Summer 2022 Undergraduate Courses

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History 1151- American History to 1877

Instructor: Tadlock, Kyle

Days/Time: Online

Session: 4-wk Session 1

Description:  This course provides a survey of American history from the Age of Encounter to the Reconstruction period.  It covers the social, economic, cultural, political, and diplomatic history of the American peoples. 

Prerequisites and Special Comments:  This course fulfills the historical study GE requirement.  Not open to students that have credit for History 151 or 2001.


History 1211-European History

Instructor: Parker, Geoffrey & Streifeneder, Dillon

Days/Time:  

Session: 8 wk Session 1

Description:  Ancient Civilizations (Near East, Greece, Rome) barbarian invasions, medieval civilizations (Byzantium, Islam, Europe); Renaissance and Reformation.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:  This course fulfills the historical study GE requirement.  Not open to students that have credit for History 111 or 2201; 2202; 2203 or 2205.


History 1212- Western Civilization, 17th Century to Present

Instructor: Vanderpuy, Peter

Days/Time: Online

Session:  4-wk Session 1

Description:  Political, scientific, and industrial revolutions, nationalism, the two World Wars; the decline of empires; the Cold War.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills the historical study GE requirement.  Not open to students that have credit for History 112; 2202; 2203; 2204 or 2205.


History 1681- World History to 1500

Instructor: Khaliyarov, Alisher  

Days/Time: Online TBA 

Session: 6-wk Ses 1

Description: Survey of the human community, with an emphasis on its increasing global integration, from the first European voyages of exploration through the present.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills the GE Historical survey; Global diversity.  Not open to students that have credit for History 181 or 2641.


History 2015- History of American Criminal Justice

Instructor: Roth, R.

Days/Time: Online

Session: 8-wk Ses 2

Description: Crime and punishment are among the most important issues in contemporary America.  This course offers an introduction to the historical study of crime in the United States from colonial times to the present.  It highlights changes in criminal behavior and in the ways Americans have sought to deter, punish, and rehabilitate.  Primary topics include historical patterns of violence, the role and organization of the police, and the evolution of punishment in theory and practice.  This course also emphasizes differences in crime and punishment by region, class, ethnicity, gender, and age.  Topics will include riots, homicide, capital punishment, organized crime, gangs, prisons, policing, jurisprudence, and official violence.

Readings:

Walker, Samuel (1998) Popular Justice: A History of American Criminal Justice, 2nd ed. New York: Oxford University Press. 0-19-507451-3 (paper)

Robert Perkinson (2010) Texas Tough: The Rise of America’s Prison Empire. Picador. ISBN-10: 0312680473 ISBN-13: 978-0312680473 (paper)

Butterfield, Fox (1995) All God's Children: The Bosket Family and the American Tradition of Violence. New York: William Morrow. 0-380-72862-1 (paper)

Quinones, Sam (2015) Dreamland: The True Tale of America’s Opiate Epidemic. New York: Bloomsbury Press. ISBN 13: 978-1620402528

Assignments:

Discussion Boards (35% of grade): Prompt and engaged participation in online discussions is mandatory. Each week will require 600 words or more of writing, as you reflect on the readings, lectures, and media content in the course, and respond to the thoughts of fellow students.

Quizzes on Readings and Lectures (25% of grade): There will be one or two online quizzes each week. The quizzes will ask you to report fully and accurately on the content of readings, lectures, and media content in the course.

Midterm and Final Examinations (20% and 20% of grade): There will be a midterm and a final. Each will require a comprehensive essay at least 6 to 8 pages in length, double-spaced.

Perquisites and Special Comments:  Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx. Not open to students with credit for 375. GE historical study course. This course fulfills American, post-1750, CPD, PCS for the history major or can fulfill a GE requirement.


History 2204- Modern European History

Instructor:  Kinley, Christopher

Days/Time: Online

Session: 6-wk Ses 2

Description: Examination of selected themes from the history of Modern Europe from the French Revolution to the Present

Prerequisites and Special Comments: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 1212. GE historical study and diversity global studies course.


History 2210- Classical Archaeology

Instructor: Green, Derek

Days/Time: Online

Session: 6-wk Ses 1

Description:  Introduction to the principles, methods, and history of archaeological investigation in the ancient Greek and Roman world, illustrated through a selection of major classical sites.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx. Not open to students with credit for 306, Clas 2301 (240), or HistArt 2301 (306). GE cultures and ideas and historical study and diversity global studies course. Cross-listed in Clas 2301 and HistArt 2301


History 2301 African Peoples and Empires in World History    

Instructor: Van Beurden, Sarah 

Days/Time: Asynchronous, Online                             

Session: 4-wk Ses 1   

Description: This course aims to demonstrate the global nature of Africa’s pre-colonial history. Debunking the myth that the African continent lacks history, we explore a variety of pre-colonial cultures and societies and the impact they had upon other cultures in the world.  In addition, we will investigate the different ways in which historians have thought about the pre-colonial history of Africa, and which topics are the subject of debate. This course also introduces students to the use and analysis of primary sources and maps.

Assigned Readings:

  • Sundiata. An Epic of Old Mali (on-line)
  • Zora Neale Hurston, Barracoon

Assignments: Discussion posts, quizzes, midterm, final, paper

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study. This course fulfills Group Africa, pre& post-1750, CCE, PCS for history majors or it can fulfill a GE requirement


History 2550- History of War

Instructor: Douglas, Sarah

Days/Time: Online

Session: 4-wk Ses 3

Description:

A survey of the main concepts and issues involved in the study of war in world perspective, using case studies from prehistoric times to the present.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 380. GE historical study and diversity global studies course. This course fulfills Global, post-1750, CPD for the history major or can fulfill a GE requirement.


History 2650- The World Since 1914

Instructor: Honchell, Stephanie

Days/Time: Online

Session: 4-wk Ses 3

Description: Global perspective on major forces that shaped the world since 1914. Provides students with factual knowledge and a critical interpretive framework for responsible global citizenship.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study and diversity global studies course. This course fulfills Global, post-1750, PCS, CCE for the history major or can fulfill a GE requirement.


History 2700- Global Environmental History

Instructor: Harris, Jim

Days/Time:: Online

Session:  6-wk Ses 2

Description:

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course may be taken to fulfill historical study, social science, or global studies GE requirements.  This course may be counted as Group Global, and either pre- or post-1750 for the major in history. 


History 2702: Food in World History

Instructor: Cahn, Dylan

Days/Time: Online

Session: 8-wk Ses 1

Description: Survey of the history of food and drink, diet and nutrition in a global context.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course may be taken to fulfill GE historical study. This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfil a GE requirement


History 2800- Introduction to the Discipline of History

Instructor: Anderson, Greg

Days/Times: Online

Session: 8-wk Ses 2

Description: Investigation of the methods and analytical approaches historians use to understand the past.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 564. GE historical study and diversity soc div in the US course.


History 3014- Gilded Age to Progressive Era, 1877-1920

Instructor: Haydar, Maysan  

Days/Times: Online

Session: 4-wk Ses 3

Description: Advanced study of U.S. social, political, cultural, foreign policy history from 1877-1920: Industrialization; immigration; urbanization; populism; Spanish-American War; progressivism; WWI.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 564. GE historical study and diversity soc div in the US course.


History 3030- History of Ohio

Instructor: Coil, William  

Days/Time: Online

Session: 8-wk Ses 2

Description: This course will survey the economic, social, and political development of the geographic area that became Ohio from the Native American period to the present. We will explore three themes in particular:  the role of disruptive technology and creative destruction in shaping Ohio’s past; the critical junctures at which Ohio might have become something entirely different from what it became; Ohio’s connection to the wider world through geography, technology, demography, economics, and politics.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:  This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.   


History 3270- History of World War 1

Instructor: Douglas, Sarah

Days/Time: Online

Session: 6-wk Ses 1

Description: In this course, we will focus on the origins, course, and historical implications of one of the most significant turning points in modern world history: the First World War. Often called “The Great War,” the conflict that broke out in the summer of 1914 and lasted for over four bloody, grinding years altered forever the global balance of power; cultural attitudes both inside and outside of Europe; domestic and international political relationships; and basic economic principles that had governed for centuries. Although the war began as a primarily-European conflict, fighting took place in the Middle East, Africa, the Atlantic, and Asia. As such, we will examine the war as a global conflict, considering both the specific aspects of the battles themselves as well as their broader social, political, and cultural context. The course will explore these events and then contemplate the role that World War I played in forming the modern world as we know it.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study course.


History 3301- History of Modern West Africa, post 1800

Instructor: Kobo, Ousman

Days/Time: Online

Session: 4-wk Ses 1

Description: This course explores some major themes in the history of modern West Africa from 1800 to the Present. We will begin by explaining the emergence of modern West Africa countries from the era immediately preceding the colonial conquest, to the emergence of contemporary West Africa states at the end of colonial rule. We will focus on exploring the political, social and economic factors that shaped and continue to shape the region’s history. The course is organized around three major historical periods—the late precolonial, the colonial era and the post-independence. We will select and emphasize only a few themes such as (i) the end of the slave trade and the expansion of colonial settlements that led to colonial conquests and colonial rule; (ii) the role of West Africans in the two world wars; (iii) the struggles leading to independence from colonial rule; (iv) and the struggles to create politically stable and economically vibrant sovereign nations amidst cold war conflicts and global economic crises. We will also examine some aspects of the region’s vibrant culture such as evident in music, fashion and sports. Students should leave this course with the ability to engage in well-informed discussions about modern West Africa and to be able to use the knowledge acquired to guide them in understanding the history of the continent as a whole.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq: English 1110.xx and any History 2000-level course, or permission of instructor. GE historical study and diversity global studies course.


History 3306- History of African Christianity

Instructor: Kobo, Ousman

Day/Time: Online

Session: 8-wk Ses 1

Description: This distance-learning seminar will explore the diverse ways Africans have adopted Christianity throughout their history. As we traverse the history of Christianity on the continent from antiquity to the present, we will pay close attention to the processes of conversion and expansion, and how Africans adapted the Christian faith to meet their own social, political and spiritual needs, and to develop a unique social, intellectual and spiritual identity that scholars can identify as “African Christians” or “African Christianity.” Although, as we will discover, Christianity has been in Africa earlier than many parts of Western Europe, we will focus mostly on the period since 1500, after a brief overview of the classical era. We will examine some major themes such as the role of Africa in the formation of Christian doctrines (during the classical era), the emergence of pre-19th century churches, the spread of mission-Christianity during and after the nineteenth century, the uneasy relationship between colonial rule and missionaries, the growth of African Independent Churches (AIC) in the twentieth century, the resurgence of Pentecostal evangelism, and the ways by which Africans today are contributing in reviving Christianity in the Western world through Africans’ engagements with the global Pentecostalism movement. Although we will consider some elements of continuity between Africa and Europe with regards the processes of conversion and expansion of the faith, the emphasis will be on the development of African expressions of Christianity in sub-Saharan Africa. 

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Prereq: English 1110.xx and any History 2000-level course, or permission of instructor. GE historical study and diversity global studies course.


History 4675- Seminar in World/Global/Transnational History

Instructor: Roth, R.

Day/ Time: Fr (Online) 2:15 pm – 5:05 pm  

Session: Smmr Trm

Description: The course will study the history of violence from the earliest human societies to the present, focusing on theories that scholars have developed to explain violence in its various forms (homicide, genocide, terror, sexual assault, suicide, etc.). We will study historical, scientific, and social scientific debates over the causes of violence, as well as the techniques historians and forensic archaeologists use to estimate the nature and extent of violence in particular societies. The goals of the course are for each student to improve their mastery of research techniques and to write an original, sophisticated research essay, 20 to 25 pages in length, on a particular topic on the history of violence.

Readings: Selected essays on Carmen

Assignments

Discussion and Participation:                  10%

Quizzes:                                                 5%

Research prospectus                              10%

Research bibliography                           10%

Research notes                                      30%

First draft of research paper                    10%

Second draft of research paper                25%

Prerequisites and Special Comments:  History 2800: Introduction to the Discipline of History