Spring 2023 Undergraduate Courses

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History 2301 African Peoples and Empires in World History

Instructor: Ahmad Sikainga

Days: Asynchronous, Session 2

Instruction Mode: Online

Description: The continent of Africa, where the earliest human species had evolved, is the home of some of the oldest civilizations such as Pharaonic Egypt, Nubia, Axum, Zimbabwe, Mali, and Songhay, just to name a few. Africa was also the site of dynamic, complex, and innovative cultures that confronted a variety of social, political, and environmental challenges. Moreover, the continent has always been connected to the wider world through trade, migration, intermarriage, and conquest. These themes are the primary focus of this course. The course is designed to introduce the students to the social, political, economic, and cultural history of Africa from the pre-historic era to the early nineteenth century. Students will gain an overview of some of the most significant developments in African history including state building and the rise of empires, Africa’s global connections, trade and migration, spread of Christianity and Islam, the rise of cities and the development of urban life, European involvement in Africa, and the Atlantic slave trade and its impact.

Assigned Readings:

Robert Harms, Africa in Global History. (Norton and Company, 2018)

DT Niane, Sundjata: An Epic of Old Mali (Longman Writers Series, 1995 or 2006 edition)

Zora Neale Hurston, Barracoon. The Story of the Last “Black Cargo.” (Harper-Collins, 2018.)

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group Africa, pre/post-1750, CCE and PCS for the history major.


History 2302 History of Modern Africa, 1800-1960s

Instructor: Thomas McDow

Days: We Fr

Time: 9:35-10:55 am

Instruction Mode: In Person

Description: Thematic survey of African history from 1800 to the 1960s.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group Africa, post-1750, CCE, and CPD for the history major.


History 3308 History of U.S.-Africa Relations, 1900-Present

Instructor: Ousman Kobo

Days: TuTh, Session 2

Time: 12:45-2:05 pm

Instruction Mode: Hybrid

Description: History of the United States' relations with Africa since World War I.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group Africa, post-1750, CPD and PCS for the history major.


History 3312 Africa and WWII

Instructor: Ahmad Sikainga

Days: Asynchronous, Session 2

Instruction Mode: Online

Description: The Second World War was a pivotal event that transformed and shaped the world as we know it today. The war was fought in different regions and led to unprecedented mobilization of human and natural resources from across the globe, including the continent of Africa. In addition to being a major theatre of military operations, Africa provided vital human and natural resources to the war efforts. Faced with severe manpower shortages and resources, British and French colonial powers looked to their African colonies to supply combat troops and laborers as well as food and cash crop. Moreover, the demands of the war led to vigorous interventions by colonial regimes into the daily lives of ordinary Africans and transformed social and economic relations within communities and household. Africa’s involvement in the war began with the Italian invasion of Ethiopia in 1935 and lasted well beyond 1945. The Italian forces that invaded Ethiopia included approximately 40,000 Somalis, Eritreans, and Libyans. African soldiers also served beyond the continent itself. In 1940 about 100,000 African soldiers were fighting against the Germans in western France. By the end of the war, there were over 370,000 Africans serving in the British armed forces. Nonetheless, most of the literature on World War II have paid little attention to the role of Africa and Africans in this global conflict. This course will shed light on this remarkably neglected African dimension of the war. The course explores not only the importance of Africans as soldiers and producers, but also the effects of the war on class, race, and gender relations within the continent. It will also illustrate the importance of the war in provoking crises in colonial empires and transforming the nature of political mobilization across the African continent.

Assigned Readings:

Judith Byfield, Carolyn Brown, Tim Parsons, Ahmad Sikainga (eds), Africa and World War II, (Cambridge, New York: Cambridge University Press) 2015. This book can be purchased from Barnes & Nobles on High Street.

David Killingray and Martin Laut, Fighting for Britain: African Soldiers in the Second World War (Boydell & Brewer Ltd) 2010

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group Africa, post-1750, and CPD for the history major.

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History 2081 African American History from 1877

Instructor: Dawn Chisebe

Days: Asynchronous

Instruction Mode: Online

Description:  The study of the African American experience in the United States from the era of Reconstruction through the present.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group America, post-1750, PCS, REN, and SOJ for the history major.


History 3086 Black Women in Slavery and Freedom

Instructor: Jerrell Beckham, Monica Stigler

Days: Mo We

Times:  9:35-10:55 am

Instruction Mode: Online

Description: Traces the experiences and struggles of African American women from slavery through the Civil Rights/Black Power era.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group America, post-1750, PCS, REN, and WGS for the history major.

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History 1151 American History to 1877

Instructor: Greyson Teague

Days: Asynchronous

Instruction Mode: Online|

Description: The political, constitutional, social, and economic development of the United States from the colonial period through the era of Reconstruction.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx. This course fulfills GEL Historical Study and GEN Historical and Cultural Studies.


History 1151 American History to 1877

Instructor: James Turner

Days: Asynchronous, Session 2

Instruction Mode: Online

Description: The political, constitutional, social, and economic development of the United States from the colonial period through the era of Reconstruction.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:  Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx. This course fulfills GEL Historical Study and GEN Historical and Cultural Studies.


History 1152 American History Since 1877              

Instructor: Robert F. Williams

Days:     Tu/Th                                                

Time: 9:35-10:55

Instruction Mode : In-Person Lecture

Description: This course serves as a survey of post-Civil War American history. History 1152 will examine the political, constitutional, social and economic development of the United States from the end of Reconstruction to the present, including, but not limited to, the failure of Reconstruction, immigration, the U.S.'s role abroad, the development of industry, progressivism, World War I, the Depression and the New Deal, World War II, the Cold War, Korean War, Vietnam, the Civil Rights Movement, the rise of the New Right, the post-Cold War world, and the War on Terrorism. The course will draw on the recent scholarship of historians as well as analyzing a variety of primary sources that speak to the very different lifestyles and concerns of Americans at different historical moments. Students will be expected to make connections between these different kinds of sources and explain to an audience the value of each.

This course is oriented around three core thematic questions:

  1. Citizenship: Who gets to be “fully American” in terms of rights, opportunities, and dignity, and how has this changed over time?
  2. Culture: Culture is the lens through which we will examine much of the past. How has culture changed, has it become more, or less inclusive? More or less divided?
  3. Conflict: What roles have the United States played in the world, and how have global forces shaped U.S. history?

Assigned Readings:

The American Yawp: A Free and Online, Collaboratively Built American History Textbook, edited by Joseph Locke and Ben Wright (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2019). http://www.americanyawp.com

The American Yawp Reader: A Documentary Companion to the American Yawp, edited by Joseph Locke and Ben Wright (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2019). http://www.americanyawp.com/reader.html

Assignments:

Two short essays, quizzes, midterm, and final.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx. Not open to students with credit for 1150 or 2002. GE historical study course. This course is available for EM credit.


History 2001 Launching America

Instructor: Randolph Roth

Days: We Fr

Times: 10:20-11:15 lecture, 55-minute discussion section on Monday (3 times available)

Description: History 2001 is an introduction to American civilization from the age of exploration and colonization through the Civil War and Reconstruction. The course focuses on central themes and issues in the development of American growth, institutional change, cultural development, and political democracy as Americans faced them in the past. Subjects treated in the course include: the pre-Columbian peoples of North America; exploration, colonization, and relations between European settlers and Native Americans; colonial America and the British Empire; family and gender relations; slavery and race; the American Revolution; establishing the new nation; technological, industrial, and transportation revolutions; social and cultural life in 19th century America; ethnic and cultural diversity in the Trans-Mississippi West; expansion, War with Mexico, and the sectional crisis; and the Civil War and Reconstruction.

Assigned readings:

Eric Foner, Give Me Liberty! Vol. 1, Brief Edition (but any edition, brief or full, will suffice). The latest edition (5th) is: ISBN-13: 978-0-393-62319-2. AVAILABLE THROUGH CARMEN BOOKS

Frederick Douglass, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (any edition, although the pagination may not match the one available at local bookstores). An inexpensive edition, Dover Publications, 2016: ISBN-13: 9780486284996. AVAILABLE AS AN E-BOOK THROUGH THE OSU LIBRARY: The 1988 edition, edited by Benjamin Quarles (Harvard University Press).

Additional readings on Carmen

Assignments:

Essays:  We will write one critical essay on primary sources (5-6 pp.).

Exams:  There will be a midterm, a final exam, and five quizzes.

Prerequisites and special comments: No previous work in history or American history is necessary. This course fulfills Group America, pre/post-1750, PCS, and CCE for the history major.


History 2002 Making America Modern

Instructor: Greyson Teague

Days: Asynchronous

Instruction Mode: Online

Description: Examines twentieth century American history in a global perspective, with special emphasis on the themes of industrial, military, and global expansion, as well as the expansion of civil and political rights of the American people.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group America, post-1750, PCS, and REN for the history major.


History 2010: History of American Capitalism

Instructor: Bart Elmore

Days: Tu Tr

Times: 9:35-10:55

Instruction Mode: In Person

Description: This 2000-level course offers an introduction to the history of American capitalism. We start with the theoretical foundations of American capitalism first penned in the eighteenth century (before the modern corporation first appeared on the American landscape) and trace the rise of various firms throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We will talk about businesses in divergent industries, from beverage companies such as Coca-Cola to computer powerhouses like Apple. The course concludes with reflections on the future sustainability of capitalist enterprises. Our goal is to identify key patterns in the development of American capitalism and to think about how economic changes transformed society, politics, and the environment in the United States.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750, PCS, SOJ and ETS for the history major.


History 2015 The History of Crime and Criminal Justice in the United States

Instructor: Randolph Roth

Days: We Fr

Times: 12:45-2:05

Instruction Mode: In Person

Description: Crime and punishment are among the most important issues in contemporary America.  This course offers an introduction to the historical study of crime in the United States from colonial times to the present.  It highlights changes in criminal behavior and in the ways Americans have sought to deter, punish, and rehabilitate.  Primary topics include historical patterns of violence, the role and organization of the police, and the evolution of punishment in theory and practice.  This course also emphasizes differences in crime and punishment by region, class, ethnicity, gender, and age.  Topics will include riots, homicide, capital punishment, organized crime, gangs, prisons, policing, jurisprudence, and official violence.

Assigned Readings:

Walker, Samuel (1998) Popular Justice: A History of American Criminal Justice, 2nd ed. New York: Oxford University Press. 0-19-507451-3 (paper)

Robert Perkinson (2010) Texas Tough: The Rise of America’s Prison Empire. Picador. ISBN-10: 0312680473 ISBN-13: 978-0312680473 (paper)

Butterfield, Fox (1995) All God's Children: The Bosket Family and the American Tradition of Violence. New York: William Morrow. 0-380-72862-1 (paper)

Quinones, Sam (2015) Dreamland: The True Tale of America’s Opiate Epidemic. New York: Bloomsbury Press. ISBN 13: 978-1620402528

Grading

Discussion and Attendance (10% of grade)

Quizzes on the Readings (10% of grade)

Midterm and Final Examinations (40% of grade)

Research Notes (20% of grade) / Research Essay (20% of grade): You will be asked to write a five-page paper on a topic in criminal justice history of interest to you (e.g., drugs, embezzlement, homicide). We will use on-line historical newspaper articles as sources. You will be required to turn in your research notes electronically as well as your essay, because the goal is to help you master the skills involved in careful historical research.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750, PCS, SOJ and CPD for the history major.


History 2065 Colonialism at the Movies: American History in Film           

Instructor: Margaret Newell

Days: Asynchronous, Session 2

Instruction Mode: Online                                                                                                             

Description:  In this course, we will examine how American history from the era of colonization through the Civil War era is presented on film. Since history is central to American identity, studying historical movies is especially important because these films reflect and shape popular understandings of what America was, and is. Most commercial movies gain audience by appealing to, rather than challenging, shared myths. National myths do evolve, and some filmmakers try to revise the story and broaden our definitions of what should be included in American history. Students will delve into popular narratives, attempts at revision, and scholarly views about America's origins and history.

Students will explore Native American societies & the colonial encounter, the Salem Witch trials, the America Revolution, slavery, immigration, the West, and the causes and outcomes of the Civil War. You will gain the background to assess when and how filmmakers get history wrong, as well as to understand how rich and informative some movies and TV series are and what they get right. We will also analyze the construction of historical narratives. Filmmakers face the same challenges that historians do: determining what stories are worth telling and choosing the best way to convey historical information.

Assigned Readings:

Past readings have included the following:

Rachel Hope Cleves, Charity and Sylvia: A Same-Sex Marriage in Early America  (Oxford, 2014)

Holger Hoock, Scars of Independence (Penguin/Random House, 2017) (selected chapters)

Solomon Northup, Twelve Years a Slave (available online) (selected chapters)

Alan Taylor, Colonial America: A Very Short History (Oxford, 2012) (available as an e-book at OSU library)

Assignments:

Students will write two one-hour, timed, open book essays and complete a final project. This project will consist of both a 6-8 pp. paper or screenplay and a digital component (a PowerPoint/Prezi or a short original film). Active participation in weekly online discussions and a small group assignment will also be required.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group North America, pre/post-1750, PCS, SOJ, GEM, and CCE for the history major.


History 2066 History of Medicine in Film
Instructor:  Jim Harris

Day: Tu                                             

Time: 3:55-5:15

Instruction Mode: Hybrid

Description:

In this course, we explore the social and cultural history of medicine as depicted on film. Using thirteen films as our primary sources, we will explore themes in the history of medicine from the work of doctors and nurses in the early twentieth century to the history of medical ethics and activism on film in the 21st century. Along the way, we will also consider how and why portrayals of medical subject matter on film has changed over time over the last century.

Assigned Readings:

Eelco F.M. Wijdicks, Cinema, MD: A History of Medicine on Screen (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2020).

Assignments:

Weekly film reflections

Three essays

Prerequisites and Special Comments: The course fulfills Group North America, post-1750, and ETS for the history major.


History 3002 U.S. Political History Since 1877

Instructor: Paula Baker

Days: Tu Th                                          

Time: 2:20-3:40 pm

Instruction Mode: In Person

Description: History of American political institutions, ideas, and culture from Reconstruction to the present.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750, and PCS for the history major.


History 3006 The United States Constitution and American Society Since 1877

Instructor: David Stebenne

Days: Tu Th                                          

Time: 11:10-12:30

Instruction Mode: In Person

Description: Examination of the major developments in American constitutional history since the Civil War.  Emphasis on the new constitutional system created by the Fourteenth Amendment; the rise and decline of laissez-faire constitutionalism; the more moderate constitutionalism of the New Deal era; and the resurgence of judicial activism in the 1960’s, ‘70’s and ‘80’s.  The course will deal in detail with the most influential Supreme Court rulings since 1877, including those in the areas of federal regulation of the economy, limits on freedom of speech and press during wartime, racial segregation, the rights of criminal suspects and defendants, affirmative action, and abortion.

Assigned Readings:

Kermit L. Hall and Timothy S. Huebner, Major Problems in American Constitutional History, 2nd ed., (2010).

Assignments: Active participation in class discussions, and take-home midterm and final examinations.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750, REN and PCS for the history major.


History 3013, Civil War and Reconstruction

Instructor: Joan Cashin

Days: Asynchronous

Instruction Mode: Online

Description: In this course we will discuss the origins of the War, which side won and why, and various attempts to remake Southern society during the Reconstruction era.  We will describe the experiences of Northerners, Southerners, and Westerners, including ordinary people (soldiers, slaves, farmers, women) as well as famous politicians and generals.  Although this course includes military history, that is not the primary focus.

Assigned Readings: Earl Hess, The Union Soldier in Battle; Margaret Storey, Loyalty and Loss; and Sarah Handley-Cousins, Bodies in Blue

Assignments:

Students will discuss the three monographs in zoom meetings, write short papers each week about the assignments, watch a documentary, and take a final exam.   

Prerequisites and Special Comments:  This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750, REN, SOJ, and PCS for the history major.


History 3014 Gilded Age to Progressive Era, 1877-1920

Instructor: Baker, Paula

Days: Tu Tr

Time: 11:10-12:30 pm

Instruction Mode: In Person

Description: Advanced study of U.S. social, political, cultural, foreign policy history from 1877-1920: Industrialization; immigration; urbanization; populism; Spanish-American War; progressivism; WWI.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group American, post-1750 for the history major.


History 3014 Gilded Age to Progressive Era, 1877-1920

Instructor: Josh Wood

Days: Asynchronous

Instruction Mode: Online

Description: Advanced study of U.S. social, political, cultural, foreign policy history from 1877-1920: Industrialization; immigration; urbanization; populism; Spanish-American War; progressivism; WWI.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group American, post-1750 for the history major.


History 3016: The Contemporary U.S. since 1963

Instructor: Bart Elmore

Days: Tu Tr

Time: 12:45-2:05 pm

Instruction Mode: In Person

Description: Advanced study U.S. political, economic, social, and cultural changes since 1963: political polarization; post-industrial economy/consumer economy; civil rights, feminism, environmentalism, Vietnam, détente, and globalization.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:  This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750, CPD, SOJ, and PCS for the history major.


History 3030 History of Ohio

Instructor: Coil, W.

Days: Asynchronous

Instruction Mode: Online

Description: This course will survey the economic, social, and political development of the geographic area that became Ohio from the Native American period to the present. We will explore three themes in particular:  the role of disruptive technology and creative destruction in shaping Ohio’s past; the critical junctures at which Ohio might have become something entirely different from what it became; Ohio’s connection to the wider world through geography, technology, demography, economics, and politics.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:  This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750, REN and PCS for the history major.

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History 2201 Ancient Greece and Rome                  

Instructor:  Peter Vanderpuy

Days: Asynchronous                                                    

Instruction Mode: Online

Description: This class is an introduction to the history of the Ancient Mediterranean Civilizations of Greece and Rome.  It provides a background of the chronological development of ancient Greek and Roman civilizations and then focuses on the broad issues of state-formation, politics, gender, warfare, tyranny, monotheism, and the environment over a period of some two thousand years.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750, CCE and PCS for the history major.


History 3211 Classical Greece                       

Instructor:  Greg Anderson

Days:     Tu Th                                                 

Time: 11.10-12.30

Instruction Mode: In Person

Description: This is the second half of a two-course survey of the history of ancient Greece.  The first course explores developments in the Greek world from the Neolithic era to the end of the Archaic age (ca. 7000-480 BC).  The second course focuses on the history and culture of the Classical age (ca. 480-320 BC), the "Golden Age" of ancient Greece.  Major topics addressed include: Athenian democracy; the cataclysmic Peloponnesian War between Athens and Sparta (431-404 BC); the rise of Macedon and Alexander the Great; tragedy and comedy; art and architecture; and philosophy.  The class places particular emphasis on the importance of engagement with original ancient sources.

Assigned Readings:

Carmen readings

Thucydides, History of the Peloponnesian War (Penguin Classics edition)

Assignments:

Mid-term exam, Final exam, Final Paper

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750, CPD and PCS for the history major.


History 3213 Slavery in the Ancient World              

Instructor:  J. Albert Harrill

Days:     Tu Tr                                   

Time: 12:45 – 2:05 p.m.

Instruction Mode: In Person

Description: Slavery is key to understanding of what life in the ancient world was like.  The purpose of this course is to consider the implications of classical antiquity as a slave society.  In what ways was slavery integrated into Greek and Roman family structures, religion, philosophy, and culture?  Was the institution questioned or attacked as immoral?  What caused slave revolts, the most famous being led a gladiator named Spartacus?  How did ancient Jews and early Christians react to slavery?  What legacies from ancient slavery remain with us today?  Attempts to answer these questions have sparked considerable controversy among scholars. This course will introduce the student to this debate, the primary sources, and their difficulties. 

Assigned Readings:

1. Apuleius, The Golden Ass, or Metamorphoses, trans. by E. J. Kenney (Penguin, 2004).

2. Spartacus and the Slave Wars, 2nd edition, ed. Brent D. Shaw (Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2018).

3. Keith Bradley, Slavery and Society at Rome (Cambridge, 1994).

4. Sandra R. Joshel, Slavery in the Roman World (Cambridge, 2010).

5. Kelly L. Wrenhaven, Reconstructing the Slave: The Image of the Slave in Ancient Greece.  (Bloomsbury, 2012).

Assignments:

An Interpretative Paper; Midterm and Final Examinations.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:  This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750, REN, RLN, and SOJ for the history major. 

Approved for the New GE Theme: Citizenship For a Diverse and Just World


History 3219 The Historical Jesus                     

Instructor: J. Albert Harrill

Days:     Tu Tr                                                  

Time: 9:35­–10:55 a.m.

Instruction Mode:  Lecture

Description:  Jesus Christ is a major religious figure about which there is considerable academic and theological debate.  This course examines this debate and thus explores the problem of how historical facts and religious persuasion are related where a religion, such as Christianity, lays claim to historical truth.  Since the Enlightenment this has been a matter of considerable intellectual and cultural interest.  The basic questions are:  Who was Jesus?  What can we know about him that will satisfy ordinary standards of historical knowledge?  What difference does it make?  Attempts to answer these questions have resulted in what is usually called the "quests" for the "historical Jesus." This course will study those previous quests for the historical Jesus and their analyses of the early Christian Gospels.  Each student will write a final paper arguing for his or her own reconstruction of the historical Jesus, using the methods of critical analysis that he or she is learning in the course.

Assigned Readings:

1.  Burton H. Throckmorton Jr., Gospel Parallels, 5th revised edition (Thomas Nelson, 1992).

2.  E. P. Sanders, The Historical Figure of Jesus (Penguin Books, 1996).

3.  Paula Fredriksen, Jesus of Nazareth, King of the Jews: A Jewish Life and the Emergence of Early Christianity (Vintage Books, 2000).

4.  Bart D. Ehrman, Jesus: Apocalyptic Prophet of the New Millennium (Oxford University Press, 2001).

5.  David R. Cartlidge and David L. Dungan, eds., Documents and Images for the Study of the Gospels, 3d edition (Fortress Press, 2015).

6.  Joan E. Taylor, ed., Jesus and Brian: Exploring the Historical Jesus and his Times via Monty Python’s Life of Brian (Bloomsbury T&T Clark, 2015).

Assignments:

1.  Class participation

2.  Midterm and Final Exams

3.  Historical Interpretative Essay (8–10 pages). 

Prerequisites and Special Comments:  This course fulfills Group Near East, pre-1750, and RLN for the history major.

Approved in the New GE Foundations: Historical and Cultural Studies.

 

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History 2352 The Ottoman Empire, 1300-1922                                  

Instructor: Yigit Akin

Days: Mo We                                                 

Time: 12:45-2:05 pm

Instruction Mode: In-person

Description: Studies the Ottoman Empire from the 13th to early 20th century, with an emphasis on the conquest of Istanbul, the consolidation of the borders of the empire, the establishment of the state apparatus in the classical period, a period of turbulence leading to a substantial transformation of the state in the early 19th century, and finally the empires dissolution in the aftermath of WWI.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group Near East, pre-1750, CCE and PCS for the history major.


History 3404 History of Modern China    

Instructor: Christopher Reed

Days: Tu Tr                                                     

Time: 2:20-3:40 pm

Instruction Mode: Online

Description: This course provides a general but analytic survey of the social, political, and intellectual history of China from 1750 to 1949. After a brief introduction to China’s geography, languages, and cultural background, we will discuss key historical phenomena that have distinguished Chinese society in the modern period. For most of the semester, the course is organized chronologically and thematically and seeks a balance between detailed examination of particular periods and exploration of patterns of continuity and change across historical periods. When appropriate, comparative historical perspectives will be suggested..

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Although not required, the course assumes students have had college-level history courses above the introductory level. Familiarity with topics covered in History 2401, "East Asian History to 1600,” or 2402, “East Asian History 1600-present” is useful but not required. This course fulfills Group East Asia, post-1750, CCE and PCS for the history major.


History 3411 Gender and Sexuality in China 

Instructor: Ying Zhang

Days:     We Fr                                                

Time: 9:35 am- 10:55 am

Instruction Mode: Hybrid

Description:  In Spring 2023, this course explores Chinese women’s and gender history by situating it in the interactions between China and the United States in the 19th and 20th centuries. Both countries went through drastic changes when they began to develop official and unofficial ties during this period. People, ideas, and things moved between these two countries across the Pacific. These movements resulted in new discoveries, exciting collaborations, and also many personal and collective tragedies. How did gender ideology shape this history? How did these developments change women’s lives and the gender discourse in modern China?

The course will introduce premodern Chinese gender ideals and practices before the era of Sino-U.S. entanglement. It shows how these ideals and practices traveled, encountered challenges, adapted, and changed in the cultural, educational, economic, political, and religious interactions between the two countries. We will focus on Chinese women in China and in the U.S., but American men and women will figure prominently in the course material as well.

Assigned Readings:  TBD

Prerequisites and Special Comments: All course materials are in English. No prior knowledge of Chinese or Chinese history required. This course fulfills Group East Asia, pre/post-1750, CCE and WGS for the history major.


History 3436 History of Modern Korea 

Instructor: Perry Miller

Days:  M                                                          

Time: 5:30 pm- 8:15 pm

Instruction Mode: Online

Description: Modern Korean History, with focus on the legacy of colonialism, the Korean War, the impact of the Cold War, divided Korea, the growth of competing national ideologies and economic systems, and the recent military crises.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group East Asia, post-1750, CCE and PCS for the history major.

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History 2500 20th Century International History                                      

Instructor: Joseph Parrott

Days:     We Fr                                                

Time: 12:45-2:05 pm

Instruction Mode: In-person

Description: Examines international political, economic, and military relations from the origins of World War I through the break up of the Soviet Union.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750, CCE, CPD, and SOJ.


History 3505 U.S. Diplomacy in the Middle East                                      

Instructor: Peter Hahn

Days:  Tu Tr                                                    

Time: 9:35 – 10:55 am

Instruction Mode: In-person

Description: Survey of U.S. foreign policy in the Middle East emphasizing the Cold War, Arab-Israeli conflict, Iran, and wars against Iraq. Sometimes this course is offered in a distance-only format.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group North America and post-1750.

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History 2700 Global Environmental History

Instructor: Mark Sokolsky

Days: Asynchronous                                                                  

Instruction Mode: Online

Description:

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group Global, pre/post-1750, GEM and ETS for history major.


History 2701 History of Technology

Instructor: James Esposito

Days: Asynchronous                                                                   

Instruction Mode: Online

Description: Survey of the history of technology in global context from ancient times.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group Global, pre/post-1750, and ETS for history major.


History 2702 Food in World History

Instructor: Dylan Cahn

Days: Asynchronous                                                                   

Instruction Mode: Online

Description: This course explores the history of food around the world and the roles that food has played in world history.  We’ll consider food from perspectives of environment, health, culture, and politics.  Topics will range from the first cooking with fire down to modern fast food and nutrition. 

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750, and ETS for history major.


History 2703 History of Public Health, Medicine, and Disease

Instructor: Jim Harris

Days: Asynchronous                                                                   

Instruction Mode: Online

Description: Amid the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic there is no greater time than the present to understand how infectious diseases (such as plague, smallpox, cholera, tuberculosis, influenza, and HIV) have shaped the course of human history and the ways in which societies across time and place have responded to these public health crises. Over the course of this semester our goals will be twofold: first, through lectures, discussions, and films, to study these issues in a deep historical and global context with the goal of understanding how studying the history of disease informs our contemporary understanding of public health. Second, we will emphasize how pandemics have been remembered (or forgotten) to engage the critical question of how history has (or has not) influenced our response to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

Assigned Readings:

  • Mitchell L. Hammond, Epidemics and the Modern World (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2020).
  • Charles Allan McCoy, Diseased States: Epidemic Control in the Britain and the United States, (Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 2020).

Assignments:

Weekly discussion post and quizzes

One primary source analysis essay

One book review essay (on Diseased States)

Final collaborative pandemic memorial project

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750, and ETS for history major.


History 3704 HIV: Microbiology to Macrohistory

Instructor: Thomas McDow

Days: Tu Tr                                                                    

Time: 2:20-3:40 pm

Instruction Mode: In Person

Description: In 2012, an estimated 35.3 million people around the world were living with HIV, a number startling close to the estimated number of people who have died from AIDs since 1981.  Unlocking the virological secrets of HIV/AIDs has been one of the grand scientific challenges of the last three decades, and the disease remains one of the world’s most serious challenges to human health and development.  The burden of the disease is very uneven globally, and sub-Saharan African, where the disease originated, is home to 69% of those living with HIV today. How did this virus and this global pandemic come to be? The course traces the evolution of the virus at both the molecular level and within its global historical context.  Team-taught by a virologist and a historian, the goal of this class at the broadest level, is to put the sciences and humanities in conversation.

The course will require students to apply the theory of evolution by natural selection to explain the origin of HIV (chimpanzees in Africa) and the ability of HIV to develop drug resistance and evade an effective vaccine. The course will simultaneously put these scientific processes and the effects of disease into historical context. The very scientific revolutions that led to Darwin’s theory of evolution and Koch's postulates of infection transmission helped make European colonialism possible. For example, Social Darwinism justified imperial aims, Pasteurian ideals of contamination influenced notions of racial purity, and the new field of tropical medicine was created to protect colonial administrators and soldiers in their distant postings. Similarly, colonial rule and the creation of the extractive economies of central and southern Africa set in motion population movements, wealth inequalities, and structures of power that amplified the effects—decades later—of HIV and contributed to what would become a global pandemic. Although the academy approaches the medical facts of disease and its social consequences through distinct disciplines, those who have contracted the virus experience all aspects of the disease. This course makes it possible for students to consider the medical, scientific, social, political, and economic causes and consequences of one of the world's most devastating viruses

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group Africa, post-1750, ETS


History 3708 Vaccines: A Global History

Instructor: Katie Summers, Jim Harris

Days: MoTuWeTh                                                        

Time: 11:30-12:25 pm

Instruction Mode:  In Person

Description: Infectious diseases have profoundly affected human history. The discovery and use of vaccines reshaped the experience and effects of these diseases, including contributing to a rapid decline in morbidity and mortality in the 20th and 21st centuries. Empirical development of the first vaccines spurred significant scientific changes in our knowledge of human and animal immune systems, leading to the creation of yet more vaccines. From their very first use, however, vaccines have spurred controversies and resistance. They have also been big business. In this course, we explore their complex history and science.

Assigned Readings:

All required readings are online.

Assignments:

Five current events reflections

Two short essays

Final collaborative research project/presentation

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750, and ETS for history major.


History 3711 Science and Society in Europe, from Copernicus to Newton

Instructor: Matt Goldish

Days: WeFr                                                                    

Time: 11:10 am -12:30 pm

Instruction Mode: In Person

Description: A survey of the history of science and its place and relationship to European society in the early modern period.  Students will understand the various strands that constitute the scientific revolution in early modern Europe, modern intellectual history, how revolutions in thought occur, and will practice analytical and communications skills in working with both secondary and primary sources.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750, and ETS for history major.

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History 1211 Western Society to 1600: rise, collapse, and recovery

Instructor: Geoffrey Parker

Instruction Mode: Online: two asynchronous lectures and one synchronous recitation

Description: For better or worse, Western societies have become extremely prominent in the world today – not just in the West but (thanks to Karl Marx and the Internet) around the world. How did this process begin? What is distinctive about Western values?  These are two of the questions that this course seeks to answer. In addition we will examine How Things Happen:

  • Why did the West develop at such an early stage the right to free speech guaranteed in this country by the First Amendment?
  • Why were 50% of all Western populations in this period under the age of 20?
  • How could 167 Spaniards overthrow the Inca Empire, with perhaps 8 million subjects, and go on to dominate much of South America?

The course also offers strategies on how to identify, among masses of facts, the aberration from the trend, the cause from the contingent, the important from the incidental, and the continuities among the changes.

Assigned Readings

Wiesner-Hanks, Crowston, Perry & McKay, A history of Western society, Volume I: From Antiquity to the Enlightenment, 13th edition (2020)

Wiesner-Hanks, Evans, Wheeler and Ruff, Discovering the Western Past, Volume I: to 1789, 7th edition (2015)

Assignments

  • Watch all materials for the course posted online
  • Read and discuss all assigned readings; attend and participate in all discussions in synchronous online recitations (20% of total grade)
  • Complete all assigned recitation exercises (20% of total grade)
  • one 5-page term paper (30% of total grade)
  • one take-home final exam (30% of total grade)

History 1212 European History II                           

Instructor: Sarah Douglas

Days: Asynchronous                     

Instruction Mode: Online

Description: Political, scientific, and industrial revolutions; nationalism; the two World Wars; the decline of empires; the Cold War

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx.


History 1212 European History II                           

Instructor: Eric Limbach

Days: Asynchronous, Session 2  

Instruction Mode: Online

Description: Political, scientific, and industrial revolutions; nationalism; the two World Wars; the decline of empires; the Cold War

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx.


History 3221 History of Rome: Republic to Empire            

Instructor: TBA

Days: TuTr

Times: 2:20-3:40 pm

Instruction Mode: In Person

Description: History of Rome: Republic to Empire.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:  This course fulfils Group Europe, pre-1750, CPD, PCS for the major.


History 3265 20th Century Germany History         

Instructor: Eric Limbach

Days: We Fr                      

Time: 11:10-12:30

Instruction Mode: In-person, Lecture/Discussion

Description: This course will examine the history of Germany from the years preceding the First World War through the present, considering three interconnected points of tension that are central to understanding Germany and the nature of German citizenship and identity in the 20th and 21st centuries: dictatorship/democracy, Germans/foreigners and guilt/innocence. This was an era of immense political shifts, of violence, war, and genocide, of economic depressions and affluence, and of emigration and immigration. At many points in the past century, Germans have been forced to come to terms with their collective past and their place within the broader European context. Above all, this is a period of constant debate over the definition of German citizenship: who qualifies as “German”, and who does not?

Assigned Readings:

Alina Bronsky, Broken Glass Park (Europa Editions, 2010)

Mary Fulbrook, A Concise History of Germany 3rd Ed. (Cambridge, 2019)

Jana Hensel, After the Wall (PublicAffairs, 2008)

Bernhard Schlink, Guilt About the Past (House of Anansi Press, 2008)

+ Document reader (available on Carmen)

+ One academic article (from curated list on Carmen)

Assignments:

Written portfolio with six items: Document Analysis Essay, Article Analysis Essay, Argumentative Essay, Two Peer Review forms, Final Self-Assessment Essay

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfils Group Europe, post-1750, CPD, and PCS for the history major.


History 3642 Women in Modern Europe, from the 18th Century to the Present    

Instructor: Birgitte Søland

Days: Tu Tr

Times: 11:10-12:30 pm

Instruction Mode: In Person

Description:  This course is designed as an introduction to the history of European women from the late eighteenth century to the mid-twentieth century.  Because there is much material to cover, my approach will necessarily be selective – emphasizing some events and developments while leaving out other things also important to the history of women. Several themes will be central to the course.  We will study the processes of industrial expansion and economic change and the impact of these developments on women’s social and economic position.  We will explore the political reorganization of Europe over the course of these centuries, and we will examine how women strove to shape and improve their lives under changing circumstances.  We will also concentrate on how relationships between women and men developed, and how beliefs about gender changed.  Finally, we will look at how economic position, religion, sexuality, marital status, regional and national differences influenced women’s experiences.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:  This course fulfils Group Europe, post-1750, WGS, PCS for the history major.

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History 2453 History of Zionism and Modern Israel                                      

Instructor: Ori Yehudai

Days: Tu Tr                                                     

Time: 9:35-10-55

Instruction Mode: In-person

Description: This course explores the history of the Jewish state from the rise of the Zionist movement to the present. It begins by examining the social and ideological roots of Zionism in late 19th-century Europe, proceeds with the development of the Jewish community in Palestine under Ottoman and British rule, and then turns to the period following the establishment of the State of Israel in 1948. Among the issues to be discussed are Jewish-Arab relations, immigration, the encounter between European and Middle Eastern Jews, the creation of a new Hebrew identity, the interaction between religion and state, the impact of the Holocaust, and Israel’s international status. Course materials include secondary historical sources, a variety of primary documents, short stories and films.

Assigned Readings: Course textbook: Anita Shapira, Israel: A History (available online through the library website); Khirbet Khizeh (novel by S. Yizhar); journal articles/book chapters; primary documents; short stories; films (subject to minor changes). Purchase required only for Khirbet Khiszeh.

Assignments: Book review; analytical essay; film review; take-home essay exam (subject to minor changes)

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group Near Eastern, post-1750, CPD, REN for history majors


History 2455 Jews in American Film               

Instructor: Matthew Goldish

Days:     We Fr                                 

Time: 9:35-10-55 am

Instruction Mode: Hybrid

Description: Jews and Jewish life have often been depicted in American television and film.  We will watch a number of films about Jews and Jewish life while reading about those same topics in primary and secondary historical sources.  We will then analyze the depiction of Jews and Judaism in the films and discuss how that depiction compares with the historical reality.  This will be accomplished through class discussion as well as through reflective writing.  We will come out of the course with both content knowledge (modern Jewish history, Jewish culture, Christian-Jewish relations) and skills (watching film and television critically; detecting attitudes and biases in writing as well as film; writing and speaking articulately about our observations).

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 332 or JewshSt 2455. Cross-listed in JewshSt. This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750, PCS, RLN for history majors

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History 2115 Women in Latin America        

Instructor: Jessica Delgado

Days: Tu Tr                                       

Time: 11.10-12.30

Instruction Mode: In Person

Description:  With a focus on women’s lives, this course will examine the role of gender in the history of Latin America.  Using the lens of gender to understand religious, political, economic, and cultural change and continuity from the colonial era to the present helps us understand both men and women’s diverse experiences and participation in this history. Race, religion, class and geography also shape people’s lives, and we will pay careful attention to the wide range of circumstances and forces that shape the way people have made history what it was, and history has made people who they are.  We will read and talk about the era of European colonization of Native Americans and enslavement of Africans; the enormous transformations that took place between the sixteenth and nineteenth centuries; the chaotic and volatile development of independent nations in the nineteenth century; and radical changes the 20th century brought throughout the region—all from the perspective of the history of women and gender

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group Latin America, pre or post-1750 for the history major.


History 3105 History of Brazil 

Instructor: Jennifer Eaglin

Days:     Tu Tr                                   

Time: 11.10-12.30 pm

Instruction Mode: In Person

Description: Known for its beaches, carnival, and soccer, Brazilian history is a far deeper story of colonialism, slavery, agricultural wealth, immigration, industrial development, political conflict over authoritarianism and democracy, and more. This course will provide a survey of the deep history of the country from its inception through its struggle to become a modern, developed nation in the 20th century.  It will touch on five key topics that affect Brazil today: economic, political, social, environmental, and popular culture.  

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group Latin America, post-1750 for the history major.

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History 2550 History of War                  

Instructor: Mark Grimsley

Days: Asynchronous

Instruction Mode:  Online

Description: “History of War” is an introduction to the salient concepts and problems involved in the study of military history.  Although it examines war from prehistoric times to the present, the course is thematic rather than strictly chronological—less  a survey of wars and military developments per se than an examination of the major concepts involved in the study of war.  In addition, the course focuses extensively on the warrior codes of various cultures (Greek, Roman, Japanese, Native American, etc.).

Students will achieve an understanding of the causes, conduct, and consequences of war, as well as how various societies—past and present, western and nonwestern—have understood and practiced war.  They will also hone their skills at critical writing and analysis, and gain greater insight into the way historians explore the human condition.

The course contends that the martial warrior ethos translates metaphorically into civilian life.  As used in the course, the ethos is defined as aggressive, disciplined action taken on behalf of a cause larger than oneself.  That cause may take the form of military service, but it may take many other forms, ranging from social justice activism to a sustained effort to improve one’s own life.  As a direct encounter with the warrior ethos, students will undertake a Personal Challenge Assignment (PCA).

Assigned Readings:

Shannon E. French, The Code of the Warrior:  Exploring Warrior Values Past and Present.

John Keegan, The Face of Battle:  A Study of Agincourt, Waterloo, and the Somme.

Wayne E. Lee, Waging War:  Conflict, Culture, and Innovation in World History.

Kelly McGonigal, The Willpower Instinct:  How Self-Control Works, Why It Matters, and What You Can Do to Get More of It.

Assignments:

Twice weekly quizzes (15 percent of course grade)
Surveys, both graded and anonymous (5 percent)
Participation in Discussion Groups (10 percent)
Personal Challenge Assignment (10 percent)
Midterm Examination (25 percent)
Final Examination (35 percent)

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750, CPD for the history major.

More information about the Personal Challenge Assignment may be found in a 6-minute video on YouTube: https://youtu.be/MRgDZH-7bX0


History 3560 American Military History, 1607-1902                                           

Instructor: Mark Grimsley

Days: Asynchronous

Instruction Mode:  Online

Description: This course explores the American military experience from the colonial period to the end of the Philippine War. In part, it focuses on “traditional” subjects; the creation of American military institutions, for example, the genesis of policy-making and maintenance of civilian control over that process, the interrelationship between foreign and military policy, the conduct of war, and the influence of American society upon the armed forces as social institutions.  But it also treats events such as Nat Turner’s 1831 slave rebellion as part of the American military experience.

Students will achieve an understanding of the main developments in American military history, the ways in which these developments have reflected or shaped developments in general American history, and the main interpretations advanced by scholars who have studied this subject. They will also hone their skills at critical writing and analysis and will gain greater insight into the way historians explore the human condition.

The course contends that the martial warrior ethos, exemplified by the Native American warriors of the western plains (as well as numerous other cultures), translates metaphorically into civilian life.  As used in the course, the ethos is defined as aggressive, disciplined action taken on behalf of a cause larger than oneself.  That cause may take the form of military service, but it may take many other forms, ranging from social justice activism to a sustained effort to improve one’s own life.  As a direct encounter with the warrior ethos, students will therefore undertake a Personal Challenge Assignment (PCA).

Assigned Readings:

Allan R. Millett and Peter Maslowski, For the Common Defense: A Military History of the United States of America, Revised and Expanded Edition.

Patrick H. Breen, The Land Shall Be Deluged in Blood: A New History of the Nat Turner Revolt.

James M. McPherson, For Cause and Comrades:  Why Men Fought in the Civil War.

Kelly McGonigal, The Willpower Instinct: How Self-Control Works, Why It Matters, and What You Can Do to Get More of It.

Assignments:

Twice weekly quizzes (15 percent of course grade)
Surveys, both graded and anonymous (5 percent)
Participation in Discussion Groups (10 percent)
Personal Challenge Assignment (10 percent)
Midterm Examination (25 percent)
Final Examination (35 percent)

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

Although any undergraduate may enroll in History 3560, I encourage students who have not already completed at least one history course at the 2000-level to take the other course I’m teaching Spring Semester:  History 2550 – The History of War.

This course fulfills Group America, post-1750, CPD for the history major.

More information about the Personal Challenge Assignment may be found in a 6-minute video on YouTube: https://youtu.be/MRgDZH-7bX0


History 3570 World War II

Instructor: Peter Mansoor

Days: We Fr                                     

Time: 2:20-3:40 pm

Instruction Mode: In person

Description: World War II was the largest and most destructive war in human history. More than seventy years after it ended, the war continues to shape our world. This course examines the causes, conduct, and consequences of this devastating conflict. Through readings, lectures, and video, the class will study the politics that shaped the involvement of the major combatants; military leadership and the characteristics of major Allied and Axis armed services; the national and theater strategies of the various major combatants; the military operations that led to victory or defeat on battlefields spanning the globe; war crimes; and other factors such as leadership, economics, military doctrine and effectiveness, technology, ideology, and racism that impacted the outcome of the war. This course falls under the new GE Foundation of Historical and Cultural Studies. In the old GE curriculum, this course falls under the GE category of Historical Study and it additionally fulfills the GE Global Studies requirement.

Assigned Readings:

Williamson Murray and Allan R. Millett, A War to be Won: Fighting the Second World War (978-0674006805)

Mark A Stoler and Molly C. Michelmore, eds., The United States in World War II: A Documentary History (978-1624667473)

West Point History of Warfare – online only (see download instructions at end of syllabus)

Michael Lynch, Hitler (978-0415436465)

E. B. Sledge, With the Old Breed: At Peleliu and Okinawa (978-0891419068)

Assignments:

Take-home mid-term and final examinations

Two book reviews (2-3 pages each)

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group America, post-1750, CPD for the history major. English 1110.xx plus AP History credit or successful completion of another college-level history course. Exceptions approved by instructor.


History 3575 The Korean War          

Instructor:  Sarah Douglas

Days: Asynchronous, Session 2

Instruction Mode:  Online

Description: This course will show how the often overlooked Korean War proved to be a critical moment in modern world history. Rooted in themes in Asian and American history from before the 20th century, this course places the Korean War conflict within a longer framework of East Asian struggles against western influence and within a broader international context.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. This course fulfills Group American, post-1750, CPD for the history major.


History 3580 The Vietnam War                    

Instructor:  Ryan Nelson

Days: Mo We

Time: 9:35-10:55 am

Instruction Mode:  Online

Description: This course explores the social, cultural, political, and military histories of the First and Second Indochina Wars,1946-1975, with greater focus on the latter conflict (aka the Vietnam War).  Intertwined Vietnamese civil wars subsumed by the global Cold War, the First and Second Indochina Wars were two of the most notable and impactful conflicts of the post-1945 period.  The roles of various combatants will be considered over the course of the semester, including Laos, Cambodia, France, China, and America, but much of the readings and lectures highlight Vietnamese communist and non-communist perspectives.  A growing trend within the field of Vietnam War studies, Vietnam-centrism focuses on Vietnamese dynamics and situates twentieth-century developments within the broader context of Vietnamese history.  Major events and topics covered during the semester include the impact of French colonialism, the rise of Vietnamese communism, major miliary battles of the First and Second Indochina Wars, nation building in North and South Vietnam, foreign military assistance to North and South Vietnam, Vietnamization, North and South Vietnamese cinematic depictions of wartime life, the Paris Peace Accords, and the Fall of Saigon.

Assigned Readings: Digital copies of all the course’s assigned readings will be provided to the students free of charge.

Assignments:

Weekly literature reviews (150-200 words)

Every week, students must submit a summarized report/review of an assigned chapter or article of their choosing

At least 4 in-class group activities/assignments

Analyzing North Vietnamese poetry during the First Indochina War

Analyzing and fixing/reconceptualizing the 1954 Geneva Agreement

Analyzing the 1960 Caravelle Manifesto

Analyzing South Vietnamese poetry during the Second Indochina War

Film review (1,000-1,200 words)

Students will have the option to review either a North or South Vietnamese film depicting wartime life:

Hoang Hoa Le (dir.), The Purple Horizon, with English-language subtitles (Saigon, 1971) or Hai Ninh (dir.), The Girl from Hanoi, with English-language subtitles (Hanoi, 1975)

Final research paper (2,000-2,500 words)

I will provide the students essay prompts from which to choose

Prerequisites and Special Comments:   This course fulfills Group America, post-1750, CPD, PCS, SOJ for the history major.


History 3670 Trans-National History of World War II in Europe

Instructor: Peter Mansoor

Days:     M          

Time: 2:15-5pm

Instruction Mode: In person

Description: History 3670 is one of two prerequisites to the World War II Student-Veteran Study Program’s May term in Europe. The purpose of this class is to deepen contextual knowledge of the different national histories and the specific sites of World War II history students will encounter in May. The course is organized according to the trip itinerary and will include content that will deepen understanding of how World War II impacted the areas through which students will travel.

Assigned Readings:

Rick Atkinson, The Guns at Last Light: The War in Western Europe, 1944-1945

Other shorter readings online or on Carmen

Assignments:

Contemporary affairs synopses

Weekly synopsis of readings

7-10 page term paper

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group America, post-1750, CPD, PCS for the history major.

Only students accepted into the World War II Student-Veteran studies program during the October registration period may enroll.


History 3670 Trans-National History of World War II in Europe

Instructor: David Steigerwald

Days:     M          

Time: 1:00-3:45 PM

Instruction Mode: In person

Description: One of two Spring prerequisite courses to the World War II Study Program's May term in Europe. Only students accepted into the program during the October registration period may enroll. This class will deepen the contextual knowledge of students about the different national histories and the specific sites they will encounter in May.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group America, post-1750, CPD, PCS for the history major.

 

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History 3071 Native American History from Removal to the Present

Instructor: Daniel Rivers

Days: Tu Tr         

Time: 12:45-2:05 pm

Instruction Mode: In person

Description: This course will introduce students to the history of Native Americans from the 1820s to the present.  We will look at the removal of Native tribes to Indian Territory, the establishment of reservation system, the resurgence of Native cultures and pan-Indian movements in the twentieth century, postwar urban migration and tribal termination policies, the Red Power movements of the 1960s, and Native legal organizing in the late 20th and 21st centuries.  The course will encourage the students to think about intersections of gender, race, sexuality, and class and to consider Native resistance movements and cultural persistence over the last two centuries.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group America, post-1750, CCE, or REN for the history major.

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History 2800 Introduction to the Discipline of History                   

Instructor: David J. Staley

Days: Tu Tr                                      

Time: 2:20-3:40

Instruction Mode: In Person

Description:  This course, designed for students planning to major in history, presents some of the main elements of historical methodology: how historians do their work. The main question we will answer in this course is “How do historians produce history?” We will study how historians gather information, organize and analyze their data, and represent their research and conclusions. Students will gain experience dealing with primary and secondary historical sources, interpreting events within their historical context, and developing a comparative understanding of historical phenomenon. In addition, students will learn more about how the past influences today’s society and how our present affects our understanding of the past.

Assigned Readings:

Assignments:

  • Analyzing primary sources:
  • Producing an Historical Narrative
  • History and Wikipedia
  • Final Essay

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course is required for all students declaring a Major in history, students must earn a “C” or higher to have it count on the history major


History 2800 Introduction to the Discipline of History

Instructor: Stephen Kern

Days: We Fr

Time: 2:20-3:40

Instruction Mode: Online, synchronous

Description: This course introduces students to the discipline of history by analyzing in detail three approaches to history based on three highly influential theories about human experience—Marxism, psychoanalysis, and phenomenology. The power of these theories derives from the fact that they are grounded in universal aspects of human experience--bodily needs and labor (Marx), sexuality and unconscious mental processes (Freud), and time and space (phenomenology). To understand the interaction between theory and practice students will read and analyze these theories at their source and then critically evaluate one application of them in contemporary historical works, one of which is my own. In addition, students will also read critical appraisals of these approaches to round out the three reading assignments that are the subject of the three assigned papers (1200-1500 words or 4-5 pages each). I also run a week-long writing workshop that clarifies mechanics of writing to be used and refined in these papers.

Assigned Readings:

George Lefebvre, The Coming of the French Revolution

Rudolph Binion, Hitler Among the Germans

Stephen Kern, The Culture of Time and Space: 1880-1918

Selected readings by Marx, Freud, and phenomenology as well as criticisms of the three applications of these theories on Carmen

Assignments:

Attendance and participation in discussion of primary and secondary sources.

Three papers

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course is required for all students declaring a Major in history, students must earn a “C” or higher to have it count on the history major


History 2800H Introduction to the Discipline of History, Honors   

Instructor:  Robin Judd

Days:     Mondays                                                         

Time:    12:30-3:15 pm

Instruction Mode: In Person

Description: This course is an introduction to the study of history, and to the concepts and skills necessary to study the past.  Our focus throughout the course will be to examine the nature of history as a discipline and the writing of history as an academic project.  Through readings, discussions, in-class activities, and written assignments, we will explore the purposes of studying history, the types of sources available to reconstruct the past, and methods and approaches for examining and interpreting history.

Assigned Readings (Tentative): 

Karen Cox, No Common Ground: Confederate Monuments and the Ongoing Fight for Racial Justice

Kelly McFall and Abigail Perkiss, Changing the Game: Title IX, Gender, and College Athletics

Mary Lynn Rampolla, A Pocket Guide to Writing in History

Assignments (Tentative):

Discussion posts, monument assignment, prospectus, book review

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course is required for all students declaring a Major in history, students must earn a “C” or higher to have it count on the history major


History 2800 Introduction to the Discipline of History

Instructor: Joan Cashin

Days:  Tu Tr
Time: 12:45 -2:05 pm

Instruction Mode: Online, Synchronous

Description: This course is designed to introduce undergraduates to the historical method, that is, how historians write history.  We will learn how to distinguish between primary sources, which are generated by historical figures, and secondary courses, which are written by historians.  We will examine important events in historical context, concentrating on a specific issue, Abraham Lincoln and emancipation.  We will explore how Lincoln reached the decision to free the slaves, how his political opponents reacted in the North, and how African Americans experienced freedom on the ground. 

Assigned Readings:

Students will read two books, William Gienapp’s biography, Abraham Lincoln and Civil War America, and his document collection, This Fiery Trial: The Speeches and Writings of Abraham Lincoln.  They will also read several articles by historians.  In addition, they will examine a variety of primary sources that can be found online: newspapers, military correspondence, personal letters, diaries, memoirs, political cartoons, and museum artifacts. 

Assignments:

Students will make presentations in class about their research in the primary sources.  They will write short papers on the articles, and a longer paper, due at the end of term, on Lincoln and emancipation.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course is required for all students declaring a major in history.  They must earn a grade of C or higher so it will count for the history major. 


History 2800 Introduction to the Discipline of History

Instructor: Stephanie Shaw

Days:  We Fr
Time:  11:10-12:30 pm

Instruction Mode: Online

Description: The specific topic of this class is Nat Turner’s rebellion.   In 1831, Turner, a Southampton County Virginia slave, led a revolt intending to overthrow the institution of slavery.  Dozens of white people were killed, and dozens of slaves and free black people were as well. The revolt has been reconstructed by historians, fictionalized by novelists, and even translated onto film.  Almost every generation re-creates Nat Turner.  We will look at available documents related to this rebellion, different interpretations of them, and draw our own intelligent conclusions about what definitely happened, what probably happened, and what we can never really know.  Ultimately, each of those things determine how and what we can, should, and/or must write.  We will also examine the evolution of the scholarship on the revolt in order to see how history, as historians produce it, changes over time and why.  It is central to our understanding how to think about the important question of whether history changes, why, and how?

Although we will spend a great deal of time on the Turner rebellion, the point of these analyses is not simply to know all we can about Turner’s revolt, but to think about the discipline of history and the various ways history is made.  We will examine primary documents from the period to aid us in this process.  We will read and write book reviews, review historical journals, and spend some time looking at new technologies and resources for conducting historical research.  We will also pay attention to problems and pitfalls of historical research and writing.  In the process, we will look at and think about “driving forces” of history, whether history is objective or subjective, and the role of the historian in history.  We will talk about “good” history and “bad” history, how to use sources, what “facts” are, and whether or not history can be scientific.  Altogether, our goal is to become better historians through critical reading, good research, and thoughtful analyses of original and interpreted sources.

 

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course is required for all students declaring a major in history.  They must earn a grade of C or higher so it will count for the history major. 


History 4015 Seminar in Modern U.S. History

Instructor: Clayton Howard

Days: Mo

Times: 2:15-5:00 pm      

Instruction mode: In Person                      

Description: Advanced research and writing on selected topics in Modern U.S. History. 

Prerequisites and Special Comments: English 1110.xx, a grade of C or above in History 2800, and any 3000-level History course; or permission of instructor.


History 4085 Seminar in African American History

Instructor: Stephanie Shaw

Days:  Tu Tr
Time:  2:20-3:40 pm

Instruction Mode: Online

Description:It is probably the case that when most people think about antebellum slavery, the image of a plantation comes to mind.  It is not an illogical image given the critical participation of slaves in the production of American agricultural products, especially cotton, tobacco, rice, corn, wheat, indigo, hemp, and sugar.  Directly and indirectly, agricultural slave labor generated a substantial (often the largest) portion of American wealth in nineteenth-century America.  But this course takes a different tack:  it looks at slavery in non-plantation/agricultural contexts and the slave experience beyond the plantation.  These individuals worked in a variety of capacities in cities, in mines, in factories, on rivers, and in homes.  And they came in contact with urban environments in diverse ways, beyond their efforts to earn a wage.  Thus, the focus here is urban, industrial, and commercial slavery. In particular, we will pay especial attention to the diverse ways historians have discussed these slaves, their lives, and their labors, and how these discussions have changed over the last hundred years. Our primary interests will be the lives of the enslaved people in these contexts —their work, family, community, culture, day-to-day lives, etc., which, sometimes, bore little resemblance to plantation/agricultural slavery.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: English 1110.xx, a grade of C or above in History 2800, and any 3000-level History course; or permission of instructor.


History 4255 Seminar in Modern European History

Instructor: Stephen Kern

Days: Tu Tr

Times: 2:20-3:40 pm

Instruction mode: Online, Synchronous                              

Description: This course explores the most creative period in Western cultural history, roughly 1890-1930, which ironically straddles one of the most destructive wars in history, World War I. To explain this great irony, we will explore how leading artists and novelists treated the war indirectly even as it transformed their personal life. That dynamic is evident in the work of cubist and abstract artists such as Picasso and Kandinsky, philosophers such as Nietzsche, and literary figures such as Virginia Woolf, James Joyce, Marcel Proust, and T. S. Eliot. We will study some causes of the war, its course, major battles, and its effects. The first section will analyze a variety of cultural developments and ideas about time and space and consider how they may have shaped the failure of diplomacy in July of 1914 that led to the outbreak of the “cubist war” and the structure of combat during its fighting. The second section will contrast two studies of the culture of the war period as ironic skepticism versus a reaffirmation of traditional values. The final section will view the effects of the war dramatized in Virginia Woolf’s novel Mrs. Dalloway that includes the hunger for wholeness and repair in English society, shell shock, the practice of psychiatry, new gender roles and feminism, lesbianism, colonization and empire, Christianity and the growing secularization of high culture, and the influenza pandemic of 1918.

Assigned Readings:

Stephen Kern, The Culture of Time and Space, 1880-1918

Paul Fussell, The Great War and Modern Memory (selections)

Jay Winter, Sites of Memory, Sites of Mourning (selections)

Virginia Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway

Assignments:

Three papers, four-five pages each.

Prerequisites: none

Prerequisites and Special Comments: English 1110.xx, a grade of C or above in History 2800, and any 3000-level History course; or permission of instructor.


History 4285 Seminar in Russian, East European, and Eurasian History

Instructor: David Hoffmann

Days: We

Times: 9:35-12:20                          

Instruction mode: In Person                      

Description: This research seminar will focus on the Russian Revolution and Stalinism.  In the course, we will read a variety of sources on the political, social, and cultural history of the Soviet Union.  Examples of topics we will cover are the Russian Revolution, the origins of Stalinism, the social consequences of Stalinist industrialization, World War II on the Eastern Front, gender roles in Soviet society, Soviet policies toward ethnic and national minorities, and official and popular culture in the Soviet Union.

Assigned Readings:

John Reed, Ten Days that Shook the World (Penguin Books, 2007)

Paperback Edition, ISBN 978-0-140-18293-4

David Hoffmann, ed., Stalinism: The Essential Readings (Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, 2002) Paperback Edition, ISBN 978-0-631-22891-2

Eugenia Ginzburg, Journey into the Whirlwind (Harcourt Inc. Publishers, 1995)

Paperback Edition, ISBN  0-15-646509-4                                   

Recommended book:

Sheila Fitzpatrick, The Russian Revolution (Oxford University Press); any edition

In addition, there are a number of shorter readings posted on Carmen.

Assignments: Students will each select a research project on some aspect of Soviet history between 1917 and 1953.  They will make a class presentation on their topic and write a final research paper.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: English 1110.xx, a grade of C or above in History 2800, and any 3000-level History course; or permission of instructor.


History 4410 Seminar in Chinese History,  “The (Second) Sino-Japanese War, 1937-45”

Instructor: Christopher Reed

Days: WF (synchronous online via Zoom)

Time: 2:20-3:40 pm

Description: In July 1937, soldiers of the Imperial Japanese Army were involved in what initially seemed to be a minor military skirmish with Republican Chinese soldiers at the Marco Polo Bridge near Beijing. Since the 19th century, Japanese and other foreign troops had frequently used such events to provide their political leaders at home with excuses to send military reinforcements to China. This time, however, what the Japanese used to call “The China Incident,” which Japan’s generals insisted to Hirohito would end in three months,  grew into a protracted eight-year continental war. Meanwhile, Japanese goals of establishing an anti-Communist East Asian order united against Russia & Western imperialists; creating “civilization;” a reformed Chinese economy oriented to Japan; and a stable new Chinese government that was friendly to Japan became ever-more elusive. In their desperation to end the war by imposing a full embargo on Chiang Kai-shek’s alleged pro-Communist wartime government holed up in Chongqing (pronounced “Chōng-cheeng,” formerly Chungking), the Japanese eventually attacked and invaded the US-controlled Philippines, British-controlled Hong Kong, all of Southeast Asia from French Indochina across Thailand to British Malaya, Singapore, and Burma; the British Raj in India; the Dutch East Indies; & colonial New Guinea. Only China survived the onslaught. Japan even assaulted Darwin, Australia, and the American-controlled, pre-statehood territory of Hawaii. In the process, the Japanese added to the China Incident what they call the Pacific War (1941-45) and what the West calls World War II. Behind it all, however, the 2nd Sino-Japanese War (1937-45) churned on unceasingly and remained the justification for all of the Empire of Japan’s various post-1940 “sideshows.”

This course will examine the 2nd Sino-Japanese War from Chinese and Japanese political, economic, military, and civilian perspectives. Like all 4000-level Readings/Research Seminars, the course will emphasize readings, discussions, sources, and student-initiated research & writing projects rather than lectures. Throughout the course, we will use the case study of the 2nd Sino-Japanese War to better understand the broader historical field of modern East Asian, particularly Chinese and Japanese, history.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: English 1110.xx, a grade of C or above in History 2800, and any 3000-level History course; or permission of instructor.

Although not required, some background in East Asian history, particularly History 2402, 3404, or 3426, as well as some general knowledge of World War II will be useful. Students should note that this is a course on the Sino-Japanese War (Japan vs. China), not on the Pacific War (Japan vs. the Rest), and their self-chosen research papers must reflect that fact.

This course is designed for junior- or senior-level History majors, especially those who have already taken History 2800 and other History courses. It fulfills a 4000-level seminar requirement for History majors. It can also count toward the History minor. Non-History majors/minors are welcome to take the course, but should first consult with the professor via email at reed.434@osu.edu.


HISTORY 4475 Seminar in Jewish History: Jewish Migration and Displacement in the 20th Century

Instructor: Ori Yehudai

Days:     Tu                                                       

Time: 9:35- 12:20 pm

Instruction Mode: In-person

Description: During the 20th century, millions of Jews were uprooted from their homes as a result of war, persecution and economic distress. This seminar course explores the impact of displacement on Jewish life in Europe, the Middle East and the Americas. It covers the major Jewish refugee and migration flows, starting with the exodus from Eastern Europe in the late 19th and early 20th centuries and concluding with post-soviet emigration. We will begin with a theoretical discussion of basic concepts such as diaspora, exile and refugees and continue with an in-depth look into specific migratory movements. Through these case studies, we will explore the relationships between displacement and such issues as gender, violence, nationalist sentiment, citizenship and Jewish and human solidarity, while also comparing Jewish and non-Jewish migration. Readings and discussions will consider the perspectives of various actors, including states, voluntary organizations and the migrants themselves. 

Assigned Readings: Journal articles and book chapters. No textbook. No purchase.

Assignments: Research paper; participation in class discussions; class presentation

Prerequisites and Special Comments: English 1110.xx, a grade of C or above in History 2800, and any 3000-level History course; or permission of instructor.


History 4575 Seminar in Military History

Instructor: Lydia Walker

Days: We

Times: 9:35-12:20 pm

Instruction mode: In Person                      

Description: This undergraduate seminar focuses on wars of national liberation in regions that we now call the Global South. Students read foundational theoretical texts (Franz Fanon, Che Guevara, Mao Zedong) as well as secondary literature focused on anticolonial movements and the struggle for independence.  The course is built around writing a final paper, topic of the student’s choice selected in consultation with the instructor, that is written in stages across the arc of the course (proposal, annotated bibliography, lit review, final paper).

Assigned Books include:

C.L.R. James, The Black Jacobins: Toussaint L’Ouverture and the San Domingo Revolution (Vintage Books, 1989 [1963, 1938]) for purchase, multiple print copies available at OSU Library.

Tim Harper, Underground Asia: Global Revolutionaries and the Assault against Empire (Harvard University Press, 2020) available through pro quest (1 user at a time) OSU Library

Adom Getachew, Worldmaking after Empire: The Rise and Fall of Self-Determination (Princeton University Press, 2019) ebook available multiple formats OSU Library

Assignments: scaffolded seminar paper

Prerequisites and Special Comments: English 1110.xx, a grade of C or above in History 2800, and any 3000-level History course; or permission of instructor.


History 4625 Seminar in Women’s/Gender History

Instructor: Daniel Rivers

Days: Mo

Times: 11:00-2:00 pm

Instruction mode: In Person                      

Description: Advanced research and readings on selected topics in Women's/Gender History. 

Prerequisites and Special Comments: English 1110.xx, a grade of C or above in History 2800, and any 3000-level History course; or permission of instructor.


History 4705 Seminar in the History of Environment, Technology, and Science

Instructor: Jennifer Eaglin

Days: We

Times: 12:45-3:30 pm

Instruction mode: In Person                      

Description: Advanced research and readings on selected topics in Environmental History, Technology, and Science.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: English 1110.xx, a grade of C or above in History 2800, and any 3000-level History course; or permission of instructor.


History 4795 Seminar in History: The Historical Imagination: History, Historical Fiction, Counterfactuals and Futures                       

Instructor: David J. Staley

Days: Mo           

Time: 2:15-5:00 pm

Instruction Mode:  In Person

Description:  How much imagination are historians actually permitted? How do historians use their imaginations, and what are the limits of that imagination? How far are we able to extend our methods to the realm of the imaginary? Why explore the imaginary?  What are the reasons for doing so?  In this seminar, we will use the tools of the historian to explore various types of “what ifs?”   (like “What if Hitler had been assassinated?” or “What if the South had won the Civil War?”)  and in doing so, determine (and transgress) the boundaries between “what happened?”, “what if something else happened?”, “what might have happened?”, and indeed “what might happen?”

Assigned Readings:

David J. Staley, Historical Imagination (Routledge, 2021) (electronic version through the Library)

Other readings uploaded to Carmen

Assignments:  Final deliverable:  Students will compose either a short piece of historical fiction, a counterfactual history or a future scenario.  These will be based on a careful analysis of primary documents, which you will have researched.  The rest of this final research paper will be a methodological explanation of how and why you arrived at your results. 

Prerequisites and Special Comments:  English 1110.xx, a grade of C or above in History 2800, and any 3000-level History course; or permission of instructor.


History 4795 Leadership in History (Honors Embedded)

Instructor: R. Judd

Days: Th                            

Time:    4:00-6:45

Instruction Mode: In Person

Description: This course considers the lessons, models, and narratives of history to consider different characteristics of leadership and followership.  Students will analyze specific historical case studies and question how those qualities might shape their vision of what it means to be an informed citizen and change-maker. A significant focus of the course will be on skill development, particularly reading, conducting research, and writing.

Assigned Readings (Tentative):

Sarah Federman, Last Train to Auschwitz: The French National Railways and the Journey to Accountability

Premilla Nadasen, Household Workers Unite: The Untold Story of African American Women Who Built a Movement

Assignments (Tentative):

Book reviews, discussion posts, research paper

Prerequisites and Special Comments: English 1110.xx, a grade of C or above in History 2800, and any 3000-level History course; or permission of instructor.

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History 2115 Women in Latin America        

Instructor: Jessica Delgado

Days: Tu Tr                                                      

Time: 11.10-12.30

Instruction Mode: In Person

Description:  With a focus on women’s lives, this course will examine the role of gender in the history of Latin America.  Using the lens of gender to understand religious, political, economic, and cultural change and continuity from the colonial era to the present helps us understand both men and women’s diverse experiences and participation in this history. Race, religion, class and geography also shape people’s lives, and we will pay careful attention to the wide range of circumstances and forces that shape the way people have made history what it was, and history has made people who they are.  We will read and talk about the era of European colonization of Native Americans and enslavement of Africans; the enormous transformations that took place between the sixteenth and nineteenth centuries; the chaotic and volatile development of independent nations in the nineteenth century; and radical changes the 20th century brought throughout the region—all from the perspective of the history of women and gender

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group Latin America, pre or post-1750 for the history major.


History 3086 Black Women in Slavery and Freedom

Instructor: Jerrell Beckham, Monica Stigler

Days: Mo We

Times:  9:35-10:55 am

Instruction Mode: Online

Description: Traces the experiences and struggles of African American women from slavery through the Civil Rights/Black Power era.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group America, post-1750, PCS, REN, and WGS for the history major.


History 3642 Women in Modern Europe, from the 18th Century to the Present     

Instructor: Birgitte Søland

Days: Tu Tr

Times: 11:10-12:30 pm

Instruction Mode: In Person

Description:  This course is designed as an introduction to the history of European women from the late eighteenth century to the mid-twentieth century.  Because there is much material to cover, my approach will necessarily be selective – emphasizing some events and developments while leaving out other things also important to the history of women. Several themes will be central to the course.  We will study the processes of industrial expansion and economic change and the impact of these developments on women’s social and economic position.  We will explore the political reorganization of Europe over the course of these centuries, and we will examine how women strove to shape and improve their lives under changing circumstances.  We will also concentrate on how relationships between women and men developed, and how beliefs about gender changed.  Finally, we will look at how economic position, religion, sexuality, marital status, regional and national differences influenced women’s experiences.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:  This course fulfils Group Europe, post-1750, WGS, PCS for the history major.


History 3411 Gender and Sexuality in China 

Instructor: Ying Zhang

Days:     We Fr                                                

Time: 9:35 am- 10:55 am

Instruction Mode: Hybrid

Description:  In Spring 2023, this course explores Chinese women’s and gender history by situating it in the interactions between China and the United States in the 19th and 20th centuries. Both countries went through drastic changes when they began to develop official and unofficial ties during this period. People, ideas, and things moved between these two countries across the Pacific. These movements resulted in new discoveries, exciting collaborations, and also many personal and collective tragedies. How did gender ideology shape this history? How did these developments change women’s lives and the gender discourse in modern China?

The course will introduce premodern Chinese gender ideals and practices before the era of Sino-U.S. entanglement. It shows how these ideals and practices traveled, encountered challenges, adapted, and changed in the cultural, educational, economic, political, and religious interactions between the two countries. We will focus on Chinese women in China and in the U.S., but American men and women will figure prominently in the course material as well.

Assigned Readings:  TBD

Prerequisites and Special Comments: All course materials are in English. No prior knowledge of Chinese or Chinese history required. This course fulfills Group East Asia, pre/post-1750, CCE and WGS for the history major.

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History 1681 World History to 1500

Instructor: Peter Vanderpuy

Days: Asynchronous, Session 2

Instruction Mode: Online

Description: This course examines the major issues that have shaped the human experience from the beginnings of human civilization (ca. 3500 B.C.E.) to ca. 1500 C.E.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:  English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor.


History 1681 World History to 1500

Instructor: Catalina Hunt

Days: Asynchronous, Session 2

Instruction Mode: Online

Description: Survey of the human community, with an emphasis on its increasing global integration, from the first European voyages of exploration through the present.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor.


History 2650 The World Since 1914

Instructor: Daniel Rivers

Days: Tu Tr                       

Time:    11:10 – 12:30 pm

Instruction Mode: In person

Description: The World since 1914 is a course on global history. We will focus on central themes of global history in the modern world – nationalism and the rise of nation-states, globalization, the emergence of mass society, gender, and identity and difference, as well as major events, such as the World Wars, the Great Depression, the Cold War, and the revolutions against colonial rule. We will also look at major issues in the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, such as food, health, energy, economic development, and the environment. Much of our class will involve discussion of primary documents and of competing theories about the causes of historical change. But the ultimate goal of the course is civic: to help us understand better the world and its problems, to develop global historical literacy, and to think about connections between our own lives and events in the past.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750  for the history major.

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History 4870 The Ohio State University: Its History and Its World

Instructor: David J. Staley

Days: Tu Tr                       

Time: 9:35-10:55

Instruction Mode: In-person

Description: This course is an introduction to the past, present and future The Ohio State University and, in the process, to the educational and intellectual experience in Ohio, the country and the world.  The course aims to develop in students a fuller understanding of the many-sided importance of this land-grant university, the great variety of discoveries and debates that have created the disciplines it houses, the interrelations of the academic and other components of the institution, and the contributions over the years of students, faculty, and staff to OSU and the wider world.   Students will become knowledgeable about higher education and the importance of the university as an institution by learning the historical contexts of issues facing colleges and universities generally and OSU specifically.  Students will become more aware of the physical evolution of the campus, of the educational philosophy that has shaped it, and of its art, traditions and collections.  Students will be stimulated to take more of an interest in the present and future of OSU by understanding the historical continuum of the University’s development.

Assigned Readings:

All readings uploaded to Carmen

Assignments:

  1. Attendance
  2. Class participation
  3. Four (4) quizzes on lectures and readings:
  4. Eight (8) primary source analysis exercises
  5. A final research project on some facet of the University’s history

Prerequisites and Special Comments:  Not open to students with credit for ArtsSci 4870. GE cultures and ideas course. Cross-listed in ArtsSci.