Spring 2022 Undergraduate Courses

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HISTORY 2303: History of Contemporary Africa, 1960-present

Instructor: Van Beurden, Sarah
Days:   WF                             
Time: 11.10-12.30

Description: This course takes a closer look at the history of the African continent from the process of decolonization until today.  We will study and discuss broad historical developments, such as the origins and histories of independence movements, the rise of development ideology, military rule and dictatorships, debt accumulation, and the economic struggles and successes of the continent. In addition, we will focus on a number of important locations and events, including the Algerian Revolution, the fall of the apartheid system in South Africa, the Congo crisis, the Rwanda genocide and the following Great War of Africa.

Assigned Readings:

Frederick Cooper, Africa Since 1940. The Past of the Present. (Cambridge University Press,2002)
Mary Ingouville Burton, The Truth and Reconciliation Commission (Ohio University Press, 2017)
Marie Beatrice Umutesi, Surviving the Slaughter. The Ordeal of a Rwandan Refugee in Zaire. (University of Wisconsin Press 2004)- available as an e-book from the library website

Assignments: midterm, final, two position papers, map quiz, reading quizzes, attendance, and participation

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110. xx. GE historical study course. This course fulfills Group Africa, post-1750, CPD, PCS for the major, or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 3704: HIV: From Microbiology to Microhistory

Instructor: McDow, Thomas & Kwiek, Jesse
Days:   TR                              
Time: 11:10-12:30 pm

Description In 2012, an estimated 35.3 million people around the world were living with HIV, a number startling close to the estimated number of people who have died from AIDs since 1981.  Unlocking the virological secrets of HIV/AIDs has been one of the grand scientific challenges of the last three decades, and the disease remains one of the world’s most serious challenges to human health and development.  The burden of the disease is very uneven globally, and sub-Saharan African, where the disease originated, is home to 69% of those living with HIV today. How did this virus and this global pandemic come to be? The course traces the evolution of the virus at both the molecular level and within its global historical context.  Team-taught by a virologist and a historian, the goal of this class at the broadest level, is to put the sciences and humanities in conversation.

The course will require students to apply the theory of evolution by natural selection to explain the origin of HIV (chimpanzees in Africa) and the ability of HIV to develop drug resistance and evade an effective vaccine. The course will simultaneously put these scientific processes and the effects of disease into historical context. The very scientific revolutions that led to Darwin’s theory of evolution and Koch's postulates of infection transmission helped make European colonialism possible. For example, Social Darwinism justified imperial aims, Pasteurian ideals of contamination influenced notions of racial purity, and the new field of tropical medicine was created to protect colonial administrators and soldiers in their distant postings. Similarly, colonial rule and the creation of the extractive economies of central and southern Africa set in motion population movements, wealth inequalities, and structures of power that amplified the effects—decades later—of HIV and contributed to what would become a global pandemic. Although the academy approaches the medical facts of disease and its social consequences through distinct disciplines, those who have contracted the virus experience all aspects of the disease. This course makes it possible for students to consider the medical, scientific, social, political, and economic causes and consequences of one of the world's most devastating viruses.

This course is cross-listed with Microbiology.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for Micrbio 3704. This course fulfills Group Africa, post-1750, ETS for the major, or it can fulfill a GE requirement.
 

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HISTORY 2080 African American History to 1877

Instructor: Shaw, Stephanie

Days:   TR (Online)               

Time: 9:35-10:55 am

Description:

This course examines the history of black Americans from the beginning of the African slave trade to the settlement, growth, dispersal, and development of the black population across what would become the United States of America up to the end of Reconstruction (1877).  The course examines slavery as a social, political, and economic institution.   A major goal is to go beyond race relations history and to learn how black people in the United States—slave and free—lived their lives in the big and the small ways from their settlement here to the immediate post-emancipation period. 

We begin with the assumption that slavery was chosen as a labor (economic) system, not inevitable, and, that once chosen, had to be maintained, thus becoming a social and political system as well.  Still, our most important objective is to see and understand how free and enslaved black people attempted to, sometimes failed to, and often succeeded in, living lives of their own in a slave nation.  

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx. Not open to students with credit for 323.01 or AfAmASt 2080. GE historical study course. Cross-listed in AfAmASt. This course fulfills Group North America, pre & post-1750, PCS, REN for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.         


HISTORY 3080 History of Slavery in the US

Instructor: Cashin, Joan
Days/Times: Online

Description: In this course, we will discuss the history of slavery in North America from the colonial era to the Civil War.  We will include material on bondage in other societies, but the focus will be on African American slavery in what is now the United States.  We will explore various aspects of the slave experience, such as work, religion, family life, resistance, and rebellion.  We will also discuss free blacks, people of mixed race, yeoman whites, and slave owners, as well as the significance of slavery as a culture, economic, and political issues.

Assignments: Students will read several monographs, write several short papers, and take one exam.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: English 1110.xx; or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 559 or AfAmASt 3080. GE historical study course. This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750, PCS, REN for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement. 


HISTORY 3086: Black Women in Slavery and Freedom

Instructor: Ragland, Allison

Days: 

Times: 12:45-2:05 pm

Description:  Traces the experiences and struggles of African American women from slavery through the Civil Rights/Black Power era.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq: English 1110.xx and any History 2000-level course, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for AfAmASt 3086. GE historical study and diversity soc div in the US course.

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HISTORY 1151 American History to 1877

Instructor: Wood, Josh
Days: Online 7W2
Time: Online

Description: This course provides a survey of American history from the Age of Encounter to the Reconstruction period.  It covers the social, economic, cultural, political, and diplomatic history of the American peoples.   

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills the historical study GE requirement.  Not open to students that have credit for History 151 or 2001.


HISTORY 1152 American History 1877-Present

Instructor: Coil, William
Days: Online
Time: Online

Description: From the aftermath of the Civil War to the 2000s, this course offers a sweeping survey of American history since 1865.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills the historical study GE requirement.  Not open to students that have credit for History 152 or 2002.


HISTORY 2001 Launching America

Instructor: Roth, Randall
Days/Times:    MW 10:20-11:15 pm (lecture)
                        F 9:10-10:05, 10:20-11:15, 12:40-1:45 pm (recitation)\

Description: History 2001 is a one-semester introduction to American Civilization from colonial times through Reconstruction.  Our emphasis will be the critical reading of primary sources--diaries, letters, political tracts, poems, songs, stories, paintings, buildings, and other material artifacts--through which we will try to understand the past.  We will focus on social history and cultural history, but we will also pay close attention to the political history of the United States.

Assigned readings:

John Mack Faragher, Out of Many, Vol. 1, Brief Fourth Edition (but any edition, brief or full, will suffice)

Frederick Douglass, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (any edition, although the pagination may not match the one available at local bookstores)

Various additional readings on Carmen

Assignments:  We will write one critical essay on primary sources (5-6 pp.). There will be a midterm, a final exam, and five quizzes.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 1151 (151). GE historical study and diversity soc div in the US course. This course fulfills Group America, pre & post-1750, PCS, CCE for the major, or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 2002: Making America Modern

Instructor: Rivers, Daniel
Days: TR
Times: 11:10-12:30 pm         

Description:  A rigorous, intermediate-level history of modern U.S. in the world from the age of industrialization to the age of globalization.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 11521. GE historical study and diversity soc div in the US course. This course fulfills Group America, post-1750, PCS, REN for the major, or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 2015 History of American Criminal Justice

Instructor: Roth, Randall  
Days: WF
Times: 12:45-2:05 pm

Description: Crime and punishment are among the most important issues in contemporary America.  This course offers an introduction to the historical study of crime in the United States from colonial times to the present.  It highlights changes in criminal behavior and in the ways Americans have sought to deter, punish, and rehabilitate.  Primary topics include historical patterns of violence, the role and organization of the police, and the evolution of punishment in theory and practice.  This course also emphasizes differences in crime and punishment by region, class, ethnicity, gender, and age.  Topics will include riots, homicide, capital punishment, organized crime, gangs, prisons, policing, jurisprudence, and official violence.

Readings:

Walker, Samuel (1998) Popular Justice: A History of American Criminal Justice, 2nd ed. New York: Oxford University Press. 0-19-507451-3 (paper)

Robert Perkinson (2010) Texas Tough: The Rise of America’s Prison Empire. Picador. ISBN-10: 0312680473 ISBN-13: 978-0312680473 (paper)

Butterfield, Fox (1995) All God's Children: The Bosket Family and the American Tradition of Violence. New York: William Morrow. 0-380-72862-1 (paper)

Quinones, Sam (2015) Dreamland: The True Tale of America’s Opiate Epidemic. New York: Bloomsbury Press. ISBN 13: 978-1620402528

Assignments:

Discussion and Attendance (10% of grade)
Quizzes on the Readings (10% of grade)
Midterm and Final Examinations (40% of grade)
Research Notes (20% of grade) / Research Essay (20% of grade): You will be asked to write a five-page paper on a topic in criminal justice history of interest to you (e.g., drugs, embezzlement, homicide). We will use on-line historical newspaper articles as sources. You will be required to turn in your research notes electronically as well as your essay, because the goal is to help you master the skills involved in careful historical research.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx. Not open to students with credit for 375. GE historical study course. This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750, CPD, PCS for the history major or can fulfill the historical study GE.


HISTORY 2065 Colonialism at the Movies: American History in Film            

Instructor: Newell, Margaret
Days:   on-line           
Time: on-line                                                                                                 

Description:  In this course, we will examine how American history from the era of colonization through the Civil War era is presented on film. Since history is central to American identity, studying historical movies is especially important because these films reflect and shape popular understandings of what America was, and is. Most commercial movies gain audience by appealing to, rather than challenging, shared myths. But, national myths evolve, and some filmmakers try to revise the story and broaden our definitions of what should be included in American history. Students will delve into popular narratives, attempts at revision, and scholarly views about America's origins and history.

Students will explore Native American societies & the colonial encounter, the Salem Witch trials, the America Revolution, slavery, immigration, women’s history, the West, and the causes and outcomes of the Civil War. You will gain the background to assess when and how filmmakers get history wrong, as well as to understand how rich and informative some movies and TV series are and what they get right. We will also analyze the construction of historical narratives. Filmmakers face the same challenges as historians do: determining what stories are worth telling and choosing the best way to convey historical information.

Past readings have included the following:

Rachel Hope Cleves, Charity and Sylvia: A Same-Sex Marriage in Early America  (Oxford, 2014)
Holger Hoock, Scars of Independence (Penguin/Random House, 2017)
Solomon Northup, Twelve Years a Slave
Alan Taylor, Colonial America: A Very Short History (Oxford, 2012)

Assignments:

Students will write one-hour, timed, open book essays and complete a final project. This project will consist of both a 6-8 pp. paper or screenplay and a digital component (a Powerpoint/Spark presentation or a short original film).  Active participation in weekly online discussions and a small group assignment film review will also be required.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study and social diversity studies course.


HISTORY 2066 History of Medicine in Film

Instructor: Harris, Jim  
Days: W
Times: 12:45-2:05 pm

Description: Examines portrayals of physicians in American film over the past seventy-five years, giving particular attention to what popular films can say about the cultural images of physicians and medicine in American society.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study course. This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750, ETS for the history major or can fulfill the historical study GE.


HISTORY 3011, American Revolution and New Nation

Instructor: Newell, Margaret
Days:   WF     
Time: 11:10-12:30                                                                                                     

Description:  The American Revolution has never been more relevant. As we debate issues of race, democracy, citizenship, partisanship, and economic inequality today, Americans look to the founding era for roots of problems as well as solutions.

This class examines the social, economic, cultural, and political changes in early America that culminated in revolution and the creation of the republic. England had twenty-three colonies in the Americas and Caribbean and yet only thirteen rebelled successfully, so the broader imperial network and the differences among colonial regions and societies will be part of our inquiry. In this context, we will examine the origins of slavery as well as the ways in new ideas about race played out in the Revolution. Colonists enthusiastically toasted the coronation of George III in 1761, so why did they tear down his statues in 1776? Colonial rebellions were unprecedented, so what did Americans think they were doing? Where did ideas about natural rights come from, and who had them? We will analyze the Declaration of Independence for answers and look at the possibilities for profound social change that the Revolution unleashed.

Independence was a social event, a political event, an economic event, and a military event, and we will study all four aspects. For some the Revolution was distant or even unwelcome, so we will explore the experiences of Loyalists and Native Americans. Mobilization and warfare involved violence, and the Revolution was America’s largest slave uprising. Finally, we will assess the “revolutionary settlement”—the institutions that Americans created to sustain and carry out revolutionary goals, including state governments, definitions of citizenship and participatory democracy, and the Constitution’s model for the federal government. For some, this settlement abandoned certain revolutionary ideals. American history after 1800 reflects continued debate over this settlement and efforts to change it.

Assignments: In addition to completing readings and discussion prompts, students will delve into primary sources and will complete a project using 18th century newspapers and another based on the Constitution.

Books used in the past have included:

Erica Armstrong Dunbar, Never Caught: The Washingtons’ Relentless Pursuit of their Runaway Slave, Ona Judge (Atria, 2017)
David Hackett Fischer, Washington’s Crossing (Oxford, 2004)
Woody Holton, Forced Founders: Indians, Debtors, Slaves, & the Making of the American Revolution in Virginia (North Carolina, 1999) **library ebook available
Rosemarie Zagarri, Revolutionary Backlash: Women and Politics in the Early American Republic (Penn, 2007) **library ebook available

Prerequisites and Special Comments: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study. This course fulfills Group American, post-1750, CPD, PCS for the major, or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 3014 Gilded Age to Progressive Era, 1877-1920

Instructor: Baker, Paula 
Days: TR
Times: 3:55-5:15 pm

Description: This course examines American politics and society from the later years of Reconstruction until the U.S. entry in World War I.  This is a period historians often overlook, one stuck between the drama of the Civil War and the more familiar developments of the 20th century.  Yet we shouldn’t.  In this period important things seemed up for grabs, within the power of Americans to manage: how industry would be controlled, the character of race relations, the role of government in shaping society, public morals, and the economy, and America's place in the world. 

We will focus on public life – on politics, social and political movements, economic change, and habits of thought that shaped how Americans responded to change.  We will explore two big themes: the working out of the Reconstruction of the South and the varied effects of rapid industrial development. We will examine solutions that various groups of Americans offered to what they saw as the problems of the day, problems that went to the nation's values as well as its economic and social conditions.  How those solutions differed from those offered during the progressive era will concern us in the last third of the course.

Assigned Readings:  (Tentative)

Charles Calhoun, The Gilded Age: Perspectives on the Origins of Modern America
Eric Rauchway, Murdering McKinley: The Making of Theodore Roosevelt's America
John Milton Cooper, Pivotal Decades: The United States, 1900-1920

Assignments:

Class participation: bonus up to ½ grade
Midterm Essay: 20%
Final Essay: 20%
Paper: 20%
Two Quizzes: 10% each
Two Short In-Class Essays: 10% each

Prerequisites and Special Comments: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study and social diversity in the US course. This course fulfills Group American, post-1750 for the major, or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 3015 From the New Era to the New Frontier, 1921-1963

Instructor: Stebenne, David
Days: TR
Times: 11:10-12:30 pm

Description: Examination of the major political, economic, social and cultural changes in the USA from the end of World War I through the early 1960’s.  Emphasis on the polarized nature of American life in the 1920’s; the seismic shocks brought by the Great Depression, World War II, and the Cold War; how they helped propel the revival of a much bigger middle class and the decline of social polarization during the 1950's; and the problems that new social system began to create.

Assigned Readings:

Warren Sloat, 1929: America Before the Crash (2004 ed.)
William Leuchtenburg, Franklin D. Roosevelt and the New Deal (1963), chaps. 3-13
John Hersey, Hiroshima (1985 ed.)
Melvyn P. Leffler, The Specter of Communism (1994), chaps. 1-4
Alan Ehrenhalt, The Lost City: Discovering the Forgotten Virtues of Community in the
     Chicago of the 1950’s (1996)
James Baldwin, The Fire Next Time (1992 ed.)
Betty Friedan, The Feminine Mystique (2013 ed.)

Assignments: A midterm, a final and a short (5-7 page) paper based on the assigned reading.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study. This course fulfills Group American, post-1750, CPD, PCS for the major, or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 3030 History of Ohio

Instructor: Coil, William 
Days: Online
Times: Online

Description: This course will survey the economic, social, and political development of the geographic area that became Ohio from the Native American period to the present. We will explore three themes in particular:  the role of disruptive technology and creative destruction in shaping Ohio’s past; the critical junctures at which Ohio might have become something entirely different from what it became; Ohio’s connection to the wider world through geography, technology, demography, economics, and politics.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study. This course fulfills Group American, post-1750, REN, PCS for the major, or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 3505 U.S. Diplomacy in the Middle East    

Instructor: Hahn, Peter
Days:   TR                                                      
Time:   11:00 – 12:30 

Description: When and why did the United States become so involved in the Middle East?  What were the origins of the foreign policy challenges the country faces in Iran, Libya, and Syria?  Why did we fight two wars against Iraq in the first place?  And how—and why—did the United States find itself caught in the middle of the Arab-Israeli dispute?  Does oil drive American policy in the Middle East?  Or does religion have something to do with it?

History 3505 will present students with the opportunity to ponder and discuss these and other challenging questions by analyzing the record of U.S. diplomacy in the Middle East since the mid-20th century.  The course will begin with an examination of the strategic, political, and cultural underpinnings of U.S. policy and then examine the numerous controversies and crises that have enmeshed American leaders, citizens, and soldiers in the Middle East since the end of World War II.

Assigned Readings (representative example from a past course; Sp22 selections are under consideration:

Peter L. Hahn, Crisis and Crossfire: The United States and the Middle East since 1945.  
Stephen Kinzer, All  the Shah’s Men: An American Coup and the Roots of Middle East Terror.
Noam Kochavi, Nixon and Israel: Forging a Conservative Partnership
David Farber, Taken Hostage: The Iran Hostage Crisis and America’s First Encounter with Radical Islam
Aaron David Miller, The Much Too Promised Land: America's Elusive Search for Arab-Israeli Peace
Peter L. Hahn, Missions Accomplished?: The United States and Iraq since World War I
Kenneth M. Pollack, et al.  The Arab Awakening: America and the Transformation of the Middle East

Assignments: Map assignment, midterm, interpretive essay, and final.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for JewshSt 3505. GE historical study and diversity global studies course. This course will fulfill the Historical Study portion of the General Education requirements.  For History majors and minors, it will fulfill Group North America, post-1750.

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HISTORY 2201 Ancient Greece and Rome

Instructor: Vanderpuy, Peter 
Days: Online
Times: Online

Description: This class is an introduction to the history of the Ancient Mediterranean Civilizations of Greece and Rome.  It provides a background of the chronological development of ancient Greek and Roman civilizations and then focuses on the broad issues of state-formation, politics, gender, warfare, tyranny, monotheism, and the environment over a period of some two thousand years.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study. This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750, CCE, PCS for the major, or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 3211: Classical Greece                

Instructor: Anderson, Greg
Days:   T, Th                                      
Time: 11.10-12.30

Description: This is the second half of a two-course survey of the history of ancient Greece.  The first course explores developments in the Greek world from the Neolithic era to the end of the Archaic age (ca. 7000-480 BC).  The second course focuses on the history and culture of the Classical age (ca. 480-320 BC), the "Golden Age" of ancient Greece.  Major topics addressed include: Athenian democracy; the cataclysmic Peloponnesian War between Athens and Sparta (431-404 BC); the rise of Macedon and Alexander the Great; tragedy and comedy; art and architecture; and philosophy.  The class places particular emphasis on the importance of engagement with original ancient sources.

Assigned Readings:

Carmen readings
Thucydides, History of the Peloponnesian War

Assignments:

Mid-term exam, Final exam, Final Paper

Prerequisites and Special Comments: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 501.02. GE historical study course. This course fulfills Group Europe and pre-1750 for the major, or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 3221 History of Rome: Republic to Empire

Instructor: Vanderpuy, Peter 
Days: Online
Times: Online

Description: History of Rome: Republic to Empire

Prerequisites and Special Comments: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 2212. GE historical study course and diversity global studies course. This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750, CPD, PCS for the major, or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


 

 

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HISTORY 2402: History of East Asia in the Modern Era

Instructor: Reed, Christopher
Days: WF
Times: 2:20-3:40 pm

Description: History 2402 will introduce the histories of the societies of East Asia (China, Korea, Japan) starting in about 1600.  To a higher degree than History 2401, which is useful but certainly not required preparation, History 2402 is organized on a 3-way comparative model (“how do China, Japan, or Korea compare to each other historically?”); one of our goals Is to learn to think comparatively about history and societies.  We will survey key historical phenomena (including political, military, social and intellectual themes) that have distinguished each country in the modern period.  For most of the semester, the course will be organized chronologically and thematically.  It will also seek a balance between examination of particular periods and exploration of patterns of continuity and change across historical period and different societies.  In addition to providing a basic narrative of East Asian Civilization since 1600, the course will introduce students to important written sources and to historical writing.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:  Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx. Not open to students with credit for 142. GE historical study and diversity global studies course. This course fulfills Group East Asia, post-1750, CCE, PCS for history majors, or a GE.


HISTORY 3365 History of Afghanistan

Instructor:  Khaliyarov, Alisher
Days: Online
Times: Online 7W2

Description: This course will address Afghan society, its historical foundations, and the challenges that confront it.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 355. GE historical study course.


HISTORY 3403 History of Early Modern China: 14th- 18th Century

Instructor: Zhang, Ying
Days: WF (Hybrid)
Times: 12:45-2:05 pm

Description:

In early modern China (ca. 1300-1800), like in our own time, people were overwhelmed by drastic changes in government, culture, religion, society, and international relations. In fact, many of these changes were similar or connected to the fascinating developments in other parts of the world, in particular in areas such as epidemics, piracy, and trade. The Chinese empire went through two dynastic cycles; the three ruling houses represented three ethnicities—Mongol, Han, and Manchu. In this class, we will think about how the dynamics of crisis, transformation, and globalization challenged traditional institutions, ideas, and practices, and how people coped with them. We will think about “China” both as an elusive concept and as a powerful reality in Eurasian and world history. 

Our course activities are designed based on this pedagogy and for the HYBRID format.

  1. Online lectures provide useful background information and explore some topics in depth.
  2. Exercises with reading assignments (historical scholarship and historical material) help you cultivate analytical skills.
  3. In-class lectures and discussion are opportunities for us to work closely in person.
  4. Written and multi-media assignments help you improve your ability to articulate and present evidence-based ideas.

Assigned Readings:

Required textbook: Timothy Brook, Great State: China and the World (Harper, 2020)
Supplemental textual and visual material available on Carmen Canvas.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study course. This course fulfills group East Asia, pre-1750, CCE, PCS for history the major or can fulfill a GE requirement. All course materials are in English. No prior knowledge of Chinese or Chinese history required.


HISTORY 3404 Modern China, 1750-1949

Instructor: Reed, Christopher
Days:  TR
Times: 2:20-3:40 pm (synchronous online via Zoom)

Description: This course provides a general but analytic survey of the social, political, and intellectual history of China from 1750 to 1949. After a brief introduction to China’s geography, languages, and cultural background, we will discuss key historical phenomena that have distinguished Chinese society in the modern period. For most of the semester, the course is organized chronologically and thematically and seeks a balance between detailed examination of particular periods and exploration of patterns of continuity and change across historical periods. When appropriate, comparative historical perspectives will be suggested.

Assigned Readings: Probably 4 books, documentary films

Assignments: TBA

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 545.03. GE historical study and diversity global studies course. Although not required, the course assumes students have had college-level history courses above the introductory level. Familiarity with topics covered in History 2401, "East Asian History to 1600,” or 2402, “East Asian History 1600-present” is useful but not required. This course fulfills group East Asia, post-1750, CCE, PCS for history the major or can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 3411 Gender and Sexuality in China

Instructor: Zhang, Ying
Days: WF (Hybrid)
Times: 9:35-10:55 am

Description: In Spring 2022, this course explores Chinese women’s and gender history by situating it in the interactions between China and the United States in the 19th and 20th centuries. Both countries went through drastic changes when they began to develop official and unofficial ties during this period. People, ideas, and things moved between these two countries across the Pacific. These movements resulted in new discoveries, exciting collaborations, and also many personal and collective tragedies. How did gender ideology shape this history? How did these developments change women’s lives and the gender discourse in modern China?

The course will introduce premodern Chinese gender ideals and practices before the era of Sino-U.S. entanglement. It shows how these ideals and practices traveled, encountered challenges, adapted, and changed in the cultural, educational, economic, political, and religious interactions between the two countries. We will focus on Chinese women in China and in the U.S., but American men and women will figure prominently in the course material as well.

Assigned Readings:

TBD

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq: English 1110.xx and any History 2000-level course, or permission of instructor. GE historical study and diversity global studies course.This course fulfills Group East Asia, pre or post-1750, PCS, WGS for history majors or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement. All course materials are in English. No prior knowledge of Chinese or Chinese history required.


HISTORY 3351:   Intellectual and Social Movements in the Muslim World

Instructor:  Hathaway, Jane
Days:  W F                                                                              
Time:  9:35-11:55

Description: This course explores significant intellectual and social movements that have arisen among Muslims from the inception of Islam in 610 C.E. until the present.  These range from the initial split over the caliphate to the great medieval theological debates to 19th- and early 20th-century reformism to the Arab Spring, the Islamic State, and the Taliban.  Special attention will be given to the development of Shia Islam, with a focus on the background to the Iranian revolution as portrayed in Roy Mottahedeh’s The Mantle of the Prophet, an account of the experiences and intellectual formation of a young Iranian mullah active during the 1970s. 

Assigned readings:

Frederick Matthewson Denny,  An Introduction to Islam, 4th ed.
Roy Mottahedeh, The Mantle of the Prophet:  Religion and Politics in Iran
Various excerpts from primary and secondary sources

Assignments:

Map exercise, in-class midterm, paper related to The Mantle of the Prophet, take-home final

Prerequisites:  Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 542.01. GE historical study course. This course fulfills Group Near Eastern, pre-1750, PCS, and RLN for the major, or it can fulfill a GE requirement.

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HISTORY 2700 Global Environmental History

Instructor: Harris, Jim
Days: Online (7W2)
Times: Online

Description: Global overview of the ecology of the human condition in past time, stressing climate change, earth systems, technology, energy, demography, and human cultural-economic revolutions.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx. GE historical study and soc sci human, nat, and econ resources and diversity global studies course.


HISTORY 2702 Food in World History

Instructor: Cahn, Dylan
Days: Online
Times: Online

Description:  Survey of the history of food, drink, diet and nutrition in a global context. 

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx. Not open to students with credit for 362. This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill the historical study GE.


 

HISTORY 2703 History of Public Health, Medicine, & Disease

Instructor: Otter, Christopher
Days: TR
Time: 9:35-10:55 am

Description: This class provides a wide-ranging, introductory survey of the history of health and disease, ranging from the infectious disease in early human communities to today’s global COVID pandemic. We will study major epidemics – plague, smallpox, influenza – as well as the various transitions leading to the rise of noncommunicable diseases – cancer, heart disease, diabetes – as major killers in the developed world. The course will also investigate the history of other types of bodily and psychological affliction, particularly occupational, environmental, and mental health. Finally, the course is not simply about various types of disease. It is also about how different societies have conceptualized and encouraged practices designed to improve health. We will spend a considerable amount of time on public health schemes, as well as practices like washing, diet, cleaning, and physical fitness.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study and diversity global studies course. This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750, and ETS for the major, or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 2704 Water: A Human History                                             

Instructor: Breyfogle, Nicholas
Days:   WF                                         
Time: 12:45-2:05

Description: Throughout human history and across this very diverse planet, water defines every aspect of human life: from the molecular, biological, and ecological to the cultural, religious, economic, and political. We live on the “blue planet.” Our bodies are made up primarily of water. Without water, life as we understand it could not exist. Indeed, water stands at the foundation of most of what we do as humans: in irrigation and agriculture; waste and sanitation; drinking and disease; floods and droughts; fishing and other food supply; travel and discovery; scientific study; water pollution and conservation; dam building; in the setting of boundaries and borders; and wars and diplomacy. Water lies at the very heart of almost all world religions (albeit in very different ways). The control of water is at the foundation of the rise and fall of civilizations, with drought and flood perpetual challenges to human life.  Water serves as a source of power (mills, hydro-electric dams), and access to water often defines (or is defined by) social and political power hierarchies. Water plays an important symbolic role in the creation of works of literature, art, music, and architecture, and it serves as a source of human beauty and spiritual tranquility. Thus, to begin to understand ourselves as humans—our bodies, minds, and souls, past and present—we must contemplate our relationship to water.

At the same time, water resources—the need for clean and accessible water supplies for drinking, agriculture, and power production—will likely represent one of the most complicated dilemmas of the twenty-first century. The World Water Forum, for instance, reported recently that one in three people across the planet will not have sufficient access to safe water by 2030. As population grows, glaciers melt, hydrological systems change, and underground aquifers are depleted, many analysts now think that the world will fight over water more than any other resource in the coming decades. The moral and logistical question of how to ration water (who gets access and for what purposes) will be a foundational ethical question of the twenty-first century.

In this class, we will examine a selection of historical moments and themes to explore the relationship between people and water over time and place.  The format of the course will be a combination of lectures, in-class discussions, workshop activities, and presentation of your work to your fellow classmates. 

Assigned Readings:

(This list is tentative, and the specific books may change)

  • Richard White, The Organic Machine: The Remaking of the Columbia River
  • Readings in Water History
  • Mary Lynn Rampolla, A Pocket Guide to Writing in History (10th edition)

* A range of other shorter readings available on Carmen

Assignments: This course requires a few short essays, a final take-home exam, a small research project, and active and engaged in-class discussion and activities.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study and diversity global studies course. This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750, PCS and ETS for the major, or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 3700 American Environmental History                 

Instructor: Elmore, Bart
Days:   TR                              
Time:  11:10-12:30 PM

Description: This course shows what history can teach us about the future survival of humanity on planet Earth. From August to December, we dive deep into the past, examining how Americans have affected the natural environment over time and how nature has shaped the course of human events. You will learn to think like an environmental historian, mastering a historical sub-discipline first developed in the 1970s that places nature at the heart of our national narrative This course tackles some of the biggest issues hitting headlines today. How bad is climate change? What can we do about it? Are we running out of water? How will we quench our thirst in the years ahead? Looking to the past, we journey across the country (and the globe) to find solutions to these questions and more. You’ll never look at American history the same way again.

Assigned Readings:

There are only two assigned books for the course:
Ted Steinberg’s Down to Earth: Nature’s Role in American History (Oxford University Press, 2009).
Marl Fiege Republic of Nature: An Environmental History of the United States (University of Washington Press, 2012).

In addition to these readings, the course features a sprinkling of articles from some of today’s top environmental historians. We’ll also watch a series of films that will help students visualize ecological changes that reshaped America.

Assignments:

TBA

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study course. This course fulfills Group American, post-1750, GEM, and ETS for the major, or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 3704: HIV: From Microbiology to Microhistory

Instructor: McDow, Thomas & Kwiek, Jesse
Days:   TR                              
Time: 11:10-12:30 pm

Description In 2012, an estimated 35.3 million people around the world were living with HIV, a number startling close to the estimated number of people who have died from AIDs since 1981.  Unlocking the virological secrets of HIV/AIDs has been one of the grand scientific challenges of the last three decades, and the disease remains one of the world’s most serious challenges to human health and development.  The burden of the disease is very uneven globally, and sub-Saharan African, where the disease originated, is home to 69% of those living with HIV today. How did this virus and this global pandemic come to be? The course traces the evolution of the virus at both the molecular level and within its global historical context.  Team-taught by a virologist and a historian, the goal of this class at the broadest level, is to put the sciences and humanities in conversation.

The course will require students to apply the theory of evolution by natural selection to explain the origin of HIV (chimpanzees in Africa) and the ability of HIV to develop drug resistance and evade an effective vaccine. The course will simultaneously put these scientific processes and the effects of disease into historical context. The very scientific revolutions that led to Darwin’s theory of evolution and Koch's postulates of infection transmission helped make European colonialism possible. For example, Social Darwinism justified imperial aims, Pasteurian ideals of contamination influenced notions of racial purity, and the new field of tropical medicine was created to protect colonial administrators and soldiers in their distant postings. Similarly, colonial rule and the creation of the extractive economies of central and southern Africa set in motion population movements, wealth inequalities, and structures of power that amplified the effects—decades later—of HIV and contributed to what would become a global pandemic. Although the academy approaches the medical facts of disease and its social consequences through distinct disciplines, those who have contracted the virus experience all aspects of the disease. This course makes it possible for students to consider the medical, scientific, social, political, and economic causes and consequences of one of the world's most devastating viruses.

This course is cross-listed with Microbiology.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for Micrbio 3704. This course fulfills Group Africa, post-1750, ETS for the major, or it can fulfill a GE requirement.

 

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HISTORY 1211 Western Society to 1600: rise, collapse, and recovery

Instructor: Parker, Geoffrey

Online; 1 synchronous recitation each Monday and 2 asynchronous lectures each week

Description:

For better or worse, Western societies have become extremely prominent in the world today – not just in the West but (thanks to Karl Marx and the Internet) around the world. How did this process begin? What is distinctive about Western values?  These are two of the questions that this course seeks to answer. In addition we will examine How Things Happen:

  • Why did the West develop at such an early stage the right to free speech guaranteed in this country by the First Amendment?
  • Why were 50% of all Western populations in this period under the age of 20?
  • How could 167 Spaniards overthrow the Inca Empire, with perhaps 8 million subjects, and go on to dominate much of South America?

The course also offers strategies on how to identify, among masses of facts, the aberration from the trend, the cause from the contingent, the important from the incidental, and the continuities among the changes.

Assigned Readings

Wiesner-Hanks, Crowston, Perry & McKay, A history of Western society, Volume I: From Antiquity to the Enlightenment, 13th edition (2020)
Wiesner-Hanks, Evans, Wheeler and Ruff, Discovering the Western Past, Volume I: to 1789, 7th edition (2015)

Assignments

  • Watch all materials for the course posted online
  • Read and discuss all assigned readings; attend and participate in all group discussions (20% of total grade)
  • Complete all assigned recitation exercises (20% of total grade)
  • one 5-page term paper (30% of total grade)
  • one final exam (30% of total grade)20

Prerequisites and Special Comments

No prerequisites. This course fulfills the following GE requirements:  1) “Historical Study,” 2) “Diversity: Global Studies”


HISTORY 1212 European History II                  

Instructor: Dragostinova, Theodora

Days:   Asynchronous, online                                    

Time: Asynchronous, online                                                                                                                         

Description: This class introduces students to the political, social, and cultural developments that shaped the history of modern Europe since 1660. Some topics include responses to war and crisis in early modern Europe; the emergence of new ideas questioning absolutism during the Enlightenment; the birth of representative politics and democratic institutions; scientific innovation, industrialization, and the new technologies; the ideologies of modernity such as conservatism, liberalism, socialism, and nationalism; the effects of European colonialism and imperialism; the new social classes and changing gender roles; the triumph of the nation-state and the two world wars; challenges to the democratic order and experiments in socialism and fascism; the Holocaust and ethnic cleansing; the divided world during the Cold War and the overthrow of the communist regimes; and decolonization, multiculturalism, and globalization. Using a variety of primary sources, students will learn and debate about the historical developments that created the modern European state, society, and culture.

Assigned Readings:

All required readings are provided on CARMEN via PDFs or web links.

Assignments:

  • Quizzes: 5%
  • Weekly discussion forum posts: 30%
  • Two 2-page reflection papers: 20% (10% each)
  • Midterm exam: 20%
  • Final exam: 25%.   

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx. Not open to students with credit for 1210, 2203, 2204. This course is available for EM credit. GE historical study and diversity global studies course.


HISTORY 1212 Western Civilization 17th Century to the Present 

Instructor: Douglas, Sarah
Days: Online
Times: Online

Description: Political, scientific, and industrial revolutions, nationalism, the two World Wars; the decline of empires; the Cold War.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills the historical study GE requirement.  Not open to students that have credit for History 112; 2202; 2203; 2204 or 2205.


HISTORY 1212 Western Civilization 17th Century to the Present 

Instructor: Limbach, Eric
Days: Online 7W2
Times: Online 7W2

Description: Political, scientific, and industrial revolutions, nationalism, the two World Wars; the decline of empires; the Cold War.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills the historical study GE requirement.  Not open to students that have credit for History 112; 2202; 2203; 2204 or 2205.


HISTORY 2202: Intro to Medieval History

Instructor: Green, Derek
Days: Online 7W2
Times: Online

Description: Survey of medieval history from the late Roman Empire to the early sixteenth century.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 1211. GE historical study and diversity global studies course.This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750, REN, PCS for the major, or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 2204H:  The West and the World since 1492

Instructor:  Conklin, Alice
Days:  W/F                                                                
Time: 11:10-12:30

Description: This course is designed for students in the OSU Honors Program.  Class size is limited to 20. Non-honors students may enroll if space is available and with permission of the instructor.  The focus of this course is on Europe from the Age of Discovery to globalization (1492-present). In the 16th century, Europe was still peripheral to much of the world.  By the beginning of the 20th century, however, Euro-American flags and interests dominated much of the globe.  The world today is the product of this transformation.  In this course we will study one aspect of the creation of the modern world through the many European revolutions and counter-revolutions—intellectual, , commercial, industrial, nationalist, imperialist, consumerist, and feminist –  that helped to bring it into being.  The first half of the course is devoted to European expansion and internal developments prior to 1800, the second half to European domination and its consequences in the 19th and 20th centuries. 

Assigned readings:

Levack , Muir and Veldman., The West: Encounters and Transformations, vol. 2 (course textbook)

Primary sources:
René Descartes, The Discourse on Method and Meditations
Françoise de Graffigny, Letters from a Peruvian Woman
Karl Marx, The Communist Manifesto
Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness
Primo Levi, Survival at Auschwitz
Frantz Fanon, Wretched of the Earth

Assignments:

Regular attendance to lectures, participation in discussion, and short written responses to primary sources (20%)
One short paper (30% each)
In-class mid-term exam (25%)
In-class final exam (25%)

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: Honors standing and English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 1212. GE historical study and diversity global studies course. This course fulfills Group Europe, post-1750, REN, PCS for the major, or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 2206:  History of Paris, Origins to the Present                               

Instructor: Bond, Elizabeth
Days:   online asynchronous                                      
Time:  online asynchronous  

Description: The History of Paris is an introductory survey course from the city’s earliest human settlement to the present day. Moving chronologically through time, we learn about the history of the people and events that shaped the Paris we know today. Throughout, we consider two themes. 

First, we study the human stories that have shaped Parisian events and history. This course begins with the fact that there is not now nor was there in the past a singular, typical Parisian. From the Romans, to the Vikings, to the present day, Parisian history has been shaped by those born outside the city. After all, they constitute the majority of Parisians.

Second, we consider how the stories about a place have shaped the ways people understand the city. Baron de Pöllnitz wrote in 1732, “Paris has been described so much and one has heard it talked about so much, that most people know what the city looks like without ever having seen it.” We examine stories of the city, from historical chronicles to literary works to film, to understand how stories about a place shape the collective memory of its residents.

Assigned Readings:

Colin Jones, Paris:  Biography of a City, Penguin:  2004.
Selected primary sources (approximately 10 pages each week) will be available via Carmen.

Assignments:

Short Essay: The way that people experienced the city of Paris is shaped by the stories that are told about it. Analyze one such story, using a film, novel, comic book, or memoir.

Take-Home Exams: Respond to lecture and course readings by synthesizing major trends at two key points in the semester.

Podcast Final Project:  In small groups, write and present a 5-minute podcast on the history of a Parisian neighborhood. The group will choose one theme to study—music, food, visual art, sports, nightlife, religion, architecture, business, etc.—everything has a history.

Quizzes:  After completing each week’s module, complete a short quiz to review key takeaways from the readings and lectures.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study course. This course fulfills Group Europe and post-1750 for the major, or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 3246 Tudor and Stuart Britain, 1485-1714          

Instructor: Butler, Sara
Days:   T R                                         
Time: 9:35 to 10:55

Description:  The Tudor-Stuart era is one of immense change in British society.  Britain left behind the Middle Ages and embraced the modern era, but what that entailed was a great deal of crisis and upheaval.  This course will analyse some of the following themes and events:  changes in what it means to be a king and ideas about the state (especially with respect to Henry VIII, Elizabeth I, and James VI and I); the Reformation and the emergence of the Anglican church; the emergence of poor law, heresy laws, and new methods of punishment; the Elizabethan stage; the Great Fire of London and its rebuilding; bubonic plague and public health measures;  Parliament’s rise in power; witch-hunts, the witch-craze, and new science; Quakers, Shakers, Ranters, Puritans; Levellers, Diggers, and other early socialists; the English Civil War; the Scottish Presbyterian movement; Thomas Hobbes, Robert Filmer, John Locke, and exactly what did happen in the Garden of Eden; early modern environmentalism; John Milton; the changing place of women; a world turned upside down!; the Glorious Revolution.

Assigned Readings:

  • Robert Bucholz and Newton Key, Early Modern England 1485-1714: A Narrative History, 2nd edition (Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell, 2009). Newton Key and Robert Bucholz, eds., Sources and Debates in English History 1485-1714, 2nd edition (Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell, 2009). 
  • Carole Levin, The Heart and Stomach of a King: Elizabeth I and the Politics of Sex and Power, 2nd edition (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2013). 

Assignments:

Participation                                                   10%    
Discussion posts                                             20%
Mid-term Exam                                              10%
Final Exam                                                      15%
Elizabeth Paper                                               20%
Research Essay                                               25%

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: Any 2000-level History course, and English 1110.xx; or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 514.01. GE historical study course. This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750, PCS, RLN for the major, or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 3247 Magic and Witchcraft in Early Modern Europe             

Instructor: Goldish, Matt
Days: WF                                           
Time: 12:45-2:05 pm             

Description:  Magic has been with us since the dawn of human consciousness and it is with us still. Understanding magical mentalities is therefore an important historical project but also a difficult one. The early modern period, 1450-1750—the period of the European witch hunts—offers an ideal setting in which to study magical thinking and related matters. We will learn why the tumultuous events of this period created a highly fertile and dynamic atmosphere for magic and witchcraft beliefs. We will learn quite a bit about this period in European history generally. We will examine the distinctions between learned and lay magic; “white” and “black” magic; and different types of magical practice. We will pay particular attention to witches, witch hunts, and shifting ideas about witchcraft on the eve of the Enlightenment. A second and more practical focus of the course will be on identifying the thesis of a chapter, article or book and on recognizing the main arguments or proofs marshaled to support that thesis. A third focus will be on the close analysis of primary documents.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for the history major or can fulfill a GE requirement. This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750, ETS, RLN for the major, or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 3253 20th Century Europe to 1950              

Instructor: Limbach, Eric
Days: TR                                            
Time: 9:35-10:55pm 

Description:  Exploration of the major historical events and issues from approximately 1900 to 1950.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:  Prereq or concur: Any 2000-level History course, and English 1110.xx; or permission of instructor. GE historical study course. This course fulfills Group Europe, post-1750, CPD, PCS for the major, or it can fulfill a GE requirement.

 


HISTORY 3640: Medieval Women: Power, Piety and Production           

Instructor: Butler, Sara
Days:   T R                                         
Time: 2:20 to 3:40                                                           

Description: The goal of this class is to explore the changes in women’s rights and roles in medieval society over the course of the high and late Middle Ages (covering the period of roughly 1050-1500) from a comparative perspective. Discussions will focus on female agency, especially: the gap between prescription and reality; the difficulty of being categorized as either an “Eve,” or a “Mary” (especially when it is all too easy to become a “Mary Magdalene”); women’s contributions to medieval society; ideas and attitudes about women. Discussion topics include: the barbarian legacy, ideas about women (from the church to anatomy), women and property law, marriage and sexuality, women and the church, education and literacy, gendered space, rebellious women, queens and royal dowagers, and single women. We will also spend a lot of time talking about famous medieval women in order to become aware that history is not just a catalog of the events of great men – women have also contributed substantially to the world in which we live.

Assigned Readings:

Beth Allison Barr, The Making of Biblical Womanhood: How the Subjugation of Women became the Gospel Truth (2021).

The rest of the readings for the course will be journal articles posted to Carmen/Canvas.

Assignments:

Book Assignment                   20%
Biography: a) ORAL:             10%
              b) WRITTEN:           25%
Discussion Post:                     25%
Final Exam                             20%

Biography:
Each student will be given the opportunity to choose an historical figure during the first week of classes. Here are the options to choose from:

Alice Kyteler –first woman to be accused of being a “witch” (in the early modern sense)
Christine de Pisan / Pizan – a writer for hire
Heloise –intellectual with a famous set of letters to philosopher-husband, Peter Abelard
Isabella d’Este – an art patron
Joan of Arc – a cross-dressing savior
Margery Kempe – the first woman to write an autobiography in English
Marguerite de Porete – a condemned heretic
Marie de France – a woman writer
Mary Magdalene – companion to Jesus with an interesting medieval story
Pope Joan – a woman who dressed as a man, became pope, then was outed
Queen Blanche of Castile – m. to King Louis VIII of France, regent twice
Queen Eleanor of Aquitaine – m. to king of France & king of England
Queen Isabel la Catolica of Spain – initiated the Spanish Inquisition
St Bridget of Sweden – mystic and ascetic, founded the Brigittine nunneries
St Catherine of Siena – mystic and ascetic, believed she was literally married to Christ
St Clare of Assisi – founded the order of the Poor Clares, companion to St Francis
St Hildegard of Bingen – intellectual, writer, mystic, physician, rebel
St Julian of Norwich – anchoress, writer, advisor
The Paston Women – an English gentry family who left behind a lot of letters
The Virgin Mary – Queen of Heaven
Trotula of Salerno – a physician and author of a medieval treatise on health of women

Students will prepare an oral presentation with Powerpoint for a class presentation, and do a 10-12 page written biography.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110 or equiv, and course work in History at the 2000 level, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 523. GE historical study course. This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750, WGS for the major, or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 3641:  Women and Gender in Early Modern Europe, 1450-1750  

Instructor: Bond, Elizabeth
Days:   online asynchronous                                      
Time:  online asynchronous  

Description: This course investigates the lives and experiences of early modern European women. We cover a range of topics, including family life, gender, work, education, religious life, and political power.

The course is organized around three units:  body, mind, and spirit. In Unit 1, we examine the laws and ideas that influenced women’s material lives, their experience of the life cycle, and the ways work shaped their lives. In Unit 2, we turn to the mind—to women’s learning and their creation of new knowledge and art. We learn about the intellectual and social practices that they employed in the expression of their own agency, such as letter writing and patronage. In Unit 3, we consider the spirit in a range of early modern religious, psychological, and social dimensions. We examine how the history of women and gender was connected to major early modern transformations, including the Reformation, colonization, and the growth of the modern state.

Every week, we foreground women’s voices through primary sources and through discussions of exciting new historical research on that week’s theme. Our reading, viewing, and listening will equip students to think about and talk about women’s history and gender history.

Assigned Readings:

  • Merry Wiesner-Hanks, Women and Gender in Early Modern Europe, 4th Edition (Cambridge University Press, 2019)
  • Barbara Burman and Ariane Fennetaux, The Pocket:  A Hidden History of Women’s Lives, 1660-1900 (Yale University Press, 2019)

We also screen three films:  The Return of Martin Guerre, Portrait of a Lady on Fire, and Belle

Assignments:

Film Responses:  Screen three films and write responses that place the films in conversation with key course themes.

Quizzes:  Complete a weekly quiz to review key takeaways from the weekly course module.

Primary Source Analysis:  Using the V&A Museum online collection, “read” an object: dress, hat, shoes, jewelry, underwear. Such objects reveal much about women’s lived experiences.

Research Paper: Explore one of the course themes (or figures we have studied) in greater depth through further reading and research.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills the historical study GE.  This course fulfills the integrated social studies prerequisite. This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750, WGS for the history major or can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 3642 Women in Modern Europe, from the 18th Century to the Present

Instructor: Søland, Birgitte  
Days: TR
Times: 11:00-12:30 pm

Description:

This course is designed as an introduction to the history of women and gender in Europe, from the late eighteenth century to the mid-twentieth century.  Several themes will be central to the course.  We will study the enormous social, political and economic upheavals Europe underwent in the 18th century, and how these upheavals also recast gender relations and produced new ideas about men and women and their respective roles and responsibilities.  We will also explore how women strove to shape and improve their lives under changing circumstances, and how relationships between women and men developed both inside the family and in society in general. Finally, we will look at how economic position, religion, sexuality, marital status, ethnic and national differences influenced women's experiences.       

Assigned Readings:

Most assigned readings will consist in primary sources, i.e. evidence drawn from the time under investigation.  The primary sources will be complemented with historical scholarship in the form of articles and book chapters.  All required readings will be made available electronically, and students will not be required to purchase any books for the course.

Assignments:

Students are required to complete one take-home midterm exam and one take-home final exam.  Both of these exams will be in essay format.  The expected page length for the midterm essay will be approximately 7-8 typed, double-spaced pages; the expected page length for the final exam will be approximately 10-12 typed, double-spaced pages.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 524. GE historical study course.

 

 

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HISTORY 2450 Ancient and Medieval Jewish History

Instructor: Frank, Daniel
Days: TR
Times: 12:45-2:05 pm

Description:

This course surveys nearly fifteen centuries of Jewish history, religion, and culture in the Near East from the days of the Maccabees (second century B.C.E.) to the death of Moses Maimonides  (1204 C.E.).  Focusing on key figures and representative subjects, the lectures will seek to offer a balanced picture of the Jewish experience in the ancient and early medieval periods. Special emphasis will be placed upon the evaluation and interpretation of primary sources (in translation). These texts will introduce students to the political, social, intellectual, and spiritual worlds of ancient and medieval Jewry.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 330.01 or JewshSt 2450. GE cultures and ideas and historical study and diversity global studies course.  This course fulfills Group Global, pre-1750 for history majors, or it can fulfill a GE.


HISTORY 2453 History of Zionism and Modern Israel

Instructor: Yehudai, Ori
Days: TR
Times: 11:10-12:30 pm

Description: This course explores the history of the Jewish state from the rise of the Zionist movement to the present. It begins by examining the social and ideological roots of Zionism in late 19th-century Europe, proceeds with the development of the Jewish community in Palestine under Ottoman and British rule, and then turns to the period following the establishment of the State of Israel in 1948. Among the issues to be discussed are Jewish-Arab relations, immigration, the encounter between European and Middle Eastern Jews, the creation of a new Hebrew identity, the interaction between religion and state, the impact of the Holocaust, and Israel’s international status. Course materials include secondary historical sources, a variety of primary documents, short stories and films.

Assigned Readings:

Course textbook: Anita Shapira, Israel: A History (available online through the library website)

Assignments:

Midterms, book review, film response (subject to change)

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 334 or JewshSt 2453. GE historical study course. Cross-listed in JewshSt. This course fulfills Group Near Eastern, post-1750, CPD, REN for the history major or can fulfill a GE requirement.

 

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HISTORY 3106 History of Mexico              

Instructor: Smith, Stephanie
Days: Online
Times: Online                                                                                                                                                                       

Description: Mexico faces many crucial issues today: immigration, the environment, cartels, the rights of women and indigenous peoples, economic and trade issues, the role of the United States, and others. Although these topics are current and timely, their historical context can be located throughout several centuries of struggle. Beginning with the Olmecs, Maya, and Aztecs, “HIST 3106” analyzes Mexico’s dynamic history during the pre-Conquest period, the colonial era, the time of Independence, the nineteenth-century, and the present. Throughout the semester we will examine patterns of conflict and negotiation, including Hernan Cortes’ invasion of the Aztec Empire (or the Spanish-Aztec War, 1519–21), and the great Mexican Revolution (1910-1917), which shaped Mexico’s historical legacies. In addition to a study of Mexico’s politics, we also will explore the ways in which everyday people participated in and influenced cultural and political events. The role of women, race and ethnicity will be analyzed throughout the lectures, as will Mexico’s transcultural interactions. And lastly, the course will consider Mexico’s rich culture, including movies, literature, and artists.

Please note that this is an asynchronous online class.

Assigned Readings: TBA

Assignments: TBA

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study and diversity global studies course. This course fulfills Group Latin American, pre & post-1750, CCE, PCS, REN for the history major or can fulfill a GE requirement.

 

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HISTORY 2550 History of War

Instructor: Douglas, Sarah
Days: Online
Times: Online

Description:

A survey of the main concepts and issues involved in the study of war in world perspective, using case studies from prehistoric times to the present.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 380. GE historical study and diversity global studies course. This course fulfills Global, post-1750, CPD for the history major or can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 3552 War in World History, 1900- Present

Instructor: Cabanes, Bruno
Days: TR                                          
Time:  09:35-10:55AM                                                                                                         

Description:  The Experience of War in the 20th Century

The past hundred years have changed the nature of war. Industrial warfare and global conflicts led to an inexorable intensification of violence. From trench warfare in World War I to ethnic cleansing in the 1990s, the total number of deaths caused by or associated with war has been estimated at the equivalent of 10% of the world’s population in 1913. In the course of the century, the burden of war shifted increasingly from armed forces to civilians, to the point where non-combatants now comprise some 80 or 90% of war victims. This lecture course investigates the blurring of distinction between combatants and non-combatants, as well as the experiences of ordinary men and women who lived through the wars of the 20th Century. It covers events such as World War I, the Spanish Civil War, World War II, the Korean War and the Vietnam War, and topics such as the experience of captivity, sexual violence in wartime, children in war, or genocide.

Assigned Readings:

Primo Levi, Survival in Auschwitz
Anonymous, A Women in Berlin
Henri Alleg, The Question
Jean Hatzfeld, Machete Season. The Killers in Rwanda Speak

Assignments:

The final grade in the course will be an average of the four grades given for: a short 2000-word paper (20%), the mid-term examination (25%), lecture Quick Writes/Quizzes (20%); the final examination (35%).

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 580.02. GE historical study course. This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750, CPD, and ETS for the history major, or it can fulfill the historical study GE.


HISTORY 3570 World War II

Instructor: Mansoor, Peter
Days: WF                               
Time: 2:20-3:40 pm

Description: World War II was the largest and most destructive war in human history. More than seventy years after it ended, the war continues to shape our world. This course examines the causes, conduct, and consequences of this devastating conflict. Through readings, lectures, and video, the class will study the politics that shaped the involvement of the major combatants; military leadership and the characteristics of major Allied and Axis armed services; the national and theater strategies of the various major combatants; the military operations that led to victory or defeat on battlefields spanning the globe; war crimes; and other factors such as leadership, economics, military doctrine and effectiveness, technology, ideology, and racism that impacted the outcome of the war. This course falls under the GE Foundation of Historical and Cultural Studies.

Assigned Readings:

Williamson Murray and Allan R. Millett, A War to be Won: Fighting the Second World War
West Point History of Warfare
(selected chapters, online only)
Mark Stoler and Molly Michelmore, eds., The United States in World War II: A Documentary History
Michael Lynch, Hitler
E. B. Sledge, With the Old Breed

Assignments:

Take-home mid-term and final examinations
Two take-home essays
Two book reviews (2-3 pages each)

Prerequisites and Special Comments: AP History credit or successful completion of another college-level history course. English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study and diversity global studies course. This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750, and CPD for the history major, or it can fulfill the historical study GE.

 

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HISTORY 3071 Native American History from Removal to Present

Instructor: Rivers, Daniel 
Days:  WF
Times: 9:35-10:55 am

Description: This course will introduce students to the history of Native Americans from the 1820s to the present. We will look at the removal of Native tribes to Indian Territory, the establishment of reservation system, the resurgence of Native cultures and pan-Indian movements in the twentieth century, postwar urban migration and tribal termination policies, the Red Power movements of the 1960s, and Native legal organizing in the late 20th and 21st centuries.  The course will encourage the students to think about intersections of gender, race, sexuality, and class and to consider Native resistance movements and cultural persistence over the last two centuries.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 568.02. GE historical study and diversity soc diversity in the US course. This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750, CCE, REN for the history major or can fulfill a GE requirement.         

 

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HISTORY 2800 Introduction to the Discipline of History

Instructor: Staley, David 
Days: TR
Times: 2:20-3:40 pm

Description: Investigation of the methods and analytical approaches historians use to understand the past.

Prerequisites: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx.


HISTORY 2800 Introduction to the Discipline of History 

Instructor: Kern, Stephen
Days: WF
Time: 2:20-3:40, online instruction

Description: This course introduces students to the discipline of history by analyzing in detail three approaches to history based on three highly influential theories about human experience generally—Marxism, psychoanalysis, and phenomenology. The power of these theories derives from the fact that they are grounded in universal aspects of human experience--bodily needs and labor (Marx), sexuality and unconscious mental processes (Freud), and time and space (phenomenology); although these universal features also vary historically. To understand the interaction between theory and practice students will read and analyze these theories at their source and then critically evaluate one extended application of them in contemporary historical works, one of which is my own. In addition, students will also read critical appraisals of these approaches to round out the three reading assignments that are the subject of the three assigned papers (1500 words or five pages each). I also run a week-long writing workshop that clarifies mechanics of writing to be used and refined in these papers.

Assigned Readings:

George Lefebvre, The Coming of the French Revolution
Rudolph Binion, Hitler Among the Germans
Stephen Kern, The Culture of Time and Space: 1880-1918
Selected readings by Marx, Freud, and phenomenology as well as criticisms of the three applications of these theories on Carmen

Assignments:

Attendance and participation in discussion of primary and secondary sources.
Three papers.

Prerequisites: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx.


History 2800 Introduction to the Discipline of History     

Instructor: Cashin, Joan
Days:     TR Online
Time: 12:45-2:05 pm 

Course Description: This course is designed to introduce undergraduates to the historical method, that is, how historians write history.  We will learn how to distinguish between primary and secondary sources, and we will examine important events in historical context.   We will concentrate on a specific issue, dissent during the Civil War, and the debate among historians on the impact this had on the war’s outcome.  We will examine various documents generated by people who lived through the War, and we will read several secondary sources.  Students will also write some papers on different aspects of wartime dissent.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:  Prereq or concur: English 1110. xx.


HISTORY 2800H Introduction to the Discipline of History     

Instructor: Newell, Margaret  
Days: WF
Times: 9:35 – 10:55 am

Description: Investigation of the methods and analytical approaches historians use to understand the past.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq: Honors standing, or permission of instructor. Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx. Not open to students with credit for 398H.


HISTORY 4015 Seminar in Modern U.S. History       

Instructor: Howard, Clayton
Days:   TR                              
Time: 2:20-3:40 pm                                   

Description:  Many Americans associate the 1960s and 1970s as an era of sexual freedom and the 1980s as a period of sexual conservatism.  Time magazine, for example, used similar images of Adam and Eve when it announced a “sex explosion” in 1969 and again when it declared “The Revolution is Over” in 1984.  Many historians have analyzed the history of sexuality in the second half of the twentieth century and have raised numerous important questions about it.  How much really changed during the sexual revolution?  Was there a “revolution” at all?  If there was a sexual revolution, when did it begin and end?  Who resisted it and did it have any lasting effects on American culture?  Students in this class will learn how some historians have tried to answer these questions and conduct their own secondary source research on the sexual revolution.  We will explore topics such as the history of marriage, LGBT life and politics, feminism, contraception, consumer culture, and the Religious Right. 

This is an upper-level seminar on the reading and writing of history.  It will treat the topic of the Sexual Revolution thematically, surveying different examples instead of attempting to tell a comprehensive history of it.  The in-class and homework assignments will push students to think critically about how historians craft an argument, organize their ideas, collect primary sources, periodize their work, and think about evidence.   

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, a grade of C or above in History 2800, and any 3000-level History course; or permission of instructor. This course is designed for junior and senior History majors and fulfills the seminar requirement for History Majors.


HISTORY 4015 Seminar in Modern U.S. History       

Instructor: Baker, Paula
Days:   TR                              
Time: 12:45-2:05 pm                                               

Description: This seminar will focus on how and why historians’ interpretations have changed over time and how we might judge conflicting interpretations. Our subject will be the life and career of Theodore Roosevelt.  A larger-than-life personality, he wrote so much – letters, articles, books – that it’s a wonder he had time to breathe. He filled every room during his lifetime, wishing to be “the corpse at every funeral, the bride at every wedding, and the baby at every christening,” according to his daughter, Alice, an attention hog herself.  And as an amateur naturalist, cowboy, historian, government official, war hero, President, and noisy ex-President, he left a trail that connects with major debates in U.S. history, including the meanings of Progressive-era reform, imperialism and the place of the U.S. in the world, race and racism, gender and masculinity, and westward expansion. We will track conflicting and changing interpretations of TR’s life and times, and also sample Roosevelt’s writing.  You will write a series of papers that deal with these debates. 

Assigned Readings:

Edmund Morris, The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt
John Morton Blum, The Republican Roosevelt
Patricia O’Toole, When Trumpets Call
Plus additional readings available on Carmen

Assignments:

4 papers plus short reaction essays.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, a grade of C or above in History 2800, and any 3000-level History course; or permission of instructor. This course is designed for junior and senior History majors and fulfills the seminar requirement for History Majors.


HISTORY 4125 Seminar in Latin America                    

Instructor: Smith, Stephanie
Day: R (online)         
Time: 2:15- 5:00 pm                                                                                                 

Description: “Revolutions and Revolutionaries in Modern Latin America”

What is a revolution? Why are successful revolutions such rare events? Why have so many revolutions failed and so few succeeded? Who are the revolutionaries? What is guerrilla warfare, and why do people resort to guerrilla warfare? What happens after the revolution, and how do revolutionaries rebuild/create a new government? What is the difference between a revolution and social movement? And historically, what was the complex relationship between the United States and modern Latin American countries, and why was the U.S. interested in Latin America?

This course examines these and other questions to analyze the history and meanings of revolutions and revolutionaries in modern Latin America. Starting with Mexico’s great revolution, we will move forward to analyze other revolutions and social movements in Guatemala, Cuba, Nicaragua, and others. Throughout this class we will discuss the causes of revolution, their changing historical nature, and revolutionary outcomes. Additionally, we also will consider dictatorships in Chile, Argentina, and Brazil to examine the search for social justice and reform. To better understand the inclusion of all peoples within the revolutionary experience, the course includes a consideration of the concepts of class, gender, and race and ethnicity. In this manner, we will pay special attention to historical actors to explore participation from the ground level up. We also will look at U.S. involvement in Latin American countries, including the role of the U.S. in revolutions and in the creation of a post-revolutionary society. Through an examination of these various historical factors, this class ultimately will provide a context for many of the major issues facing Latin American today.

Assigned Readings: TBA

Assignments: TBA

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, a grade of C or above in History 2800, and any 3000-level History course; or permission of instructor.  This course is designed for junior and senior History majors and fulfills the seminar requirement for History Majors.


History 4255 Seminar in Modern European History   

Instructor: Dragostinova, Theodora
Days:   R                                            
Time: 2:15-5:00 pm                                                                          

Description: Nation-Building and Belonging in Modern Europe

This class examines different perspectives on nation- and state-building and national belonging in modern Europe, roughly from the French Revolution on, by using case studies from a variety of geographical contexts, both in Western and Eastern Europe as well as the European overseas empires. Some topics include the birth of nationalism in the modern age; the question of citizenship, the invention of the passport, and the use of maps, museums, and censuses as tools of state building; the “threat” of immigration and the processes of immigrant integration in the nation; the limits of national belonging and matters of difference (race and religion); and questions of state-sponsored violence and refugee flight due to persecution or war.

After reviewing the literature in the first half of the semester, during the second half each student will write a 12-to-20-page historiographical or primary source-based paper on a topic of their choice. The students will make extensive use of the OSU Library resources.

Assigned Readings:

Possible readings include (the list will be finalized later!):

Benedict Anderson, Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism (Verso, 2016).
Radhika Mongia, Indian Migration and Empire: A Colonial Genealogy of the Modern State (Duke University Press, 2018).
Dominique Reill, The Fiume Crisis: Life in the Wake of the Habsburg Empire (Harvard University Press, 2020).
Deborah Dwork and Robert Jan van Pelt, Flight from the Reich: Refugee Jews, 1933-1946 (Norton, 2012).
Isabel Fonseca, Bury Me Standing: The Gypsies and Their Journey (Vintage, 1996).
Ian Buruma, Murder in Amsterdam: Liberal Europe, Islam, and the Limits of Tolerance (Penguin, 2007).
Johnny Pitts, Afropean: Notes from Black Europe (Penguin, 2019).

Assignments:

Short papers and bibliographies: 20%
Discussion and participation: 30%
Final long 20-page paper: 50%

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This class has an embedded Honors section. Honors students will have two choices for an extra assignment, to be discussed individually with the instructor: 1) to reflect on an additional novel and film of their choice; or 2) to write a policy memo on a current issue through a survey of contemporary media and/or polls. This course is designed for junior and senior History majors and fulfills the seminar requirement for History Majors.


History 4255 Seminar in Modern European History, The Culture of World War I

Instructor: Kern, Stephen
Days: TR, Online
Time: 2:20-3:40 pm

Description:  This course explores the most creative period in Western cultural history, roughly 1890-1930, which ironically straddles one of the most destructive wars in history, World War I. To explain this great irony, we will explore how leading artists and novelists treated the war indirectly even as it transformed their personal life. That dynamic is evident in the work of cubist and abstract artists such as Picasso and Kandinsky, philosophers such as Nietzsche, and literary figures such as Virginia Woolf, James Joyce, Marcel Proust, and T. S. Eliot. We will study some causes of the war, its course, major battles, and its effects. The first section will analyze a variety of cultural developments and ideas about time and space and consider how they may have shaped the failure of diplomacy in July of 1914 that led to the outbreak of the “cubist war” and the structure of combat during its fighting. The second section will contrast two studies of the culture of the war period as ironic skepticism versus a reaffirmation of traditional values. The final section will view the effects of the war dramatized in Virginia Woolf’s novel Mrs. Dalloway that includes the hunger for wholeness and repair in English society, shell shock, the practice of psychiatry, new gender roles and feminism, lesbianism, colonization and empire, Christianity and the growing secularization of high culture, and the influenza pandemic of 1918.

Assigned Readings:

Stephen Kern, The Culture of Time and Space, 1880-1918
Paul Fussell, The Great War and Modern Memory (selections)
Jay Winter, Sites of Memory, Sites of Mourning (selections)
Virginia Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway

Assignments:

Three papers, four-five pages each.
Prerequisites: none

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, a grade of C or above in History 2800, and any 3000-level History course; or permission of instructor. This course is designed for junior and senior History majors and fulfills the seminar requirement for History Majors.


HISTORY 4285 Seminar in Russian, East European, and Eurasian History

Instructor: Hoffmann, David
Days: W
Time: 9:35-12:20 pm                                                             

Description: This research seminar will focus on the Russian Revolution and Stalinism.  In the course, we will read a variety of sources on the political, social, and cultural history of the Soviet Union.  Examples of topics we will cover are the Russian Revolution, the origins of Stalinism, the social consequences of Stalinist industrialization, World War II on the Eastern Front, gender roles in Soviet society, Soviet policies toward ethnic and national minorities, and official and popular culture in the Soviet Union.

Assigned Readings: Students will read a number of books and articles that we will discuss in class.  In addition, they will read primary sources related to research projects of their own choosing. 

Assignments: Students will each select a research projects on some aspect of Soviet history between 1917 and 1953.  They will make a class presentation on their topic and write a final research paper.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, a grade of C or above in History 2800, and any 3000-level History course; or permission of instructor. This course is designed for junior and senior History majors and fulfills the seminar requirement for History Majors.


History 4325 Seminar in African History

Instructor: Kobo, Ousman
Days: TR
Time: 2:20-3:40 pm

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, a grade of C or above in History 2800, and any 3000-level History course; or permission of instructor. This course is designed for junior and senior History majors and fulfills the seminar requirement for History Majors.


HISTORY 4375 Seminar in Islamic History: Modern Turkey: Past & Present

Instructor: Akin, Yigit
Days:   T                                             
Time: 2:15-5:00 pm

Description: Why is Turkey always in the news? Now more than ever, Turkey’s geopolitical role, its ambitious foreign policy, its complex and ever-shifting internal dynamics, and finally its crisis-ridden relations with the United States, the European Union, and its neighbors in the Middle East are making the country a prime focus of interest for journalists, scholars, and policy makers alike. This research seminar provides a nuanced understanding of the past and present of modern Turkey. It explores the disintegration of the Ottoman Empire in the aftermath of World War I, the formation of a secular, republican Turkish nation-state, and the country’s dramatic socio-political transformation since the 1950s in response to domestic, regional, and international challenges. We will also critically consider Turkey’s fluctuating relations with the U.S., the meteoric rise of political Islam, and the war against Kurdish separatism. For the final project, students will produce a research paper based principally upon primary source material.

Assigned Readings:

TBA

Assignments:

Active participation in discussions every week, weekly reflection papers, annotated bibliography, final research paper

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, a grade of C or above in History 2800, and any 3000-level History course; or permission of instructor.  This course is designed for junior and senior History majors and fulfills the seminar requirement for History Majors


HISTORY 4410 Seminar in Chinese History: “The (Second) Sino-Japanese War, 1937-45”

Instructor: Reed, Christopher
Days: WF
Time: 2:20-3:40 pm (synchronous online via Zoom)

Description: In July 1937, soldiers of the Imperial Japanese Army were involved in what initially seemed to be a minor military skirmish with Republican Chinese soldiers at the Marco Polo Bridge near Beijing. Since the 19th century, Japanese and other foreign troops had frequently used such events to provide their political leaders at home with excuses to send military reinforcements to China. This time, however, what the Japanese used to call “The China Incident,” which Japan’s generals insisted to Hirohito would end in three months,  grew into a protracted eight-year continental war. Meanwhile, Japanese goals of establishing an anti-Communist East Asian order united against Russia & Western imperialists; creating “civilization;” a reformed Chinese economy oriented to Japan; and a stable new Chinese government that was friendly to Japan became ever-more elusive. In their desperation to end the war by imposing a full embargo on Chiang Kai-shek’s alleged pro-Communist wartime government holed up in Chongqing (pronounced “Chōng-cheeng,” formerly Chungking), the Japanese eventually attacked and invaded the US-controlled Philippines, British-controlled Hong Kong, all of Southeast Asia from French Indochina across Thailand to British Malaya, Singapore, and Burma; the British Raj in India; the Dutch East Indies; & colonial New Guinea. Only China survived the onslaught. Japan even assaulted Darwin, Australia, and the American-controlled, pre-statehood territory of Hawaii. In the process, the Japanese added to the China Incident what they call the Pacific War (1941-45) and what the West calls World War II. Behind it all, however, the 2nd Sino-Japanese War (1937-45) churned on unceasingly and remained the justification for all of the Empire of Japan’s various post-1940 “sideshows.”

This course will examine the 2nd Sino-Japanese War from Chinese and Japanese political, economic, military, and civilian perspectives. Like all 4000-level Readings/Research Seminars, the course will emphasize readings, discussions, sources, and student-initiated research & writing projects rather than lectures. Throughout the course, we will use the case study of the 2nd Sino-Japanese War to better understand the broader historical field of modern East Asian, particularly Chinese and Japanese, history.

Assigned Readings: 6 required books & some articles

Assignments: TBD, but, as is standard with 4000-level courses, all students will research a final paper on a topic of their own interest and choosing.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Although not required, some background in East Asian history, particularly History 2402, 3404, or 3426, as well as some general knowledge of World War II will be useful. Students should note that this is a course on the Sino-Japanese War (Japan vs. China), not on the Pacific War (Japan vs. the Rest), and their self-chosen research papers must reflect that fact.

This course is designed for junior- or senior-level History majors, especially those who have already taken History 2800 and other History courses. It fulfills a 4000-level seminar requirement for History majors. It can also count toward the History minor. Non-History majors/minors are welcome to take the course, but should first consult with the professor via email at reed.434@osu.edu.


History 4625 Seminar in Women’s History, Girls, Young Women, and Social Change in the Western World, 18th century to the present

Instructor: Søland, Birgitte
Days: W
Time: 2:00-4:45 pm

Description:  Girls and young women have most often been perceived as vulnerable and powerless individuals, in need of guidance, supervision and protection by older adults.  Rarely have they been seen as historical actors who contribute to producing social change.  This seminar seeks to re-assess that perception by uncovering some of the ways in which girls and young women have played active roles in affecting historical change, whether socially, culturally, politically or economically. 

Focusing on the Western world from the 18th century to the present, we will examine a number of specific cases when the activities and activism of girls and young women helped reshape the world.  Specific cases to be addressed include the role of girls and young women in the Industrial Revolution; young women’s role in the expansion of educational opportunities for women; girls and young women in political movements; girls and young women in the struggle for civil rights; young women, feminism and GLTBQ rights; and young women’s environmental activism.

In addition to familiarizing students with an often neglected subject in women’s history, the objective of this course is to facilitate for all students the completion of an individual research paper on a topic related to girls, young women and social change based principally on primary source material. 

Assigned Readings: TBA

Assignments:

Weekly reading assignments; active participation in class discussions of assigned readings.

A 15-page research paper based predominantly on primary sources. As part of the final research paper, each student will be required to turn in a research topic; an annotated list of primary and secondary sources; and an outline of the paper.

In addition, each student will be expected to prepare a 15-minute presentation on your research project to be shared in class during the final class meeting. 

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, a grade of C or above in History 2800, and any 3000-level History course; or permission of instructor.  This course is designed for junior and senior History majors and fulfills the seminar requirement for History Majors


History 4705 Seminar in the History of Environment, Technology, & Science

Instructor: Moore, Erin
Days: T
Time: 2:15-5:00 pm

Description:  Advanced research and readings on selected topics in Environmental History, Technology and Science.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, a grade of C or above in History 2800, and any 3000-level History course; or permission of instructor. This course is designed for junior and senior History majors and fulfills the seminar requirement for History Majors

 

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HISTORY 3640: Medieval Women: Power, Piety and Production           

Instructor: Butler, Sara
Days:   T R                                         
Time: 2:20 to 3:40                                                           

Description: The goal of this class is to explore the changes in women’s rights and roles in medieval society over the course of the high and late Middle Ages (covering the period of roughly 1050-1500) from a comparative perspective. Discussions will focus on female agency, especially: the gap between prescription and reality; the difficulty of being categorized as either an “Eve,” or a “Mary” (especially when it is all too easy to become a “Mary Magdalene”); women’s contributions to medieval society; ideas and attitudes about women. Discussion topics include: the barbarian legacy, ideas about women (from the church to anatomy), women and property law, marriage and sexuality, women and the church, education and literacy, gendered space, rebellious women, queens and royal dowagers, and single women. We will also spend a lot of time talking about famous medieval women in order to become aware that history is not just a catalog of the events of great men – women have also contributed substantially to the world in which we live.

Assigned Readings:

Beth Allison Barr, The Making of Biblical Womanhood: How the Subjugation of Women became the Gospel Truth (2021).

The rest of the readings for the course will be journal articles posted to Carmen/Canvas.

Assignments:

Book Assignment                   20%
Biography: a) ORAL:             10%
              b) WRITTEN:           25%
Discussion Post:                     25%
Final Exam                             20%

Biography:

Each student will be given the opportunity to choose an historical figure during the first week of classes. Here are the options to choose from:

Alice Kyteler –first woman to be accused of being a “witch” (in the early modern sense)
Christine de Pisan / Pizan – a writer for hire
Heloise –intellectual with a famous set of letters to philosopher-husband, Peter Abelard
Isabella d’Este – an art patron
Joan of Arc – a cross-dressing savior
Margery Kempe – the first woman to write an autobiography in English
Marguerite de Porete – a condemned heretic
Marie de France – a woman writer
Mary Magdalene – companion to Jesus with an interesting medieval story
Pope Joan – a woman who dressed as a man, became pope, then was outed
Queen Blanche of Castile – m. to King Louis VIII of France, regent twice
Queen Eleanor of Aquitaine – m. to king of France & king of England
Queen Isabel la Catolica of Spain – initiated the Spanish Inquisition
St Bridget of Sweden – mystic and ascetic, founded the Brigittine nunneries
St Catherine of Siena – mystic and ascetic, believed she was literally married to Christ
St Clare of Assisi – founded the order of the Poor Clares, companion to St Francis
St Hildegard of Bingen – intellectual, writer, mystic, physician, rebel
St Julian of Norwich – anchoress, writer, advisor
The Paston Women – an English gentry family who left behind a lot of letters
The Virgin Mary – Queen of Heaven
Trotula of Salerno – a physician and author of a medieval treatise on health of women

Students will prepare an oral presentation with Powerpoint for a class presentation, and do a 10-12 page written biography.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110 or equiv, and course work in History at the 2000 level, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 523. GE historical study course. This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750, WGS for the history major or can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 3641 Women and Gender in Early Modern Europe, 1450-1750 

Instructor: Bond, Elizabeth
Days:   online asynchronous                                      
Time:  online asynchronous  

Description: This course investigates the lives and experiences of early modern European women. We cover a range of topics, including family life, gender, work, education, religious life, and political power.

The course is organized around three units:  body, mind, and spirit. In Unit 1, we examine the laws and ideas that influenced women’s material lives, their experience of the life cycle, and the ways work shaped their lives. In Unit 2, we turn to the mind—to women’s learning and their creation of new knowledge and art. We learn about the intellectual and social practices that they employed in the expression of their own agency, such as letter writing and patronage. In Unit 3, we consider the spirit in a range of early modern religious, psychological, and social dimensions. We examine how the history of women and gender was connected to major early modern transformations, including the Reformation, colonization, and the growth of the modern state.

Every week, we foreground women’s voices through primary sources and through discussions of exciting new historical research on that week’s theme. Our reading, viewing, and listening will equip students to think about and talk about women’s history and gender history.

Assigned Readings:

Merry Wiesner-Hanks, Women and Gender in Early Modern Europe, 4th Edition (Cambridge University Press, 2019)
Barbara Burman and Ariane Fennetaux, The Pocket:  A Hidden History of Women’s Lives, 1660-1900 (Yale University Press, 2019)
We also screen three films:  The Return of Martin Guerre, Portrait of a Lady on Fire, and Belle

Assignments:

Film Responses:  Screen three films and write responses that place the films in conversation with key course themes.
Quizzes:  Complete a weekly quiz to review key takeaways from the weekly course module.
Primary Source Analysis:  Using the V&A Museum online collection, “read” an object: dress, hat, shoes, jewelry, underwear. Such objects reveal much about women’s lived experiences.
Research Paper: Explore one of the course themes (or figures we have studied) in greater depth through further reading and research.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills the historical study GE.  This course fulfills the integrated social studies prerequisite. This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750, WGS for the history major or can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 3642 Women in Modern Europe, from the 18th Century to the Present

Instructor: Soland, B. 
Days: TR
Times: 11:00-12:30 pm

Description:

This course is designed as an introduction to the history of women and gender in Europe, from the late eighteenth century to the mid-twentieth century.  Several themes will be central to the course.  We will study the enormous social, political and economic upheavals Europe underwent in the 18th century, and how these upheavals also recast gender relations and produced new ideas about men and women and their respective roles and responsibilities.  We will also explore how women strove to shape and improve their lives under changing circumstances, and how relationships between women and men developed both inside the family and in society in general. Finally, we will look at how economic position, religion, sexuality, marital status, ethnic and national differences influenced women's experiences.       

Assigned Readings:

Most assigned readings will consist in primary sources, i.e. evidence drawn from the time under investigation.  The primary sources will be complemented with historical scholarship in the form of articles and book chapters.  All required readings will be made available electronically, and students will not be required to purchase any books for the course.

Assignments:

Students are required to complete one take-home midterm exam and one take-home final exam.  Both of these exams will be in essay format.  The expected page length for the midterm essay will be approximately 7-8 typed, double-spaced pages; the expected page length for the final exam will be approximately 10-12 typed, double-spaced pages.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 524. GE historical study course. This course fulfills Group Europe, post-1750, PCS, WGS for the history major or can fulfill a GE requirement.

 

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HISTORY 1681 World History to 1500

Instructor: Honchell, S.
Days: Online
Times: Online

Description: This course examines the major issues that have shaped the human experience from the beginnings of human civilization (ca. 3500 B.C.E.) to ca. 1500 C.E.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills the GE Historical survey; Global diversity.  Not open to students that have credit for History 181 or 2641.


HISTORY 1682 World History from 1500 to the Present

Instructor: Murtha, Colin
Days: Online 7W2
Times: Online 7W2

Description: Survey of the human community, with an emphasis on its increasing global integration, from the first European voyages of exploration through the present.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills the historical study GE requirement.  Not open to students that have credit for History 182 or 2642.


HISTORY 2650 The World Since 1914

Instructor: Haydar, Maysan
Days: Online (7W2)
Times: Online

Description: Global perspective on major forces that shaped the world since 1914. Provides students with factual knowledge and a critical interpretive framework for responsible global citizenship.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:  Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study and diversity global studies course. This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for the history major or can fulfill the historical study GE.