Autumn 2022 Undergraduate Courses

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HISTORY 3302 Nationalism, Socialism, and Revolution in Africa

Instructor: Sikainga, Ahmad

Days: Online (Asynchronous) 7W2                  

Time: Online (Asynchronous) 7W2

Description: The Second World War was a pivotal event that transformed and shaped the world as we know it today. The war was fought in different regions and led to unprecedented mobilization of human and natural resources from across the globe, including the continent of Africa. In addition to being a major theatre of military operations, Africa provided vital human and natural resources to the war efforts. Faced with severe manpower shortages and resources, British and French colonial powers looked to their African colonies to supply combat troops and laborers as well as food and cash crop. Moreover, the demands of the war led to vigorous interventions by colonial regimes into the daily lives of ordinary Africans and transformed social and economic relations within communities and household. Africa’s involvement in the war began with the Italian invasion of Ethiopia in 1935 and lasted well beyond 1945. The Italian forces that invaded Ethiopia included approximately 40,000 Somalis, Eritreans, and Libyans. African soldiers also served beyond the continent itself. In 1940 about 100,000 African soldiers were fighting against the Germans in western France. By the end of the war, there were over 370,000 Africans serving in the British armed forces. Nonetheless, most of the literature on World War II have paid little attention to the role of Africa and Africans in this global conflict. This course will shed light on this remarkably neglected African dimension of the war. The course explores not only the importance of Africans as soldiers and producers, but also the effects of the war on class, race, and gender relations within the continent. It will also illustrate the importance of the war in provoking crises in colonial empires and transforming the nature of political mobilization across the African continent.

Assigned Readings:

Judith Byfield, Carolyn Brown, Tim Parsons, Ahmad Sikainga (eds), Africa and World War II, (Cambridge, New York: Cambridge University Press) 2015. This book can be purchased from Barnes & Nobles on High Street.

David Killingray and Martin Laut, Fighting for Britain: African Soldiers in the Second World War (Boydell & Brewer Ltd) 2010

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study and diversity global studies course. This course fulfills Group Africa, post-1750, CPD, PCS for history majors or it can fulfill a GE requirement


HISTORY 3304 History of Islam in Africa

Instructor: Kobo, Ousman

Days: Online (asynchronous)               

Time: Online (asynchronous)   

Description: This course explores the development and expansion of Islam in Africa from about the 8th century CE to the present.  It will address historical contingencies that account for Islam's local receptivity as well as its dynamic interactions with local cultures, politics, traditional religions, Christianity and European colonialism.  While the Islamization of Africa is important for understanding African history, the Africanization of Islam is equally important. Consequently, we will seek to understand the dialectical relationship between Islam and African religious and cultural expressions, especially how Islam transformed and was transformed by indigenous religious knowledge, cultures and polity. We will further analyze how African Muslims reconstructed and asserted their religious identities by localizing Islamic intellectual traditions, healing practices, music, arts, cultural norms and formal and informal religious festivals.  We will also examine current issues in contemporary African Muslim societies such as internal debates about spiritual purity such as between members of Sufi brotherhoods and their opponents, the Salafi, the complex relationship between Islam and the secular state, Islam and socio-economic developments, and Muslims’ engagements with people of other faiths. Rather than homogenizing Islam in Africa, we will explore diverse religious practices across time and space even as we pay attention to common denominators and patterns. By the end of the semester, students should be able to appreciate Islam’s common framework as well as its diversity and dynamics within that larger framework. In particular, students should be able to explain the nuances of religious affiliations, cooperation, and conflicts, and to understand the difference between religious politics and faith.

Assignments: Rather than completing an entire research project, students will conduct a number of smaller writing exercises each week, and a short paper at the end of the semester. In addition, students will take a number of quizzes designed to ensure the readings are done diligently. Students should leave this course with the ability to engage in well-informed discussions about the history of Islam in Africa and to be able to use these skills to understand the history of Islam in a global context. Readings will include a text book and a number of academic journal articles.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study and diversity global studies course. This course fulfills Group Africa, pre and post-1750, RLN, PCS for history majors or it can fulfill a GE requirement


HISTORY 3307 History of African Health and Healing

Instructor: McDow, Thomas

Days: WF                    

Time: 9:35 am – 10:55 am

Description: This course explores approaches to health and healing in sub-Saharan Africa over the last 150 years.  By using a historical perspective on health and healing, we see why specific diseases emerge, why they persist, and what their consequences are for African societies.  Diseases we will consider include cholera, sleeping sickness, malaria, tuberculosis, and HIV/AIDS, among others.  The course is also interested in African experiences of being unwell.

While students will gain some biological or technological understanding of diseases and causes of illness, the course focuses on the wider social or economic consequences that promote disease and illness.  By investigating illness, we can consider the ways that different governments (colonial and post-colonial) have attempted to control disease and control the people disease affected; the rise and elaboration of tropical medicine as a field; and the impact of colonial and post-colonial policy on land use, ecology, and human settlement.  In addition, by thinking about health and what makes one healthy, we can find insights into societal values, and look at the overlapping and contradictory therapeutic traditions (grounded in both popular and biomedical treatments) that African people have used to regain health.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study and diversity global studies course. This course fulfills Group Africa, pre and post-1750, ETS, PCS for history majors or it can fulfill a GE requirement


HISTORY 3312 African & World War II

Instructor: Sikainga, Ahmad

Days: Online Asynchronous 7W2                     

Time: Online Asynchronous 7W2

Description: This course examines the history of the nationalist, revolutionary, and socialist movements in Africa in the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. The course will begin with a discussion of the establishment and the legacy of European colonial rule in Africa, and proceeds to examine the development of African nationalism and decolonization. Using a variety of secondary and primary sources as well as films and documentaries, the discussion will illuminate the complexities and the ideologies that informed the nationalist movements in Africa. The anti-colonial protests and the nationalism movements in Africa produced many charismatic leaders and intellectuals whose ideas and writings had a lasting impact on the nationalist and the post-colonial discourse in Africa.  They included figures such as Kwame Nkrumah, Julius Nyerere, Patrice Lumumba, and Amilcar Cabral, just to name a few. The course will also examine the way in which conflict and tensions involving such issues as race, ethnicity, gender, and class have shaped nationalist thought, strategies, agenda, and the post-colonial realities in Africa. The last part of the course will focus on the theory and practice of socialism in Africa by looking at specific examples from countries such as Tanzania, Mozambique, Burkina Faso, and Ethiopia. We will conclude by assessing the experiences and the success and failures of these regimes and their impact.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study course.

 

 
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HISTORY 2080 African American History to 1877

Instructor: Shaw, Stephanie

Days: TR 7W2      

Time: 4:00-5:45 pm (Online)

Description: This course examines the history of black Americans from the beginning of the African slave trade to just after the Civil War.  Obviously, slavery will be an important part of this class.  We will look at diverse sites of slavery, beginning in the early years and in the North when and where small farm and town/city slaves were the norm.  Our examination of plantation slavery recognizes the changes in that system as the nation evolved from “a society with slaves” into “a slave society,” and we will follow that expansion of slavery westward (across the mountains) and southward (into the Deep South and across the Gulf states).  We begin with the assumption that slavery was chosen as a labor system, not inevitable, and, that once chosen, had to be maintained, thus becoming a social and political system as well as an economic system.  We will also pay attention to free black people in the North and the South, their diverse efforts to live as free people, and their relationship to those who remained enslaved.  Our most important objective is to see and understand how black people—slave and free—lived.  We will also study their interior worlds of family, work, community, and culture and the ways they sought to an often succeeded in shaping a life and a lifestyle that constantly resisted external systems of domination.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. . Not open to students with credit for AfAmASt 2080 This course fulfills Group American, pre & post-1750, PCS, and REN for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 3082 Black Americans During the Progressive Era

Instructor: Shaw, Stephanie

Days: TR  7W2

Time: 9:35- 11:25 am (Online)

Description: History and experiences of black Americans during the period best known in American History as the Progressive Era.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for AfAmAsSt 3082. This course fulfills Group American, post-1750, PCS, and REN for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 3083 Civil Rights and Black Power Movements

Instructor: Jeffries, Hasan

Days:   TR (Hybrid)

Time: 12:45- 2:05 pm

Description: This course examines the Civil Rights/Black Power Movement. It begins by looking at Black activism and Black life at the start of the 20th century. It continues by examining the development and impact of the mass mobilization efforts of the 1950s and 1960s, from the Montgomery bus boycott and the student sit-ins, to the Freedom Rides and the March on Washington. At the same time, it scrutinizes the grassroots organizing campaigns led by the young people of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). This course concludes by looking at civil rights activism outside the South, evaluating the impact of civil rights legislation, and analyzing the ideological and tactical transition to Black Power. This course employs a grassroots, bottom-up approach to understanding the black freedom struggle. It takes seriously the notion that the driving force behind the movement was every day, ordinary, Black folk, and the skilled African American activists who helped them organize and mobilize.  The goal of this course is to familiarize students with the people (famous, infamous, and forgotten), places, and events of the most significant American social movement of the 20th century. In addition, and arguably most importantly, this course aims to show the process by which seemingly powerless African Americans organized to transform the society in which they lived, and the way white Americans, particularly in the South, responded, i.e. their attempts to preserve the status quo.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for AfAmASt 3083. GE historical study and diversity soc div in the US course. Cross-listed in AfAmAS. This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750, PCS, REN, SOJ for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.

 

 

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HISTORY 1151 American History to 1877

Instructor: Teague, Greyson

Days: 7W2 Online                    

Time: Online

Description: This course provides a survey of American history from the Age of Encounter to the Reconstruction period.  It covers the social, economic, cultural, political, and diplomatic history of the American peoples. 

Prerequisites and Special Comments: :  This course fulfills the historical study GE requirement.  Not open to students that have credit for History 151 or 2001.


HISTORY 1152 American History since 1877

Instructor: Wood, Joshua

Days:   7W2 online      

Time: Online

Description:  From the aftermath of the Civil War to the 2000s, this course offers a sweeping survey of American history since 1865.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills the historical study GE requirement.  Not open to students that have credit for History 152 or 2002.


HISTORY 2001 H Launching America

Instructor: Cashin, Joan

Days: TR                     

Time: 12:45- 2:05 pm

Description: In this class, we will discuss the social, economic, cultural, and political history of the American people from the Age of Discovery to the eve of the Civil War.  We will include the experiences of Native Americans, Africans, and Europeans, in all parts of what is now the United States.  We will explore the lives of famous historical figures as well as ordinary people.  The course will include readings in secondary sources (works by historians) as well as primary sources (works created by historical figures).   The students will write some short papers on both kinds of sources, and they will discuss some of these sources in class.         

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 1152. GE historical study and diversity soc div in the US course. This course fulfills Group North America, pre and post-1750, PCS, CCE for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 2002 Making America Modern

Instructor: Elmore, Bart

Days: TR                     

Time: 11:10 pm - 12:30 pm

Description: From the aftermath of the Civil War to the 2000s, this course offers a sweeping survey of American history since 1865. The story of America that unfolds is one of perpetual contest between competing cultures, political factions, and institutions, each struggling to define the meaning of freedom and citizenship within the United States and beyond its borders. It is a story filled with contradictions, one featuring moments when economic progress coincided with egregious violations of social justice and progressive reform melded with retrogressive repression. Our primary objectives in this course are the following: to identify key moments when Americans sought to reconcile competing visions of democracy and to catalog the key figures and social and political conflicts that helped shape modern America.

Throughout the semester, you will come to know personalities from the past by reading letters, speeches, and book excerpts from specific time periods. You will also have the opportunity to watch YouTube clips featuring historical footage and radio recordings of key historical moments. Students in the course will evaluate and interpret these primary sources each week and construct historical insights to share with fellow students in discussion section. Often the readings, videos, and radio recordings for the week will offer insights into contemporary issues we face today. Through short essays, each student will make connections between key historical events in the past and present-day issues facing our nation.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 1152. GE historical study and diversity soc div in the US course. This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750, PCS, REN for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 2070 Introduction to Native American History

Instructor: Kraemer, Michael

Days: Tu Th

Time: 8:00 – 9:20 am

Description: History of Native Americans from pre-contact times to the present.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills North America, post, CCE, REN for the history major or it can satisfy the requirement for Historical Studies.


HISTORY 3003 American Presidential Elections

Instructor: Baker, Paula

Days: Tu 7W1             

Time: 2:15-5:00 pm

Description: This course traces the history of American presidential elections because they are interesting, because they are sometimes vitally important, and because they help us understand changing political practices and expectations for government.  It’s a seven-week sprint covering events over a more than 200-year span. While we will focus on a few elections in some detail, time constraints dictate an organizational scheme that can guide us through elections from Washington’s to the present. I’ve organized elections around the rules of the game.  The rules sometimes are formal -- which Americans had the right to vote, for example.   But they are also a mix of law and custom that determine how campaigns were financed and run, and how candidates were nominated, for example.  The rules reflected both the political calculations of ambitious politicians and parties and political, economic, and cultural change.  The rules also have shaped the candidates we get to choose among.

For all of this discussion of change, we will also note some constants.  Nasty campaigns have been the rule, not a recent development.  Media – from print to radio to television to Twitter – has always mattered in elections.  Candidates and parties have communicated to voters through mass media; sometimes the media has been independent but often not.  Candidates typically balance unity (above partisan statesmanship) and partisanship, which reflects a wider public desire for both unity and party victory.  In some ways, our current political climate is not so strange.

Assigned Readings: Gil Troy, See How They Ran: The Changing Role of the Presidential Candidate, revised and expanded edition, 1996

Additional material (articles, chapters, and documents) on Carmen

Assignments: 3 quizzes, 3 in-class essays, 2 short document papers, final

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study and diversity soc div in the US course. This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750, PCS for history majors or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 3005 The United States Constitution and American Society to 1877

Instructor: Stebenne, David

Days: Tu Tr     

Time: 2:20-3:40 p.m.

Description: Examination of the major developments in American constitutional history from the origins of European settlement of what became the USA through the era of Reconstruction.  Emphasis on the origins of the English Common Law, its transmission to the Thirteen Colonies, constitutionalism and the American Revolution, the rise and decline of the Articles of Confederation and the antebellum constitutional system, law and American economic development, the pressures placed on the legal system by the expansion of slavery, the constitutional crisis of the late 1850’s, the emergence of a new constitutional system in the wake of the American Civil War, and the changing legal status of African-Americans in the 1860’s and ‘70’s.

Assigned Readings:

Kermit L. Hall and Timothy S. Huebner, Major Problems in American Constitutional History, 2nd ed., (2009).

Assignments:  Active participation in class discussions, and take-home midterm and final examinations.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study course. This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750, PCS, REN for history majors or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 3012 Antebellum America

Instructor: Cashin, Joan

Days: TR                     

Time: 9:35-10:55 am

Description: In this course, we will be discussing the social, economic, cultural, and political history of antebellum America.  We will explore the experiences of ordinary people, such as farmers, shopkeepers, factory workers, as well as famous names, such as Andrew Jackson and Harriet Tubman.  We will also explore large-scale social processes such as the expansion of slavery, the growth of reform movements, and sectionalism in national politics.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 557.02. GE historical study course. This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750, PCS, REN for history majors or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.


HISTORY 3014 Gilded Age to Progressive Era, 1877-1920

Instructor: Haydar, Maysan

Days: 7W2 Online        

Time: Online

Description: Advanced study of U.S. social, political, cultural, foreign policy history from 1877-1920: Industrialization; immigration; urbanization; populism; Spanish-American War; progressivism; WWI.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 564. GE historical study and diversity soc div in the US course.


HISTORY 3030 History of Ohio

Instructor: Coil, William

Days: Online    

Time:  Online

Description: This course will survey the economic, social, and political development of the geographic area that became Ohio from the Native American period to the present. We will explore three themes in particular:  the role of disruptive technology and creative destruction in shaping Ohio’s past; the critical junctures at which Ohio might have become something entirely different from what it became; Ohio’s connection to the wider world through geography, technology, demography, economics, and politics.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:  This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.


HISTORY 3040 The American City

Instructor: Howard, Clayton

Days: MWF                 

Time: 1:50-2:45 pm

Description: History of the American city (urban-suburban) from colonial times to the early 21st century.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study and diversity soc div in the US course. This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750, PCS, ETS for history majors or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 3501 U.S. Diplomacy: 1920 to Present

Instructor: Parrott, Joseph

Days: Online   

Time: Online

Description: Since 1920, the United States has played a dominant role in international affairs due to its massive economy, unrivaled military, and global cultural influence. Historians have often referred to this era as “the American century,” a term coined by Time Magazine publisher Henry Luce in February of 1941. However, Luce’s editorial was as much a call to action as it was an accurate description: as late as 1941, the nation was still debating its desired role in world affairs. Far from a dedicated superpower, the United States was and remains a country whose foreign relations are hotly contested. The nation has struggled to discern a consistent path between opposing tendencies of democracy, empire, isolationism, internationalism, national security, and the role of defense in daily life. At the same time, many countries have militantly resisted projections of American power.

In this course, we will explore a sampling of these contests and the sometimes contradictory foreign policies they produced. While focusing on the specific policy history of the United States, we will also assess the impact American actions have had across the globe, foreign responses to the United States, the changing contexts that transformed official thinking, and the decentralization of the international system. The course will ultimately seek to have you engage directly with the ways U.S. foreign policymaking has affected and responded to global and domestic events, and what this means for the future of American foreign affairs. 

Please note, this is an upper level history course and will require your active engagement with a larger amount of regular weekly reading and viewing assignments.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study. This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750, CPD, SOJ for history majors or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


 

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HISTORY 2201 Ancient Greece and Rome

Instructor: Vanderpuy, Peter

Days:   7W2 Online     

Time:  Online

Description:  Comparative historical analysis of ancient Mediterranean civilizations of the Near East, Greece, and Rome from the Bronze Age to Fall of Rome.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:  Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 1211 or 301. This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 2210 Classical Archaeology

Instructor:  Turner, James

Days: Online                

Time: Online

Description:  Introduction to the principles, methods, and history of archaeological investigation in the ancient Greek and Roman world, illustrated through a selection of major classical sites.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx. Not open to students with credit for 306, Clas 2301 (240), or HistArt 2301 (306). GE cultures and ideas and historical study and diversity global studies course. Cross-listed in Clas 2301 and HistArt 2301. This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750, ETS , PCS for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 2221 Introduction to the New Testament: History and Literature

Instructor: Harrill, J. Albert

Days: MWF                 

Time: 9:10 am- 10:05 am

Description: What we call the "New Testament" is a not a single book but an anthology of diverse works by different, mostly unknown authors.  These works disagree on crucial matters of religious faith, community, and discipleship, all of which continue to divide Christians today. This course thus introduces the New Testament historically, from outside the framework of any particular belief system.  It presupposes no previous study in the Bible, or religion, and expands the study of ancient Christianity as an area of focus in the Department of History.

You will examine early Christianity in its ancient context of Judaism and the Greco-Roman world, examine its controversies that surrounded a self-appointed apostle named Paul, and compare its diverse biographical narratives (“gospels”) about a Jewish messiah named Jesus.  The course is designed to help you develop certain analytical skills crucial for a liberal arts education (e.g., in making and evaluating persuasive arguments).  As you may have already inferred, it is not one of the goals of the class to convert you to a particular confessional point of view.  Students are urged to approach the issues we address with honesty, openness, and a healthy dose of good humor.

Assigned Readings:

1.  The HarperCollins Study Bible: Student Edition.

2.  Bart D. Ehrman, A Brief Introduction to the New Testament

3.  Burton H. Throckmorton, Jr., Gospel Parallels: A Comparison of the Synoptic Gospels.

Assignments: Two unit tests, one interpretative paper, and a final examination.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for Clas 2221, 2221E, 2401, or 2401E. GE for lit and historical study course. Cross-listed in Clas. This course fulfills Group Near East, pre-1750, RLN for history majors or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 3210 Archaic Greece

Instructor: Anderson, Greg

Days: TR                     

Time: 11:10-12:30 pm

Description: This is the first half of a two-course sequence that surveys the history of ancient Greece (the second half will be offered in Spring semester--it is not necessary to take both courses).  The course examines the formation of Greek culture, from the Neolithic era (ca. 7000-3000 BC) all the way down to the year 480 BC.  We will explore major political developments, including: the rise and mysterious demise of the Mycenean kingdoms of the Late Bronze Age (ca. 1600-1100 BC); the subsequent emergence of small, village-based chiefdoms; and the first city-states in the Dark Age (ca. 1100-700 BC); the creation of written laws, political institutions, and, ultimately, the world's first citizen-states in the Archaic Age (ca. 700-480 BC); and the momentous wars against the Persian empire in the early fifth century.  Along the way, we will also explore various social and cultural phenomena associated with these political developments.  Here, particular attention will be paid to the many innovations of the Archaic Age in art, architecture, sports, literature, and philosophy, as well as to broader social issues, such as the place of women and slaves in Greek society.

Assigned Readings:

Herodotus, The Histories, Rev. Ed. (Penguin Classics, 2003)

West, M. L., Greek Lyric Poetry (Oxford University Press, 1993)

Assignments:

2 exams and term paper

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 501.01. GE historical study course. This course fulfills Group Near East, pre-1750 for history majors or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 3216 War in Ancient Mediterranean World

Instructor: Green, Derek

Days: Online    

Time: Online

Description: A survey of military history from the late Bronze Age to the fall of the Roman Empire in the West.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 2212 or 504.01. GE historical study and diversity global studies course.

 

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HISTORY 2350 Islam, Politics, and Society in History

Instructor: Kamali Sarvestani, Mehrak

Days: Online 7W2

Time: Online 7W2

Description: Introduction to the manner in which Islam has interacted with politics in the Middle East and vicinity from the rise of Islam through the present.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx. Not open to students with credit for 340. GE historical study course. This course fulfills Group Near East, pre & post -1750, RLN, PCS for history majors or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 2353 The Middle East Since 1914

Instructor: Akin, Yigit

Days: TR         

Time: 11:10-12:30 pm

Description: This course presents a foundational overview of the political, social, economic, and cultural history of the Middle East from the late-nineteenth century to the present. It aims to go beyond the simplistic generalizations and stereotypes about the region and its people by introducing students to the complexities of the Middle East’s modern history and its present. The course also aims to enable students to adopt an informed and critical perspective on the region’s current conflicts and challenges. Among other issues, we will pay particular attention to the following topics: nineteenth century reformism; economic dependency, imperialism, and anti-imperialism; nationalism and nation state formation; the Israeli-Palestinian conflict; women’s experiences; U.S. involvement in the region; the Islamic Revolution in Iran; the rise of Islamist movements; and recent upheavals in the Middle East. This course offers students the chance to explore these issues through a variety of media—academic works, film, fiction, and other primary sources.

Assigned Readings: TBA

Assignments: Attendance & participation, quizzes, response papers, writing assignment, take home final exam

Prerequisites and Special Comments:  Prereq: English 1110.xx or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 3358 or 540.05. GE historical study course. This course fulfills Group Near East, post-1750, CCE, PCS for history majors or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 2402 History of East Asia in the Modern Era

Instructor: Reed, Christopher

Days: WF (Online)

Time: 2:20-3:40 pm

Description: History 2402 (synchronous online) will introduce the histories of the societies of East Asia (China, Korea, and Japan) starting in about 1600. To a higher degree than History 2401, which is a useful but certainly not required preparation, History 2402 is organized on a 3-way comparative model (“how do China, Japan, or Korea compare to each other in our historical period?”); one of our goals is to learn to think comparatively about history and these societies. We will survey key historical phenomena (covering political, military, social, and intellectual themes) that have distinguished each country in the long modern era. For most of the semester, the course will be organized chronologically and thematically. In addition to providing a basic narrative of East Asian civilization since 1600, the course will introduce students to important written and cinematic sources and to historical writing.

Assigned Readings:  a textbook, a monograph, primary sources, short films

Assignments: TBA, similar to other courses at this level

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110. xx. Not open to students with credit for 142. GE historical study and diversity global studies course. This course fulfills Group East Asia, post-1750, CCE, PCS for history majors or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 3365 History of Afghanistan

Instructor: Khaliyarov, Alisher

Days: Online                

Time: Online

Description: This course will address Afghan society, its historical foundations, and the challenges that confront it.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group East Asia, post-1750 for history majors or can fulfill the historical study GE requirement. This course fulfills Group Near East, post-1750, CCE, PCS for history majors or it can fulfill a GE requirement.

 


HISTORY 3426 History of Modern Japan

Instructor: Reed, Christopher

Days: TR (Synchronous, Online)                      

Time: 2:20-3:40 pm

Description: This synchronous online course focuses on key aspects of the history of Japan from about 1800 to approximately 2000. It provides a nuanced understanding of the historical development of the country within internationally comparative frameworks. Attention will be given to Japan's cultural and political foundations in the late Tokugawa shogunal period, changes undertaken with the Meiji Restoration, the Taisho and early Showa periods (including militarism, nationalism, imperialism, cultural change, & economic development), followed by World War II, the American Occupation, and postwar state and society. Organized chronologically, the course seeks a balance between detailed examination of particular periods and exploration of elements of continuity and discontinuity in state (re)formation, economy, and society. By the end of the semester, you will be able to analyze the evolution of Japan from a semi-feudal state into a modern world power, discuss the impact of Western influence on Japanese society in historical perspective, and evaluate the interactions of modern Japan with its neighbors and the world.

Assigned Readings: A textbook, two novels, and a sourcebook

Assignments: TBD, but similar to other 3000-level courses

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Although not required, the course assumes students have had college-level history courses above the introductory level. Familiarity with topics covered in History 2402, "East Asian History since 1600" is useful but not required.  Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study course. This course fulfills Group East Asia, post-1750, CCE, PCS for history majors or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 3475 History of the Arab-Israeli Conflict

Instructor: Yehudai, Ori

Days: Tu Th    

Time: 9:35-10:55 am

Description: The Arab-Israeli conflict is one of the most enduring and controversial conflicts in the world. This course follows the history of the conflict from its inception in the late 19th century to the early 21st century. The first part of the course will examine the circumstances surrounding the emergence of the Jewish and Palestinian Arab nationalist movements, and the encounter between Jews and Arabs in Palestine during the late Ottoman and British mandate periods. We will then discuss the attainment of Israeli independence and the exodus of Palestinian Arabs in 1948, the succeeding wars between Israel and its Arab neighbors, the two intifadas, and the attempts to achieve a peace settlement. Course materials include secondary historical sources, a variety of primary documents and films. These texts, combined with lectures, will provide students with an in-depth understanding of the history of the conflict, taking into account the positions of Palestinian Arabs, Jews, and other regional and global forces involved in the conflict.

Assigned Readings: Textbook: Charles D. Smith, Palestine and the Arab Israeli Conflict; primary historical documents and films.

Assignments: Book review, film review, mid-term and final (subject to change).

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE cultures and ideas and historical study course.

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HISTORY 1911: Climate Change: Mechanisms, Impacts, and Mitigation

Instructor: Brooke, John (History), Satlzman, Matt (Earth Sciences), Hood, Jim (Evolution, Ecology, & Organismal Biology)

Days and Times:

Lectures: T, Th 3:55-5:15 pm

Sections:  Mon: 9:10-10:05, 10:20-11:15, 12:40-1:35, 1:50-2:45

                 Wed: 9:10-10:05, 10:20-11:15, 12:40-1:35, 1:50-2:45 

Description: An interdisciplinary introduction to the historical causes and unfolding consequences of modern climate change, presented by a team including a geologist, an ecologist, and a climate historian.  The course examines the basic science of climate change, its impacts on the biosphere, and the ways in which it has been shaped by the history of population growth, expanding economies, and accelerating technological change over the last several hundred years.  We close with considerations the impact of climate change on global sustainability in the coming century. 

Assignments:

Online reading essays; In class quizzes; Team Poster project; Final paper

Prerequisites & Special Comments:

We assume a background in high school science and history. This course may fulfill any one of the following distribution requirements:  GE Historical Study, GE Natural Science: Biological Science, GE Natural Science: Physical Science. This course is cross-listed as ES 1911 and EEOB 1911


HISTORY 2700 Global Environmental History

Instructor: White, Samuel

Days: Online 7W1

Time: Online

Description: In this course, we explore how humans have shaped the environment and how the environment has shaped human history from prehistory to the present.  Our topics will range from fire to deforestation to climate change.  Students will learn the essential background to major environmental issues and consider how history might (or might not) help us confront present environmental challenges.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx. GE historical study and soc sci human, nat, and econ resources and diversity global studies course. This course fulfills Group Global, pre & post-1750, ETS, GEM for history majors or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 2701 History of Technology

Instructor: Powell, Julie

Days: 7W2 Online                    

Time: Online

Description:  Survey of the history of technology in global context from ancient times.

Prerequisites & Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx. Not open to students with credit for 362. GE historical study course. This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 2702 Food in World History

Instructor: Cahn, Dylan

Days: Online    

Time: Online

Description: Survey of the history of food and drink, diet and nutrition in a global context.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course may be taken to fulfill GE historical study. This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 2703 History of Public Health, Medicine and Disease

Instructor: Jones, Marian Moser

Days: WF        

Time: 12:45- 2:05 pm

Description: Survey of the history of public health, disease and medicine in a global context.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study and diversity global studies course. This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750, ETS for history majors or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 2704 Water: A Human History

Instructor: Breyfogle, Nicholas

Days: WF                    

Time: 9:35-10:55 am

Description: Throughout human history and across this very diverse planet, water defines every aspect of human life: from the molecular, biological, and ecological to the cultural, religious, economic, and political. We live on the “blue planet.” Our bodies are made up primarily of water. Without water, life as we understand it could not exist. Indeed, water stands at the foundation of most of what we do as humans: in irrigation and agriculture; waste and sanitation; drinking and disease; floods and droughts; fishing and other food supply; travel and discovery; scientific study; water pollution and conservation; dam building; in the setting of boundaries and borders; and wars and diplomacy. Water lies at the very heart of almost all world religions (albeit in very different ways). The control of water is at the foundation of the rise and fall of civilizations, with drought and flood perpetual challenges to human life.  Water serves as a source of power (mills, hydro-electric dams), and access to water often defines (or is defined by) social and political power hierarchies. Water plays an important symbolic role in the creation of works of literature, art, music, and architecture, and it serves as a source of human beauty and spiritual tranquility. Thus, to begin to understand ourselves as humans—our bodies, minds, and souls, past and present—we must contemplate our relationship to water.

At the same time, water resources—the need for clean and accessible water supplies for drinking, agriculture, and power production—will likely represent one of the most complicated dilemmas of the twenty-first century. The World Water Forum, for instance, reported recently that one in three people across the planet will not have sufficient access to safe water by 2030. As population grows, glaciers melt, hydrological systems change, and underground aquifers are depleted, many analysts now think that the world will fight over water more than any other resource in the coming decades. The moral and logistical question of how to ration water (who gets access and for what purposes) will be a foundational ethical question of the twenty-first century.

In this class, we will examine a selection of historical moments and themes to explore the relationship between people and water over time and place.  The format of the course will be a combination of lectures, in-class discussions, workshop activities, and presentation of your work to your fellow classmates. 

Assigned Readings:

(This list is tentative and the specific books may change)

  • Richard White, The Organic Machine: The Remaking of the Columbia River
  • Readings in Water History
  • Mary Lynn Rampolla, A Pocket Guide to Writing in History (10th edition)

* A range of other shorter readings available on Carmen

Assignments: This course requires a few short essays, a final take-home exam, a small research project, and active and engaged in-class discussion and activities.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study and diversity global studies course. This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750, ETS PCS, SOJ for history majors or it can fulfill a GE requirement.

 


HISTORY 3701 History of American Medicine

Instructor: Harris, Jim

Days: Online    

Time: Online

Description: Survey of the history of American medicine from the Colonial period through the twentieth century.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 562. GE historical study course. This course fulfills Group American, post-1750, ETS for the history major or it can fulfil a GE requirement


HISTORY 3702 Digital History

Instructor: Staley, David

Days: Tu Th    

Time: 11:10-12:30 PM

Description: This course is a survey of the ways digital technology is impacting history: from the collection and preservation of primary sources, to the analysis of those documents with the aid of algorithms, to the representation of the past through digital means.  What does it look like when we take our study of the past into the digital realm?  How has the availability of millions of digitized primary and secondary sources impacted our practices?  How has the digital medium altered how we represent the past?  How have data analytics tools helped historians to uncover new patterns in the past? 

This course will be organized as an online studio based-course, one in which we will engage in the process of creating many forms of digital history.  As a final deliverable, students will reflect on digital history as a set of approaches to studying the past.

This course assumes no prior technical or programming knowledge, and is meant to provide a basic grounding in the theoretical and technological skills needed to present history in digital form. 

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical studies course. This course fulfills Group Global, ETS for history majors or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 3706 Coca-Cola Globalization: The History of American Business and Global Environmental Change 1800-Today

Instructor: Elmore, Bart

Days: TR         

Time: 2:20-3:40 pm

Description: Coca-Cola is everywhere. Today, the company sells over 1.8 billion servings of its products daily to customers in over 190 countries worldwide. The company has bottling plants in every corner of the globe from Australia to Zimbabwe. This is remarkable considering the company started out as a “brain tonic” first sold for just five cents in a small Gilded Age Atlanta pharmacy in 1886 by a sick and cash-strapped businessman named John Pemberton. So how did the company do it? That’s one of the big questions we will ask in this global environmental history course.

History 3706 offers an introduction to the fields of environmental history and business history. It is organized chronologically, beginning with the railroad revolution of the nineteenth century and ending in the twenty-first century. It chronicles the rise of some of America’s biggest multinational corporations and examines how these firms, working with governments and other institutions, shaped global ecological change between 1800 and 2017. It also considers the social and political responses to these environmental changes.

The questions we will ask in this course are not simple, and they will require us to re-imagine well-told stories from a new, ecological perspective. How did Coca-Cola acquire the natural resources it needed to end up all over the world? Can history tell us whether global climate change is real? Are Californians going to run out of water? We will deal with these and other intriguing questions as we explore the history of America in the world through the lens of environmental history.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study and diversity soc div in the US course. This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750, ETS, SOJ for history majors or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 3712 Science and Society in Europe, from Newton to Hawking

Instructor:  Otter, Christopher

Days: WF                    

Time: 2:20-3:40 pm

Description: What are scientific facts and why are they important? How did science become the primary technique through which truths about the natural world and the human body and mind are established? Is scientific authority under threat in a post-truth age? This course explores these questions, and more, by following the history of science from the scientific revolution to current debates surrounding human-made climate change. Students will study major developments in the physical, geological, biological, chemical, and human sciences, such as thermodynamics, evolutionary biology, germ theory, the creation of the periodic table of the elements, quantum theory and free-market economics. The course does not only study “successful” scientific ideas, but also discarded and ridiculed ones, including catastrophism, phrenology and Lamarckianism. Students will learn to comprehend the socially-embedded nature of science, the complex relations between science and politics, the vast efforts that are made to divide science from pseudoscience, and the historical origins of skepticism, denialism and “alternative facts.”

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study course. This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750, ETS for history majors or it can fulfill a GE requirement.

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HISTORY 1211 European History I

Instructor: Parker, Geoffrey

Days: Lecture- WF Online

Time:  Recitation- MWF 10:20-11:15 am 11:30-12:25 pm, 12:40-1:35 pm,

Description: For better or worse, Western societies have become extremely prominent in the world today – not just in the West but (thanks to Karl Marx and the Internet) around the world. How did this process begin? What is distinctive about Western values?  These are two of the questions that this course seeks to answer. In addition we will examine How Things Happen:

  • Why did the West develop at such an early stage the right to free speech guaranteed in this country by the First Amendment?
  • Why were 50% of all Western populations in this period under the age of 20?
  • How could 167 Spaniards overthrow the Inca Empire, with perhaps 8 million subjects, and go on to dominate much of South America?

The course also offers strategies on how to identify, among masses of facts, the aberration from the trend, the cause from the contingent, the important from the incidental, and the continuities among the changes.

Assigned Readings

Wiesner-Hanks, Crowston, Perry & McKay, A history of Western society, Volume I: From Antiquity to the Enlightenment, 13th edition (2020)

Wiesner-Hanks, Evans, Wheeler and Ruff, Discovering the Western Past, Volume I: to 1789, 7th edition (2015)

Assignments

  • Watch all materials for the course posted online
  • Read and discuss all assigned readings; attend and participate in all group discussions (20% of total grade)
  • Complete all assigned recitation exercises (20% of total grade)
  • one 5-page term paper (30% of total grade)
  • one final exam (30% of total grade)20

Prerequisites and Special Comments

No prerequisites

This course fulfills the following GE requirements:  1) “Historical Study,” 2) “Diversity: Global Studies”


HISTORY 1212 European History II

Instructor: Conklin, Alice

Days: Asynchronous, online                 

Time: Asynchronous, online     

Description: This class introduces students to the political, social, and cultural developments that shaped the history of modern Europe since 1660. Some topics include responses to war and crisis in early modern Europe; the emergence of new ideas questioning absolutism during the Enlightenment; the birth of representative politics and democratic institutions; scientific innovation, industrialization, and the new technologies; the ideologies of modernity such as conservatism, liberalism, socialism, and nationalism; the effects of European colonialism and imperialism; the new social classes and changing gender roles; the triumph of the nation-state and the two world wars; challenges to the democratic order and experiments in socialism and fascism; the Holocaust and ethnic cleansing; the divided world during the Cold War and the overthrow of the communist regimes; and decolonization, multiculturalism, and globalization. Using a variety of primary sources, students will learn and debate about the historical developments that created the modern European state, society, and culture.

Assigned Readings:

All required readings are provided on CARMEN via PDFs or web links.

Assignments:

  • Quizzes: 5%
  • Weekly discussion forum posts: 30%
  • Two 2-page reflection papers: 20% (10% each)
  • Midterm exam: 20%
  • Final exam: 25%.   

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx. Not open to students with credit for 1210, 2203, 2204. This course is available for EM credit. GE historical study and diversity global studies course


HISTORY 1212 European History II

Instructor: Douglas, Sarah

Days:   7W2 Online     

Time:  Online

Description:  Political, scientific, and industrial revolutions; nationalism; the two World Wars; the decline of empires; the Cold War.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills the historical study GE and diversity global studies requirement.  Not open to students that have credit for History 1210; 2203; 2204


HISTORY 2202 Introduction to Medieval History

Instructor: Vanderpuy, Peter

Days: Online                

Time: Online

Description:  Survey of medieval history from the late Roman Empire to the early sixteenth century.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 1211. GE historical study and diversity global studies course. This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750, REN, PCS for history majors or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


 

HISTORY 2231 The Crusades

Instructor: Butler, Sara

Days:   Tu Th

Time:  2:20-3:40 pm

Description: Many Muslim terrorists of the 21st century feel strongly that attacks on Western society are simply a continuation of the Wars of the Cross begun in the late 11th century.  By contrast, most Westerners today know very little about the Crusades themselves and feel no sense of continuity with the movement. These distinct attitudes are a legacy of the medieval period.  In March 1095, envoys from the Byzantine emperor Alexios II addressed Pope Urban II at a Church Council in Piacenza, describing Constantinople’s urgent need for soldiers to supplement his existing forces in the fight against the Turks.  This was the spark, fanned several months later by Urban’s call to arms at Clermont, that would ignite the Crusading movement.  In the inception of the First Crusade we see the undertaking of a religiously-sanctioned war, waged to recapture the Holy Land and to free a Christian kingdom from the threat of a common enemy – a war with both material and spiritual rewards.  In its denouement and aftermath – and in subsequent Crusades – we can trace the progressive mutation of the original crusading ideals once confronted with the social, political, religious and culture realities of the medieval Middle East. The impact of the Crusades dramatically transformed all three cultures:  Western Europe, Byzantium, and the Middle East. 

Assigned Readings:

  • S.J. Allen and Emilie Amt (eds.), The Crusades: A Reader, 2nd edition (Toronto: Broadview Press, 2014).
  • Paul Moses, The Saint and the Sultan:  The Crusades, Islam, and Francis of Assisi’s Mission of Peace (New York: Doubleday, 2009).
  • All other readings will be on Carmen/Canvas

Assignments:

Discussion Posts                       20%

Book Review                           20%

Position Paper                          20%

Mid-term Exam            20%

Final Exam                               20%

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study and diversity global studies course. This course fulfills Group Global, pre-1750, CPD, RLN for history majors or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 2240 Elizabethan England

Instructor: Schoonover, Jordan  

Days: MWF                 

Time: 11:30-12:25 am

Description:  The social, political, cultural and religious history of England during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I, 1558-1603, including the darker side of the Golden Age.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study and diversity global studies course. This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750, RLN , PCS for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 2275 Children and Childhood in the Western World

Instructor: Soland, Birgitte

Days: TR

Time: 11:10-12:30 pm

Description: History of children, childhood and youth in the Western World from Antiquity to the present.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. This course fulfills Group Europe, pre & post-1750, WGS or it can fulfill GE historical study and diversity soc div in the US course.


HISTORY 3232 Solving Crime in Medieval Europe

Instructor: Butler, Sara

Days: Tu Th

Time:  9:35-10:55 am

Description: This course explores the interaction between the development of criminal law and social change in the late medieval period (c. 1100-1550) from a comparative perspective, examining primarily the English common law, but also the continental courts of law, and occasionally also the ecclesiastical courts. Classes will be organized thematically and will focus on a broad range of subjects, such as: the passing of the trial by ordeal and its replacements; law enforcement; forensic medicine; jurisdictional competition; revenge; homicide and self-killing; women as victims and perpetrators; sex crimes; clerical criminals, treason; domestic violence; sanctuary, and fear-mongering. In examining these subjects, emphasis will be placed on the role played by litigants and jurors to use the law courts to their best advantage, highlighting the gap between the theory and practice of the law.

Assigned Readings:

  • Robert Bartlett, The Hanged Man: A Story of Miracle, Memory, and Colonialism in the Middle Ages (Princeton, 2004). Available at Barnes & Noble – The Ohio State University, 1598 N. High St.
  • All other readings for this course are on Carmen/Canvas.

Assignments:

Discussion Posts                                                           20%

Book Review                                                               20%

Research Project                                                           30%

Final Exam                                                                   30%

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study and diversity global studies course. This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750, PCS, for history majors or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 3240 History of the Italian Renaissance, 1250-1450

Instructor:  Maltempi, Anne

Days: Online    

Time: Online

Description: Study of the society, culture, and politics of Italy, from the communal era until the age of humanism, thirteenth to fifteenth century.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: Any 2000-level History course, and English 1110.xx; or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 509.01. GE historical study course. This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750, RLN, for history majors or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 3247 Magic and Witchcraft in Early Modern Europe (1450-1750)

Instructor: Goldish, Matthew

Days: WF

Time:  11:10-12:30 pm

Description: Investigation of the history of European witchcraft, focusing on intellectual, religious, and social developments and on the great witchcraft trials of the early modern period.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study and diversity global studies course. This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750, ETS, RLN, for history majors or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 3253 20th Century Europe to 1950

Instructor: Kern, Stephen

Days: WF Online                     

Time: 2:20-3:40 Online

Description: This course covers one of the most dynamic periods in modern European history from 1900 to 1950 that spans the two world wars. It will concentrate on Modernist culture, World War I, the Russian Revolution, Weimar Germany, the rise of Nazism, and Hitler and the holocaust.

Assigned books:

Richard Hamilton, Decisions for War, 1914-1917

Rex Wade, The Russian Revolution, 1917

Eric Weitz, Weimar Germany: Promise and Tragedy

Rudolph Binion, Hitler and the Holocaust

Assignments:

Three papers, 5 pages each.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: Any 2000-level History course, and English 1110.xx; or permission of instructor. GE historical study course. This course fulfills Group Europe, post-1750, CPD, PCS, for history majors or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 3282 History of the Soviet Union

Instructor: Hoffman, David

Days: Tu Tr     

Time: 12:45-2:05 pm

Description: This course is a survey of the entire Soviet period, from the 1917 Revolution to the demise of the Soviet Union in 1991. It will also cover the post-Soviet period, from 1991 to the present.  A central theme of this course is the unfulfilled promise of the Revolution and the genesis of the Stalinist dictatorship.  Topics include the Civil War, the New Economic Policy and problems of underdevelopment, collectivization and industrialization, Soviet culture, the delineation of gender roles, the Second World War and its legacy, the Cold War, de-Stalinization, nationality issues, the collapse of Communism, and Russia under Putin’s government.

Assigned Readings: Each week there will be reading assignments from a variety of sources, including government documents, memoirs, and novels.  The total amount of reading for the course will be about ten books.

Assignments: There will be a midterm exam, paper, and final exam.  In addition, students will have short weekly writing assignments on assigned readings.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 538. GE historical study and diversity global studies course. This course fulfills Group Europe, post-1750, PCS, for history majors or it can fulfill a GE requirement.

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HISTORY 2455 Jews in American Film

Instructor: Goldish, Matthew

Days: F           

Time: 9:35- 10:55 am

Description: Jews and Jewish life have often been depicted in American television and film.  We will watch a number of films about Jews and Jewish life while reading about those same topics in primary and secondary historical sources.  We will then analyze the depiction of Jews and Judaism in the films and discuss how that depiction compares with the historical reality.  This will be accomplished through class discussion as well as through reflective writing.  We will come out of the course with both content knowledge (modern Jewish history, Jewish culture, Christian-Jewish relations) and skills (watching film and television critically; detecting attitudes and biases in writing as well as film; writing and speaking articulately about our observations).

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 332 or JewshSt 2455. GE historical study course. Cross-listed in JewshSt. This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750, PCS, RLN for history majors or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 2475 History of the Holocaust

Instructor: Judd, Robin

Days:WF         

Time:  9:30-10:50 am

Description: We continue to debate the Holocaust’s history even though it has been over seventy years since the Allies liberated the last of the Nazi camps.  How did the Nazis rise to power? When did the Nazi government begin to plan for the Final Solution? Who was culpable in planning and executing the genocide?  This course will peel away at some of these questions. Together we will examine the state-sponsored murder of millions of Jews and non-Jews by the Nazis and their collaborators during World War II.  We will study the individuals, institutions, historical events, and ideologies that allowed for the Holocaust to occur.

Assigned Readings (TENTATIVE):

Doris Bergen, War and Genocide, Marion Kaplan, Between Dignity and Despair, Gerda Weissman Klein, All But My Life

Assignments (TENTATIVE):

Attendance, weekly reading questions, midterm, final, short paper

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for JewshSt 2475. GE historical study course. Cross-listed in JewshSt. This course fulfills Group Europe, post-1750, PCS, REN for history majors or it can fulfill a GE requirement.

 

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HISTORY 3100 Colonial Latin America

Instructor: Delgado, Jessica

Days:   TR      

Time: 9:35 AM -10:55 AM

Description: Mayan, Aztec, and Incan Empires; the Spanish and Portuguese conquests and the transplanting of Iberian institutions; the Baroque period; the Bourbon Century and the Enlightenment.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 533.01. GE historical study course. This course fulfills Group Latin American, pre-1750, CCE, GEM for history majors or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 3106 History of Mexico

Instructor: Smith, Stephanie

Days: Online   

Time: Online

Description: Mexico faces many crucial issues today: immigration, the environment, cartels, the rights of women and indigenous peoples, economic and trade issues, the role of the United States, and others. Although these topics are current and timely, their historical context can be located throughout several centuries of struggle. Beginning with the Olmecs, Maya, and Aztecs, “HIST 3106” analyzes Mexico’s dynamic history during the pre-Conquest period, the colonial era, the time of Independence, the nineteenth-century, and the present. Throughout the semester we will examine patterns of conflict and negotiation, including Hernan Cortes’ invasion of the Aztec Empire (or the Spanish-Aztec War, 1519–21), and the great Mexican Revolution (1910-1917), which shaped Mexico’s historical legacies. In addition to a study of Mexico’s politics, we also will explore the ways in which everyday people participated in and influenced cultural and political events. The role of women, race and ethnicity will be analyzed throughout the lectures, as will Mexico’s transcultural interactions. And lastly, the course will consider Mexico’s rich culture, including movies, literature, and artists.

Please note that this is an asynchronous online class.

Assigned Readings:

TBA

Assignments:

TBA

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study and diversity global studies course. This course fulfills Group Latin American, pre & post-1750, PCS, REN, SOJ for history majors or it can fulfill a GE requirement.

 

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HISTORY 2550 History of War

Instructor: Grimsley, Christopher

Days: Online

Time: Online 

Description:

“History of War” is an introduction to the salient concepts and problems involved in the study of military history.  Although it examines war from prehistoric times to the present, the course is thematic rather than strictly chronological—less  a survey of wars and military developments per se than an examination of the major concepts involved in the study of war.  In addition, the course focuses extensively on the warrior codes of various cultures (Greek, Roman, Japanese, Native American, etc.).  The study of the warrior code will include a practical exercise on incorporating the warrior ethos into one’s own life.

Students will achieve an understanding of the causes, conduct, and consequences of war, as well as how various societies—past and present, western and nonwestern—have understood and practiced war.  They will also hone their skills at critical writing and analysis, and gain greater insight into the way historians explore the human condition.

The course is taught online “asynchronously,” meaning that it will have no lectures or other presentations that all students must attend at the same time.  Instead, students will learn in three ways; first, via recorded lecture presentations, selected documentaries, and film clips; second, via the required readings; and third, via discussions with fellow students.

Assigned Readings

Shannon E. French, The Code of the Warrior:  Exploring Warrior Values Past and Present.

Victor Davis Hanson, Carnage and Culture:  Landmark Battles in the Rise of Western Power.

Wayne E. Lee, Waging War:  Conflict, Culture, and Innovation in World History.

Kelly McGonigal, The Willpower Instinct:  How Self-Control Works, Why It Matters, and What You Can Do to Get More of It.
William Strunk and E.B. White, The Elements of Style, 4th edition.
Selected articles and primary source documents.

Assignments

Participation in Discussions – 10 percent of course grade
Personal Challenge Assignment – 10 percent (for details, see special comments, below)
Quizzes – 30 percent

Completion and Submission of Surveys – 5 percent

Midterm Examination – 20 percent

Final Exam – 25 percent

Prerequisites and Special Comments

Prerequisite:  Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 380. GE historical study and diversity global studies course. This course fulfills the historical study GE & Group Global, post-1750, PCS for the history major or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.

Special Comment:  The Personal Challenge Assignment (PCA) is a practical exercise to carry the warrior ethos from the realm of mere head knowledge to an opportunity to experience it personally and, in the process, to discover and explore the warrior within oneself.  The essence of the warrior ethos is aggressive, self-disciplined action taken on behalf of a cause larger than oneself.  Self-improvement counts as such a cause, because it creates a person larger than one’s present self, a person better equipped to deal with the demands, stresses, and opportunities of life. 

Students will select one of the following challenges:  1) overcoming procrastination; 2) mental and emotional health; 3) general exercise; 4) strength training; 5) weight control; 6) improving study skills.  Students will be divided into Discussion Groups based on their selected challenge.


HISTORY 2550 History of War

Instructor: Douglas, Sarah

Days: Online 7W2

Time: Online 7W2

Description: A survey of the main concepts and issues involved in the study of war in world perspective, using case studies from prehistoric times to the present.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills the historical study GE & Group Global, post-1750, PCS for the history major or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.


HISTORY 3552 War in World History, 1900- Present

Instructor: Cabanes, Bruno

Days: TR

Time: 9:35-10:55 am   

Description: The past hundred years have changed the nature of war. Industrial warfare and global conflicts led to an inexorable intensification of violence. From trench warfare in World War I to ethnic cleansing in the 1990s, the total number of deaths caused by or associated with war has been estimated at the equivalent of 10% of the world’s population in 1913. In the course of the century, the burden of war shifted increasingly from armed forces to civilians, to the point where non-combatants now comprise some 80 or 90% of war victims. This lecture course investigates the blurring of distinction between combatants and non-combatants, as well as the experiences of ordinary men and women who lived through the wars of the 20th Century. It covers events such as World War I, the Spanish Civil War, World War II, the Korean War and the Vietnam War, and topics such as the experience of captivity, sexual violence in wartime, children in war, or genocide.

Assigned Readings:

Primo Levi, Survival in Auschwitz

Anonymous, A Women in Berlin

Henri Alleg, The Question

Jean Hatzfeld, Machete Season. The Killers in Rwanda Speak

Assignments: The final grade in the course will be an average of the four grades given for: the mid-term examination (25%), lecture Quick Writes/Quizzes (25%), a short 2000-word paper (20%), the final examination (30%).

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 580.02. GE historical study course This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for the history major, or it can fulfill the historical study GE.


HISTORY 3580 The Vietnam War

Instructor: Douglas, Sarah

Days: Online    

Time: Online

Description: Study of the background, causes, conduct, and consequences of the Vietnam War, 1945-1975.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:  Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study and diversity global studies course. This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfil a GE requirement

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HISTORY 2800 Introduction to the Discipline of History

Instructor: Hoffman, David

Days: Online

Time:  Online

Description: This course will introduce students to historiography and historical methodology – that is, to different interpretations of history and to different methods of studying it.  Among the themes to be covered in the course are gender and history, historical commemorations, and cultural representations of historical events.  Topics will include student unrest in the 1960s, including the feminist movement, the civil rights movement, and the anti-war movement.

Assigned Readings:  Students will be required to read several articles or a book every week – the equivalent of roughly ten books during the semester.

Assignments: Students will have weekly written assignments based on the course readings.  These assignments will amount to roughly 7 short papers.  In addition, students will be required to participate regularly in online discussions.  They will also conduct historical research which will culminate in 3 longer papers or projects.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx. The course is intended primarily for history majors and minors, though it is open to all students.  However, the course does not fulfill any GE requirements.


HISTORY 2800 Introduction to the Discipline of History

Instructor: Harrill, J. Albert

Days: WF

Time: 12:45-2:05 pm

Description: This course prepares you to become an undergraduate history major by investigating the methods and analytical approaches that historians use to understand the past.  Unlike other history classes, this course does not treat a specific topic or period in history, but rather focuses on historical methodology.  It considers some of the problems we face in interpreting sources, assessing arguments, and presenting our research to others. 

A series of exercises will give you practical, hands-on training as well as some more theoretical knowledge about the study of the past in more depth: the puzzling case of a missing and returned soldier in sixteenth-century France; and how a massive slave revolt by the ancient Roman gladiator Spartacus gave rise to a modern legend about slaves in Hollywood filmmaking in the Age of McCarthy and the Red Scare.

Assigned Readings:

1. Michael J. Salevouris with Conal Furay, The Methods and Skills of History: A Practical Guide

2.  Natalie Zemon Davis, The Return of Martin Guerre.

3.  Natalie Zemon Davis, Slaves on Screen: Film and Historical Vision.

4.  John Lewis Gaddis, The Landscape of History: How Historians Map the Past.

5.  Mary Lynn Rampolla, A Pocket Guide to Writing History.

Assignments: Seminar discussions, a series of short papers, and a final research dossier

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx.


HISTORY 2800 Introduction to the Discipline of History

Instructor: Soland, Birgitte

Days: TBA    

Time: TBA

Description: Investigation of the methods and analytical approaches historians use to understand the past.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx.


HISTORY 2800H Introduction to the Discipline of History- Honors

Instructor: Stebenne, David

Days: M

Time: 12:30-3:15 pm

Description: This course will introduce honors students planning to major in history (and honors students in other majors and/or minoring in history) to history as a discipline.  The course is designed to give students practice in the analysis of historical sources and in developing logic and clarity in both written and oral assignments.

Assigned Readings:

Josephine Tey, The Daughter of Time (1951)

James Romm, Herodotus (1998)

E. H. Carr, What is History? (1961)

David Cannadine, ed., What is History Now? (2002)

Sharlene Sayegh and Eric Altice, History and Theory (2014)

Elliott Gorn, Randy Roberts and Terry Bilhartz, Constructing the American Past, 8th ed., Vol. 1 (2017)

Assignments: Discussion of the assigned reading; three-chapter summaries (précis); book review and oral presentation of the results; journal analysis and oral presentation of the results; website review and oral presentation of the results; history based on primary documents and oral presentation of the results.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: Honors standing and English 1110.xx. or Permission from instructor


HISTORY 4015 Seminar in Modern U.S. History

Instructor: Baker, Paula

Days: TR

Time: 11:45-1:05 pm

Description: This seminar will focus on how and why historians’ interpretations have changed over time and how we might judge conflicting interpretations.

Our subject will be the life and career of Theodore Roosevelt.  A larger-than-life personality, he wrote so much – letters, articles, books – that it’s a wonder he had time to breathe. He filled every room during his lifetime, wishing to be “the corpse at every funeral, the bride at every wedding, and the baby at every christening,” according to his daughter, Alice, an attention hog herself.  And as an amateur naturalist, cowboy, historian, government official, war hero, President, and noisy ex-President, he left a trail that connects with major debates in U.S. history, including the meanings of Progressive-era reform, imperialism, and the place of the U.S. in the world, race and racism, gender and masculinity, and westward expansion.

We will track conflicting and changing interpretations of TR’s life and times, and also sample Roosevelt’s writing.  You will write a series of papers that deal with these debates. 

Assigned Readings:

Edmund Morris, The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt

Patricia O’Toole, When Trumpets Call

Plus additional readings available on Carmen

Assignments:

4 papers plus short reaction essays.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, a grade of C or above in History 2800, and any 3000-level History course; or permission of instructor.


HISTORY 4125 Seminar in Latin American History

Instructor: Smith, Stephanie

Days: R (Online)

Time: 11:00-1:45 pm (Online)

Description: “Revolutions and Revolutionaries in Modern Latin America”

What is a revolution? Why are successful revolutions such rare events? Why have so many revolutions failed and so few succeeded? Who are the revolutionaries? What is guerrilla warfare, and why do people resort to guerrilla warfare? What happens after the revolution, and how do revolutionaries rebuild/create a new government? What is the difference between a revolution and social movement? And historically, what was the complex relationship between the United States and modern Latin American countries, and why was the U.S. interested in Latin America?

This course examines these and other questions to analyze the history and meanings of revolutions and revolutionaries in modern Latin America. Starting with Mexico’s great revolution, we will move forward to analyze other revolutions and social movements in Guatemala, Cuba, Nicaragua, and others. Throughout this class we will discuss the causes of revolution, their changing historical nature, and revolutionary outcomes. Additionally, we also will consider dictatorships in Chile, Argentina, and Brazil to examine the search for social justice and reform. To better understand the inclusion of all peoples within the revolutionary experience, the course includes a consideration of the concepts of class, gender, and race and ethnicity. In this manner, we will pay special attention to historical actors to explore participation from the ground level up. We also will look at U.S. involvement in Latin American countries, including the role of the U.S. in revolutions and in the creation of a post-revolutionary society. Through an examination of these various historical factors, this class ultimately will provide a context for many of the major issues facing Latin American today.

Assigned Readings: TBA

Assignments: TBA

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, a grade of C or above in History 2800, and any 3000-level History course; or permission of instructor.


HISTORY 4215 Seminar in Greek History

Instructor: Anderson, Greg

Days: R

Time: 2:15-5:00 pm

Description: This is a seminar-style course for undergraduates that focuses on the politics and culture of ancient Athens, the largest and most powerful of all Greek city-states during the classical period.  It offers students the chance to pursue a more advanced level of enquiry into Greek history through close reading of a variety of primary and secondary texts, giving them a fuller sense of how scholars reconstruct the past from often scanty and problematic literary and archaeological evidence.  Employing a synoptic approach, the course will explore all major components of Athenian political life—ritual, political, social, economic, cultural, and military, looking at how all this “fits together” as a way of life. Along the way, a number of significant issues and questions will also be raised, including: How was Athenian demokratia different from modern liberal democracy? Why did the Athenians dedicate so much time, energy, and expense to ritual activities? Where women considered full members of the polis? How did the Athenians justify their use of slave labor? What does the Parthenon “mean”? Was the polis of the Athenians really the cultural “ancestor” of the modern western nation-state?

Assigned Readings: All free on Carmen; no purchases required

Assignments: Preparation of weekly readings, regular attendance, contributions to discussions; final term paper

Prerequisites and Special Comments: History major/minor, or HISTORY 3210 or HISTORY 3211. Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, a grade of C or above in History 2800, and any 3000-level History course; or permission of instructor.


HISTORY 4255:  The Culture of World War I

Instructor: Stephen Kern

Days: TR

Time: 2:20-3:40

Description: This course explores the most creative period in Western cultural history, roughly 1890-1930, which ironically straddles one of the most destructive wars in history, World War I. To explain this great irony, we will explore how leading artists and novelists treated the war indirectly even as it transformed their personal life. That dynamic is evident in the work of cubist and abstract artists such as Picasso and Kandinsky, philosophers such as Nietzsche, and literary figures such as Virginia Woolf, James Joyce, Marcel Proust, and T. S. Eliot. We will study some causes of the war, its course, major battles, and its effects. The first section will analyze a variety of cultural developments and ideas about time and space and consider how they may have shaped the failure of diplomacy in July of 1914 that led to the outbreak of the “cubist war” and the structure of combat during its fighting. The second section will contrast two studies of the culture of the war period as ironic skepticism versus a reaffirmation of traditional values. The final section will view the effects of the war dramatized in Virginia Woolf’s novel Mrs. Dalloway that includes the hunger for wholeness and repair in English society, shell shock, the practice of psychiatry, new gender roles and feminism, lesbianism, colonization and empire, Christianity and the growing secularization of high culture, and the influenza pandemic of 1918.

Assigned Readings:

Stephen Kern, The Culture of Time and Space, 1880-1918

Paul Fussell, The Great War and Modern Memory (selections)

Jay Winter, Sites of Memory, Sites of Mourning (selections)

Virginia Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway

Assignments:

Three papers, four-five pages each.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: Honors Standing, English 1110.xx, a grade of C or above in History 2800, and any 3000-level History course; or permission of instructor.


HISTORY 4375 Seminar in Islamic History

Instructor: Akin, Yigit

Days:  R          

Time: 2:15-5:00 pm

Description:

This research seminar focuses on one of the most significant turning points in the history of the modern Middle East—the First World War. We will examine the war as a transformative moment in the region’s politics, society, and culture. Among other subjects, we will pay particular attention to the impact of the war on home-front civilians; wartime gender relations; common soldier’s experiences of the battle and his motivations; famine, population movements, and genocide; and the war’s reflection in social memory. Finally, we will move on to the Great War’s equally, if not more, cataclysmic aftermath and discuss its profound and lasting legacy on the region and its peoples. Throughout our seminar, we will read monographs and articles on various aspects of World War I and become familiar with key historical debates on the impact of the war in the region. Our readings and discussions will not only focus on the intellectual, political, and military elites but we will also examine how non-elite individuals and groups influenced the course of the war and how they were affected by it.

Assigned Readings: TBA

Assignments: Active participation in discussions, response papers, preliminary report, annotated bibliography, final research paper

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, a grade of C or above in History 2800, and any 3000-level History course; or permission of instructor.


HISTORY 4475 Seminar in Jewish History

Instructor: Yehudai, Ori

Days: Tu

Time: 12:45-3:30 pm

Description: This advanced seminar explores the history of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict from its inception in the late 19th century to the present day. It takes a chronological approach, focusing on key moments and aspects of the conflict, including, but not limited to, the emergence of Jewish and Arab nationalism, the early encounter between Jews and Arabs in Palestine during the late Ottoman and British mandate periods, the wars of 1948 and 1967 and their long-term impact, US involvement, and the efforts to reach a peace settlement. The seminar will expose students to the recent as well as classical secondary literature on the topic, and to a variety of primary sources. These texts, combined with class discussions, will provide students with an in-depth understanding of the history of the conflict, taking into account the positions of Palestinian Arabs, Jews, and other regional and global forces involved in the conflict.

Assigned Readings: Weekly book chapters and journal articles; short stories, poems and films; primary historical documents. (subject to change.)

Assignments: A research or historiographical paper; class participation.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, a grade of C or above in History 2800, and any 3000-level History course; or permission of instructor.


HISTORY 4625 Seminar in Women’s/Gender History

Instructor: Soland, Birgitte

Days: W

Time: 12:45- 3:30 pm

Description:  Men, Women and Gender Crisis at the Turn-of-the Twentieth Century in the Western World

In the decades around the turn of the twentieth century, gender relations in the Western world were in upheaval.  As growing numbers of women asserted their rights to equal status and treatment; expanded opportunities in work, education, culture, and politics; and new freedoms in their personal lives, many men found their privileges threatened and their entitlements under attack.  This course examines the gendered conflicts and experiences of men and women during the era from the 1880s to the 1920s.  The focus will be on European history, but North American developments will be included as well.

In addition to familiarizing students with this subject matter, the objective of this course is to facilitate for all students the opportunity to complete an individual research paper on a specific issue related to the seminar topic based principally on primary source material. 

Assigned Readings: TBA

Assignments: Weekly reading assignments; active participation in class discussions of assigned readings.

A 15-page research paper based predominantly on primary sources. As part of the final research paper, each student will be required to turn in a research topic; an annotated list of primary and secondary sources; and an outline of the paper.

In addition, each student will be expected to prepare a 15-minute presentation on his/her/their research project to be shared in class at the end of the semester.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, a grade of C or above in History 2800, and any 3000-level History course; or permission of instructor.


HISTORY 4705 Seminar in the History of Environment, Technology, and Science

Instructor: Eaglin, Jennifer

Days: W          

Time: 12:45-3:30 pm

Description: Advanced research and readings on selected topics in Environmental History, Technology, and Science

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, a grade of C or above in History 2800, and any 3000-level History course; or permission of instructor.

 

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HISTORY 3620- Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender History in the U.S., 1940-Present

 

Instructor: Rivers, Daniel

Days: TBA

Time: TBA (in person)

Description: An overview of LGBT culture and history in the U.S. from 1940 to the present. Students will examine changes in LGBT lives and experiences during the last half of the 20th century and the beginning of the 21st century, as well as the intersections of race, sexuality, and class, and how these categories have affected sexual minority communities and broader US law and culture.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750, SOJ, WGS or it can fulfill GE historical study and diversity soc div in the US course.

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HISTORY 1682 World History from the 1500 to the Present

Instructor: White, Samuel

Days: Online 7W1
Time: Online

Description: Survey of the human community, with an emphasis on its increasing global integration, from the first European voyages of exploration through the present.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills the historical study GE requirement.  Not open to students that have credit for History 182 or 2642.


HISTORY 1682 World History from 1500 to the Present

Instructor: Limbach, Eric

Days: 7W2 Online        

Time: Online

Description: Survey of the human community, with an emphasis on its increasing global integration, from the first European voyages of exploration through the present.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:  This course fulfills the historical study GE requirement.  Not open to students that have credit for History 182 or 2642.


HISTORY 2650 The World since 1914

Instructor: Limbach, Eric

Days: TBA                  

Time:  TBA

Description: Global perspective on major forces that shaped the world since 1914. Provides students with factual knowledge and a critical interpretive framework for responsible global citizenship.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study and diversity global studies course. This course fulfills Global, post-1750, PCS, CCE for the history major or can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 2650 The World since 1914

Instructor: Mackaman-Lofland, Kiki

Days: Tu Th     

Time: 3:55-5:15 pm

Description: Global perspective on major forces that shaped the world since 1914. Provides students with factual knowledge and a critical interpretive framework for responsible global citizenship.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study and diversity global studies course. This course fulfills Global, post-1750, PCS, CCE for the history major or can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 2675 The Indian Ocean: Communities and Commodities in Motion

Instructor: McDow, Thomas

Days: TR

Time: 9:35-10:55 am

Description: This course surveys the long history of the Indian Ocean as a vital arena of world history. We need the Indian Ocean to understand Mahatma Gandhi, Osama bin Laden, and Freddie Mercury. The Indian Ocean was a meeting point for the peoples and cultures of Africa, the Middle East, and Asia long before European colonization, and it has become a site of intense innovation in our global age. It helps to understand the history of East Africa, Arabia, India, and Southeast Asia in relation to each other. Part of the story is based on the sea because the Indian Ocean is home to monsoon winds, Sinbad the sailor, and a long history of piracy from British "privateers" Davy Jones and William Kidd to more recent Somali freebooters. But it is also a story of landed empires and strategic port cities. We'll look at the production and circulation of commodities, from spices and textiles, to ivory and cloves, to opium and oil. Slaves and indentured servants crossed the Indian Ocean to work plantations in the past, and we can see new coerced labor regimes in the rise of Persian Gulf states. The Indian Ocean has been the home of Islamic scholarly networks and a focus in the global war on terror. Finally, the Indian Ocean is also an ideal place to study the history of environmental change: the dodo was hunted extinct on one of the ocean's islands in the 17th century, and global warming threatens island nations like the Maldives. In short, this is a course that will provide an introduction to a fascinating region.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750, CCE, REN or it can fulfill GE historical study and diversity global studies course.


HISTORY 2700 Global Environmental History

Instructor: White, Samuel

Days: Online   

Time: Online

Description: In this course, we explore how humans have shaped the environment and how the environment has shaped human history from prehistory to the present.  Our topics will range from fire to deforestation to climate change.  Students will learn the essential background to major environmental issues and consider how history might (or might not) help us confront present environmental challenges.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx. GE historical study and soc sci human, nat, and econ resources and diversity global studies course. This course fulfills Group Global, pre & post-1750, ETS, GEM for history majors or it can fulfill a GE requirement.