Spring 2018 Graduate Courses

HISTORY 5080 READINGS IN AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Topic: Non-plantation Slavery during the Antebellum Era

 
It is probably the case that when most people think about antebellum slavery, the image of a plantation comes to mind.  It is not an illogical image given the critical participation of slaves in the production of American agricultural products, especially cotton, tobacco, rice, corn, wheat, indigo, hemp, and sugar.  Directly and indirectly, agricultural slave labor generated a substantial (often the largest) portion of American wealth in nineteenth-century America and on some other parts of the world.  But this course takes a different tack:  it looks at slavery in non-plantation/agricultural contexts and the slave experience beyond the plantation.  These individuals worked in cities, in mines, in factories, on rivers, and in homes, among other places.  And they came in contact with town/urban environments in diverse ways, beyond their efforts to earn a wage.  In addition to these details, we will also pay especial attention to the diverse ways historians have discussed these slaves, their lives, and their labors, and how these discussions have changed over the last hundred years.  
 

Time                      Meeting Days                    Instructor
12:45-3:30           Wednesday                        Shaw, S.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
Graduate standing. 


HISTORY 7086 CIVIL RIGHTS & BLACK POWER MOVEMENTS

 

This graduate reading course in African American history will focus on the Civil Rights and Black Power Movements. It begins by looking at black activism and black life during the Jim Crow era. It continues by examining the grassroots organizing campaigns led by the young radicals of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), and by examining the civil rights roots of the Black Power Movement. It concludes by examining Black Power organizations, specifically the Black Panther Party, and Black Power struggles, primarily in the urban North. Broadly, this course aims to make clear the process of social movement formation. More specifically, it seeks to explicate the process by which seemingly powerless African Americans, in both the North and the South, organized to transform the society in which they lived, and the way white Americans, from rural hamlets in Mississippi to the halls of Congress, responded.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:40-3:25       Monday                       Jeffries, H.           

Assigned Readings: TBA

Assignments:
3-5 book reviews
10-15-page historiographical essay on a Civil Rights/Black Power theme of the students choosing due at the end of the quarter.

Prerequisites and Special Comments
Graduate students only. 


HISTORY 7210 SEMINAR IN ANCIENT HISTORY

Gnosticism and Manichaeism

 
This seminar will study the major religious movements of late antiquity that scholars have traditionally gathered under the rubric “Gnosticism”: the Gnostic (“Sethian”) school of Christian thought, Valentinian Christianity, the Thomas literature, and Manichaeism.  We will read in translation literature that survives from these movements (along with some relevant intertexts, such as Plato’s Timaeus), and we will consider the current debate over how to define and interpret Gnosticism as well as other issues in contemporary scholarship.
 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
ARR                 ARR                             Brakke, D.

Assigned Readings:
Bentley Layton, The Gnostic Scriptures
Iain Gardner and Samuel N. C. Lieu, Manichaean Texts from the Roman Empire
Marvin Meyer, The Nag Hammadi Scriptures: The International Edition
Antti Marjanen (ed.), Was There a Gnostic Religion?
Additional primary literature (Plato and Platonists, Jewish apocalyptic, etc.)
Additional secondary literature

Assignments:
Attendance and participation; one or more reports/reviews on secondary books or articles; a major paper on a relevant topic of the student’s choice.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
Day and time of 2-hour weekly meeting will be arranged among the participants after the conclusion of registration.  Ancient sources will be read in English, but knowledge of Greek, Latin, Coptic, and/or Syriac will be helpful. Graduate standing. 


HISTORY 7230 SEMINAR IN MEDIEVAL HISTORY

“Medieval England: A Social History”

 
G.M. Trevelyan once defined “social history” as “the history of the people with the politics left out.”  Although many have criticized the simplicity of his definition, Trevelyan aptly expresses the challenge of working in a field where the nature of the history is not always obvious. Politics produce political history; religious institutions produce religious history; armies and wars produce military history.  What is the cause of social history? Social history is a big broad amorphous field encompassing “human as well as the economic relations of different classes, the character of family and household life, the conditions of labor and leisure, the attitude of man towards nature, and the cumulative influence of all these subjects on culture, including religion, architecture, literature, music, learning and thought” (David Cannadine). This course aims to introduce students to the field of social history, using medieval England as our model.  In doing so, we will explore a variety of different approaches to historical study:  spatial theory, feminist theory, masculinity studies vs identity politics, demography and quantitative methods, legal history, material history, economic theory, and the history of emotions. This course will also introduce students to some of the major thinkers in this field, including: Barbara A. Hanawalt, P.J.P. Goldberg, Shannon McSheffrey, Ruth Mazo Karras, Cordelia Beattie, Sandy Bardsley, R.N. Swanson, Jacqueline Murray, Charles Donahue, Jr., Judith Bennett, Maryanne Kowaleski, and Marjorie McIntosh.
 
Subjects that we will address include: social hierarchy (especially the Great Chain of Being); domesticity and the material household; communal living, including the question “what is the community?”; masculinity across the ranks; women and what it means to be feminine; gender and the clergy, asking in particular whether clergy should be considered a third gender; marriage and what it meant in the medieval context; women and work (because yes, women have always worked); single women (yes, they did exist); the experience of childhood; standards of living; gossip and reputation; leisure time. 
 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
2:15-5:00          Monday                       Butler, S.

Assigned Readings:
All readings will be available as journal articles on Carmen.
Grade breakdown:
60% Research Essay
40% Participation

Prerequisites and Special Comments
Graduate standing. 


HISTORY 7280 SEMINAR IN RUSSIAN, SOVIET & EURASIAN HISTORY


To commemorate the centennial of the world-changing February and October Revolutions in Russia, this semester’s graduate seminar will explore the theme of “Russia in War and Revolution, 1905-1925.”  This intensive reading course is designed to introduce students to the historiography of Russia/Soviet Union/Eurasia during the region’s time of troubles in the early twentieth century.  The seminar will explore the era’s dazzling, dynamic creativity and unbearable, horrifying cruelty and violence.   We’ll explore fin de siècle Russia, the Russo-Japanese war of 1904-05, the gripping 1905 revolution and its aftermath, World War I, the Revolutions of 1917, the Civil War, and the establishment of the Soviet government and society.
 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:45-3:30       Wednesday                 Breyfogle, N.

Assigned Readings:
This is a very tentative list and specific books will change.
David Schimmelpenninck van der Oye, Toward the rising sun: Russian ideologies of empire and the path to war with Japan
Andrew Verner, The Crisis of Russian Autocracy: Nicholas II and the 1905 Revolution
Charters Wynn, Workers, Strikes, and Pogroms: The Donbass - Dnepr Bend in Late Imperial Russia, 1870-1905
Rochelle Goldberg Ruthchild, Equality and Revolution: Women’s Rights in the Russian Empire, 1905–1917
Laura Engelstein, The Keys to Happiness: Sex and the Search for Modernity in fin-de-Siècle Russia
Stephen Jones, Socialism in Georgian Colors: The European Road to Social Democracy, 1883-1917
Dominic Lieven, The End of Tsarist Russia: The March to World War I and Revolution
Peter Gatrell, A Whole Empire Walking: Refugees in Russia during World War I
Michael Reynolds, Shattering Empires: The Clash and Collapse of the Ottoman and Russian Empires 1908-1918
Alexander Rabinowitch, The Bolsheviks Come to Power: The Revolution of 1917 in Petrograd
Aaron Retish, Russia's Peasants in Revolution and Civil War: Citizenship, Identity, and the Creation of the Soviet State, 1914-1922
Heather Coleman, Russian Baptists and Spiritual Revolution, 1905-1929
Daniel Beer, Renovating Russia: The Human Sciences and the Fate of Liberal Modernity, 1880-1930
Joshua Sanborn, Drafting the Russian Nation: Military Conscription, Total War, and Mass Politics, 1905-1925

Assignments:
Reading: 1 book per week
Informed and intelligent in-class discussion
4-6 four-page reviews of books
Final Historiographical, analytical, 15-20-page essay

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
Open to graduate students only.  Previous knowledge of Russian history is helpful, but by no means necessary.


HISTORY 7301 AFRICAN HISTORIOGRAPHY & METHODOLOGY


This course provides an overview of the various schools of thought and practice in the writing and researching of the history of Africa. We will cover both classic and innovative work, from staples in the field to interdisciplinary and provocative new scholarship. The student will gain perspectives on how the field of African history has developed, its strengths and weaknesses, its current direction(s) and its blind spots. We will devote special attention to how historians of Africa approach source work, methodology, and theoretical frameworks. 
 
This course is designed to provide an introduction to African historiography for students who seek a general introduction to the field as well as those who are preparing for further research in African history or related fields. It will be useful to students whose own research involves thinking and writing about the past of African places, peoples, societies, economies, cultures, states or environments, and to those who are interested in developing a deeper historical understanding of the continent today.
 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
2:15-5:00         Monday                       Van Beurdan, S.

Assigned Readings: TBD, a combination of books, articles, and digital scholarship.

Assignments:
A 25-page historiography paper on the topic of your choice within African and African Diaspora history.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
Graduate standing. This course assumes no prior experience with African history.


HISTORY 7350 STUDIES IN ISLAMIC HISTORY


This course will require students to analyze a number of works, both articles and books, that are either established as classic studies or have otherwise proven to be very influential in the study of early modern, pre-colonial Central Asian history.  Students are responsible for reading each of these volumes by the dates assigned and attending the seminar prepared to discuss the material.  On several occasions during the semester students will be required to present the material to the class.  Special attention will be given to the individual authors’ arguments, their use of primary sources to substantiate those arguments, their debts to earlier scholarship, and the developing historiography of the field.  At the end of the semester, students will submit a thorough historiographical analysis summarizing our work during the semester.  Students’ grades will be determined by their command of the sources as demonstrated through his participation in our meetings (50 percent), and the quality of their final papers (50 percent).
 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:45-3:30       Tuesday                       Levi, S.

Assigned Readings
To be assigned.  Readings will be available on reserve.

Prerequisites and Special Comments
Graduate students only. 


HISTORY 7410 STUDIES IN PRE-MODERN CHINESE HISTORY:
MAIN HISTORIOGRAPHICAL QUESTIONS


This class introduces the students to the most important and recent historiographical issues and debates in the field of premodern Chinese history. It will also engage some methodological questions.  The readings will focus on the following subjects: empire; frontier and ethnicity, religion, environment, literati culture, and material culture.
 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
4:30-7:15         Wednesday                 Zhang, Y.

Prerequisites and Special Comments
Graduate standing. 


HISTORY 7500 STUDIES IN INTERNATIONAL HISTORY


The Cold War defined the second half of the 20th century. The unique nature of the conflict – undeclared, transnational, ideological, and potentially apocalyptic – touched all parts of the globe in ways that even the previous world wars had not. It set two of history’s most powerful militaries against each other, inspiring a technologically driven weapons race and splitting much of the world into armed camps whose borders were policed by proxy conflicts. In the United States – as in many other nations – changing economic, governmental, and social relations operated under this umbrella and the constant fear of nuclear war, reshaping the way that nations defined security and threats. 
This course will explore how the Cold War transformed international affairs, as well as its impact on individual countries – with a slight emphasis on the United States. It is designed to deepen your understanding of the politics, diplomacy, and continuing influence of this era, as well as the ways historians have interpreted it over the past five decades. Weekly readings will explore how the historiography has evolved toward more diverse, global understandings of this conflict, and what this means for the process of engaging in international, transnational, and military history. 
 
 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
2:15-5:00         Monday                       Parrott, J.

Assigned Readings:
13-15 books, which may include The Tragedy of American Diplomacy (Williams), Strategies of Containment (Gaddis), The Global Cold War (Westad), Irresistible Empire (De Grazia), Khrushchev’s Cold War (Fursenko and Naftali), Choosing War (Logevall), A Diplomatic Revolution (Connelly), Rising Wind (Plummer), The Lavender Scare (Johnson), Nuclear Statecraft (Gavin), Power and Protest (Suri), Mexico’s Cold War (Keller), Human Rights Activism and the End of the Cold War (Snyder), or Of Limits and Growth (Macekura)

Assignments:
Active Participation
Leading One Class Discussion
2 Book Reviews (900-1200 words)
Final Historiographical Essay (3500-4000 words)

Prerequisites and Special Comments
Graduate standing. 


HISTORY 7600 STUDIES IN THE HISTORY OF WOMEN AND GENDER

Gender, Class and Politics: European Women’s History 18-20th Centuries


This intensive readings course is designed to provide graduate students from a range of academic disciplines with a broad introduction to the history of women and gender in Modern Europe, and to the theoretical approaches and methodologies employed by scholars working in this field.  Our readings will be clustered around a number of topics including cultural constructions of women and gender; female sexuality and life course options; labor and consumption; social movements, and feminism.  Additional topics will be determined by the specific interests of seminar participants.
 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
7:00-9:45 pm   Thursday                     Soland, B.

Prerequisites and Special Comments
Graduate standing. 


HISTORY 7725 GRADUATE READINGS IN POWER, CULTURE & STATE


This is a continuation from History 7725 in Autumn 2017 which you had to have been registered for in order to enroll in this course.
 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
2:15-5:00 pm   Friday                          Newell, M.


HISTORY 7900 COLLOQUIUM IN THE PHILOSOPHY OF HISTORY & THE HISTORIAN’S SKILLS

 
There is no single way to “do” history. Historians actually utilize a variety of different methods, techniques, styles and approaches. Historians also operate on many different scales: some focus on a few years in a single place, others on millennia at a planetary level. Some historians write with great literary effect, while others use graphs and numbers. Many choose humans as their historical subjects, but some write about animals, microorganisms, objects, cities or ideas. History is a discipline of remarkable scope and variety, which is what makes it such an endlessly rich discipline. 
 
This class is designed to introduce students to this diversity and richness by focusing on salient trends in methodology and historiography. The focus is largely on recent developments, with most texts drawn from the last two decades. It aims to provide students with the language and concepts to become conversant in questions of methodology, and to be able to apply these methodological insights to their own reading, research, and writing. En route, we will have the opportunity to discuss a wide range of other questions, from philosophical ones such as the relationship between language and reality to political ones like the primary purposes of history-writing.
 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:45-3:30       Thursday                     Otter, C.

Prerequisites and Special Comments
Graduate standing. 


HISTORY 7910 PROSPECTUS WRITING & PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT


This seminar is dedicated to researching and writing your dissertation prospectus. Throughout the semester we will focus on the craft of historical writing, strategies, and the practicalities of launching a research project. As we move through the class, you will analyze various issues, including your topic/questions/significance; your argument/thesis; historiography; method and theory; primary (including archival) and secondary sources; organization; time table; research plan; funding; and your bibliography. We also will consider such matters as grammar and style. By the end of this course you will have produced a dissertation prospectus that you will present to your committee members.
 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
4:30-7:15         Tuesday                       Smith, S.

Assigned Readings:     TBA

Assignments:
In preparing your prospectus you will draw particularly on three areas of support:

·         First, your fellow students are a valuable source for feedback. In this course you will help each other launch your projects.
·         Second, I will read your drafts and offer advice.
·         Third, your advisor and members of your dissertation committee are the experts to whom you will turn for substantive advice about archives, resources, and the feasibility of your project.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
Graduate Standing.


HISTORY 8000 SEMINAR IN EARLY AMERICAN HISTORY TO 1877


This is a graduate seminar designed for students in the field of early American history.  Students will research and write papers on a specific topic within the time period from 1600 to 1877.  They will do research in the appropriate primary sources, and they will read the pertinent secondary literature.  During the term, students will discuss their ideas with the professor and with each other, as their research unfolds.  About halfway through the semester, they will begin writing.  After that, they will exchange drafts with other students and confer with the professor about their drafts.  The paper is due on the last day of class. 
 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:45-3:30       Tuesday                       Cashin, J.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
Graduate standing. 


HISTORY 8550 SEMINAR IN MILITARY HISTORY


The seminar offers graduate students an opportunity to write an article (10,000 words) of publishable quality; or a dissertation chapter (10,000-12,500 words), also of publishable quality.  Either product must be written in such a way that it is rigorous enough to satisfy specialists in the subject area and accessibly enough that non-specialists can readily comprehend it.  The seminar will focus on framing a historical problem, identifying the proper sources, organizing the paper effectively, writing lucidly, and critiquing each paper constructively.  The seminar is open to graduate students whose work falls in either the Human Conflict, Peace, and Diplomacy or Power, Culture, and the State Constellations.
 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:45-3:30       Tuesday                       Grimsley, M.

Assigned Readings:
2-3 books on effective writing, TBD

Assignments:
The finished product outlined in the Course Description

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
Graduate standing. 

 
0


To find course availability and times, please visit the Ohio State Course Catalog and Master Schedule.