Spring 2017 Undergraduate Courses

                                                                       

AFRICAN HISTORY


HISTORY 2301 AFRICAN PEOPLES AND EMPIRES

3 Cr. Hrs.

As a cradle of humanity, Africa is the home of some of the world’s oldest civilizations. Prominent among those are the ancient civilization of Egypt, Nubia, Axum, and Zimbabwe, just to name a few. Africa was also one of first regions in which Christianity and Islam spread and played a major role in African societies. Moreover, the period between the 9th and the 19th centuries witnessed the rise of a series of kingdoms and empires such as Ghana, Mali, Songhay, Benin, Congo, Ashanti, Oyo, and several others. For several centuries these empires played a vital role in African and world histories. In addition to examining the histories and the significance of these empires, the course will discuss the spread and the impact of Christianity and Islam in Africa, trans-Saharan and Indian Ocean trade, European contacts with Africa, and the Atlantic slave trade and its aftermath. These topics will be illuminated through lectures, class room discussion, readings, and films.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

9:35-10:55       TR                               Sikainga, A.

Assigned Readings:

1.            Kevin Shillington, History of Africa, 2012

2.            Erik Gilbert & Jonathan Reynolds, Africa in World History, 2008.

3.            Basil Davidson, African Civilization Revisited, Africa World Press, 1998 

Assignments:

Two exams (midterm and final)

4 Response papers

4 Quizzes

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Africa, pre-1750 for History majors.


HISTORY 2303 HISTORY OF CONTEMPORARY AFRICA, 1960 - PRESENT

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course focuses on the history of independent African states from the end of European colonial rule in 1960s to the present.  This course will discuss the emergence of modern Africa and the challenges of building viable nation states within the context of global politics and domestic difficulties.  Using an interdisciplinary approach and a variety of teaching materials, the course will highlight the most significant developments and events in Africa during this period.  The course will begin with European colonialism and then proceed to discuss nationalism and decolonization, the emergence of modern nation states, the political systems adopted by post-independent African nations, civil wars and conflicts, economic development, political reforms, and the current conditions in Africa.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

12:45-2:05       TR                               Sikainga, A.

Assigned Readings:

Frederick Cooper, Africa since 1940: The Past of the Present.

Richard Reid, A History of Modern Africa: 1800 to the Present, Wiley-Blackwell.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Africa, post-1750 for history majors.                                                                                                                                             


HISTORY 3306 HISTORY OF AFRICAN CHRISTIANITY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This intensive reading and writing class will examine the origins and spread of Christianity in Africa, with a specific focus on the processes by which the interactions between Christian doctrines and indigenous African belief systems produced what we call, African expressions of Christianity.  We will attempt to explain, in the words of Terr Haar, “How [the Christian] God became African.”  Historians once studied Christianity in Africa either as a tool of colonial oppression & alienation, or as a platform for cultural appropriation and resistance against colonial rule.  Today, most historians approach the study of African Christianity as a genuine spiritual expression and the site for mutual cultural borrowing and appropriations between African and Western cultures.  This new approach stemmed from the increasing presence of Pentecostal Churches and Born-again Christianity across sub-Saharan Africa.  These faiths have reformulated the Christian doctrine to conform to the need of Africans without violating orthodoxy, and in the process undermined the influence of the established mission-oriented churches such as the Catholic Church & the various Protestant faiths that seemed too concerned about putative syncretism encouraged by the Pentecostals.  The faith-based and miracle-centered Pentecostal movement emerged from local initiatives as well as external impetus, thus producing a hybrid African Christianity that appealed to urban masses.  Today, Christianity is growing faster in Africa than in the Western world, and Africans are taking Christianity back to the Western world.  The course will therefore not only help students understand the history of Christianity in Africa, but also the transformation of the faith across the globe.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

2:20-3:40         TR                               Kobo, O.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Africa, pre and post-1750 for history majors.                                                                                                                                              


HISTORY 3308 HISTORY OF U.S.-AFRICA RELATIONS, 1900-PRESENT       

3 Cr. Hrs.

Following the September 11 terrorists, the United States began to develop new foreign policy toward Africa that would allow a more active engagement between the U.S. and Africa.  This new policy clearly shaped by the US war on terror, as illustrated by the establishment of the United States Africa Command Force (AFRICOM), and the emergence of Africa as an oil exporting continent. Using a variety of sources, this course explores the history of U.S.-African relations since early 19th century.  We will examine the various factors that shaped US interests or lack of interests, in Africa, and how various African leaders perceived developed strategies for engaging with U.S. interests.  We will pay close attention to specific themes that shaped U.S. African engagements, human rights; politics of HIV/AIDS; democratization; international trade and foreign investments; China-Africa relations; and the new war on terrorism.  We will consider the dynamics of Africa-U.S. relations in these areas in order to assess the degree of continuity and divergence and that factors that shaped these relations.  As former President Bill Clinton remarked in 2000, “There are a thousand reason Africa and the United States should work together for the 21st century, reasons buried deep in our past, reason apparent in the future just ahead.  It is the right thing to do, and it is in the self-interest of all the peoples.  Africa matters to all Americans.”  What are these “thousand reasons”? 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

5:30-6:50         TR                               Kobo, O.

Assignments:

Assignments will include a midterm exam, a number of quizzes, group discussions and short research papers that will be revised and re-submitted as the final assignment.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Africa, post-1750 for history majors.                                                                                                                                              


HISTORY 3704 HIV: FROM MICROBIOLOGY TO MACROHISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

HIV: From Microbiology to Macrohistory is an interdisciplinary exploration of HIV/AIDs that combines history and virology through team teaching.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

3:55-5:15         TR                               McDow, T. & J. Kwiek

In 2012, an estimated 35.3 million people around the world were living with HIV, a number startling close to the estimated number of people who have died from AIDs since 1981.  Unlocking the virological secrets of HIV/AIDs has been one of the grand scientific challenges of the last three decades, and the disease remains one of the world’s most serious challenges to human health and development.  The burden of the disease is very uneven globally, and sub-Saharan African, where the disease originated, is home to 69% of those living with HIV today. How did this virus and this global pandemic come to be? The course traces the evolution of the virus at both the molecular level and within its global historical context.  Team-taught by a virologist and a historian, the goal of this class at the broadest level, is to put the sciences and humanities in conversation.

This course will require students to apply the theory of evolution by natural selection to explain the origin of HIV (chimpanzees in Africa) and the ability of HIV to develop drug resistance and evade an effective vaccine.  The course will simultaneously put these scientific processes and the effects of disease in historical context.  The very scientific revolutions that led to Darwin’s theory of evolution and Koch’s postulates of infection transmission helped make European colonialism possible.  For example Social Darwinism justified imperial aims, Pasteurian ideals of contamination influenced notions of racial purity, and the new field of tropical medicine was created to protect colonial administrators and soldiers in their distant postings.  Similarly, colonial rule and the creation of the extractive economies of central and southern Africa set in motion population movements, wealth inequalities, and structures of power that amplified the effects – decades later – of HIV and contributed to what would become a global pandemic.  Although the academy approaches the medical facts of disease and its social consequences through distinct disciplines, those who had contracted the virus experience all aspects of the disease.  This course makes it possible for students to consider the medical, scientific, social, political, and economic causes and consequences of one of the world’s most devastating viruses.

Assigned Readings:

Students will read primary source, scientific findings, and scholarly publications from the humanities, social sciences, and hard sciences.

Assignments:

Students will complete assignments that are typical of both history and microbiology; they will synthesize these approaches in a final capstone project.  Weekly assessments will ask students to either reflect on the reading or lecture for that week or will ask them to analyze and manipulate scientific data.  The course will have a midterm and final examination that will require students to demonstrate both specific knowledge and their abilities to synthesize material across disciplines.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course is cross-listed and thus has two prerequisites: one historical, one scientific, for history it is a 2000 level (or higher) course and for Biology it is Biology 1101, 1102, 1113 or equivalent. Students who have questions about their preparation should contact the professors.

This course fulfills Group Africa, post-1750 for history majors.                                                                                                                                                          

AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY


HISTORY 2080 AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY TO 1877

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course examines the history of black Americans from the beginning of the African slave trade to just after the Civil War.  Obviously, slavery will be an important part of this class.  We will look at diverse sites of slavery, beginning in the early years and in the North when and where small farm and town/city slaves were the norm.  Our examination of plantation slavery recognizes the changes in that system as the nation evolved from a “society with slaves” into “a slave society,” and we will follow that expansion of slavery westward (across the mountains) and southward (into the Deep South and across the Gulf states).  We begin with the assumption that slavery was chosen as a labor system, not inevitable, and, that once chosen, had to be maintained, thus becoming a social and political system as well.  We will also pay attention to free black people in the North and the South, their diverse efforts to live as free people, and their relationship to those who remained enslaved. Our most important objective is to see and understand how black people - slave and free – lived. As much as this system of slavery could dominate the lives of all black people, whether slaves or not, we will also study their interior worlds of family, work, and community and the ways they sought to and often succeeded in shaping a life and a lifestyle that constantly resisted this system of domination.  

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

2:20-3:40         TR                               Shaw

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group North America, pre or post-1750 for history majors.                                                                                                                                                    


HISTORY 3082 BLACK AMERICANS DURING THE PROGRESSIVE ERA

3 Cr. Hrs.

The Progressive Era in American history, roughly 1890 to 1920, is generally characterized as a period of major changes in American social, political, and economic life.  Americans were becoming increasingly urban; urban areas became more industrial and more socio-culturally diverse, and politics became more complex.  The seemingly rapid and sometimes haphazard changes that accompanied (sometimes spawned and sometimes resulted from) this reorganization also led to major reform movements in many areas of life-in some ways, the most significant characteristic of the era.   Reformers believed that whether in politics, public health, child welfare, government, housing, urban development, work, or any other area of life, the problems generated by rapid urbanization, industrialization, and immigration could be addressed and corrected.  People from all walks of life went to work in ways they thought would improve society.  Implicit in the intellectual/scholarly construct of “the Progressive Era” is the idea of progress and modernization. 

But this period, beginning slightly earlier, has also been labeled “the Nadir”—the lowest point in the history of American race relations.  It was a period of increasing segregation, discrimination, and racial terror, symbolized most especially by lynching and race riots involving white attacks on black communities and individuals.  Despite those horrors, it was also a period of intense and successful organizing and advancements among black Americans:  black clubs, beneficial and benevolent societies were formed; the NAACP, the Urban League, The Negro Business League, the National Association of Colored Women were a few of the national organizations created to for the advancement of the race.  Major black-owned insurance companies, banks, newspapers, and a variety of other important businesses were formed.  And these institutions, along with black migration from the country to the city and from the South to the North and West, contributed to the creation of a racial/cultural identity that would undergird the Harlem Renaissance and shape a black political consciousness that would lead to the beginning of the modern Civil Rights Movement.  Thus this course is a study of that rich, interesting, and complex period in African-American history during which some of the most horrific crimes were committed against black people and some of the most effective community (local and national) development and social and political organizing took place among them.

The course combines lectures and discussions, primary and secondary source and seeks to bring to life this especially important period in black American history during which black people continued the work to realize the “more perfect union” that the Constitution aimed to create.    

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

11:10-12:30     TR                               Shaw, S.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for history majors.                                                                                                                                                         


HISTORY 3085 AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY THROUGH CONTEMPORARY FILM

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course explores the African American experience through the lens of major motion pictures and documentary films.  The aim is for students to gain an understanding of how and why various historical topics have been depicted in movies, and to what extent the film version of particular events reflect reality.  The purpose of the class is to use film to explore and historicize themes such as race and racism, slavery and freedom, oppression and resistance, and to reflect of the meaning of this themes (and films) in today’s society. The films will cover the entirety of the African American experience, from slavery through the present.

This course grapples with a central question: Given the fact that the majority of people in American society rely upon media and film to make sense of the past, to what extent do contemporary films do an adequate job of relaying the “truth” and accuracy of various historical subjects in the African American experience?  As a result, this class examines a variety of topics, including American slavery, African American culture, racial violence, Jim Crow, the civil rights and Black Power movements, and contemporary conflicts between the police and black communities, by examining film that treat these topics in conjunction with historical research.  We will also look closely at a select few recurring issues in films on the African American experience, such as the subordinate role of black women and the use of white characters as the primary narrative vehicles. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

2:15-5:00         M                                 Jeffries

Assigned Readings: The reading list (TBA) will consist of book chapters and articles that explore the central topic of the film selected for in-class viewing. There will also be weekly documentary films to be viewed prior to class via OSU’s Secured Media Site online streaming service.

Course Format: One film will be watched and discussed, in class, each week. Films will include: The Birth of a Nation; 12 Years A Slave; Glory; Life; Straight Outta Compton; and Fruitvale Station, among others.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for history majors.

AMERICAN HISTORY


HISTORY 2001 LAUNCHING AMERICA

3 Cr. Hrs.

History 2001 explores key turning points in American History.  The goal of this course is not only to help you gain a basic factual knowledge of crucial events in American history, such as the competition among European global empires for control in North America, the influence of Native Americans, the rise of African slavery, the American Revolution, the writing of the Constitution and the coming of the Civil War, and the capitalist transformation, but also to develop your ability to think critically about these and other historical issues.  You will discover that there is often more than one interpretation of the various events we study.  By participating in class discussions and completing the reading and writing assignments, you will learn how to analyze evidence, evaluate the interpretations of others, and develop your own informed views. Together we will study who launched America and who shaped its most important qualities.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

On-line            on-line                         Newell, M.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

Not open to students with credit for History 151 or 1151.                                                                                                                                                           


HISTORY 2002 MAKING AMERICA MODERN

3 Cr. Hrs.

This class will introduce students to modern United States history from the end of the Civil War to the War on Terror.  Topics will include the Industrial Revolution, racial segregation, the colonization of Western North America and the Philippines, immigration, women’s suffrage, the Great Depression, World Wars I and II, the Atomic Age, the civil rights movement, and the 2008 financial crash.  For each week of the semester, we will specifically focus on three key themes: the changing role of the federal government, the growth of a market economy, and contests over the meaning of “freedom.”  The period after the Civil War witnessed a revolution in the nation’s economy, new understandings of federal power, and ongoing debates about what it meant to be “free” in a modern society.   Students will be expected to not only identify these themes by the end of the semester but also to explain how they evolved over time. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

11:30-12:25     MW                             Rivers, D.

9:10; 11:30;     Friday (recitations)

12:40

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

Not open to students with credit for History 152 or 1152.                                                                                                                                                           


HISTORY 2010 HISTORY OF AMERICAN CAPITALISM

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will examine the long term development of America’s economic and social organization. Focusing on the reasons for and effects of capitalist growth, students will gain an understanding of how North America turned from a relatively minor outpost of the Atlantic economy to the powerhouse of the world economy, and how this in turn shaped the ways Americans produced and lived. Topics range from the structure of the colonial economy to the economic consequences of the Civil War; from the intellectual foundations of capitalism to the changing structures of American businesses; and from the position of the United States economy in the world economy to the role of the government in channeling economic development. The course will put particular emphasis on the global context of American economic development and situate it deeply in the political and social developments of the age. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

11:10-12:30     WF                              Puig-Raposo, N.

Assigned Readings:

Jonathan Hughes & Louis P. Cain (2007). American Economic History. Pearson. London. Selected chapters.

Jeremy Atack (2014). “America: capitalism’s promised land”. In L. Neal & J. Williamson (eds), The Cambridge History of Capitalism, Cambridge University Press, volume I, chap.17.

Robert J. Gordon (2016). The Rise and Fall of American Growth. The U.S. Standard of Living since the Civil War. Princeton-Oxford. Princeton University Press. Selected chapters.

Primary sources and texts from contemporary authors (available on Carmen).  

Assignments:

Class participation and independent study are crucial to make the most of, enjoy and pass this course. History 2010 is based on three types of activities: reading, analysis of graphs and statistics, and examination of contemporary texts. Students are expected to read the assigned readings (guiding questions will be provided in advance) and to make at least one class presentation related to their research paper.

Grading:

Class participation (25%), a midterm exam (25%), a 5-10 page-long research paper (25%), and a take-home, 5-10 pages long final exam (25%).

Prerequisites or Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group North America; post-1750 for History majors.                                                                                                                                                          


HISTORY 2066 HISTORY OF MEDICINE IN FILM

3 Cr. Hrs.

In this course, we explore the social and cultural history of 20th and early 21st century American medicine through the depiction of health care practitioners and health care systems in Hollywood movies. We use films as our central primary source, watching approximately one a week through the semester. Readings from a variety of secondary and primary sources help us to put these films into their historical contexts.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

9:30-10:55       TR                               Lawrence, S.

Assigned Films:

Assigned films (available through OSU on-line streaming)

Frankenstein  1931

Arrowsmith  1931

The Secret of Dr. Kildare  1939

Welcome Stranger  1947

No Way Out  1950

The Interns  1962

M.A.S.H.  1970

The Hospital  1971

Coma  1978

Whose Life Is It Anyway?  1981

The Doctor  1991

John Q 2002

Contagion  2011

Assignments:

Two five page essays

A take-home midterm

Final exam

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

There are no books to purchase for this course.  Readings will be available via the OSU Library system or in pdf files on Carmen. This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for history majors.  


HISTORY 2705 THE HISTORY OF MEDICINE IN WESTERN SOCIETY

3 Cr. Hrs.

In this course, we explore the intellectual, economic, institutional and cultural relationships that have characterized medicine in the Western world from antiquity to the present. We consider the education of practitioners, locations of healing, and expectations that people had of medicine as ideas about the body and illness shifted with new discoveries and theories about health and disease.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

8:00-9:20         TR                               Lang, K.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group North American and post-1750 for history majors and also fulfills the GE: Historical Study requirement.                                                                                                                                                         


HISTORY 3012 ANTEBELLUM AMERICA

3 Cr. Hrs.

In this course we will be discussing the social, economic, cultural, and political history of antebellum America.  We will explore the experiences of ordinary people, such as farmers, shopkeepers, factory workers, as well as famous names, such as Andrew Jackson and Harriet Tubman.  We will also explore large-scale social processes such as the expansion of slavery, the growth of reform movements, and sectionalism in national politics.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

9:35-10:55       TR                               Cashin, J.

Assignments:

Students will read several monographs; they will write a paper and take one exam.  Students are expected to attend class and meet the course requirements.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for history majors.                                                                                                                                                         


HISTORY 3016 UNITED STATES HISTORY SINCE 1963

3 Cr. Hrs.

Riots, hippies, and rock n’ roll. That’s where we’ll start in this course as we examine American history since the death of John F. Kennedy. It gets more exciting from there as we talk about Black Power, Vietnam, and atomic war with the Soviet Union. We’ll meet some of the most radical activists pushing for civil rights in this country and travel to the arid West where we’ll discuss eco-terrorists plans to blow up dams. As you can see, we’ll be detailing a time of revolution, but we’ll also document how these changes bred backlash. The course will tackle Reaganomics and examine how our economy has changed over time, and in our final weeks of class, we will devote time to a conversation about the most pressing issues of our day—climate change, for example—as we discuss how history can make us better citizens in the twenty-first century. Hang on, because it’s going to be a magical mystery tour. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

9:35-10:55       TR                               Elmore, B.

Assigned Readings:

TBA, but two books should be expected.  Short course readings on Canvas as well.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for history majors.                                                                                                                                                          


HISTORY 3017 THE 1960s

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will examine that tumultuous period, which we know as “The Sixties.”  We will consider as broad themes the rise and fall of Cold War liberalism; the Black Freedom struggle and American race relations; the Vietnam War and American society; American culture in the Age of Aquarius; and, finally, the rise of contemporary conservatism and the so-called white backlash.

In the midst of these broad themes, we will have time to consider many other important ingredients of the period, including the radical student movement; the urban crisis; the technological-consumer society; the sexual revolutions; among many others. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

11:30-12:25     MWF                           Steigerwald, D.

Assigned Readings:

John Lewis, Walking with the Wind: A Memoir of the Movement

Alice Echols, Scars of Sweet Paradise: The Life and Times of Janis Joplin

Robert McNamara, In Retrospect: The Tragedy and Lessons of Vietnam

William Shkurti, The Ohio State University in the Sixties: The Unraveling of the Old Order

Assignments:

Depending on class size, on-line quizzes and discussion assignments.  Four essays amounting to 16-20 pages in all. 

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for history majors.                                                                                                                                                          


HISTORY 3045 AMERICAN RELIGIOUS HISTORY         

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course covers the sweep of American religious history, from the colonial era to the present, focusing on the roles of religious movements and leaders in the development of the United States. Among the topics that we will consider are: spiritual practices and beliefs of indigenous peoples; African religious influences; the impact of religion on European colonization; varieties of Christian expression; Enlightenment ideas about deity; revivalism; evangelicalism and reform movements; the growth of denominations; religion and nativism; American Judaism; church and state; Islam; race and religion; unbelief; liberal theology; the Social Gospel; New Age movements; occultism; and religion and politics, including significant court cases. We will focus on connections between religion and political, social, economic, and cultural developments.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

5:30-6:50         Wednesdays               Irwin, R.

Assigned Readings:

Primary documents and articles on digital reserve, between 70 and 100 pages of reading per week.

Assignments:

Weekly quizzes.

Three short papers (1000 – 1300 words).

Final exam.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This is a hybrid course that combines online lectures and weekly in-person discussions. For majors, this course fulfills Group North America, post-1750.                                                                                                                                                               


HISTORY 3071 NATIVE AMERICAN HISTORY FROM REMOVAL TO PRESENT

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will introduce students to the history of Native Americans from the 1820s to the present.  We will look at the removal of Native tribes to Indian Territory, the establishment of reservation system, the resurgence of Native cultures and pan-Indian movements in the twentieth century, postwar urban migration and tribal termination policies, the Red Power movements of the 1960s, and Native legal organizing in the late 20th and 21st centuries.  The course will encourage the students to think about intersections of gender, race, sexuality, and class and to consider Native resistance movements and cultural persistence over the last two centuries.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

9:35-10:55        TR                           Rivers, D.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for history majors.                                                                                                                                                         


HISTORY 3700 AMERICAN ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

American Environmental History will focus on the history of American ecosystems from last Ice Age to the present. We will study scientific and historical debates over the causes of environmental change. We will spend some time on the history of the environmental movement and environmental philosophy, but our main purpose is to consider the historic impacts of humans and non-human nature on each other.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

11:10-12:30     WF                              Roth, R.

Assigned Readings:

William Cronon, Nature's Metropolis:  Chicago & the Great West (W. W. Norton ISBN-10: 9780393308730, ISBN-13: 978-0393308730)

Alfred Crosby, Ecological Imperialism:  The Biological Expansion of Europe, 900-1900 (Cambridge University Press ISBN-10: 9780521837323, ISBN-13: 978-0521837323)

Andrew Hurley, Environmental Inequalities: Class, Race, and Industrial Pollution in Gary, Indiana, 1945-1980 (University of North Carolina Press, 1995) / ISBN-10: 0807845183 / ISBN-13: 978-0807845189

Donald Worster, The Dust Bowl:  The Southern Plains in the 1930s (Oxford University Press ISBN-10: 0195174887, ISBN-13: 978-0195174885)

J. R. McNeill, Something New Under the Sun (W. W. Norton ISBN-10: 0393321835, ISBN-13: 978-0393321838

Selected scientific and historical essays on Carmen

Assignments:

Quizzes:  There will be five quizzes on the readings in the course.  The quizzes will ask you to report fully and accurately on the content of readings in the course.

Midterm and final examinations:  There will be a midterm examination and a final examination.  The midterm will ask you to write one comprehensive one-hour essay, the final two.

Essay:  You will be asked to write an essay (5 to 6 pages in length). Each should reflect on a major problem in environmental history. You should devote these essays to an analysis of a particular historical and/or scientific debate, or to an analysis of the environmental history of your family.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for history majors.

ANCIENT HISTORY


HISTORY 2210 CLASSICAL ARCHAEOLOGY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Note: This course will be offered ONLY in this online version.  There will be no class meetings and all assignments will be done on the Internet; that means you do not have to come to campus for classes or examinations, but that you must feel comfortable doing the work with your computer.  You must, however, read the assigned books (that you need to purchase) and you may want to visit a library to do some of the assignments.

This course examines the history and methods of Classical Archaeology—the archaeology of ancient Greek and Roman civilizations.  It will investigate how classical archaeology emerged as a discipline and what classical archaeologists actually do.  It will look at a number of the major archaeological sites of classical civilization and how archaeology has contributed to our understanding of the past.  An important feature of this course is that part of it will involve real material and experiences from the Ohio State University Excavations at Isthmia, in Greece!  Students will have a chance to see what the OSU excavation team has been doing and to follow the progress, problems, and successes that make up classical archaeology.

Required Books (print versions):

Brian M. Fagan, A Brief History of Archaeology, Classical Times to the Twenty-First Century (Pearson: Upper Saddle River, NJ 2005).  ISBN 0-13-177698-3

Charles Gates, Ancient Cities, The Archaeology of Urban Life in the Ancient Near East and Egypt, Greece and Rome 2nd edition. Routledge: 2011) ISBN 978-0415498647.

Various online readings, available on the class website, will also be required.

Assignments:

Regular graded online discussion, and a choice of other assignments from a list of examinations and various short projects.  You should expect to spend at least as much time on this course as you would in a regular classroom course.  You will need to be online at least 3-4 times a week for 1-2 hours each time, since much of the material will be delivered this way (but there will be no specific time each week when you must do these assignments—you can choose the time, as long as you get the assignments done when they are due).  In other words, most of the assignments will be done by handing something in, through a tool within the program software, or by posting discussion points on the class site.  Students who are not comfortable using the computer and who do not have access to a fast Internet connection should probably not take the course. 

All students in the class must successfully complete an online Course Organization quiz requiring an understanding of how the class is set up along with several beginning of class activities. This is designed to help you use the tools and requirements of the class before you get started. 

Prerequisites:

There are no special prerequisites for this course and no knowledge of archaeology is presumed. Since this is an online course, with no regular class meetings, students who sign up for the course should feel comfortable using a computer to do their school work (see below).

Special Features:

As mentioned above, this course will bring material directly from Greece for student use.  It will do so with photographs, graphics, and nearly “live” video prepared just for this course.  We have made an online glossary to help you with new words, and there are many new visual displays to help you understand the basic ideas of classical archaeology.  We hope these features will make this an enjoyable experience for you.

Study Abroad Opportunity:

Students taking this class in Spring semester may be interested in taking part in a real archaeological project in Greece this summer.  OSU Excavations at Isthmia have been offering such a program for many years, and this year we have organized an opportunity to participate in two archaeological projects for 8 weeks and earn 9 credit hours of upper division credit.  Students enrolled in this class will, in fact, be given priority for enrollment in this unique and exciting program.  As an aside, successful completion of History 2210 and the summer Study Abroad program will qualify a student for a Minor in History at OSU.

For further information contact Professor Gregory at, gregory.4@osu.edu.                                                                                                                                                            


HISTORY 2221 INTRODUCTION TO THE NEW TESTAMENT: HISTORY AND LITERATURE

3 Cr. Hrs.                                                                                                                                   

This course seeks to examine the Bible historically, from outside the framework of any particular belief system.  It presupposes no previous study in religion or theology, and expands the study of the literatures and cultures of ancient Greece and Rome in the Department of Classics.  Topics include the circulation of letters by an apostle named Paul, the production of the first "gospels" about the life of a Messiah Jesus, and the formation of ancient churches in the ancient city––all in the historical context of the Roman Empire.  What we call the "New Testament" is a not a single book, but an anthology of diverse writings by different authors in the past.  These authors disagreed on crucial matters of faith, community, and discipleship, which continue to divide Christians today.  We will read the entire New Testament as well as important apocryphal works.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

10:20-11:15     MWF               .           Harrill, J. Albert          

Assigned Readings:

1.  The HarperCollins Study Bible, Revised Edition, edited by H. W. Attridge and W. A. Meeks et al. San Francisco: HarperOne, 2006.

2.  Bart D. Ehrman, A Brief Introduction to the New Testament.  3d edition.  Oxford University Press, 2013.

3.  Burton H. Throckmorton, Jr., Gospel Parallels: A Comparison of the Synoptic Gospels.  5th edition.  Nashville: Thomas Nelson, 1992.

Assignments:

Two (2) unit tests and a final examination.  Two (2) interpretative essays.

Prerequisites and Special Comments

This course fulfills Group Near East, pre-1750 for History majors.


HISTORY 3211 HISTORY OF CLASSICAL GREECE

3 Cr. Hrs.

The course explores the history of the classical era, the “Golden Age” of ancient Greece.  It traces political and cultural developments in the world of the Greek city-states from the time of the watershed Persian Wars of 480-479 BC down to the death of Alexander the Great in 323 and its immediate aftermath.  Major topics covered include: the rise of Athens as imperialist superpower and “cultural capital” of the Greek world; the escalating tensions between the Athenian empire and the Spartan-led Peloponnesian League that resulted in the cataclysmic Peloponnesian War (431-404 BC); the subsequent attempts by states like Sparta and Thebes to exercise hegemony over their fellow Greeks; the formation of the world’s first complex democracy in Athens; and the ground-breaking innovations that would shape the future course of art, architecture, philosophy, science, literature, and drama in the western world.  The course will conclude by looking at how the relatively sudden emergence of Philip II of Macedon as the dominant player on the Greek stage effectively ended the era of the independent city-states, and at how the conquest of the Persian empire by Philip’s son Alexander the Great transformed the political and cultural fortunes of Greece and the ancient Near East thereafter. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

11:10-12:30     WF                              Anderson, G.

Assignments: Two exams and a term paper.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for history majors.                                                                                                                                                            


HISTORY 3213 SLAVERY IN THE ANCIENT WORLD     

3 Cr. Hrs.

Slavery was a fundamental component of the ancient family, economy, and society.  Scarcely any classical author wrote without some reference to the institution.  Many scholars today consider slavery the key to an understanding of what life in the ancient world was like.  The purpose of this course is to consider the implications of classical antiquity as a slave society.  In what ways was slavery integrated into Greek and Roman family structures, religion, philosophy, and culture?  Was the institution questioned or attacked as immoral?  What caused slave revolts, the most famous being led a gladiator named Spartacus?  How did ancient Jews and early Christians react to slavery?  What legacies from ancient slavery remain with us today?  Attempts to answer these questions have sparked considerable controversy among scholars in recent years.  This course will introduce the student to this debate, the primary sources, and their difficulties. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

12:45-2:05       WF                              Harrill, B.

Assigned Readings:

Apuleius.  The Golden Ass.  Trans.  E. J. Kenny.  Penguin Books, 2004.

Bradley, Keith.  Slavery and Society at Rome.  Cambridge University Press, 1994.

duBois, Page.  Slavery: Antiquity and Its Legacy.  Oxford University Press, 2009.

Joshel, Sandra R.  Slavery in the Roman World.  Cambridge University Press, 2010.

Shaw, Brent D.  Spartacus and the Slave Wars.  Bedford/St.Martin’s Press, 2001

Assignments

Midterm and Final Examinations.  Two (2) historical essays using primary sources.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for history majors.                                                                                                                                                           


HISTORY 3221 ROME FROM THE GRACCHI TO NERO

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course focuses on Rome’s transform republic to empire.  Topics include the political strife of the late Republic; the rise of Julius Caesar; problem of the Republic’s “fall”; civil war; the Augustan “revolution”; and the Julio-Claudian dynasty.  The course also examines foreign policy and imperial administration, economic and social developments in both Italy and the provinces, family life, women’s status, the impact of slavery, literature, art, and religion.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

12:45-2:05       WF                              Rosenstein, N.

Assigned Readings:

Appian, The Civil Wars

Boatwright, Gargola, and Talbert, The Romans, From Village to Empire

Catullus, The Poems of Catullus

Cicero, Selected Political Speeches

Horace, The Complete Odes and Epodes

Petronius & Seneca, Satyricon & Apocolocyntosis

Plutarch, The Fall of the Roman Republic

Sallust, The Jugurthine War and the Conspiracy of Catiline

Suetonius, The Twelve Caesars

Tacitus, Complete Works

Virgil, The Aeneid

Assignments:

Term paper; midterm; final exam.             

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for history majors.                                                                                                                                                            


HISTORY 3226 THE LATER BYZANTINE EMPIRES

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will be offered ONLY in this online version.  There will be no class meetings and all assignments will be done on the Internet, using the University’s class-delivery system, “Carmen.”  History 3226 will not be offered in a classroom setting this year.  Note that this online class is precisely the same as one offered in the classroom: the requirements, grading system, and credits are precisely the same as any other class at this level.  Online classes offer some freedom of time and location (you don’t have to come to a regular class), but they also require significant self-discipline and the ability to work independently.  Do not make the mistake of thinking that this class will be easier than a regular in-class course.

History 3226 covers the history of the Byzantine Empire from the eleventh century to the fall of Constantinople to the Ottoman Turks (1453). It will focus on the period of the Crusades and the reorganization of the Byzantine state in the Komnenan era, the fall of Constantinople to the Crusaders and the revival of the empire in the 13th century, the emergence of rival Slavic and Turkic states, the final conquest of Constantinople to the Ottomans and the survival of Byzantine culture in the period after 1453 (including modern times).  A primary goal of the class is to promote an understanding of Byzantine civilization in its historical setting; thus, we will seek to comprehend the "mind-set" of the Byzantines and how they reacted to the world around them.  The Byzantines developed a unique civilization, one that was different from that of their classical Greek and Roman ancestors and different from that of their contemporaries in the medieval West.  Even in modern times Byzantium has been generally misunderstood and often maligned.  This course will present the Byzantine achievement in a positive light and allow the student to draw his/her own conclusions about the value of the Byzantine tradition.      

A single textbook is available at SBX and other bookstores:

Timothy Gregory, A History of Byzantium, 2nd edition (ISBN 978-1-4051-8471-7)

Online Readings in Later Byzantine History will be available in the online Carmen class site.           

Assignments:

Regular graded online discussion and a series of quizzes (mandatory), plus a choice of two other graded assignments, from the following list Mid-term and Final Examinations and short papers, and Class Project (you will not have to do all of these assignments, but only a total of 4).

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

Although this course continues the material covered in History 3225, there is no individual prerequisite for the course (beyond those for any 3000-level courses), and no prior knowledge of Byzantine history is assumed. The course is especially appropriate for individuals who want to understand better current affairs in Eastern Europe, Greece, and the Middle East, since many of these have their roots in the Byzantine period.

This course fulfills Group Europe pre-1750 for history majors.

For further information contact Timothy Gregory, at gregory.4@osu.edu.                                                                                                                                                          

ASIAN & ISLAMIC HISTORY


HISTORY 2351 EARLY ISLAMIC SOCIETY, 610-1258

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course explores the rise of Islam and key political, social, economic, and intellectual developments in the various empires that arose during Islam's first six centuries. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

3:55-5:15         WF                              Bolanos, I.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Middle East, pre-1750 for history majors.                                                                                                                                                           


HISTORY 2392 COLONIAL INDIA

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course investigates the history of the Indian subcontinent during British rule, ca. 1757-1947.  

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

3:55-5:15         WF                              Ventatesh, A.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group East Asia, Middle East, South or Central Asia Group, pre-1750 for history majors.                                                                                                                                                           

 


HISTORY 2402 HISTORY OF EAST ASIA IN THE MODERN ERA, 1600-PRESENT

3 Cr. Hrs.

History 2402 will introduce the histories of the societies of East Asia (China, Korea, Japan) starting in about 1600.  To a higher degree than History 2401, which is useful but certainly not required preparation, History 2402 is organized on a 3-way comparative model (“how do China, Japan, or Korea compare to each other?”); one of our goals is to learn to think comparatively about history and societies.  We will survey key historical phenomena (including political, military, social, and intellectual themes) that have distinguished each country in the modern period.  For most of the semester, the course will be organized chronologically and thematically.  It will also seek a balance between examination of particular periods and exploration of patterns of continuity and change across historical periods and different societies.  In addition to providing a basic narrative of East Asian civilization since 1600, the course will introduce students to important written sources and to historical writing.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

1:50-2:45         MW                             Reed, C.

11:30; 1:50; 3:00                                 Friday (recitations)

Assigned Readings:

A textbook, a monograph, primary sources, short films.

Assignments:

TBA, similar to other courses at this level.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

History 2401 is NOT a prerequisite for History 2402.


HISTORY 3410 STUDIES IN CHINESE HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

History of Chinese Religion

This course offers an overview of the history of Chinese religion. We focus on the development of multiple religious traditions in pre-1900 China.  But we also think about how the history of Chinese religion helps us understand the Chinese culture, society, and governance in the twentieth-first century.  We will explore the following questions: How do we describe the relationship between the state and diverse religious systems in the long history of imperial China? How did the major religious systems—such as Confucianism, Buddhism, and Daoism—interact with one another and evolve together? How was the history of Islam and Christianity intertwined with the early phase of globalization? How did the evolution of Chinese religion intersect with and contribute to the changes in politics, gender, ethnicity, and East-West connectivity?

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

12:45-2:05       TR                               Zhang, Y.

Assigned Readings:

Students will read translated historical material and interdisciplinary scholarship.

Assignments:

Readings: Most available electronically.  Students must do the readings before coming to lecture and discussion in class.

Other assignments: short papers (analysis of visual and literary material); teamwork on visual presentation of small research projects.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

No knowledge of Chinese or Chinese history is required.

This course fulfills Group East Asia, pre-1750 for history majors.                                                                                                                                                   


HISTORY 3426 HISTORY OF MODERN JAPAN

3 Cr. Hrs.                                                                                                           

This course treats major elements of Japanese history in the 19th to 21st centuries: political developments over three different regimes (late pre-modern, pre-WWII and post-War), socio-cultural transformation, and international contexts. Several themes are emphasized: changing relations between local communities and their governments; commercialization and industrialization of the economy; imperialism (Western and Japanese) and its outcomes; the development of science and technology in Japan; and the environmental contexts of Japanese history.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

10:20-11:15     MWF                           Brown, P.

Assigned Readings:

Gordon, Andrew, A Modern History of Japan: From Tokugawa Times to the Present

Nakazawa, Kieji, Barefoot Gen: A Cartoon Story of Hiroshima, Vol. I

Terasaki, Gwen, A Bridge to the Sun: A Memoir of Love and War

Tsutsui, William, Godzilla on My Mind: Fifty Years of the King of Monsters

Other books selected by students from a list of possibilities

Several additional articles.

Assignments:

Book review

Course paper employing Nakazawa, Terasaki and/or Tsutsui (no other research required)

Final

Midterm

Prerequisites and Special Comments: 

This course fulfills Group East Asia, post-1750 for history majors.

EUROPEAN HISTORY


HISTORY 2202 INTRODUCTION TO MEDIEVAL HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course offers an introduction to Medieval History through the use and critique of popular representations of the period and its people in contemporary media (including film, television, games, and historical fiction).

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

WF                  12:45-2:05                   Favorito, R.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for history majors.


HISTORY 2203 INTRODUCTION TO EARLY MODERN EUROPE

3 Cr. Hrs.

In this survey course, we will study the history of Europe from the Black Death to the Congress of Vienna. This course examines social, cultural, religious, political and economic developments from the mid fourteenth to the early nineteenth century. We will study the cultural world of this pivotal period through primary sources, film, and recent scholarship by historians. Among the questions we will discuss are:  What were the intellectual movements of The Renaissance, the Scientific Revolution, and the Enlightenment? How did states evolve through empire, absolutism, and revolution? How did religious practice transform communities during the Reformation, the Wars of Religion, and the witch craze?  And how were people’s daily lives shaped by such large-scale changes?

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

11:10-12:30     TR                               Bond, E.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for history majors.


HISTORY 2204 MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This class introduces students to the political, social, and cultural developments that made the fabric of modern Europe. The course adopts a broad understanding of European history, examining developments on the peripheries of Europe and the European colonies overseas. We will explore the main features of the modern period, including the emergence of different models of state- and nation-building in Europe; the birth of representative politics and democratic institutions; scientific innovation, industrialization, and the new technologies; the ideologies of modernity such as conservatism, liberalism, socialism, and nationalism; the effects of European colonialism and imperialism; the new social classes and changing gender roles; the triumph of the nation-state and the limits of self-determination in the interwar period; the challenges to the democratic order and experiments in socialism and fascism; the Holocaust and ethnic cleansing; the divided world during the Cold War and the overthrow of the communist regimes; and decolonization and globalization. Combining a survey textbook with primary sources and fiction, students will learn and debate about the historical trends that created the modern European state, society, and culture.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

10:20-11:15     MW                             Dragostinova, T.

9:10; 10:20      Friday (recitations)

12:40               Friday (recitations)

Assigned readings:

Brian P. Levack et al, The West: Encounters & Transformations, Vol. II: Since 1550, 4th ed.

Others readings to be announced.

Assignments:

Midterm: 15%

Two 3-page papers: 30% (15% each)

Final: 25%

Participation and discussion (including weekly responses): 20%

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Europe, post-1750 for history majors.


HISTORY 2220 INTRODUCTION TO CHRISTIANITY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Introduces students to the historical study of Christianity as a religious tradition.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

3:55-5:15         TR                               Beshay, M.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for history majors.


HISTORY 2270 LOVE IN THE MODERN WESTERN WORLD

3 Cr. Hrs.

The course will address the following questions: What were ancient Jewish and Christian ways of loving and how did they play out in Western history? Why does the Marquis de Sade lurk behind the philosophy of eighteenth-century love? Were the Victorians sexually repressed, and if so what was the impact on how they loved? Why did Victorians believe that if a woman had a child sired by a second man it might resemble the biological father of her first child? What do we know about genetics, the placental barrier, blood typing, and sexual reproduction that our ancestors did not? How have improvements in contraception and obstetrics impacted love? Why are women's faces and eyes typically highlighted in courtship imagery, while men are in profile and off center? How was love influenced by bicycles, automobiles, movies, telephones, television, the internet, and smart phones? Is love an unchanging instinct or does it have a history? Is it conceivable that love becomes more authentic, more humanizing from generation to generation? Or have we rather lost something along the way? How does reading about love or taking courses about love affect how one loves? How have psychoanalysis and existentialism influenced love? How have changes in the social, economic, educational, political, medical, and legal status of women affected love? How do wars and sexual transmitted diseases affect love? How is love socially constructed? How does the influence of parents change historically? Do men and women love differently, and if so, how do those gender modes vary historically?

The readings will be from my book on the subject, selections from Simone de Beauvoir's classic statement of existential feminism, and three representative novels from 1847, 1920, and 1992, marking three moments in the history of loving. A number of lectures will be slide presentations exploring love in art, and one class will be devoted to the magnificent love duet in Wagner’s opera Tristan and Isolde. Lectures will cover the history of love since antiquity, although the readings and the three assigned papers (4 pages each) will concentrate on the last two centuries.

A two-day writing workshop will prepare students to write the assigned papers.  By the end of the course students will have specific guidelines for improving their writing skills and three opportunities for putting them into practice.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

2:20-3:40         TR                               Kern

Assigned Readings:

Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre

D. H. Lawrence, Women in Love

Carol Shields, The Republic of Love

Simone de Beauvoir, The Second Sex (selections).

Stephen Kern, The Culture of Love: Victorians to Moderns

Diana Hacker, A Pocket Style Manual 3rd. Ed.

This course fulfills Group Europe, post-1750 for history majors.                                                                                                                                               


HISTORY 2275 CHILDREN & CHILDHOOD IN THE WESTERN WORLD

3 Cr. Hrs.

While the process of developing from infancy through childhood into adult life is a biological phenomenon, the specific ways in which children have been treated and understood vary enormously across time and place.  In this class we will explore the history of children in the Western World from Antiquity to the present.  How has the role of children in Western culture changed across the centuries?  Have relationships between parents and children changed?  How has the understanding and treatment of children changed?  Ultimately, we will seek to define both changes and continuities in the lives of children in the Western world.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

11:10-12:30     TR                               Soland

Assigned Readings: Readings will consist of a mixture of primary and secondary sources.  All readings will be available on Carmen.

Assignments: 2 short papers (3-5 pages) plus final paper (15 Pages)

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group Europe, pre or post-1750.                                                                                                                                              


HISTORY 2475 THE HOLOCAUST

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will examine the state-sponsored murder of millions of Jews and non-Jews by the Nazis and their collaborators during World War II.  Together we will trace the interrelated individuals, institutions, historical events, and ideologies that allowed for the Holocaust to occur.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

8:00-9:20         WF                              Freeman, K.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Europe, post-1750 for history majors.


HISTORY 2500 20TH CENTURY INTERNATIONAL HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Examines the international, political, economic, and military relations from the origins of World War I through the breakup of the Soviet Union.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

8:00-9:20         WF                              Larson, Z.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Europe, post-1750 for history majors.


HISTORY 3246 TUDOR & STUART BRITAIN, 1485-1714

3 Cr. Hrs.

The Tudor-Stuart era is one of immense change in British society.  Britain left behind the Middle Ages and embraced the modern era, but what that entailed was a great deal of crisis and upheaval. This course will analyze some of the following themes and events: changes in what it means to be a king and ideas about the state (especially with respect to Henry VIII, Elizabeth I and James I); the Reformation and the emergence of the Anglican church; the emergence of poor law, heresy laws, and new methods of punishment; the Elizabethan stage; the Great Fire of London and its rebuilding; bubonic plague and public health measures; Parliament’s rise in power; witch-hunts, the witch-craze, and new science; Quakers, Shakers, Ranters, Puritans; Levellers, Diggers, and other early socialists; the English Civil War; the Scottish Presbyterian movement; Thomas Hobbes, Robert Filmer, John Locke, and exactly what did happen in the Garden of Eden; early modern environmentalism; John Milton;  the changing place of women; a world turned upside down!; Jacobites and the Glorious Revolution. The course will be a lecture / discussion class and great emphasis will be placed on the reading of primary source material.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

12:45-2:05       TR                               Butler, S.

Assigned Readings:

·         Carole Levin, The Heart and Stomach of a King: Elizabeth I and the Politics of Sex and Power (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1994).

·         Newton Key and Robert Bucholz, Early Modern England, 1485-1714: A Narrative History, 2nd ed. (Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, 2008).

·         Newton Key and Robert Bucholz, Sources and Debates in English History, 1485-1714, 2nd ed. (Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, 2009).

Assignments:

·         Book review (of Levin’s The Heart and Stomach of a King)

·         Research Essay

·         Mid-term and final examinations

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750.                                                                                                                                               


HISTORY 3250 REVOLUTIONARY & NAPOLEONIC EUROPE, 1750-1815

3 Cr. Hrs.

History 3250 is designed as a survey of European, but especially French history from the crisis of the Old Regime to the end of the wars of the French Revolution.  Through course lectures, small-group discussions, primary source analysis, and film, this course provides students with intellectual tools and information with which to make sense of this period of political, social, and cultural change.  Although this course will focus on France itself, we will also evaluate the global interactions that shaped the course of the French Revolution in France and abroad.  We will study France in comparison to other European states in order to explain what was unique about the French context, making Revolution possible there.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

2:20-3:40         TR                               Bond, E.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Europe, post-1750.                                                                                                                                              


HISTORY 3252 PEOPLE ON THE MOVE: MIGRATION IN MODERN EUROPE

3 Cr. Hrs.

In this course, students learn about European migrations from the late 19th century until the present. First, they explore patterns of economic migration within and out of Europe due to changes in economic relations and, mainly, the advent of industrialization. In this section, students learn about European migrations to the USA, the disillusionment and return of many migrants back to Europe, and the nativist attitudes in US society vis-a-vis Irish, Italian, Jewish, and Eastern European migrants. Second, students examine the emergence of political migrations in Europe associated with the rise of nationalism and study in detail the various refugee flows in the continent during and after the Great War and World War II, with a focus on the plight of Jews from Germany during the 1930s and 1940s. Third, students examine the emergence of the Iron Curtain in Cold War Europe, with a special focus on developments in divided Germany and the building of border fortifications between East and West Germany. Finally, they examine the transformation of Europe into a continent of immigration after 1945, paying special attention to the evolving situation of the Turks in Germany, Algerians in France, and Indians and Africans in Britain.

Throughout the class, students debate the changing meaning of ideas of nationhood, border control, citizenship, community, sovereignty, and international law, making constant comparisons between historical and contemporary developments. The goal is to think through what history can teach us about current events and realize how historical analysis can provide us with the tools to better comprehend complex global crises related to human mobility.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

12:45-2:05       WF                              Dragostinova, T.

Assigned Readings:

Saskia Sassen, Guests and Aliens (New York: New Press, 1999).

Mark Wyman, Round-Trip to America: The Immigrants Return to Europe, 1880-1930 (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1996).

Deborah Dwork and Robert Jan van Pelt, Flight from the Reich (New York: Norton, 2012).

Peter Schneider, The Wall Jumper:A Berlin Story  (Univ. Chicago Press, 1998).

Faiza Guene, Kiffe Kiffe Tomorrow (New York: Harvest Books, 2006).

Aleksander Hemon, The Book of My Lives (Picador, 2014).

Assignments:

Discussion and Weekly responses to the readings on Carmen: 15%

Three 5-page essays: 45% (15% each)

Final research project: 30%

Attendance: 10%

Prerequisites and Special comments:

This course fulfills Group Europe, post-1750 for history majors.


HISTORY 3260 MODERN BRITISH HISTORY, 1775-1920

3 Cr. Hrs.

This lecture course provides a survey of British history, including imperial history, from the late eighteenth to the twentieth century.  It covers many dimensions of British history: political, economic, social, religious, medical, technological, and environmental. The central themes of the course are the rise of liberalism as a political and economic theory, the development of industrial and urban society, the dramatic growth of the British empire, the Irish famine and its aftermath, the rise of social problems. The course will explore how Britain and its governments attempted to generate economic strength while simultaneously ameliorating the ‘social question’. The tensions between economic freedom and social protection remain central to British politics, just as they do in America.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

9:35-10:55       WF                              Otter

Assigned Readings: None; readings are posted weekly on Carmen.

Assignments: Midterm, final paper, final examination

Prerequisites and Special Comments

This course fulfills: Group Europe, post-1750 for history majors.                                                                                                                                               


HISTORY 3277 20th CENTURY EUROPEAN THOUGHT AND CULTURE

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course surveys the most dynamic period of Western cultural history, roughly 1890-1940, which saw a spectrum of revolutionary developments: modern art (Pablo Picasso, Wassily Kandinsky); modern literature (James Joyce, Marcel Proust); relativity and quantum theory (Albert Einstein, Werner Heisenberg); modern music (Arnold Schoenberg, Igor Stavinsky), psychoanalysis (Sigmund Freud); and existential philosophy (Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir).  Smack in the middle was the hugely destructive First World War. The first part centers on novellas by Joseph Conrad and Thomas Mann that foreshadow the decline of Western Civilization.  The second part covers Friedrich Nietzsche and the “death of God,” my book on the impact of new transportation and communication technologies on time and space as well as the war, and Virginia Woolf’s challenge to men and women in her classic feminist manifesto.  The third part is divided between Freud’s efforts to promote mental healing and Sartre’s attempt to define what it means to be a human being.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

2:20-3:40         WF                              Kern, S.

Assigned Readings:

Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness

Thomas Mann, Death in Venice

Friedrich Nietzsche, Nietzsche and the Death of God, ed. by Peter Fritzsche

Stephen Kern, The Culture of Time & Space: 1880-1910

Sigmund Freud, Introductory Lectures on Psychoanalysis (selections)

Virginia Woolf, A Room of One’s Own

Jean-Paul Sartre, The Philosophy of Jean-Paul Sartre (selections)

James Joyce, Ulysses (selections)

Assignments: Students write three papers 4 pages based on the readings and class discussions.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This class fulfills Group Europe, post-1750 for the history major.                                                                                                                                               


HISTORY 3590 WARS OF EMPIRE: EUROPE’S “SMALL WARS” OF THE 19th & 20th CENTURIES

3 Cr.  Hrs.                    

In the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Europe’s empires expanded madly.  In 1800, Europe and its possessions covered approximately 55% of the globe; in 1878, 67%; and in 1914, Europe and its possessions covered 84.4% of the globe.  This grand burst of imperial expansion was only achieved through great military effort.   The wars of empire through which the modern European empires “pacified” the regions they conquered were considered to be “Small Wars,” because they were felt to be conflicts that were imbalanced, with well-trained, well-equipped regular troops on one side, and what one military theorist called “savages and semi-civilized races” on the other.  In these military clashes of civilization vs. semi-civilization, “civilized” Europe was expected to easily triumph.

History tells a different tale, however.  Time and time again, Europe’s great empires found themselves challenged and thwarted on the battlefields of Asia and Africa.  This course will examine the means, methods, challenges and results of Europe’s military encounters with the indigenous forces who sought to push back the tide of imperial conquest.  We will look at a number of examples from the histories of the British, French, and Russian and Italian Empires, discussing both the military and imperial contexts of these struggles.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

11:10-12:30     TR                               Siegel, J.

Assigned Readings (tentative):

The reading may include:

Callwell, Col. C.E. Small Wars, Their Principles and Practice (1899)

Fraser, George MacDonald, Flashman

Assignments:

Weekly readings and class discussions

Midterm and Comprehensive final

Map quizzes

Two short papers.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750.                                                                                                                                               


HISTORY 3711 S SCIENCE AND SOCIETY IN EARLY MODERN EUROPE

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will deal with the scientific revolutions of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.  We will discuss changing ideas in astronomy and physics, but also in technology, chemistry, cosmography, medicine, and other areas.  The focus of the course will be on the interactions between science and society.

This is a second session course (3/1/17 - 4/24/17).

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

9:35-12:20         WF                              Goldish

Assigned Readings:

Readings will consist of a textbook, a book of primary sources, and possibly one or two further small monographs or some articles.

Assignments:

Grades will be based on quizzes, exams, and a paper.  No background knowledge is necessary

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills group Europe, pre-1750 for the history major.                                                                                                                                                           

JEWISH HISTORY 


HISTORY 2450 ANCIENT AND MEDIEVAL JEWISH HISTORY, 300BCE -1100CE

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course surveys nearly fifteen centuries of Jewish history, religion, and culture in the Near East from the days of the Maccabees (second century B.C.E.) to the death of Moses Maimonides (1204 C.E.).  Focusing on key figures and representative subjects, the lectures will seek to offer a balanced picture of the Jewish experience in the ancient and early medieval periods. Special emphasis will be placed upon the evaluation and interpretation of primary sources (in translation). These texts will introduce students to the political, social, intellectual, and spiritual worlds of ancient and medieval Jewry.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

12:45-2:05       TR                               Frank

Assigned Readings:

The following titles are required; they can be purchased from SBX:

1. H.H. Ben-Sasson, A History of the Jewish People.

2. David Biale, Cultures of the Jews, Vol. I: Mediterranean Origins

2. Lawrence H. Schiffman, Texts and Traditions:  A Source Reader for the Study of

Second Temple and Rabbinic Judaism.

Assignments:

1.  There will be six ungraded written assignments; each will consist of a 250 word response to an assigned question (you will be given a choice).  Essays will be checked, but not individually graded or marked. All assignments must be completed on time.

2.  There will be four quizzes, which will be drawn directly from the short-answer questions posted on CARMEN.  The lowest grade will be dropped.

3.   There will be two examinations: the first will cover material presented in sessions 1-13. It will consist of both short-answer and essay questions. The second examination will cover material presented in sessions 14-26.  It will consist of both short-answer and essay questions. Study guides will be distributed in advance of each examination.

4.  There will be one book review of five pages (1,250 words). Guidelines and a list of books will be provided in a separate document.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Global, pre-1750 for history majors.                                                                                                                                               


HISTORY 3470 MESSIAHS & MESSIANISM IN JEWISH HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will deal with the ways in which Jewish messiahs, messianic speculation and messianic ideas over the course of 2,000 years have acted as agents of change.  Topics covered will include Christianity, Talmudic messianism, medieval and modern movements, and major historiographical debates on the topic.

 Time               Meeting Days              Instructor

9:35-10:55       WF                              Goldish

Assigned Readings (tentative):

Matt Goldish, The Sabbatean Prophets

Harris Lenowitz, The Jewish Messiahs, From the Galilee to Crown Heights

Marc Saperstein, ed., Essential Papers on Messianic Movements & Personalities in Jewish History

Readings on Carmen.

Assignments:

Quizzes

In-class writing assignments

Paper

Take-home bibliographical exercise

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Europe, pre & post-1750 for the history major.                                                                                                                                                 

LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY

 


HISTORY 3106 HISTORY OF MEXICO

3 Cr. Hrs.

Mexico faces many crucial issues today: drug cartels and drug trafficking, immigration, NAFTA, the Chiapas rebellion, the role of the United States, neo-liberal reforms and oil, the distrust of Mexico’s ruling party, among many others.  Although these important topics are relatively recent, their historical context can be located throughout several centuries of struggle.         

HIST 3106 analyzes Mexico’s dynamic and exciting history from the pre-Conquest era to the present. Throughout the semester we will examine patterns of conflict and negotiation, including the great Mexican Revolution, which shaped Mexico’s historical future until today. In addition to a study of Mexico’s politics, we also will emphasis the ways in which everyday people participated in and influenced cultural and political events. Issues of gender and the role of women, race and ethnicity will be emphasized in the lectures, as will Mexico’s transcultural interactions and conflicts. Additionally, the course will explore Mexico’s rich culture, including movies, literature, and artists, such as the painters Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera.

Several themes considered during the course are: 1. The diversity of Mexico’s pre-Columbian indigenous societies; 2. The Conquest; 3. The complex interactions between the Spaniards and the indigenous populations of Mexico; 4. The colonial era, including the development of colonial political, economic, and social systems; 5. The Independence movements; 6. The 19th century breakdown into chaos; 7. The modernizing “Porfirian” dictatorship; 8. The Mexican Revolution; 9. The rise of the country’s one-party state, the Institutional Revolutionary Party (P.R.I.); 10. The 1968 student movements; 11. The post-1968 political, social and economic struggles; 12. Mexico’s ongoing struggles for just economic development, and the continuing movement for inclusion by Mexico’s indigenous population; 13. Mexico’s border with the United States, including the movement of peoples; 14. Mexico’s current critical issues, including the “drug wars” and immigration.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

9:35-10:55       TR                               Smith

Assigned Readings: TBA

Assignments:

Midterm, final and a paper.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Group Latin America, pre/post-1750 for majors.                                                                                                                                              

MILITARY HISTORY


HISTORY 2550 THE HISTORY OF WAR

3 Cr. Hrs.

The History of War examines the evolution of warfare and its impact on human civilization from antiquity to the present. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

8:00-9:20         TR                               Watson, M.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Global, post -1750 for history majors.  This course also fulfills the GE historical study requirement as well as the GE Global diversity requirement.                                                                                                                                               


HISTORY 3270 WORLD WAR I

3 Cr. Hrs.

In this course, we will focus on the origins, course, and historical implications of one of the most significant turning points in modern world history: the First World War.  Often called “The Great War,” the conflict that broke out in the summer of 1914 and lasted for over four bloody, grinding years altered forever the global balance of power; cultural attitudes both inside and outside of Europe; domestic and international political relationships; and basic economic principles that had governed for centuries. Although the war was a European conflict, fighting took place in the Middle East, Africa, the Atlantic, and Asia. As such, we will examine the war as a global conflict, considering both the specifics aspects of the battles themselves as well as their broader social, political, and cultural context. The course grade will be comprised of attendance, a midterm, a final, and a 5-7 page essay on a topic to be discussed in lecture.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

11:10:12:30     TR                               Douglas, S.

Assignments:

Attendance: 15%

Midterm: 25%

Paper: 25%

Final Exam: 35%

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Global, post -1750 for history majors.                                                                                                                                              


HISTORY 3551 WAR IN WORLD HISTORY, 1651-1899

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course is an introduction to the salient concepts and problems involved in the study of military history from the mid-17th century to the turn of the 20th century.  The most significant development during this period was the rise of the West (Europe and its settler societies, such as the United States) to global dominance. Consequently it will be a prominent course theme.  We will also give extended attention to the ways in which the Age of Democratic Revolution (circa 1760-1800) and the Napoleonic Wars (1803-1815) profoundly influenced military affairs in Europe and the United States.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

2:20-3:40         TR                               Grimsley, M.

Assigned Readings (tentative):

Wayne E. Lee, Waging War: Conflict, Culture, and Innovation in World History.

Victor Davis Hanson, Carnage and Culture:  Landmark Battles in the Rise of Western Power.

Gunther E. Rothenberg, The Napoleonic Wars.

Assignments:

Two midterm examinations and a final examination, each with an essay-based take home portion and an in-class “objective question” portion.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

There are no prerequisites, but a basic knowledge of Western Civilization or World History is helpful. This course fulfills Group Global, post -1750 for history majors.                                                                                                                                              


HISTORY 3560 AMERICAN MILITARY POLICY, 1607-1902

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course describes and analyzes the history of American military policy from the colonial period to the end of the Philippine War. It focuses on the creation of American military institutions, the genesis of policy-making and maintenance of civilian control over that process, the interrelationship between foreign and military policy, the conduct of war, and the influence of American society upon the armed forces as social institutions.

Students will achieve an understanding of the main developments in American military history, the ways in which these developments have reflected or shaped developments in general American history, and the main interpretations advanced by scholars who have studied this subject. They will also hone their skills at critical writing and analysis, and will gain greater insight into the way historians explore the human condition.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

12:45-2:05       WF                              Grimsley, M.

Assigned Readings:

Allan R. Millett and Peter Maslowski, For the Common Defense: A Military History of the United States of America., Revised & Expanded Edition.
Fred Anderson, A People's Army: Massachusetts Soldiers and Society in the Seven Years' War.
James M. McPherson, For Cause and Comrades.
Steven E. Woodworth, Beneath a Northern Sky:  The Short History of the Gettysburg Campaign.

Assignments: (tentative)

First midterm examination (25 percent); Second midterm examination (35percent)
Final examination (40 percent).

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

Although there are no prerequisites, a solid grounding in U.S. History is very helpful.

This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for History majors.                                                                                                                                               


HISTORY 3570 WORLD WAR II

3 Cr. Hours

World War II was the largest and most destructive war in human history.  More than seventy years after it ended, the war continues to shape our world.  This course examines the causes, conduct, and consequences of this devastating conflict.  Through readings, lectures, and video, the class will study the politics that shaped the involvement of the major combatants; military leadership and the characteristics of major Allied and Axis armed services; the national and theater strategies of the various major combatants; the military operations that led to victory or defeat on battlefields spanning the globe; war crimes; and other factors such as leadership, economics, military doctrine and effectiveness, technology, ideology, and racism that impacted the outcome of the war.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

12:45-2:05       TR                               Mansoor, P.

Assigned Readings:

Williamson Murray and Allan R. Millett, A War to be Won: Fighting the Second World War

West Point History of Warfare (online only)

Michael Lynch, Hitler

E. B. Sledge, With the Old Breed

Assignments:

In-class mid-term and final examinations

Two book reviews (2-3 pages each).

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

AP History credit or successful completion of another college-level history course.

This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for history majors. This course also fulfills the historical study and global studies category of the GE.                                                                                                                                               

THEMATIC COURSE OFFERINGS


HISTORY 2704 WATER: A HUMAN HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Throughout human history and across this very diverse planet, water defines every aspect of human life: from the molecular, biological, and ecological to the cultural, religious, economic, and political. We live on the “blue planet.” Our bodies are made up primarily of water. Without water, life as we understand it could not exist. Indeed, water stands at the foundation of most of what we do as humans: in irrigation and agriculture; waste and sanitation; drinking and disease; floods and droughts; fishing and other food supply; travel and discovery; scientific study; water pollution and conservation; dam building; in the setting of boundaries and borders; and wars and diplomacy. Water lies at the very heart of almost all world religions (albeit in very different ways). The control of water is at the foundation of the rise and fall of civilizations, with drought and flood perpetual challenges to human life.  Water serves as a source of power (mills, hydro-electric dams), and access to water often defines (or is defined by) social and political power hierarchies. Water plays an important symbolic role in the creation of works of literature, art, music, and architecture, and it serves as a source of human beauty and spiritual tranquility. Thus, to begin to understand ourselves as humans—our bodies, minds, and souls, past and present—we must contemplate our relationship to water.

At the same time, water resources—the need for clean and accessible water supplies for drinking, agriculture, and power production—will likely represent one of the most complicated dilemmas of the twenty-first century. The World Water Forum, for instance, reported recently that one in three people across the planet will not have sufficient access to safe water by 2030. As population grows, glaciers melt, hydrological systems change, and underground aquifers are depleted, many analysts now think that the world will fight over water more than any other resource in the coming decades. The moral and logistical question of how to ration water (who gets access and for what purposes) will be a foundational ethical question of the twenty-first century.

In this class, we will examine a selection of historical moments and themes to explore the relationship between people and water over time and place.  The format of the course will be a combination of lectures, in-class discussions, workshop activities, and presentation of your work to your fellow classmates. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

12:40-1:35       MW                             Breyfogle, N.

11:30; 12:30    Friday  recitations

&  3:00           

Assigned Readings:

(This list is tentative and the specific books may change)

Richard White, The Organic Machine: The Remaking of the Columbia River

Graham Swift, Waterland

Valentin Rasputin, Farewell to Matyora

Mary Lynn Rampolla, A Pocket Guide to Writing in History (8th edition)

* Other shorter readings available on Carmen

Assignments:

This course requires one mid-term exam, one paper, a final exam, various other quizzes and brief writing assignments, and active and engaged in-class discussion and activities.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

Coreq or Prereq:  English 1110.xx

For Students Following the Semester Requirements:

This is a GE course.   This course fulfills the following GE requirements: 

1.    "Historical Study,"

2.    "Culture & Ideas or Historical Study,"

3.    Open Option and

4.    “Diversity-Global Studies”

History Minor:   History 2704 counts toward the history minor, which typically requires only four courses to complete and may overlap up to six hours with general education requirements. 

For History Majors:  this course fulfills the following Geographic, Chronological, and Thematic requirements:  “Comparative/Transnational/Global” post-1750, ETS and PCS

For Students Following the Quarter Requirements:

This is a GEC course.  This course fulfills the second half of the GEC Category 5. Arts and Humanities A. Historical Survey.  It also fulfills the GEC category “International issues western (non-United States) course.”                                                                                                                                                           


HISTORY 2800 INTRODUCTION TO THE DISCIPLINE OF HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course introduces undergraduate history majors to the methods and skills that historians use to study the past, and it considers some of the problems we face in interpreting evidence, assessing arguments, and presenting our research to others.  We will use a series of exercises to work on our basic skills, and two case studies will enable us to reflect on historical problems in more depth: the puzzling case of a missing and returned soldier in sixteenth-century France, and the murder of Hypatia in fifth-century Alexandria.  Students will identify and analyze primary and secondary sources on specific topics that interest them. This is a seminar, in which students will be expected to prepare work and participate in each class meeting.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

11:10-12:30     WF                              Brakke, D           

Assigned Readings:

Conal Furay & Michael Salevouris, The Methods & Skills of History (4th ed)

John Lewis Gaddis, The Landscape of History: How Historians Map the Past

Natalie Zemon Davis, The Return of Martin Guerre

Assignments:

Assignments will include exercises from Furay and Salevouris, short written assignments (e.g., précis, a book review, a movie review).  The “final examination” will be a proposal and dossier for a research paper.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course is required for all students declaring a Major in History; students must earn a C or higher to have it count on the Major.  It may not be used for the GE Historical Study requirement.                                                                                                                                                          


HISTORY 2800 INTRODUCTION TO THE DISCIPLINE OF HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course is designed to introduce undergraduates to the historical method, that is, how historians write history.  We will learn how to distinguish between primary and secondary sources, and we will examine important events in historical context.  We will concentrate on a specific issue, dissent during the Civil War.  We will explore opposition to the war effort in both the North and the South, in addition to the larger role that dissent played in the war’s outcome.    

Time               Meetings Days             Instructor

12:45-2:05      TR                                Cashin, J.

Assigned Readings:

Students will read a textbook, two monographs, and a variety of documents generated by nineteenth-century Americans.  These documents can be found online, such as newspapers, located at Ohio State University Library; Official Records of the War, at Cornell University; Documenting the American South, at University of North Carolina. 

Assignments:

Students will also write three short papers on different aspects of wartime dissent.    

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course is required for all students declaring a Major in history, students must earn a “C” or higher to have it count on the history major. It may not be used for the GEC/GE Historical Study requirement.                                                                                                 


HISTORY 2800 INTRODUCTION TO THE DISCIPLINE OF HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will introduce students to historiography and historical methodology – that is, to different interpretations of history and to different methods of studying it.  Among the themes to be covered in the course are gender and history, historical commemorations, and cultural representations of historical events.  Topics will include student unrest in the 1960s, including the feminist movement, the civil rights movement, and the anti-war movement.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

On-line            On-line                        Hoffmann, D.                                   

Assigned Readings:

Students will be required to read several articles or a book every week – the equivalent of ten books during the semester.

Assignments:

Students will have weekly written assignments based on the course readings.  These assignments will amount to roughly 7 short papers. In addition, students will be required to participate regularly in online discussions.  They will also conduct historical research which will culminate in 3 longer papers or projects.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

The course is intended primarily for history majors and minors, though it is open to all students.  However, the course does not fulfill any GE requirements, so it should not be taken by students seeking to fulfill the GE historical studies requirement.                                    


HISTORY 2800 INTRODUCTION TO THE DISCIPLINE OF HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course, designed for students planning to major in history, presents some of the main elements of historical methodology: how historians do their work. We shall study how historians gather information, organize and analyze their data, and write up their research and conclusions. In short, we will learn how history is produced. Students will gather experience in dealing with primary and secondary historical sources, interpreting events within their historical context, and developing a comparative understanding of historical phenomenon. This is a required course for all History majors.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

12:45-2:05       WF                              Staley, D.

Assigned Readings:

John Tosh, The Pursuit of History, 6th edition

Getz & Clarke, Abina and the Important Men

Jo Guldi & David Armitage, The History Manifesto

Assignments:

1) Attendance: worth 10% of final grade.

2) Participation: worth 25% of final grade

3) Creating an archive: worth 15% of the final grade

4) History and Wikipedia 15% of the final grade

5) Digital history project: worth 15% of the final grade

6) Final essay worth 20% of the final grade

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course is required for all students declaring a Major in History. Students must earn a C or higher to have it count on the Major. It may not be used for GE requirements.                                                                                                                                               


HISTORY 2800H INTRODUCTION TO THE DISCIPLINE OF HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

What is history? In this course, we explore how historians seek to understand the past.  We cover the challenges of finding and interpreting evidence, constructing convincing arguments, and dealing with different ways of thinking about historical questions. Doing history well requires close reading, logical analysis and imagination. It also requires careful writing. We work on improving these skills as students develop a research proposal on a topic of their own choosing.

Time               Meetings Days             Instructor

2:20-3:40        TR                                Lawrence, S.

Assigned Readings:

Students are required to have Joseph M. Williams and Joseph Bizrup, Style: Lessons in Clarity and Grace (12th edition), New York: Pearson, 2016; Kate Turabian, A Manual for Writers of Research Papers, Theses, and Dissertations (8th edition), Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2008 and Allan Megill, Historical Knowledge, Historical Error: A Contemporary Guide to Practice, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2007. All of other course readings are available electronically. We read digital images of archival sources, printed primary sources, academic articles, selections from books, and scholarly websites.  

Assignments:

Students are expected to attend class and to participate actively in every discussion. Students complete short essays (3-4 pages) on specific skills, including analysis of a primary source, analysis of an academic article, comparative evaluation of the quality of four websites devoted to historical topics and a book analysis.  The final project is a proposal for a research project in history supported by a bibliography that includes archival sources, printed primary sources, and scholarly academic sources.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course is required for all students declaring a major in History; this version is highly recommended for honors students in History; students must earn a C or higher to have it count towards the major.  It may not be used for the GE Historical Study requirement, unless the student submits petition to their college Honors committee.                                                                                                                                                    


HISTORY 3191 HISTORICAL INTERNSHIP

3 Cr. Hrs.

One of the most important experiences you can have as an undergraduate, many experts on higher education say, is the hands-on knowledge you gain from holding an internship.  Most employers now suggest that you have at least one internship experience as an undergraduate, and many recommend more than one.

Why?  An internship will help you explore some of the possibilities in the “real world” for using the skills you’re acquiring.  You’ll have practice in using them, in learning new ones, and in knowing how to describe what you can do for prospective employers.   You’ll have the opportunity to network, as well as to learn how organizations work and how work culture takes shape in light of institutional goals.  You’ll get experience you can put on your resumé, along with the confidence that comes from experience.

In this course, you’ll have the opportunity to choose from a range of internship possibilities at nearby historical and history-related institutions and agencies.  You’ll receive three credit hours for your semester-long work experience, along with the chance to reflect with your peers on what you’re learning about history, historical skills, and future career directions.  By the end of the course, my hope is that you’ll have a better sense of who you are and who you want to become in the future as a contributor to the work force.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

ARR                ARR                            Cayton, M.

Assigned Readings: Maybe an occasional short article.  

Assignments/Course Requirements:

(1)   Six class meetings of 90 minutes each (time to be arranged)

(2)   Initial assignment request, with rationale (500 words)

(3)   60 hours of work during the semester (or an average of 6 hours per week) in internship assignment

(4)   Bi-weekly blog posts in response to prompts.

(5)   A final reflection paper of 1000-1500 words.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: History majors preferred, minors are ok too. You must have completed at least one History course at the 2000-level. You can find a description of the goals and requirements of the History Department Internship Program & a list of last year’s internships https://history.osu.edu/undergrad/internships.The list will be updated by October 15.                                                                                                                                                    


HISTORY 3650 FAMILIES IN HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE

3 Cr. Hrs.

We all know that families play an important role in our society.  But what exactly do we mean by “the family,” and how has this definition changed over time?  Does the family mean the same thing to people across cultures, or across time periods?  How do our culture’s normative ideals about family life compare with our lived experiences of family relationships?  How do families shape history, and how does historical change shape family lives? 

This course examines families in comparative and transnational perspective.  We’ll take examples from many times and places, and focus especially on how sexuality, gender, race, ethnicity and class shape family history.  From families of birth to families of choice, from the legalization of gay marriage to debates about transracial adoption, we’ll consider family history as a window into a wider world of social, political, economic, and cultural change.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

9:35-10:55       WF                              Sreenivas, M.

Prerequisites & Special Comments: This course fulfills group Global, post-1750 for history majors.                                                                                                                                                           


HISTORY 4010 READINGS IN MODERN U.S. HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Sex, Youth and Moral Panic

In the early twenty-first century, conflicts over sexuality, race, drugs, and gender are central components of U.S. politics and culture.  From the Daily Show to presidential campaigns, concerns about issues such as sex and violence in the media, same-sex marriage, or crime have periodically divided and united different groups of Americans.  This class will explore the origins of these debates, moving from the early twentieth century to the present.  In particular, we will discuss the powerful role of the market in shaping Americans’ cultural identities and producing “moral panics” over youth and family.  We will cover topics such as racial segregation, the entertainment industry, youth culture, gay and lesbian life, dating, pornography, drug prohibition, and social conservatism.  Over the course of the semester, we will ask: Why have Americans periodically expressed chronic anxiety about children and youth?  Are these concerns entirely new and what are their root origins?  How has Americans’ understanding of sexuality and race changed over time?

This course is an upper-level seminar, designed to encourage critical analysis of scholarly articles and books and primary source research.  Like all 4000-level courses, this seminar is reading and writing intensive, and students should come to class prepared to discuss their work.  By the end of the semester, they should be able to explain the role of race, gender, sexuality, and the market in perpetuating some of the nation’s “culture wars,” think critically about scholarly texts, and write papers that analyze primary sources about race, gender, and sexuality.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

11:10-12:30     TR                               Howard, C.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills the reading seminar requirement toward a history major for semester students; this fulfills the 598 seminar requirement for quarter students. This course is only open to junior and senior history majors.                                                                     


HISTORY 4080 READINGS IN AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Childhood in Slavery and Freedom

Children occupy a unique place in the history of Atlantic chattel slavery and emancipation. They were at once the means of slavery’s continuation after the transatlantic trade was abolished, the subject of abolitionist protests against the system’s cruelty, and symbols of the post-emancipation future. Long considered unknowable, historians have recently taken up questions concerning how child subjects experienced slavery. Combining examples of this recent scholarship with slave narratives, children’s literature, poetry, conduct manuals, novels (nineteenth-century and contemporary), and film, this class will trace the history of enslaved children from the beginnings of the transatlantic slave trade through to post-emancipation period, with particular emphasis on the U.S. and British Caribbean. It will also consider how legacies of child enslavement shape the present. Questions addressed in this class include: How did a child’s experience of the Middle Passage, bondage, and emancipation differ from an adult’s? What did it mean to grow up enslaved? What effect did the trauma and dislocation of slavery have on childhood? What effect does it have on notions of race and family today? How did enslaved children adapt to or resist bondage? How did enslaved people’s notion of kinship differ from enslavers? What did freedom mean to parents and children? How did their lives change or stay the same with slavery’s end? How do we interpret these lives when so few sources authored by children survive? Can fiction be a useful historical source for this purpose? What is Ohio’s place in the history of child enslavement and emancipation?

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

11:10-12:30       Tuesday & Thursday      Thomas, A.

Assignments:

The assignments will include a class presentation, a research paper, and participation in class discussion.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills the reading seminar requirement toward a history major for semester students; this fulfills the 598 seminar requirement for quarter students. This course is only open to junior and senior history majors.                                                                     


HISTORY 4255 RESEARCH SEMINAR IN MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course examines different perspectives on migrations within, out of, and (back) to Europe from the late nineteenth century until the present. The course explores human mobility in several discreet contexts, industrialization, the growth of nationalism, the dynamics of the world wars, and the emergence of a multicultural European society after 1945, comparing and contrasting developments in Eastern and Western Europe.  The seminar engages theories of migration, diaspora, citizenship, nationality, and empire and studies how notions of nationality, citizenship, and border control influenced migration movements in Europe. 

After reviewing the literature in the first half of the semester, during the second half of the seminar each student will write a research paper on a case study of his/her choice. Students will make extensive use of the OSU Library print and electronic resources and visit the library for presentations and hands-on experiences on how to use these resources in historical research.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

12:45-3:30       Monday                       Dragostinova, T.

Assigned readings (tentative):

Saskia Sassen, Guests and Aliens (New York: New Press, 1999).

Tara Zahra, The Great Departure: Mass Migration from Eastern Europe and the Making of the Free World, (New York: Norton, 2016)

Bruce Clark, Twice a Stranger: The Mass Expulsions that Forged Modern Greece and Turkey (Cambridge, Ma: Harvard University Press, 2007).

Atina Grossmann, Jews, Germans, and Allies: Close Encounters in Occupied Germany (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2008).

John Bowen, Can Islam Be French?: Pluralism and Pragmatism in a Secularist State  (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2008).

Aleksander Hemon, The Book of My Lives (Picador, 2014).

Assignments:

Two short papers: 20% (10% each)

Final 20 page research paper (60%) executed in multiple stages

Weekly participation and discussion: 20%

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course is designed for senior History majors and fulfills the RESEARCH Seminar requirement for all History Majors.                                                                                                                                              


HISTORY 4400 READING SEMINAR IN CHINESE HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Gender and Sexuality

This seminar introduces students to historical research on women, gender, and sexuality in Chinese history. We will look into a cluster of interlocking questions: gendered aspects of the political system; changes and continuities in the Confucian gender system; the intersection of gender, sexuality, ethnicity, religion, and class; meanings of liberation, oppression, victim, and agency; the politics of writing women’s history in transcultural and global contexts; the particularities of Chinese masculinity, etc. We will also think about how our own gender politics and temporal location shape our reading of the history of Chinese women, as well as how a gendered approach changes the way we examine historical evidence and interpret historical events. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

2:20-5:05         Tuesday                      Zhang, Y.

Assigned Readings:

Books and articles in English, most of which are available electronically.

Assignments:

Readings: Students will read and present on assigned chapters/articles each week.  They will also be asked to work with visual material.

Written assignments: short review papers; a research paper on a topic of the student’s own choice.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course is designed for junior and senior History majors and fulfills the Reading Seminar requirement for History Majors. No Knowledge of Chinese or Chinese history is required.                                                                                                                                 


HISTORY 4430 RESEARCH IN JAPANESE HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

“Toxic Archipelago?: Research in the Environmental History of Japan”

Japanese environmental history brings into sharp focus a number of the key issues confronting modern societies as they deal with the full range of human-envi-ronmental interactions.  From response to global warming, to very local issues of waste disposal, from extensive management of rivers to ocean farming, and hazards associated with urban life, Japanese society has often confronted key environmental issues before other societies.  Nature provides great opportunities, but also high impact, high magnitude natural threats:  earthquakes, volcanoes and more.  Man-made pollution has been extreme (1960s Tokyo police took oxygen breaks from directing traffic, urban rivers transported sewage and industrial waste, their recreational use inconceivable).  Japan’s experience provides both models in the resolution of such environmental challenges, as well as warnings for others.

Student research projects will explore these and related issues over the course of the 19th to 21st centuries. A rich body of English-language material is available for students to utilize – Japanese English language newspapers, government white papers, and more. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

12:45-3:30       Wednesday                 Brown, P.

Assigned Readings:

Conrad Totman. Japan: An Environmental History. I. B. Tauris

Mary Lynn Rampolla. A Pocket Guide to Writing in History. Bedford/St. Martin’s  

Selected articles, book chapters (PDF).  

Assignments:

Half-page response papers for readings

A research problem statement

Book review (one)

Annotated bibliography (0ne)

Draft of research paper (with presentation to class)

Final research paper

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

History 4425 is desirable foundation, as is past experience in the study of environmental history, Japanese history or East Asian history.  Feel free to contact the instructor to discuss this course before registration.  This course fulfills the RESEARCH requirement for the history major.                                                                                                                                                          


HISTORY 4600 READINGS IN WOMEN’S & GENDER HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

“Queens, Slaves, Consorts, and Concubines":
Power and the Royal Household in Global Perspective:

This course examines the intricate dynamics of power within royal households, with case studies ranging from the Roman Empire, to Imperial China, to France’s Bourbon Dynasty, and the court of Queen Nzinga of Matamba. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

2:00-4:45         Tuesday                      Watkins, S.

Assigned Readings:

Readings will challenge students to use feminist theories of domestic and intimate labor to reconceptualize how member of the royal household—kings and queens, princesses, concubines, royal mistresses, and slaves—manipulated their intimate roles to exercise power within monarchical and imperial states.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course is designed for junior and senior History majors and fulfills the Reading Seminar requirement for History Majors.                                                                                                                                                            


HISTORY 4675 RESEARCH SEMINAR IN WORLD/GLOBAL/TRANSNATIONAL HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

The History of Violence

Histories of violent crime and violent death have proliferated over the past forty years, as historians have tried to understand the causes and consequences of violence, and the ways in which rates of violence have varied across time and space. Some of these histories are "microhistories."  They focus on particular crimes in an effort to understand the social and cultural circumstances that produced particular acts of violence in the past. Other studies examine nations, regions, communities, or ethnic groups over longer periods of time. These studies look for broader patterns in violent crime and violent death (including homicides, sexual assaults, domestic violence, accidents, suicides, genocides, and terrorism), in an effort to understand when, where, and why aggressive, self-destructive, or reckless behavior has been more common.

Students will have the opportunity to write a research paper from primary sources on a topic of their choice, exclusive of military history, since other seminars cover that topic. They may conduct their research in any period or geographical region. Although most students will probably choose to study the history of violence in the United States, students who are proficient in languages other than English will be encouraged to work with primary sources in those languages, as long as appropriate sources are available on-line or through the Ohio State University Library. Students might work with a particular crime, or with a coroner's book from a particular county, or with a local newspaper and its accounts of crime and violence.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

2:20-5:05         Friday                          Roth, R.

Assigned Readings will include:

Steven Pinker, The Better Angels of Our Nature: Why Violence Has Declined. New York: Viking, 2011. (ISBN-10: 0670022950, ISBN-13: 978-0670022953)

Assignments:

Written Assignments:  Research prospectus, research bibliography, research notes, progress reports, and research paper (20-25 pp., two drafts).

Exams:  quizzes on the reading in Pinker.

Grading:

            Discussion, participation, and quizzes                        10%

            Research bibliography                                                10%

            Research prospectus                                      15%

            Research notes                                               15%

            First draft of research paper                           15%

            Second draft of research paper                        35%

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills the research seminar requirement toward a history major for semester students; this fulfills the 598 seminar requirement for quarter students. This course is only open to junior and senior history majors.                                                                    


HISTORY 4700 READINGS IN THE HISTORY OF ENVIRONMENT, TECHNOLOGY & SCIENCE

3 Cr. Hrs.                    

“Water in Human History”

This course explores the place of water in human history.   Water defines human life, from the molecular to the cultural and political.   We live on the Blue Planet.   Our bodies are made up primarily of water—we are in essence wandering sacks of water.   Without water, life as we understand it would simply cease to exist.   Yet water resources—the need for clean and accessible water supplies for drinking, agriculture, and power production—will likely represent one of the most complicated dilemmas of the twenty-first century.  The World Water Forum, for instance, reported recently that one in three people across the planet will not have sufficient access to safe water by 2025.  Many analysts now think that the world will fight over water more than any other resource in the coming decades.  In this seminar, we will examine a selection of historical moments and themes to explore the relationship between people and water over time and place.  The course will examine such historical topics as:   Water as sacred substance; water as power; the politics of water; irrigation and agriculture; water for waste and sanitation; drinking water and disease; floods and droughts; fishing; travel and discovery; scientific study of water; water pollution and conservation; dam building; and water wars and diplomacy.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

12:45-3:30       Thursday                     Breyfogle, N.

Assigned Readings:

(This list is a very tentative and the specific books may change)

Richard White, The Organic Machine: The Remaking of the Columbia River

Paolo Squatriti, Water and Society in Early Medieval Italy, AD 400-1000

David Blackbourn, The Conquest of Nature: Water, Landscape, and the Making of Modern Germany

David Pietz, The Yellow River: The Problem of Water in Modern China

Marc Reisner, Cadillac Desert:   The American West and its Disappearing Water

Brian Fagan, Elixir: A History of Water and Humankind

Michael Cathcart, The Water Dreamers: The Remarkable History of our Dry Continent

Jean-Pierre Goubert, The Conquest of Water: The Advent of Health in the Industrial Age

David Biggs, Quagmire: Nation-Building and Nature in the Mekong Delta

Mark Carey, In the Shadow of Melting Glaciers: Climate Change and Andean Society

Heather Hoag, Developing the Rivers of East and West Africa: An Environmental History

Assignments:

Grades will be determined based on 1) active class participation, informed in-class discussion of weekly readings, and regular attendance, 2) an in-class presentation; 3) short, weekly written comments on readings; and 4) a final paper on a topic of water history chosen by the student in consultation with the instructor (as part of writing the final paper, students will be asked to submit a bibliography and outline of the paper at different points during the quarter as preparation for the final project.)

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course is designed for junior or senior History majors and fulfills the “Readings Seminar” requirement for the degree in History for Majors that began OSU in the semester system.  It fulfills the 598 seminar requirement for history majors that began OSU in quarters.       

WOMEN'S HISTORY


HISTORY 3214 WOMEN, GENDER, & SEXUALITY IN THE HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will focus on women, gender, and (to a lesser extent) sexuality in Christianity during the first three centuries, until the conversion of Constantine in 312.  After a brief look at the roles of women in other religious traditions of the ancient Mediterranean, we will consider the writings of the New Testament and such second- and third-century sources as martyrdom accounts, apocryphal gospels and acts, church orders, and Gnostic mythology.  We will study literary depictions of Christian women, the significance of gender in Christian theologies and narratives, the roles that women played in Christian communities, and the debates that these issues provoked.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

2:20-3:40         WF                              Brakke, D.

Assigned Readings:

The HarperCollins Study Bible (New Revised Standard Version) (ed. Wayne A. Meeks)

Ross Kraemer and Mary Rose D’Angelo, Women and Christian Origins

Bart Ehrman, After the New Testament: A Reader in Early Christianity (2nd edition)

Assignments:

Attendance and participation, midterm and final exams, and two short (non-research) papers.  Interested students may choose to substitute a longer research paper for the midterm and short papers.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

Some previous study of early Christianity (such as HIST 2221 or 3229) will be helpful, but is not required.  There are no prerequisites.


HISTORY 3640 MEDIEVAL WOMEN, POWER, PIETY AND PRODUCTION

3 Cr. Hrs.

The goal of this class is to explore the changes in women’s rights and roles in medieval society over the course of the high and late Middle Ages (covering the period of roughly 1050-1500) from a comparative perspective.  Discussions will focus on female agency, especially: the gap between prescription and reality, the difficulty of being categories as either an “Eve,” or a “Mary” (especially when it is all too easy to become a “Mary Magdalene”; women’s contributions to medieval society; ideas and attitudes about women. Discussion topics include: the barbarian legacy, ideas about women (from the church to anatomy), women and property law, marriage and sexuality, women and the church, education and literacy, gendered space, rebellious women, queens and royal dowagers, and singlewomen. We will also spend a lot of time talking about famous medieval women in order to become aware that history is not just a catalog of the events of great men – women have also contributed substantially to the world in which we live.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

9:35-10:55       TR                               Butler, S.

Assigned Readings:

All readings can be found as pdfs on Canvas / Carmen.  To give you an idea of what we’ll be reading, here are some of the titles:

  • Anne L. Klinck, “Anglo-Saxon Women and the Law”
  • Vern L. Bullough, “Medieval Medical and Scientific Views of Women”
  • Ruth Mazo Karras, “Sex and the Middle Ages”
  • Fiona Harris Stoertz, “Suffering and Survival in Medieval English Childbirth”
  • Rasa Mazeika, “Nowhere was the Fragility of their Sex Apparent: Women Warriors in the Baltic Crusade Chronicles”
  • Merry Wiesner, “Having her Own Smoke: Employment and Independence for Singlewomen in Germany, 1400- 1750”

Assignments:

  • Each student will choose to research a medieval woman (from Trotula of Salerno, to Eleanor of Aquitaine – there are saints, scholars, patrons, and regular women).  Students will work in groups to present that woman to the class, but work separately to write her biography.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for history majors.

WORLD HISTORY


HISTORY 2642 WORLD HISTORY, 1500-PRESENT

3 Cr. Hrs.

In this course we explore the sweeping historical changes that created today's world. We trace the key processes that reshaped the politics, cultures, and economies of various regions since 1500. While Europe and the United States are part of our focus, we primarily consider Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East. Each of these geographic regions became enmeshed in a global system affected by far-reaching religious transformations, mercantile activity, industrial growth, and imperialism/colonialism. Finally, we study the influences of modern nationalism, Cold War dynamics, and anti-colonial movements in the twentieth century. By semester's end, students learn to think like a historian in order to grasp and analyze the major trends underlying more than five centuries of world history.

Time               Meetings Days             Instructor

9:35-10:55      WF                               McDow

Assigned Readings:

The readings will include a textbook, a collection of primary sources, and two short books, at least one of which will be a graphic novel.

Assignments:

Assignments will include midterm and final examinations; regular reading responses; several short quizzes; and two short papers.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for history majors.                                                                                                                                                    


HISTORY 2700 GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

In this course we explore how humans have shaped the environment and how the environment has shaped human history from prehistory to the present.  Our topics will range from fire to deforestation to climate change. Students will learn the essential background to major environmental issues and consider how history might (or might not) help us to confront environmental challenges in the present and future.

Time               Meeting Days             Instructor

10:20-11:15    MW                             White, S.

9:10; 10:20      F (recitation)

12:40               F (recitation)

Assigned Readings:

J. R. McNeill and Peter Engelke, The Great Acceleration: An Environmental History of the Anthropocene since 1945 (Cambridge, MA: Harvard Belknap, 2016), and other readings TBA.

Assignments:

In-class quizzes and exercises, weekly recitation sections, and one essay written in multiple stages.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

Prerequisite: English 1110.01 previous or concurrent.

Undergraduate Program Credit:

History: This course may be counted as Group Global, and either “pre-1750” or “post-1750.”

GE: This course may be taken to fulfill one [but only one] of three GE Requirements: 

3. Historical Study; 4C: Social Science: Human, Natural, and Economic Resources; 6B:

I would encourage students in the natural and social sciences and professional fields related to the environment to take this course as well as history students.                                                                                                                                                    


HISTORY 2702 FOOD IN WORLD HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course explores food and drink from prehistory to present.  We will examine the roles of food and drink in all aspects of human lives from human evolution to religion, politics, commerce, class, war, and national identity.  Students will learn both how food has shaped history and how history can help us understand modern food systems, modern diets, and their associated environmental and health costs.  The course will place particular emphasis on the interaction between material and cultural factors in history. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

12:45-2:05       WF                              White, S.

Assigned Readings:

Jeffrey Pilcher, Food in World History (New York: Routledge, 2006), and other readings TBA.

Assignments:

In-class quizzes and exercises and one class essay, written in multiple stages.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills the Global, post-1750 category for history majors and GE historical study.

 

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To find course availability and times, please visit the Ohio State Course Catalog and Master Schedule.