentieth Century America (New York: Columbia University Press, 1991)
  • Joanne Meyerowitz, How Sex Changed: A History of Transsexuality in the United States (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2002)
  • Susan Stryker, Transgender History (Emeryville, CA: Seal Press, 2008)
  • Clare Hemmings, Bisexual Spaces: A Geography of Sexuality and Gender (New York: Routledge, 2002)

As well as:

  • Primary documents from post-WWII LGBT history including lesbian feminist and gay liberation flyers and periodicals, oral histories with lesbians, gay men, and trans men and women from the 1950s and 1960s, bisexual and pansexual periodicals from the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s, videotaped interviews with transgender men and women, and much more

Assignments:

Two 5-7 double-spaced papers, in-class midterm and final, and several discussion posts

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills the North America, post-1750 category for history majors or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.


 

HISTORY 3642 WOMEN IN MODERN EUROPE FROM THE 18TH CENTURY TO THE PRESENT

3 Cr. Hrs.                 

This course is designed as an introduction to the history of European women from the late eighteenth century to the mid-twentieth century.  Because there is much material to cover, my approach will necessarily be selective – emphasizing some events and developments while leaving out other things also important to the history of women. Several themes will be central to the course.  We will study the processes of industrial expansion and economic change and the impact of these developments on women’s social and economic position.  We will explore the political reorganization of Europe over the course of these centuries, and we will examine how women strove to shape and improve their lives under changing circumstances.  We will also concentrate on how relationships between women and men developed, and how beliefs about gender changed.  Finally, we will look at how economic position, religion, sexuality, marital status, regional and national differences influenced women’s experiences.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

11:10-12:30     TR                               Soland, Birgitte

Assignments:

Midterm paper and take-home final exam.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Europe, post-1750 for the history major or can fulfill a GE requirement.

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WORLD HISTORY

 

HISTORY 1681 WORLD HISTORY TO 1500

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course examines the major issues that have shaped the human experience from the beginnings of human civilization (ca. 3500 B.C.E.) to ca. 1500 C.E.

Time               Meeting Days               Instructor

ONLINE               ONLINE                           Limbach, Eric

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills the GE Historical survey; Global diversity.  Not open to students that have credit for History 181 or 2641.


 

HISTORY 1682 WORLD HISTORY FROM 1500 TO THE PRESENT

3 Cr. Hrs.

Survey of the human community, with an emphasis on its increasing global integration, from the first European voyages of exploration through the present.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

ONLINE              ONLINE                            Limbach, Eric

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills the historical study GE requirement.  Not open to students that have credit for History 182 or 2642.                                                                                                                                                    


 

HISTORY 1682 WORLD HISTORY FROM 1500 TO THE PRESENT

3 Cr. Hrs.

Survey of the human community, with an emphasis on its increasing global integration, from the first European voyages of exploration through the present.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

3:55-5:15        TR                                Murtha, C.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills the historical study GE requirement.  Not open to students that have credit for History 182 or 2642.


 

HISTORY 2650 THE WORLD SINCE 1914

3 Cr. Hrs.

The World since 1914 is a course on global history. We will focus on central themes of global history in the modern world – nationalism and the rise of nation-states, globalization, the emergence of mass society, gender, and identity and difference, as well as major events, such as the World Wars, the Great Depression, the Cold War, and the revolutions against colonial rule. We will also look at major issues in the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, such as food, health, energy, economic development, and the environment. Much of our class will involve discussion of primary documents and of competing theories about the causes of historical change. But the ultimate goal of the course is civic: to help us understand better the world and its problems, to develop global historical literacy, and to think about connections between our own lives and events in the past.

Time               Meetings Days             Instructor
12:40-1:35      MW                              Rivers, Daniel
10:20-11:15   Friday (recitations)
12:40-1:35    Friday (recitations)
1:50-2:45      Friday (recitations)

ONLINE

Assigned Readings:

  • Carter Vaughn Findley and John Alexander Murray Rothney, Twentieth-Century World. 7th edition. (Boston: Wadsworth/Cengage, 2011)
  • James H. Overfield, Sources of Global History since 1900. 2nd edition. (Boston: Wadsworth/Cengage, 2012)

Assignments:

6-8 pg. essay on your own family, in-class midterm and final, Two 3-page film analyses

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 597. GE historical study and diversity global studies course.


 

HISTORY 2675 THE INDIAN OCEAN: COMMUNITIES AND COMMODITIES IN MOTION

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course surveys the long history of the Indian Ocean as a vital arena of world history. We need the Indian Ocean to understand Mahatma Gandhi, Osama bin Laden, and Freddie Mercury. The Indian Ocean was a meeting point for the peoples and cultures of Africa, the Middle East, and Asia long before European colonization, and it has become a site of intense innovation in our global age. It helps of understand the history of East Africa, Arabia, India, and Southeast Asia in relation to each other. Part of the story is based on the sea because the Indian Ocean is home to monsoon winds, Sinbad the sailor, and a long history of piracy from British "privateers" Davy Jones and William Kidd to more recent Somali freebooters. But it is also a story of landed empires and strategic port cities. We'll look at the production and circulation of commodities, from spices and textiles, to ivory and cloves, to opium and oil. Slaves and indentured servants crossed the Indian Ocean to work plantations in the past, and we can see new coerced labor regimes in the rise of Persian Gulf states. The Indian Ocean has been the home of Islamic scholarly networks and a focus in the global war on terror. Finally, the Indian Ocean is also an ideal place to study the history of environmental change: the dodo was hunted extinct on one of the ocean's islands in the 17th century, and global warming threatens island nations like the Maldives. In short, this is a course that will provide an introduction to a fascinating region.

Time               Meetings Days             Instructor

11:10-12:30    TR                                McDow, Thomas

Assigned Readings:

Readings will include historical primary sources, journal articles, and at least one book:

Edward Alpers, The Indian Ocean in World History (2013)

Assignments:

Map quiz, midterm, final, and two short papers.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill the historical study GE.


 

HISTORY 2700 GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

In this course, we will explore how humans have shaped the environment and how the environment has shaped human history from prehistory to the present.  Our topics will range from fire to deforestation to climate change.  Students will learn the essential background to major environmental issues and consider how history might (or might not) help us confront present environmental challenges.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

Hybrid                                                  White, Samuel

10:20-11:15    Friday (recitations)
1:50-2:45         Friday (recitations)
12:40-1:35       Friday (recitations)
1:50-2:45         Friday (recitations)

Assigned Readings:

This course has two required textbooks:

Daniel Headrick, Humans versus Nature

J.R. McNeill and Peter Engelke, The Great Acceleration: An Environmental History of the Anthropocene since 1945

All other course readings will be posted to Carmen.

Assignments:

Regular short quizzes and exams, weekly recitation activities, and a final paper.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course may be taken to fulfill historical study, social science, or global studies GE requirements.  This course may be counted as Group Global, and either pre- or post-1750 for the major in history.  This course has been recommended for students pursuing degrees in SENR, but students in all degree programs are welcome.

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To find course availability and times, please visit the Ohio State Course Catalog and Master Schedule.