Autumn 2021 Undergraduate Courses

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History 3307 History of African Health and Healing
Instructor: McDow, Thomas
Days: WF
Time: 9:35-10:55 

Description: African approaches to health and healing; interaction between religion, culture, and healing; intersections and contradictions between African and Western concepts of health healing.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study and diversity global studies course. This course fulfills Group Africa, pre & post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement. 

 



 

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History 3083 Civil Rights and Black Power Movements 
Instructor: Jeffers, H. 
Days: TR
Time: 12:45-2:05 pm

Description: This course examines the Civil Rights/Black Power Movement. It begins by looking at Black activism and Black life at the start of the 20th century. It continues by examining the development and impact of the mass mobilization efforts of the 1950s and 1960s, from the Montgomery bus boycott and the student sit-ins, to the Freedom Rides and the March on Washington. At the same time, it scrutinizes the grassroots organizing campaigns led by the young people of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). This course concludes by looking at civil rights activism outside the South, evaluating the impact of civil rights legislation, and analyzing the ideological and tactical transition to Black Power. This course employs a grassroots, bottom-up approach to understanding the black freedom struggle. It takes seriously the notion that the driving force behind the movement was every day, ordinary, Black folk, and the skilled African American activists who helped them organize and mobilize.  The goal of this course is to familiarize students with the people (famous, infamous, and forgotten), places, and events of the most significant American social movement of the 20th century. In addition, and arguably most importantly, this course aims to show the process by which seemingly powerless African Americans organized to transform the society in which they lived, and the way white Americans, particularly in the South, responded, i.e. their attempts to preserve the status quo.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This is a reading intensive course. This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 the history major. Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for AfAmASt 3083. GE historical study and diversity soc div in the US course. Cross-listed in AfAmASt. 
 

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History 1151 American Civilization to 1877
Instructor: Morrow, J.
Days: Online    
Time: Online

Description:  In this course, we will explore the major historical developments in United States history from 1492 to 1877. We will focus on the large political themes that drive much of the history of the United States, but we will also explore many of the groups and individuals who played a major role in the shaping of American history. This includes minority groups like women, slaves, and Native Americans, as well as the more dominant groups within society. This course will not be limited by region and will instead show the complexities of the entire United States. We will explore Columbus’s exploration of the Americas and ultimately culminate in Reconstruction and the fall out of the Civil War.
Goals:

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx. Not open to students with credit for 1150, 2001, or 151. GE historical study course. This course is available for EM credit.


History 1151 American Civilization to 1877
Instructor: Turner IV, J. 
Days: Online    
Time: Online

Description:  The political, constitutional, social, and economic development of the United States from the colonial period through the era of Reconstruction.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx. Not open to students with credit for 1150, 2001, or 151. GE historical study course. This course is available for EM credit.


History 1152 American Civilization since 1877
Instructor: Schoof, M. 
Days: Online
Time: Online

Description: The political, constitutional, social and economic development of the United States from the end of Reconstruction to the present.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx. Not open to students with credit for 1150, 2002, or 152. GE historical study course. This course is available for EM credit.


History 2001 Launching America
Instructor:  Brooke, J.
Days:     TR        
Time:  9:35-10:55  (lecture)
            

Description: Launching America is an intermediate-level overview of American history from its origins in scattered colonial settlements through the American Revolution to the American Civil War and its aftermath.  Throughout the course, we examine the American story in its wider Atlantic context, focusing on the central problems of power and democracy among a diversity of peoples.  Would America be the “land of the free,” or a land of slavery?  Sketching the larger patterns of American history, we engage with historians’ efforts to understand and interpret the meaning of this past and introduce some of the key approaches to historical study.   

Assigned Books: 
Eric Foner, Give Me Liberty! An American History [Vol. I]  (Norton: 6th Seagull Edition, 2020) This book will be available online on Carmen.
Betty Wood, The Origins of American Slavery (Hill and Wang, 1998)   
A Narrative of a Revolutionary Soldier: Some Adventures, Dangers, and Sufferings of Joseph Plumb Martin  
Joseph Ellis, Founding Brothers: The Revolutionary Generation 
Angela Murphy, The Jerry Rescue: The Fugitive Slave Law, Northern Rights, and the American Sectional Crisis  
Documents posted on Carmen

Assignments:
Part I exam:                   20% 
Part 2 Paper:                  25%
Part 3. Exam:                 25%
Section participation:    30% [including occasional quizzes and three short document response essays]

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 1151 (151). GE historical study and diversity soc div in the US course. This course fulfills Group American, pre & post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfil a GE requirement.


History 2002H Making America Modern
Instructor: Steigerwald, D.
Days: WF
Time: 9:35-10:55 am

Description: Examines twentieth-century American history in a global perspective, with special emphasis on the themes of industrial, military, and global expansion, as well as the expansion of civil and political rights of the American people. 

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: Honors standing, and English 1110.xx; or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 2002. GE historical study and diversity soc div in the US course. This course fulfills Group American, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


History 3002 U.S. Political History since 1877

Instructor: Baker, P.

Days: M

Time: 12:30-3:15 pm

Description: History of American political institutions, ideas, and culture from Reconstruction to the present.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq: English 1110.xx and any History 2000-level course, or permission of instructor. GE historical study and diversity soc div in the US course. This course fulfills Group American, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


History 3013 Civil War and Reconstruction 
Instructor: Cashin, J. 
Day/Time: Online

Description: 
In this course, we will discuss the origins of War, which side won and why, and various attempts to remake Southern society during the Reconstruction era.  We will describe the experiences of Northerners, Southerners, and Westerners, including ordinary people (soldiers, slaves, farmers, women) as well as famous generals and politicians.  Although this course includes military history, that is not the primary focus of the course.

Assigned Readings: Several monographs on the period.

Assignments: Students will write one paper, take a final exam, and discuss the monographs in class.  Students are expected to attend class on a regular basis.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 557.03. This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement. This course fulfills Group American, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


History 3014 Gilded Age to Progressive Era, 1877-1920

Instructor: Susner, L. 
Days/Time: Online- 7W2

Description: History 3014 is an advanced undergraduate course that will examine U.S. social, political, cultural, and foreign policy history from 1877-1920, including the New South, the West and Populism, industrialization, immigration, urbanization, imperialism, and the Spanish-American War, Progressivism, and World War I.  We will investigate this period through the lens of primary sources and secondary sources, including several books.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:  Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 564. GE historical study and diversity soc div in the US course.


History 3016 The Contemporary U.S. since 1963
Instructor: Stebenne
Days: T, Th.                
Time: 11:10 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

Description: Examination of the major political, economic, social, and cultural changes in the USA since the spring of 1963: mass suburbanization, causes and consequences of the Vietnam War, the civil rights movement, political polarization, the revival of feminism, the counter-culture, the new environmentalism, détente and the decline of East-West tensions, the new world disorder, the rise of a service-based economy, and globalization.

Assigned Readings:
Thomas Hine, Populuxe (1990)
Frederik Logevall, The Origins of the Vietnam War (2001)
Juan Williams, Eyes on the Prize: America’s Civil Rights Years, 1954-1965 (1988), chaps. 4-8
Bruce Shulman, The Seventies: The Great Shift in American Culture, Society and Politics (2002)
Jules Tygiel, Ronald Reagan and the Triumph of American Conservatism, 2nd ed. (2006), chaps. 7-11
Barbara Ehrenreich, Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting by in America (2001)
David Owen, Green Metropolis: Why Living Smaller, Living Closer and Driving Less are the Keys to Sustainability (2010)

Assignments: A midterm, a final and a short (5-page) paper based on the assigned reading.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:  Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 566. GE historical study course. This course fulfills Group American, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


History 3017 The Sixties             
Instructor: Parrot
Days:     MWF                
Time: 10:20-11:15
                
Description: This course will examine that tumultuous period known as “The Sixties.”  We will consider as broad themes the rise and fall of Cold War liberalism; the Black Freedom struggle and American race relations; the Vietnam War and American society; American culture in the Age of Aquarius; and, finally, the rise of contemporary conservatism and the so-called white backlash.  In the midst of these broad themes, we will also consider many other important ingredients of the period, including the radical student movement; the urban crisis; the technological-consumer society; the sexual revolutions; among others.  

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 309. GE historical study course. This course fulfills Group American, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


History 3040 The American City
Instructor: Howard, C.
Days: MWF
Time: 1:50-2:45 

Description: History of the American city (urban-suburban) from colonial times to the early 21st century. 

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study and diversity soc div in the US course. This course fulfills Group American, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


History 3030 History of Ohio

Instructor: Coil, W.

Days/Time: Online

Description: This course will survey the economic, social, and political development of the geographic area that became Ohio from the Native American period to the present. We will explore three themes in particular:  the role of disruptive technology and creative destruction in shaping Ohio’s past; the critical junctures at which Ohio might have become something entirely different from what it became; Ohio’s connection to the wider world through geography, technology, demography, economics, and politics.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.



HISTORY 3045- American Religious History

Instructor: Irwin, R.

Days: Wednesdays

Time: 3:55-5:15  

Description: This course covers the sweep of American religious history, from the colonial era to the present, focusing on the roles of religious movements and leaders in the development of the United States. Among the topics that we will consider are: spiritual practices and beliefs of indigenous peoples; African religious influences; the impact of religion on European colonization; varieties of Christian expression; Enlightenment ideas about deity; revivalism; evangelicalism and reform movements; the growth of denominations; religion and nativism; American Judaism; church and state; Islam; race and religion; unbelief; liberal theology; the Social Gospel; New Age movements; occultism; and religion and politics, including significant court cases. We will focus on connections between religion and political, social, economic, and cultural developments.

Assigned Readings: Primary documents and articles on digital reserve, between 50 and 75 pages of reading per week.

Assignments:

Modular quizzes.

Historiographical and primary source review.

Decision analysis paper.

Final presentation.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:  Any 2000-level History course, and English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. This is a hybrid course that combines online lectures and weekly in-person discussions. For majors, this course fulfills Group North America, post-1750.     

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History 1211 Western Society to 1600: Rise, Collapse, and Recovery
Instructor: Parker, G
Days/Times: Online; 1 synchronous recitation each Monday and 2 asynchronous lectures each week

Description: For better or worse, Western societies have become extremely prominent in the world today – not just in the West but (thanks to Karl Marx and the Internet) around the world. How did this process begin? What is distinctive about Western values?  These are two of the questions that this course seeks to answer. In addition, we will examine How Things Happen: 

•    Why did the West develop at such an early stage the right to free speech guaranteed in this country by the First Amendment? 
•    Why were 50% of all Western populations in this period under the age of 20? 
•    How could 167 Spaniards overthrow the Inca Empire, with perhaps 8 million subjects, and go on to dominate much of South America? 

The course also offers strategies on how to identify, among masses of facts, the aberration from the trend, the cause from the contingent, the important from the incidental, and the continuities among the changes. 

Assigned Readings
Wiesner-Hanks, Crowston, Perry & McKay, A history of Western society, Volume I: From Antiquity to the Enlightenment, 13th edition (2020)
Wiesner-Hanks, Evans, Wheeler and Ruff, Discovering the Western Past, Volume I: to 1789, 7th edition (2015)

Assignments
•    Watch all materials for the course posted online
•    Read and discuss all assigned readings; attend and participate in all group discussions (20% of total grade)
•    Complete all assigned recitation exercises (20% of total grade)
•    one 5-page term paper (30% of total grade)
•    one final exam (30% of total grade)20

Prerequisites and Special Comments: No prerequisites. This course fulfills the following GE requirements:  1) “Historical Study,” 2) “Diversity: Global Studies”


History 2201 Ancient Greece and Rome 
Instructor: Koperski, A.
Days: TR
Time: 8:00-9:20 am 

Description: Comparative historical analysis of ancient Mediterranean civilizations of the Near East, Greece, and Rome from the Bronze Age to Fall of Rome.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 1211 or 301. GE historical study course. This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


History 2201 Ancient Greece and Rome

Instructor: Green, D.

Days /Time: Online

Description:  Comparative historical analysis of ancient Mediterranean civilizations of the Near East, Greece, and Rome from the Bronze Age to Fall of Rome.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:  Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 1211 or 301. This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


History 2210 Classical Archaeology

Instructor: Vanderpuy, P.

Days/Time: Online

Description:  Introduction to the principles, methods, and history of archaeological investigation in the ancient Greek and Roman world, illustrated through a selection of major classical sites.

 Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx. Not open to students with credit for 306, Clas 2301 (240), or HistArt 2301 (306). GE cultures and ideas and historical study and diversity global studies course. Cross-listed in Clas 2301 and HistArt 2301


 History 2210 Classical Archaeology

Instructor: Green, D.

Days/Time: Online

Description:  Introduction to the principles, methods, and history of archaeological investigation in the ancient Greek and Roman world, illustrated through a selection of major classical sites.

 Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx. Not open to students with credit for 306, Clas 2301 (240), or HistArt 2301 (306). GE cultures and ideas and historical study and diversity global studies course. Cross-listed in Clas 2301 and HistArt

 


History 2213 The Ancient Mediterranean City 
Instructor: Sessa, K. 
Days: TR
Time: 9:35-10:55 am

Description:  Cities in the ancient Near East, Greece, and Rome, with an emphasis on their physical form and historical importance. 

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx. Not open to students with credit for 504.02. GE historical study course. This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


History 2220 Introduction to the History of Christianity                  
Instructor: David Brakke
Days:     MWF                
Time: 10:20-11:15
    
Description: Ranging from Jesus to Joel Osteen, this course will study how in 2,000 years the messianic beliefs of a small group of Jews transformed into a worldwide religion of amazing diversity. Our approach will be historical and contextual: How have Christian beliefs, practices, and institutions changed over time and adapted to different cultures? We will consider major developments in theology (from the Council of Nicaea, to medieval scholasticism, to liberation theology), spirituality (from monasticism, to mysticism, to tent meetings), modes of authority (from apostles, to bishops, to televangelists), and social structures (from house assemblies, to an imperial church, to base communities). We will cover the histories and characteristics of the major forms of Christianity: Roman Catholicism, Eastern Orthodoxy, Protestantism, and Pentecostalism. “Christianity” has never been a single monolithic entity, but rather an astonishing collection of individuals and groups creating new and diverse ways of living as followers of Christ.

Assigned Readings:
Peter Feldmeier, The Christian Tradition: A Historical and Theological Introduction
C. Douglas Weaver and Rady Roldán-Figueroa, Exploring Christian Heritage: A Reader in History & Theology (2nd edition)
Plus readings from the Bible and additional sources on Carmen

Assignments: Two unit tests, final exam, and three short papers.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study and diversity global studies course. This course fulfills Group Global, pre-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


History 3210 Archaic Greece             
Instructor: Anderson
Days:     TR            
Time: 11.10-12.30

Description: This is the first half of a two-course sequence that surveys the history of ancient Greece (the second half will be offered in the Spring semester).  The course examines the formation of Greek culture, from the Neolithic era (ca. 7000-3000 BC) all the way down to the year 480 BC.  We will explore major political developments, including the rise and mysterious demise of the Mycenean kingdoms of the Late Bronze Age (ca. 1600-1100 BC); the subsequent emergence of small, village-based chiefdoms; and the first city-states in the Dark Age (ca. 1100-700 BC); the creation of written laws, political institutions, and, ultimately, the world's first citizen-states in the Archaic Age (ca. 700-480 BC); and the momentous wars against the Persian empire in the early fifth century.  Along the way, we will also explore various social and cultural phenomena associated with these political developments.  Here, particular attention will be paid to the many innovations of the Archaic Age in art, architecture, sports, literature, and philosophy, as well as to broader social issues, such as the place of women and slaves in Greek society.

Assigned Readings:
I. Morris and B. Powell, The Greeks: History, Culture, and Society 2nd. Ed. (Prentice Hall, 2010)
Herodotus, The Histories, Rev. Ed. (Penguin Classics, 2003)

Assignments:
2 exams and term paper

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 501.01. GE historical study course. This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


History 3216 War in the Ancient Mediterranean World

Instructor: Awasthi, A.

Days/Time: Online

Description: A survey of military history from the late Bronze Age to the fall of the Roman Empire in the West.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 2212 or 504.01. GE historical study and diversity global studies course.


History 3229 History of Early Christianity 
Instructor: Sessa, K.
Days: TR
Times: 2:20-3:40 pm

Description:  A survey of the history of Christianity from its Jewish and Greco-Roman roots to the late sixth century.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 506. GE historical study and diversity global studies course. This course fulfills Group Global, pre-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.

 

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History 2351 Early Islamic Society, 610-1258
Instructor: Whitehead, C. 
Days: WF
Time: 2:20-3:40 pm

Description:  Origins and early development of selected fundamental Islamic institutions in their historical and cultural context.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx. Not open to students with credit for 540.01. GE historical study course. This course fulfills Group Near Eastern, pre-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


History 2353 The Middle East since 1914      
Instructor: Akin, Y. 
Days:     TR            
Time: 11:10-12:30 pm 
                                                
Description: This course presents a foundational overview of the political, social, economic, and cultural history of the Middle East from the late-nineteenth century to the present. It aims to go beyond the simplistic generalizations and stereotypes about the region and its people by introducing students to the complexities of the Middle East’s modern history and its present. The course also aims to enable students to adopt an informed and critical perspective on the region’s current conflicts and challenges. Among other issues, we will pay particular attention to the following topics: nineteenth century reformism; economic dependency, imperialism, and anti-imperialism; nationalism and nation state formation; the Israeli-Palestinian conflict; women’s experiences; U.S. involvement in the region; the Islamic Revolution in Iran; the rise of Islamist movements; and recent upheavals in the Middle East. This course offers students the chance to explore these issues through a variety of media—academic works, film, fiction, and other primary sources.

Assigned Readings: TBA

Assignments: Quizzes, weekly reflections, writing assignment, primary source analysis, take home final exam

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq: English 1110.xx or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 3358 or 540.05. GE historical study course. This course fulfills Group Near Eastern, post- 1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


History 2401 History of East Asia in the Pre-Modern Era
Instructor: Zhang, Ying
Days: Online
Time: Online

Description: Introduction to societies and cultures of pre-modern China, Korea, and Japan; the East Asian geographical and cultural unit. 

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx. Not open to students with credit for 141. GE historical study and diversity global studies course. This course fulfills Group East Asia, pre-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


History 3355 The Early Islamic Conquests (CE 630-750)
Instructor: Anthony, S. 
Days: TR
Times: 12:45-2:05 pm

Description: Utilizing new historical methods for reading and interpreting the sparse contemporary and near contemporary testimonies for this historical period, this course explores how these testimonies, both Muslim and non-Muslim, continue to challenge historians to revise the history of the Islamic conquests. In this course a strong focus is placed on reading primary source materials in translation.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq: Not open to students with credit for Islam 3355. GE historical study and diversity global studies course. Cross-listed in Islam.


History 3365 History of Afghanistan

Instructor: Khaliyarov, A.

Days/Time: Online

Description: This course will address Afghan society, its historical foundations, and the challenges that confront it.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group East Asia, post-1750 for history majors or can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.


History 3426 History of Modern Japan, 1800-2000 
Instructor: Reed
Days: TR
Time: 2:20-3:40 pm, Online

Description: This course explores key aspects of the history of Japan from 1800 to approximately 2000. It provides a nuanced understanding of the historical development of the country within international & comparative frameworks. Attention will be given to Japan's cultural and political foundations in the late Tokugawa shogunal period, changes undertaken during the Meiji, Taisho, and early Showa periods (including themes such as militarism, nationalism, imperialism, cultural change, & political-social-economic development), followed by World War II, the American Occupation, and the postwar Japanese state and society. Organized chronologically, the course seeks a balance between detailed examination of particular periods and exploration of elements of continuity and discontinuity in state (re)formation, economy, and society. By the end of the semester, you will be able to describe the evolution of Japan from a semi-feudal state into a modern world power, the impact of Western influence on Japanese society in historical perspective, and the interactions of modern Japan with its neighbors and the world.

Assigned Readings: TBD, a textbook, 2-3 other books, films

Assignments: TBD, but similar to other 3000-level courses

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Although not required, the course assumes students have had college-level history courses above the introductory level. Familiarity with topics covered in History 2402, "East Asian History since 1600" is useful but not required. GE historical study course. This course fulfills Group East Asia, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


History 3475 History of the Arab-Israeli Conflict             
Instructor: Yehudai, O. 
Days:     TR                
Time: 9:35AM - 10:55AM
                
Description: The Arab-Israeli conflict is one of the most enduring and controversial conflicts in the world. This course follows the history of the conflict from its inception in the late 19th century to the early 21st century. The first part of the course will examine the circumstances surrounding the emergence of the Jewish and Palestinian Arab nationalist movements, and the encounter between Jews and Arabs in Palestine during the late Ottoman and British mandate periods. We will then discuss the attainment of Israeli independence and the exodus of Palestinian Arabs in 1948, the succeeding wars between Israel and its Arab neighbors, the two intifadas, and the attempts to achieve a peace settlement. Course materials include secondary historical sources, a variety of primary documents and films. These texts, combined with lectures, will provide students with an in-depth understanding of the history of the conflict, taking into account the positions of Palestinian Arabs, Jews, and other regional and global forces involved in the conflict.

Assigned Readings:
Textbook: Charles D. Smith, Palestine and the Arab Israeli Conflict; primary historical documents and films.

Assignments: Reflection papers and book review (subject to change).

Prerequisites and Special Comments:  Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE cultures and ideas and historical study course.    
 

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History 1212 European History II, 1500-present          
Instructor: Bond, E. 
Days:     Asynchronous, online                
Time: Asynchronous, online    
                                            
Description: This class introduces students to the political, economic, social, and cultural history of modern Europe from roughly 1500 to the present. This course contextualizes European history within a global frame. We will study the major changes of the modern period, including:  the Protestant and Catholic Reformations; the emergence of new models of states and empires; the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment; the Age of Revolutions, democracy, and human rights; the Industrial Revolution, urbanization, and popular politics; the First World War, technology, and diplomacy; World War II and the Holocaust; the Cold War and the collapse of communism; decolonization and globalization; and life in Europe today. This survey course also focuses on how these larger trends were experienced by people. Readings, lectures, and films will highlight how these moments in modern European history were lived.

Assigned Readings:
Textbook: Edward Berenson, Europe in the Modern World, a New Narrative History since 1500 (Oxford, 2021, Second Edition). ISBN: 9780190078874
All other class materials, including assigned memoirs and films, will be provided electronically via Carmen. 

Assignments:
Weekly Quizzes: 40%
Film response: 30%
Final paper: 30%

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx. Not open to students with credit for 1210, 2203, 2204, or 112. This course is available for EM credit. GE historical study and diversity global studies course.


History 1212 Western Civilization, 17th Century to Present          
Instructor: Dragostinova, T. 
Days:     Asynchronous, online                
Time: Asynchronous, online    
                                            
Description: This class introduces students to the political, social, and cultural developments that made the fabric of modern Europe from roughly 1650 on. The course adopts a broad understanding of European history, examining developments on the peripheries of Europe and the European colonies overseas. We will explore the main features of the modern period, including the emergence of different models of state- and nation-building in Europe; the birth of representative politics and democratic institutions; scientific innovation, industrialization, and the new technologies; the ideologies of modernity such as conservatism, liberalism, socialism, and nationalism; the effects of European colonialism and imperialism; the new social classes and changing gender roles; the challenges to the democratic order and experiments in socialism and fascism; the Holocaust and ethnic cleansing; the divided world during the Cold War and the overthrow of the communist regimes; and decolonization and globalization.

Assigned Readings:
Optional textbook: Brian P. Levack et al, The West: Encounters & Transformations. Volume II: Since 1550 (Pearson, 2017; Fifth Edition). ISBN-13: 9780134377766
All other class materials will be provided electronically on Carmen. 

Assignments:
Lecture quizzes: 10%
Discussion posts: 30%
Reflection papers: 20%
Midterm: 20%
Final exam: 20%

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx. Not open to students with credit for 1210, 2203, 2204, or 112. This course is available for EM credit. GE historical study and diversity global studies course.


History 2202 Introduction to Medieval History

Instructor: Vanderpuy, P.

Days/Time: Online

Description:  Survey of medieval history from the late Roman Empire to the early sixteenth century.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 1211. GE historical study and diversity global studies course. This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


History 2204   Modern European History
Instructor:  Breyfogle
Lecture Days:  MW            Time: 9:10-10.05
Recitations:   F            Time:  9:10, 10:20, or 12:40
                                                
Description: Welcome to the Wonderful World of Modern European History!  In this course, we will study fundamental events and processes in European politics, war, economics, intellectual thought, culture, and society from the French and Industrial Revolutions to the present.  We will attempt to explain how Europeans and the European world have arrived at where they are today.  We will strive to understand how Europeans came to dominate much of the planet; how Europeans introduced revolutions in political ideas, including participatory democracy, liberalism, socialism, communism, fascism/Nazism, and nationalism; why the great industrial transformation began in Europe and what its consequences were; and how Europeans lived and gave meaning to their lives in the “modern” era.  The course is both topically and chronologically organized and emphasizes the common characteristics of European civilization as a whole rather than specific national histories. It traces threads of continuity while also examining the vast changes experienced by European society in these 250 years.  We will focus on particular cases that illustrate important patterns of change and conflict that have shaped the European world as we know it now.  The format of the course will be a combination of lectures, class discussions, and other forms of direct student participation.  

Assigned Readings:
Emile Guillaumin, The Life of a Simple Man.
Erich Maria Remarque, All Quiet on the Western Front.  
Art Spiegelman, MAUS, vols. I and II.
Mary Lynn Rampolla, A Pocket Guide to Writing in History (8th edition) 
Other shorter readings available on Carmen

Assignments: This course requires a few short essays, one take-home mid-term exam, a final take-home exam, various quizzes and brief writing assignments, and active and engaged in-class discussion and activities.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 1212. GE historical study and diversity global studies course. This course fulfills Group Europe, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


History 2204H Modern European History                                                
Instructor: Kern, S. 
Days:     WF                                                         
Time: 2:20-3:40, Online

Description: A survey of the most transformative developments of the Western world beginning with a short investigation of the French Revolution of 1789 that laid the foundation for modern politics and social relations. As a first assignment, students will explore reverberations of those developments in the nineteenth century as dramatized in Emile Zola’s literary masterpiece, Germinal. That work deals with the Industrial Revolution, conservatism, liberalism, Darwinism, Marxism, and anarchism along with the realist literary style. The second unit is on World War I that toppled European world supremacy and ushered in the modern world. We will examine two books that offer contrasting interpretations of the significance of the war as a shattering of traditional values versus a reaffirmation of them. The final section evaluates a psychological analysis of Hitler that explains why he wanted to kill Jews and how he was able to get many Germans to help him do it. 

Readings:
Emile Zola, Germinal
Paul Fussell, The Great War and Modern Memory
Jay Winter, Sites of Memory, Sites of Mourning
Rudolph Binion, Hitler Among the Germans 
Selections from Karl Marx, Sigmund Freud, Ian Kershaw, and Diana Hacker (on Carmen) 
Sigmund Freud, Introductory Lectures on Psychoanalysis (selections) 

Assignments: Three papers of 4-5 pages each on the assigned readings. I emphasize clear writing and conduct a week-long writing workshop to help students prepare to write those papers. 

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Honors standing and English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 2204. GE historical study and diversity global studies course. This course fulfills Group Europe, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


History 2231 The Crusades

Instructor: Douglas, S.

Days/Time: Online

Description: Examines the various European crusades - in the Holy Land, Spain, Eastern Europe, and southern France - from their origins to the late 15th century.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study and diversity global studies course. This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


History 2270 Love in the Modern World 
Instructor: Kern, S. 
Days: TR
Times: 2:20-3:40, Online

Description: Love is a source of intriguing debates about male and female gender roles, courtship practices, and marriage as well as birth control, abortion, pornography, and prostitution. A historical approach deepens understanding of these issues. This course will trace the history of love by responding to the following questions: What were ancient Greek, Jewish, and Christian love, and how did those legacies play out in Western history? Why does no major love story in the Western world until the twentieth century focus on the love of a married couple? Were the Victorians sexually oppressed by others and sexually repressed by their inner moral sense, and if so, what was the impact on how they loved? Why are women's faces and eyes typically highlighted in courtship imagery, while men are in profile and off center? How has modern feminism shaped love? How was love influenced by new bicycles, automobiles, telephones, movies, television, and the internet? 

More generally we will be asking: Is love an unchanging instinct or does it have a history? If it has a history what is its meaning? Is it conceivable that love became more authentic and humanizing across history? Or have we rather lost something along the way? Or both? How does reading about love affect the way one loves? How have psychoanalytic theory and existential philosophy influenced love? What do we know about sexuality and love that our ancestors did not? In light of the fact that the past century has brought about major changes in the social, economic, educational, political, medical, and legal status of women, how have they affected love between men and women? How does the history of gay and lesbian love fit into this history? How do wars and sexually transmitted diseases affect love? How is love socially constructed? Do men and women love differently, and if so, how do those gender modes of love vary historically? How has COVID impacted love?

The readings will be from my book on the subject, selections from Simone de Beauvoir's classic statement of existential feminism, selections by Sigmund Freud, and three representative novels. A few lectures will be slide presentations exploring love in art. We will discuss images of love in art to develop analytical skills and interpretive language that students will be using in writing the assigned papers, but they will be based on the three novels and material from my book. The first weeks of lecture present my theoretical orientation, offer some deep historical background, and introduce the elements of loving that the students will study throughout the course. These elements are the chapters in my book, The Culture of Love. 

Required Books: 
Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre
D. H. Lawrence, Women in Love
Carol Shields, The Republic of Love

Readings on Carmen: 
Stephen Kern, The Culture of Love: Victorians to Moderns (selections)
Diana Hacker, A Pocket Style Manual (selections)

Recommended Readings on Carmen: 
Sigmund Freud, Introductory Lectures on Psychoanalysis (selections)
Simone de Beauvoir, The Second Sex (selections)

Assignments:
Students will write three papers of 4-5 pages (1200-1500 words) on assigned topics based on the readings, lectures, and class discussions. I emphasize writing and conduct a writing workshop before the first paper. 

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq: English 1110.xx or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 3278 or 528. GE historical study course. This course fulfills Group Europe, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


History 3231 Creating Medieval Monsters: Constructions of the “Other”
Instructor: Butler, S.
Days: WF
Time: 2:20-3:40pm

Description: This course examines the development of a persecuting society in medieval Europe and explores the various ways that minorities were demonized (literally turned into "monsters") in the medieval discourse and artwork in order to create a strong sense of unity within Christendom, with a specific focus on Jews, lepers, Muslims, religious non-conformists, sexual nonconformists, and women.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study and diversity global studies course. This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


History 3239 Medieval England
Instructor: Butler, S.
Days: WF
Time: 9:35-10:55 pm

Description: This course is a study of political, religious, social, and cultural developments in England from the Anglo-Saxons to the year 1500. This course will attempt to address a variety of themes, including: England’s mixed cultural heritage, the emergence of Parliament, the development of common law, interaction and exchange with England’s neighbors and invaders, religious transformations and outgrowths, debunking myths about England’s monarchs, and English proto-nationalism.

Assigned Readings:
•    C. Warren Hollister, Robert C. Stacey, and Robin Chapman Stacey, The Making of England: To 1399, vol. 1, 8th ed. (Cengage, 2001). *In the course schedule, this text is abbreviated as H/S/S.
•    Ben Waggoner, ed., The Sagas of Ragnar Lodbrok (Troth Publications, 2009).
•    All other readings are available on Carmen/Canvas.

Assignments:
•    Reading Responses
•    Exams
•    Radnar Lodbrok Paper (5 pages)
•    Research Essay (10 pages)

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for history majors. For the General Education requirements, it fulfills the category of “Historical Study.”  This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


History 3245 The Age of Reformation             
Instructor: Brakke, D. 
Days: 7wk2  TR 
Time: 11:10-12:30
                
Description: During the sixteenth century, European Christians fought bitterly over the most basic questions of their faith: What is sin? How are people saved? What is the nature of religious authority? How can ordinary people experience God? What are the sacraments, and how do they work? The divisions and reform movements that divided and rejuvenated the Roman Catholic Church make the century after 1517 one of the most fascinating and perplexing eras in the history of Christianity. Although we will not neglect social and political developments, this course will focus on the religious history of sixteenth-century Europe—the teachings and practices of the Lutheran, Anabaptist, Calvinist, Anglican, and Catholic reformers. We will study their roots in the medieval Church, especially in the thought of Augustine of Hippo, and consider what the diverse reform movements (both Protestant and Catholic) shared as well as how they differed. The rapid religious changes of this tumultuous century set the stage for new forms of Christianity and “secularism” in the modern West. Previous study of Christian history (e.g., 2220, 3229, 3230) will be helpful, but is not required.

Assigned Readings:
Denis Janz, A Reformation Reader: Primary Texts with Introductions (2nd edition)
Carter Lindberg, The European Reformations (3rd edition, but 2nd is OK)
Natalie Zemon Davis, The Return of Martin Guerre
Additional readings on Carmen

Assignments:
Attendance and participation, two short papers, midterm examination, and final examination.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 511. GE historical study course. This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


History 3247 Magic & Witchcraft in Early Modern Europe (1450-1750)
Instructor: Goldish, M. 
Days: R 
Time: 3:15- 6:00 pm

Description: Investigation of the history of European witchcraft, focusing on intellectual, religious, and social developments and on the great witchcraft trials of the early modern period.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study and diversity global studies course. This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for the history major or it can fulfil a GE requirement.


History 3254 Europe After Hitler (Europe Since 1945)             
Instructor: Dragostinova, T. 
Days:     WF    
Time: 12:45-2:05pm (Hybrid class)                                        

Description:
This upper-level course explores the post-World War II history of Europe through the examination of several discreet themes: the rebuilding of the continent after the war; the origins and development of the Cold War in Europe; the end of European empires and the Cold War in the Third World; immigration and the making of multicultural Europe; protest movements and youth counterculture; European economic and political integration; and changes in historical memory and European identities over time. Tracing developments both in Western and Eastern Europe comparatively, the class interrogates the shifting meanings of West, East, and Europe from the Cold War until today. 

Assigned Readings (tentative):
Peter Schneider, The Wall Jumper: A Berlin Story (Pantheon Books, 1983).
Faïza Guène, Kiffe Kiffe Tomorrow (Mariner Books, 2006).
Luisa Passerini, An Autobiography of a Generation: Italy, 1968 (Wesleyan UP, 1996).

All other materials will be made available electronically on CARMEN. 

Assignments:
Discussion posts: 20%
Reflection papers: 30%
Midterm essay exam: 20% 
Final essay exam: 20%
Participation in discussion: 10%

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study and diversity global studies course. This course fulfills Group Europe, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


History 3260 Modern British History 1775-1920
Instructor: Otter, C. 
Days: WF
Time: 9:35 am -10:55 am

Description: This lecture course provides a survey of the history of Britain and its empire from the late eighteenth to the early twentieth century. It covers many dimensions of British history: political, economic, social, religious, medical, technological, and environmental. The central theme of the course is how powerful and beguiling ideas of individual and economic liberty, rooted in the philosophies of Locke and Smith, reverberated through every domain of British life, including the gendered domestic sphere, welfare policies, famine relief, imperial governance, railway construction, ideas of race, evangelical religion and evolutionary biology. As in the United States, “freedom” was, and is, a far from straightforward idea.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 514.02. GE historical study course. This course fulfills Group Europe, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


History 3263 20th Century France at War   
Instructor:  Conklin, A.
Days:     TR            
Time:  11:10-12:30 
                                                    
Description: This course explores France’s experience of three major wars: the Great War from 1914 to 1918, much of which was fought on French soil; the Second World War, during which France was occupied by Hitler’s Germany; and the Algerian War, when the French army and settlers fought to maintain the overseas territory called “French Algeria” against an anti-colonial uprising. We will look at how each of these wars had an impact on civilians as well as soldiers, the moral dilemmas they posed, and the legacies they left up to the present. Using a variety of primary and secondary sources, we will also consider how these wars have been represented by historians as well as in fiction and film.

Assigned Readings:
Henri Barbusse, Under Fire (Penguin Classics edition)
Irène Némirovsky, Suite Française
Alice Conklin, Sarah Fishman, and Robert Zaretsky, France and its Empire since 1870

There will also be a primary document and media packages (available on Carmen).
Films to be screened include Army of the Shadows (1969), Days of Glory (2006), Battle of Algiers (1967)

Assignments:
2 short essays (40%) and two midterms (30%) and one final exam (20%)  Class participation (based on attendance and in-class discussion): 10%

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study course. This course fulfills Group Europe, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


History 3711 Science and Society in Europe, from Copernicus to Newton
Instructor: Goldish, M. 
Days:  WF (2nd session, hybrid delivery)
Time: 9:35-10:55 am

Description:
A survey of the history of science and its place and relationship to European society in the early modern period.  Students will understand the various strands that constitute the scientific revolution in early modern Europe, modern intellectual history, how revolutions in thought occur, and will practice analytical and communications skills in working with both secondary and primary sources.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study. This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.

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History 2475: History of the Holocaust             
Instructor:  Judd, R.
Days:     TR 
Time: 12:45-2:05              
                                
Description: Despite the fact that it has been over seventy years since the Allies liberated the last of the Nazi camps, we continue to debate the Holocaust’s history.  How did the Nazis rise to power? When did the Nazi government begin to plan for the Final Solution? Who was culpable in planning and executing the genocide?  This course will peel away at some of these questions. Together we will examine the state-sponsored murder of millions of Jews and non-Jews by the Nazis and their collaborators during World War II.  We will study the individuals, institutions, historical events, and ideologies that allowed for the Holocaust to occur; all the while we will be paying attention to what we mean by “the Holocaust.”   

We will begin our study with an analysis of historical factors that predated the Nazi rise to power. After we study the histories of antisemitism and early 20th century Europe, we will consider how the Nazis assumed and consolidated power during the early 1930s. The next segment of the class will examine the crucial period of 1933-1938, paying close attention to the erratic anti-Jewish policies of the era and the myriad of Jewish responses to them.  In the third portion of the course, we will explore the Final Solution.  Our fourth section of the course will be devoted to the study of perpetrators, bystanders, and victims during the Holocaust.  Finally, we will consider the Holocaust’s aftermath and legacy among Jews and non-Jews in Germany, Israel, and the United States.

Assigned Readings (tentative):
Doris Bergen, War and Genocide
Gerda Weissman Klein, All But My Life

Assignments (tentative):
Reading questions, 2 semester exams, final exam

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for JewshSt 2475. GE historical study course. Cross-listed in JewshSt. This course fulfills Group Europe, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfil a GE requirement.

 

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History 4125 Seminar in Latin American History

Instructor: Hernandez, V.
Days:     Th  (Online)          
Time: 11:00 am-1:45 pm     
                
Description: From Tacos to Fries: A Global History of Latin American Food

In their quest for food, humans have transformed plants and animals into food, cooking into cuisine, ceremony into etiquette, and mothers’ cooking into tradition. New eating patterns have changed cultures, economies, and landscapes. This seminar analyzes those transformations through food and foodways from the Americas. How did colonialism change eating habits in Europe, Africa, and the Americas? What are the legacies of indigenous Latin American foods in international cuisine? How did globalization change Latin American landscapes and U.S. foodways? In this seminar, we will discuss processes of colonialism, revolution, and globalization through the lens of Latin American food. No previous knowledge of Latin American history is required to take this class.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, a grade of C or above in History 2800, and any 3000-level History course; or permission of instructor. This course is designed for junior and senior History majors and fulfills the seminar requirement for History Majors. 

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History 2550 History of War         
Instructor: Grimsley, M.
Days:     TR                
Time: Online
                                
Description: This course is an introduction to the salient concepts and problems involved in the study of military history.  It also addresses the effect of war on human society and development and examines the significance of war in human culture.  Although it examines war from prehistoric times to the present, the course is thematic rather than strictly chronological -- less  a survey of wars and military developments per se than a survey of the major concepts involved in the study of war.  In addition to such topics as the nature of war, the causes of war, and the development of warfare, we will also examine the “warrior code” as understood in various cultures (Greek, Roman, Norse, Japanese, Native American, etc.).

Students will achieve an understanding of the causes, conduct, and consequences of war, as well as how various societies—past and present, western and nonwestern—have understood and practiced war.  They will also hone their skills at critical writing and analysis, and gain greater insight into the way historians explore the human condition.

Assigned Readings (tentative)
Wayne E. Lee, Waging War:  Conflict, Culture, and Innovation in World History.
Shannon E. French, The Code of the Warrior:  Exploring Warrior Values Past and Present.
Victor Davis Hanson, Carnage and Culture:  Landmark Battles in the Rise of Western Power.

Assignments
The course grade is based on two midterm examinations and a final examination.  Each of these will have an in class and a take home portion.  

Prerequisites and Special Comments
Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. A solid grounding in Western Civilization or World History is very helpful. GE historical study and diversity global studies course. This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


History 2550 History of War

Instructor: Douglas, S.

Days/Time: Online

Description: A survey of the main concepts and issues involved in the study of war in world perspective, using case studies from prehistoric times to the present.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 380. This course fulfills the historical study GE & Group Global, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.


History 3550 War in World History, 500-1650

Instructor: Haydar, M.

Days/Time: Online

Description: Study of the causes, conduct, and consequences of warfare around the world, 500-1650

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq: English 1110.xx and any History 2000-level course, or permission of instructor. GE historical study and diversity global studies course. This course fulfills Group Global, pre-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement


History 3551 War in World History, 1651-1899

Instructor: Douglas, S.

Days/Time: Online

Description:  Study of the causes, conduct, and consequences of warfare around the world, 1650-1900.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study course. This course fulfills Group Global, pre & post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement


History 3552 War in World History, 1900- Present         
Instructor: Cabanes, B.
Days:     TR                
Time:  9:35-10:55AM
                                    
Description: The Experience of War in the 20th Century: The past hundred years have changed the nature of war. Industrial warfare and global conflicts led to an inexorable intensification of violence. From trench warfare in World War I to ethnic cleansing in the 1990s, the total number of deaths caused by or associated with war has been estimated at the equivalent of 10% of the world’s population in 1913. In the course of the century, the burden of war shifted increasingly from armed forces to civilians, to the point where non-combatants now comprise some 80 or 90% of war victims. This lecture course investigates the blurring of distinction between combatants and non-combatants, as well as the experiences of ordinary men and women who lived through the wars of the 20th Century. It covers events such as World War I, the Spanish Civil War, World War II, the Korean War and the Vietnam War, and topics such as the experience of captivity, sexual violence in wartime, children in war, or genocide.

Assigned Readings:
Primo Levi, Survival in Auschwitz
Anonymous, A Women in Berlin 
Henri Alleg, The Question
Jean Hatzfeld, Machete Season. The Killers in Rwanda Speak

Assignments:
The final grade in the course will be an average of the four grades given for: a short 2000-word paper (20%), the mid-term examination (25%), lecture Quick Writes/Quizzes (20%); the final examination (35%).
 
Prerequisites and Special Comments: 
Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for the history major, or it can fulfill the historical study GE. This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement


History 3580 The Vietnam War 
Instructor: Parrott, J.
Days:  WF
Time: 2:20-3:40 pm

Description: Study of the background, causes, conduct, and consequences of the Vietnam War, 1945-1975.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:  Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study and diversity global studies course. This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement

 

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History 2800 Introduction to the Discipline of History
Instructor:  Hathaway J.
Days:  W 11:10-12:30 online, F 11:10-12:30 online or in person as necessary

Description: This is the “gateway” course for history majors.  It will introduce you to the academic discipline of history and to the methods that professional historians use to investigate the past, including different kinds of primary and secondary sources.  A key goal of the course is to hone your historical writing skills; you will prepare rough drafts and final versions of both major written assignments while completing shorter weekly assignments.  You will also get the opportunity to engage in peer review of your classmates’ work while receiving their reviews of yours; this sort of constructive critique is a key part of the professional historian’s career.  In addition to honing your critical writing skills, this course will enable you to practice oral presentation.  We will also visit various historical collections, either in-person or virtually.

The class is hybrid.  We will meet online (via Zoom) for the most part, and in person no more than once a week, mainly for presentations and field trips where possible.  
  
Assigned readings:
Mary Lynn Rampolla, A Pocket Guide to Writing in History, 10th ed. (7th- 9th eds. are also acceptable and may well be cheaper.)

Assignments:
Chapter summaries of the Rampolla book; critical book review; research essay; oral presentations of book review and research essay 

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx.  Must be a History major or minor.


History 2800 Introduction to the Discipline of History     
Instructor: Cashin, Joan 
Days:     TR 
Time: 1:00-2:20 PM 

Course Description: This course is designed to introduce undergraduates to the historical method, that is, how historians write history.  We will learn how to distinguish between primary and secondary sources, and we will examine important events in historical context.   We will concentrate on one issue, women during the Civil War, specifically their support for the two causes, the Union and the Confederacy, and how their views affected the war’s outcome.  We will read a textbook, some monographs, and various documents generated by people who lived through the War.  Students will write three papers of six-to-eight pages on women’s lives during the War.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:  Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx.


History 2800 Introduction to the Discipline of History     
Instructor: Hoffman, David 
Days/Time: Online

Description: Investigation of the methods and analytical approaches historians use to understand the past.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:  Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx.


History 2800: Introduction to the Discipline of History     
Instructor: McDow, T. 
Days: R
Times: 2:15-5:00 pm

Description: Investigation of the methods and analytical approaches historians use to understand the past.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:  Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx.


History 2800 Introduction to the Discipline of History     
Instructor: Staley, D.
Days: TR
Times: 9:35-10:55 

Description: Investigation of the methods and analytical approaches historians use to understand the past.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:  Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx.


History 2800 H Introduction to the Discipline of History         
Instructor: R. Judd
Days:     M 
Time: 12:30-3:15
                                                        
Description: This course is an introduction to the study of history, and to the concepts and skills necessary to study the past.  Our focus will be to examine the nature of history as a discipline and the writing of history as an academic project.  Through readings, discussions, in-class activities, and written assignments, we will explore the purposes of studying history, the types of sources available to reconstruct the past, and methods and approaches for examining and interpreting history.

Unlike other history courses, this course does not treat a specific topic or period; instead, it focuses on historical methodology.  We will practice a series of fundamental skills, including critical thinking, analytical reading, accurate research, public speaking, and effective writing, all essential for your success in the history major, and for life and work beyond your undergraduate years.  
Because this is the 2800 intended for honors students, we also will spend some time discussing the honors thesis; not all honors students write theses, but the course offers us an opportunity to explore what a thesis looks like, how students can apply for research monies if they so choose, and how one goes about identifying a thesis topic.  

Assigned Readings:
Mary Lynn Rampolla, A Pocket Guide to Writing in History, 9th ed

Assignments:
Participation, short writing assignments, digital project

Prerequisites and Special Comments:   Prereq: Honors standing, or permission of instructor. Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx. Not open to students with credit for 2800 (398) or 2800H (398H)


History 4015H Honors Seminar in History: American Legal History Since 1830
Instructor: Stebenne, D.
Days: M                
Time: 9:35 a.m. – 12:20 p.m.  
Credit hours: 3

Description: An examination of the leading legal-historical controversies in the United States since 1830.  Emphasis on the judiciary’s role in resolving major legal and political disputes, such as those arising out of government support for industrialization and a modern market economy, anti-slavery, pacifist agitation during wartime, efforts to achieve equality before the law for black people and women, reproductive rights, privacy, the rights of criminal suspects and defendants, legislative redistricting, church-state relations, the death penalty, and mass incarceration.

Assigned readings: Weekly reading assignments delve into the above topics in depth; approximately 125-150 pages per week.
 
Assignments: Attendance at, and lively participation in, all class meetings; a 3-5-page research paper prospectus; and a first draft and a final draft of a 15-page research paper.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course is designed for junior and senior History majors and fulfills the seminar requirement for History Majors. Prereq or concur: Honors standing, English 1110.xx, a grade of C or above in History 2800, and any 3000-level History course; or permission of instructor. 


History 4125 Seminar in Latin American History: From Tacos to Fries: A Global History of Latin American Food

Instructor: Hernandez, V.
Days: Th (Online) 7Wk2
Time: 11:00 am-1:45 pm     
                
Description: In their quest for food, humans have transformed plants and animals into food, cooking into cuisine, ceremony into etiquette, and mothers’ cooking into tradition. New eating patterns have changed cultures, economies, and landscapes. This seminar analyzes those transformations through food and foodways from the Americas. How did colonialism change eating habits in Europe, Africa, and the Americas? What are the legacies of indigenous Latin American foods in international cuisine? How did globalization change Latin American landscapes and U.S. foodways? In this seminar, we will discuss processes of colonialism, revolution, and globalization through the lens of Latin American food. No previous knowledge of Latin American history is required to take this class.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, a grade of C or above in History 2800, and any 3000-level History course; or permission of instructor. This course is designed for junior and senior History majors and fulfills the seminar requirement for History Majors. 


History 4215 Seminar in Greek History/The World of Classical Athens
Instructor: Anderson
Days:     Th            
Time: 2:15-4:40    
                
Description: This is a seminar-style course for undergraduates that focuses on the politics and culture of ancient Athens, the largest and most powerful of all Greek city-states during the classical period.  It offers students the chance to pursue a more advanced level of enquiry into Greek history through close reading of a variety of primary and secondary texts, giving them a fuller sense of how scholars reconstruct the past from often scanty and problematic literary and archaeological evidence.  Employing a synoptic approach, the course will explore all major components of Athenian political life—ritual, political, social, economic, cultural, and military, looking at how all this “fits together” as a way of life. Along the way, a number of significant issues and questions will also be raised, including: How was Athenian demokratia different from modern liberal democracy? Why did the Athenians dedicate so much time, energy, and expense to ritual activities? Where women considered full members of the polis? How did the Athenians justify their use of slave labor? What does the Parthenon “mean”? Was the polis of the Athenians really the cultural “ancestor” of the modern western nation-state?

Assigned Readings:
All free on Carmen; no purchases required

Assignments:
Preparation of weekly readings, regular attendance, contributions to discussions; final term paper

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
History Major/Minor or History 3210 or History 3211; Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, a grade of C or above in History 2800, and any 3000-level History course; or permission of instructor. This course is designed for junior and senior History majors and fulfills the seminar requirement for History Majors. 


History 4255: Seminar in Colonial Encounters
Instructor: Conklin, A. 
Days:     W (hybrid)
Time: 9:35 am - 12:20 pm
                
Description: This research seminar will explore the world’s often brutal -- and always complex – colonial encounters. Special attention will be paid to the French, British, and Belgian colonial empires in the heart of Africa in the 19th and 20th centuries, as well as the legacies of colonialism in Europe and the former colonies themselves. But empire-building has affected all societies on all continents at different points in time, not just modern nation-states (the Roman Empire, the Aztec Empire, the Hapsburg Empire, the Nazi Empire, the Soviet Empire, the Japanese Empire, the American Empire, to just list some). Students in the seminar are encouraged to develop research topics on past empires in any part of the world for which they can find primary sources.

The course has two specific objectives: 1) to familiarize students with the broader history of “colonialism” and “empire-building” 2) to complete a research paper on a topic related to the topic of colonial empires based principally upon primary source material. Themes we will consider in class meetings include: the difference between land-based and overseas empires; the role of slavery in ancient and modern empires; the economic, political, and moral motives for colonial expansion; the emergence of modern racist and humanitarian ideologies connected to empires; forms of colonial violence, from imperial wars to legal codes to genocide; strategies of resistance and accommodation to colonial rule; and men and women’s different roles in empire.

Assigned Readings: 

Stephen Howe, Empire: A Very Short Introduction

Adam Hochschild, King Leopold’s Ghost: A Story of Greed, Terror, and Heroism in Colonial Africa

Sven Lindqvist, Exterminate All the Brutes: One Man's Odyssey into the Heart of Darkness and the Origins of European Genocide

Assignments: Three 3-page papers due during the semester on the assigned reading. A 15-20 page research paper based on a set of documents relating to a particular colonial encounter (newspapers, diaries, court records, novels/images/documentaries, digitized archives, and on-line data bases are all possible). As part of the final research project, students will turn in a research topic, an annotated bibliography, and a rough draft, and do a 15-minute presentation to the class on your research findings during the final class meeting.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course is designed for junior and senior History majors and fulfills the seminar requirement for History Majors.  Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, a grade of C or above in History 2800, and any 3000-level History course; or permission of instructor


History 4475 Seminar in Jewish History: Jews and Arabs in Palestine/Israel
Instructor: Ori Yehudai
Days:     Tu                
Time: 12:45PM - 3:30PM
                
Description: This advanced seminar explores the history of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict from its inception in the late 19th century to the present day. It takes a chronological approach, focusing on key moments and aspects of the conflict, including, but not limited to, the emergence of Jewish and Arab nationalism, the early encounter between Jews and Arabs in Palestine during the late Ottoman and British mandate periods, the wars of 1948 and 1967 and their long-term impact, US involvement, and the efforts to reach a peace settlement. The seminar will expose students to the recent as well as classical secondary literature on the topic, and to a variety of primary sources. These texts, combined with class discussions, will provide students with an in-depth understanding of the history of the conflict, taking into account the positions of Palestinian Arabs, Jews, and other regional and global forces involved in the conflict.

Assigned Readings: Weekly book chapters and journal articles; short stories, poems and films; primary historical documents.

Assignments: A research or historiographical paper; class participation. 

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course is designed for junior and senior History majors and fulfills the seminar requirement for History Majors.  Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, a grade of C or above in History 2800, and any 3000-level History course; or permission of instructor


History 4375 “Seminar in Islamic History: World War I and the Making of the Modern Middle East”         
Instructor: Yigit, A
Days: R                
Time: 2:15-5:00            
                                    
Description: This research seminar focuses on one of the most significant turning points in the history of the modern Middle East—the First World War. We will examine the war as a transformative moment in the region’s politics, society, and culture. Among other subjects, we will pay particular attention to the impact of the war on home-front civilians; wartime gender relations; common soldier’s experiences of the battle and his motivations; famine, population movements, and genocide; and the war’s reflection in social memory. Finally, we will move on to the Great War’s equally, if not more, cataclysmic aftermath and discuss its profound and lasting legacy on the region and its peoples. Throughout our seminar, we will read monographs and articles on various aspects of World War I and become familiar with key historical debates on the impact of the war in the region. Our readings and discussions will not only focus on the intellectual, political, and military elites but we will also examine how non-elite individuals and groups influenced the course of the war and how they were affected by it.

Assigned Readings:
TBA

Assignments:
Active participation, weekly reflection papers, annotated bibliography, final research paper

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course is designed for junior and senior History majors and fulfills the seminar requirement for History Majors. Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, a grade of C or above in History 2800, and any 3000-level History course; or permission of instructor


History 4575- Seminar in Military History 
Instructor: Cabanes, B.
Days:     W            
Time:  9:35AM-12:20PM                                                    
Description: The First World War- This course is a research seminar that explores and analyzes the history of World War I. Students will read and discuss in class several books, articles and documents related especially to the military, social, cultural and gendered aspects of the conflict. A research paper, based on significant primary sources, will be the core requirement of the course. 

Assigned Readings:

+ Bruno Cabanes, August 1914. France, the Great War and a Month that Changed the World Forever (Yale University Press, 2016)
+ Martha Hanna, Your Death Would be Mine (Harvard University Press, 2006)
+ Jay Winter, Sites of Memory, Sites of Mourning (Cambridge University Press, 1998)

Assignments: The final grade in the course will be an average of the six grades given for: regular and intensive participation (10%), leading the group discussion (20%), an annotated bibliography (10%) ; first draft of the final paper (10%) ; an oral report on the research project (10%); a final research paper (40%)

Prerequisites and Special Comments:  This course is designed for junior and senior History majors and fulfills the seminar requirement for History Majors. Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, a grade of C or above in History 2800, and any 3000-level History course; or permission of instructor


History 4625: Seminar in Women’s/Gender History: The Global History of Contraception and Abortion    
** Note: this course is also 4625E **        
 
Instructor: Mytheli Sreenivas
Days:     R                
Time: 2:15-5:00
                
Description: How did the development of reliable forms of birth control in the twentieth-century change culture, society, and politics around the world?  Why has abortion been criminalized in some places and times, and encouraged in others? How did advances in science and medicine transform the politics of sexuality, and in turn, how did new ways of thinking about sexuality change the direction of scientific and medical research? 
From the sexual revolution to the politics of population control, and from the development of the “pill” to the new generation of LARCs (long-acting reversible contraception), our class will investigate the global history of contraception and abortion in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. We will examine a wide range of primary and secondary sources, and work towards developing our own historical interpretations based on original research.

Assigned Readings: TBA

Assignments: TBA; email Dr. Sreenivas (.2) with any questions.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course is designed for junior and senior History majors and fulfills the seminar requirement for History Majors. Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, a grade of C or above in History 2800, and any 3000-level History course; or permission of instructor

 

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History 2610 Introduction to Women and Gender in the U.S.   
Instructor: Wagenhoffer, M.  
Days: WF 
Time: 8:00-9:20 am 

Description: Survey of women and gender from pre-European settlement to present, with particular attention to differences among women.  

Prerequisites and Special Comments:  
Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx. Not open to students with credit for 325. GE historical study and diversity soc div in the US course. This course fulfills Group American, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement. 


History 3600 Studies in Women’s and Gender History 
Instructor: Delgado, J. 
Days: WF 
Time: 12:45-2:05 

Description: In-depth analysis of selected topics in American, European, and/or Third World women's history; topic varies by semester.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Repeatable to a maximum of 12 cr hrs. GE historical study course.


History 3620 Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender History in the United States, 1940-Present
Instructor: Rivers, D. 
Days: TR 
Time: 11:10-12:30 

Description: An overview of LGBT culture and history in the U.S. from 1940 to the present. Students will examine changes in LGBT lives and experiences during the last half of the 20th century and the beginning of the 21st century, as well as the intersections of race, sexuality, and class, and how these categories have affected sexual minority communities and broader US law and culture.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. This course fulfills Group American, post-1750, WGS for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.  GE historical study and diversity soc div in the US course.


History 3642 Women in Modern Europe from the 19th Century to the Present 
Instructor: Soland, B. 
Days: WF
Time: 11:10-12:30 pm

Description: This course is designed as an introduction to the history of European women from the late eighteenth century to the mid-twentieth century.  Because there is much material to cover, my approach will necessarily be selective – emphasizing some events and developments while leaving out other things also important to the history of women. Several themes will be central to the course.  We will study the processes of industrial expansion and economic change and the impact of these developments on women’s social and economic position.  We will explore the political reorganization of Europe over the course of these centuries, and we will examine how women strove to shape and improve their lives under changing circumstances.  We will also concentrate on how relationships between women and men developed, and how beliefs about gender changed.  Finally, we will look at how economic position, religion, sexuality, marital status, regional and national differences influenced women’s experiences.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 524. GE historical study course. This course fulfills Group Europe, post-1750 for the history major. This course fulfills Group Europe, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement


History 4625: Seminar in Women’s/Gender History: The Global History of Contraception and Abortion    
** Note: this course is also 4625E **        
 
Instructor: Mytheli Sreenivas
Days:     R                
Time: 2:15-5:00
                
Description: How did the development of reliable forms of birth control in the twentieth-century change culture, society, and politics around the world?  Why has abortion been criminalized in some places and times, and encouraged in others? How did advances in science and medicine transform the politics of sexuality, and in turn, how did new ways of thinking about sexuality change the direction of scientific and medical research? 
From the sexual revolution to the politics of population control, and from the development of the “pill” to the new generation of LARCs (long-acting reversible contraception), our class will investigate the global history of contraception and abortion in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. We will examine a wide range of primary and secondary sources, and work towards developing our own historical interpretations based on original research.

Assigned Readings: TBA

Assignments: TBA; email Dr. Sreenivas (.2) with any questions.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course is designed for junior and senior History majors and fulfills the seminar requirement for History Majors. Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, a grade of C or above in History 2800, and any 3000-level History course; or permission of instructor

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History 1212 Western Civilization, 17th Century to Present 
Instructor: Bond, E.
Days: Online
Times: Online

Description:  Political, scientific, and industrial revolutions; nationalism; the two World Wars; the decline of empires; the Cold War.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:  Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx. Not open to students with credit for 1210, 2203, 2204, or 112. This course is available for EM credit. GE historical study and diversity global studies course.


History 1681:  Global History to 1500
Instructor:  Hathaway, J. (Professor, Dept. of History)
Days:  W, F                                                                               
Time:  8:00-9:20 am 

Description: This course examines the major issues that have shaped the human experience from the beginnings of human civilization (ca. 3500 B.C.E.) to ca. 1500 C.E., when the European voyages of exploration were beginning to tie the world together more tightly than ever before in a new pattern of global interrelatedness.  Before 1500, societies in different parts of the world had far less contact with each other.  In particular, Afro-Eurasia and the Americas remained almost entirely cut off from each other.  For this reason, the main emphasis of History 1681 will be the comparative study of civilizations.  Within that context, religions (belief systems), trade, and technology will be emphasized as factors that differentiated civilizations while also linking different civilizations at regional and hemispheric, if not yet global, levels.

Assigned readings:
Richard W. Bulliet, et al., The Earth and Its Peoples: A Global History, 7th ed., volume 1 (6th ed. 
   and 6th ed. “Advantage” are also acceptable.)
Robert van Gulik (1910-67), The Lacquer Screen: A Chinese Detective Story

Assignments:  
“Past in the Present” paragraph, take-home midterm and final, comparative paper (~ 5-7 pages) connected to The Lacquer Screen

Prerequisites and Special Comments: English 1110.xx concurrent or previous; not open to students with credit for History 181 or 2641. This course fulfills GE Historical Survey; Global Diversity. This course also fulfills one of the prerequisites for students applying to OSU’s Master’s degree in Education for social studies licensure.  


History 1911 – Climate Change: Mechanisms, Impacts, and Mitigation
Instructors: 
John Brooke, History
Matt Saltzman, Earth Sciences
Jim Hood, Evolution, Ecology, & Organismal Biology

Days and times:       
Lectures: T, Th 2:30-3:40
Sections:  Mon: 9:10-10:05, 10:20-11:15, 12:40-1:35, 1:50-2:45
                 Wed: 9:10-10:05, 10:20-11:15, 12:40-1:35, 1:50-2:45
                        
Description: An interdisciplinary introduction to the historical causes and unfolding consequences of modern climate change, presented by a team including a geologist, an ecologist, and a climate historian.  The course examines the basic science of climate change, its impacts on the biosphere, and the ways in which it has been shaped by the history of population growth, expanding economies, and accelerating technological change over the last several hundred years.  We close with considerations the impact of climate change on global sustainability in the coming century.  

Assignments: 
Online reading essays; In class quizzes; Team Poster project; Final paper

Prerequisites & Special Comments: We assume a background in high school science and history.

This course may fulfill any one of the following distribution requirements: 
GE Historical Study, 
GE Natural Science: Biological Science,
GE Natural Science: Physical Science

This course is cross-listed as ES 1911 and EEOB 1911. 


History 2650 The World since 1914

Instructor: Limbach, E.

Days/Time: Online

Description:  Global perspective on major forces that shaped the world since 1914. Provides students with factual knowledge and a critical interpretive framework for responsible global citizenship.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:  Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study and diversity global studies course.  This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement 


History 2680 It’s the End of the World! Apocalypticism in Christianity, Judaism & Islam
Instructor: Goldish, M. 
Days: WF
Time: 11:10-12:30 pm

Description: This course will explore how the end of the world-generally understood to be preceded by enormous wars and disasters as well as the judgment of people and a reckoning of their deeds-was imagined over two millennia by Christians, Jews, and Muslims. The course will cover primary and secondary historical works, as well as fictional bestsellers, about the apocalypse from around the world.

Prerequisites & Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for NELC 2680. Cross-listed in NELC. GE historical study and diversity global studies course. This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement


 


 

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History 2700 Global Environmental History
Instructor: White, Sam
Days: Online                
Time: Online
                                    
Description: In this course, we explore how humans have shaped the environment and how the environment has shaped human history from prehistory to the present.  Our topics will range from fire to deforestation to climate change.  Students will learn the essential background to major environmental issues and consider how history might (or might not) help us confront present environmental challenges.

Assigned Readings:
This course has two required textbooks:
Daniel Headrick, Humans versus Nature (New York: Oxford University Press, 2019).
J. R. McNeill and Peter Engelke, The Great Acceleration: An Environmental History of the Anthropocene since 1945 (Cambridge, MA: Harvard Belknap, 2016).
All other course readings will be posted to Carmen.

Assignments:
Short quizzes, regular writing exercises and discussion boards, and a course essay completed in multiple steps

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course may be taken to fulfill historical study, social science, or global studies GE requirements.  This course may be counted as either Group A or Group B, and either pre- or post-1750 for the major in history.  This course has been recommended for students pursuing degrees in SENR, but students in all degree programs are welcome.


History 2701 History of Technology
Instructor: Cahn, D. 
Days/Times: Online 

Description:  Survey of the history of technology in global context from ancient times.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx. Not open to students with credit for 362. This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill the historical study GE.


History 2701 History of Technology
Instructor: Esposito, J.
Days/Times: Online 

Description:  Survey of the history of technology in global context from ancient times.

Prerequisites & Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx. Not open to students with credit for 362. GE historical study course. This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


History 2703 History of Public Health, Medicine and Disease

Instructor: Harris, J.

Days: TR

Time: 9:35-10:55

Description: Survey of the history of public health, disease, and medicine in a global context.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:  Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. The course fulfills Group Global, post-1750, ETS for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement GE historical study and diversity global studies course.


History 2704 Water: A Human History

Instructor: Harris, J.

Days/Time: Online

Description: Water is a miraculous molecule: it is the only molecule that occurs naturally in all three states of matter (solid, liquid, gas). The human body is, on average, 65% water. About 71% of the Earth’s surface is covered in water.  Without water on our “blue planet” life as we understand it could not exist. Water shapes life from the molecular and biological level to the national and even the geopolitical level, yet far too often we take this marvelous substance for granted. In this course, we will dispel this false assumption.

Taking a thematic approach that environmental history so usefully affords us, in this course we will examine the human use and understanding of water from the ancient past to the present day, using a series of case studies from around the globe. We will examine how water has been used in irrigation and the development of civilization and how humans have sought to manipulate (control) water as a source of power. We will examine how water is essential to the development of cities, and how cities have faced the infrastructural challenge of ensuring access to clean drinking water. We will study how water is a carrier of disease and pollution. We will study how water has become a commodity and a vital component part of modern economic systems, especially food systems. We will look at oceans, which are often ignored in traditional geographically-bound histories. We will explore the various ways in which water has distinct cultural meanings around the world. Finally, we will examine how global climate change is impacting the human relationship with water today.

 Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor.   This course fulfills the following Geographic, Chronological, and Thematic requirements: “Comparative/Transnational/Global” post-1750, ETS and PCS.


History 3706 Coca-Cola Globalization: The History of American Business and Global, Environmental Change, 1800-Today
Instructor:  Elmore, B.
Days:     TR        
Time:   11:10-12:30 PM
                                                
Description: Coca-Cola is everywhere. Today, the company sells over 1.8 billion servings of its products daily to customers in over 190 countries worldwide. The company has bottling plants in every corner of the globe from Australia to Zimbabwe. This is remarkable considering the company started out as a “brain tonic” first sold for just five cents in a small Gilded Age Atlanta pharmacy in 1886 by a sick and cash-strapped businessman named John Pemberton. So how did the company do it? That’s one of the big questions we will ask in this global environmental history course.

History 3706 offers an introduction to the fields of environmental history and business history. It is organized chronologically, beginning with the railroad revolution of the nineteenth century and ending in the twenty-first century. It chronicles the rise of some of America’s biggest multinational corporations and examines how these firms, working with governments and other institutions, shaped global ecological change between 1800 and 2017. It also considers the social and political responses to these environmental changes. 

The questions we will ask in this course are not simple, and they will require us to re-imagine well-told stories from a new, ecological perspective. How did Coca-Cola acquire the natural resources it needed to end up all over the world? Can history tell us whether global climate change is real? Are Californians going to run out of water? We will deal with these and other intriguing questions as we explore the history of America in the world through the lens of environmental history.

Assigned Readings:

Ted Steinberg, Down to Earth: Nature’s Role in American History (Oxford University Press, 2009).
TBA
Assignments:
TBA

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study and diversity soc div in the US course. This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement


History 3708 Vaccines: A Global History

Instructor: Harris, J.

Days: MW

Time: 9:35-10:55

Description: Infectious diseases have profoundly affected human history. The discovery and use of vaccines reshaped the experience and effects of these diseases, including contributing to a rapid decline in morbidity and mortality in the 20th and 21st centuries. Empirical development of the first vaccines spurred significant scientific changes in our knowledge of human and animal immune systems, leading to the creation of yet more vaccines. From their very first use, however, vaccines have spurred controversies and resistance. They have also been big business. In this course, team-taught between the departments of history and the college of pharmacy, we explore their complex history and science

 Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course is a GE Historical Study course.  This course fulfills group Global, post-1750 for the History major.


History 3711 Science and Society in Europe, from Copernicus to Newton
Instructor: Goldish, M. 
Days:  WF (2nd session, hybrid delivery)
Time: 9:35-10:55 am

Description:
A survey of the history of science and its place and relationship to European society in the early modern period.  Students will understand the various strands that constitute the scientific revolution in early modern Europe, modern intellectual history, how revolutions in thought occur, and will practice analytical and communications skills in working with both secondary and primary sources.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study. This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.