Spring 2018 Undergraduate Courses

Courses offered the second 7 weeks of the semester:
 


QUICK LINKS:

              

AFRICAN HISTORY


HISTORY 2302 HISTORY OF MODERN AFRICA, 1800-1960

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course examines major political, social, and economic developments in Africa from 1800 to 1960.  This was one of the most pivotal periods in the history of Africa for it witnessed European colonization of the continent as well as the rise of African nationalism and the end of colonial rule.  The course will begin with a discussion of the conditions in Africa during the nineteenth century and proceeds to examine European colonial conquest and African response, colonial economic and social policies, the transformation of African societies under colonial rule, African nationalism and decolonization, and the legacy of European colonial rule in Africa.  In addition to regular lectures and discussion sections, these topics will be illuminated by films and other audiovisual materials

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
10:20-Noon     MWF                           Sikainga, A.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
Please note: This is a 2nd session course.

This course fulfills Group Africa, post-1750 for the history major or can fulfill a GE requirement.                                                                                                             


HISTORY 2303 HISTORY OF CONTEMPORARY AFRICA, 1960 – PRESENT

3 Cr. Hrs.

After less than 70 years of colonial rule, most European colonies in Africa gained their independence by the end of the 1960s. Formal independence from European colonial rule implied that Africans assumed full responsibility for their own political and economic destinies. Has that been the case? What happened during this era of formal independence? How did African leaders seek to create stable political systems to promote economic progress in their societies and what difficulties did they encounter? In what ways did the colonial legacy and the new world order that emerged after the Second World War affect the processes of nationbuilding in Africa? What relationship emerged between Africa and the former colonial rulers on the one hand, and between Africa and the new world powers (the United States and the Soviet Union) on the other? This section of the African civilization survey explores these questions in ways that will help us understand why Africa has continued to struggle to implement viable political stability and sustainable economies. Rather than seeking to provide you with a cohesive body of knowledge, the course will focus on important themes that will give you a broader picture of historical processes, contingencies and outcomes that will help us understand Africa’s predicaments as well as achievements since the 1960s. Students should leave this course with the ability to engage in well-informed discussions about modern Africa and its place in the global system. 

Time                          Instructor
On-line                      Kobo, O.

Assigned Readings:
None. Open source materials and journal articles.

Assignments:
Online Quizzes
Online Discussion
Analyses of Historical Documents

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Africa, post-1750 for history majors or can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.                                                                 


HISTORY 3302 NATIONALISM, SOCIALISM, AND REVOLUTION IN AFRICA

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course explores the history of the nationalist and revolutionary movements as well as the socialist regimes in Africa in the twentieth and early twenty first centuries. The course will begin with a discussion of the establishment and the legacy of European colonial rule in Africa, and proceeds to examine the development of African nationalism and decolonization. The course will use a variety of secondary and primary sources as well as films and documentaries to illuminate the complexities and the ideologies that informed the nationalist movements. The nationalist movement produced a number of leaders and political thinkers whose ideas and writings have shaped the nationalist discourse and anti-colonial struggle.  They include figures such as Kwame Nkrumah, Julius Nyerere, Patrice Lumumba, Amilcar Cabral, just to name a few. Moreover, the course will explore the way in which race, ethnicity, gender, and class have shaped nationalist discourse, strategies, and agenda as well as the manner in which conflicts and tensions within the nationalist movement have continued to shape post-colonial states and society in Africa. The last part of the course will focus on the theory and practice of socialism in Africa by looking at specific examples from countries such as Ghana, Tanzania, Guinea, Angola, Mozambique, and Ethiopia. The course will conclude by assessing the experiences and the success and failures of these examples and their impact.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
1:50-3:40         MWF                           Sikainga, A.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
Please note: This is a 2nd session course.

This course fulfills Group Africa, post-1750 for history the major or can fulfill the historical study and global diversity GE requirements.                           


HISTORY 3304 HISTORY OF ISLAM IN AFRICA

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course explores the development and expansion of Islam in Africa from about the 8th century CE to the present.  It will address historical contingencies that account for Islam's local receptivity as well as its dynamic interactions with local cultures, politics, traditional religions, Christianity and European colonialism.  While the Islamization of Africa is important for understanding African history, the Africanization of Islam is equally important. Consequently, we will seek to understand the dialectical relationship between Islam and African religious and cultural expressions, especially how Islam transformed and was transformed by indigenous religious knowledge, cultures and polity. We will further analyze how African Muslims reconstructed and asserted their religious identities by localizing Islamic intellectual traditions, healing practices, music, arts, cultural norms and formal and informal religious festivals.  We will also examine current issues in contemporary African Muslim societies such as internal debates about spiritual purity such as between members of Sufi brotherhoods and their opponents, the Salafi, the complex relationship between Islam and the secular state, Islam and socio-economic developments, and Muslims engagements with people of other faiths. Rather than homogenizing Islam in Africa, we will explore diverse religious practices across time and space even as we pay attention to common denominators and patterns. By the end of the semester, students should be able to appreciate Islam’s common framework as well as its diversity and dynamics within that larger framework. In particular, students should be able to explain the nuances of religious affiliations, cooperation and conflicts, and to understand the subtle differences between religious politics and faith.

Time        Meeting Days              Instructor
On-line    on-line                          Kobo

Assigned Readings:

(1)  David Robinson, Muslim Societies in African History, (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press) 2004 
(2)  Richard Smith, Ahmad al-Mansur: Islamic Visionary, Pearson Education, Inc. 2006.   

Assignments:
Online and in-class discussions
Quizzes
Short response papers on specific readings and analyzing historical documents
Midterm Exam
Final Exam

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Africa, pre-1750 for history majors or a GE requirement.                                                                                                                                                 


HISTORY 3704 HIV: FROM MICROBIOLOGY TO MACROHISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

HIV: From Microbiology to Macrohistory is an interdisciplinary exploration of HIV/AIDs that combines history and virology through team teaching. The course traces the virus that causes HIV through its history, from its molecular origins, to its transmission to humans more than a century ago, to its emergence as a worldwide disease in the 1980s, up to today.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
3:00-3:55         MWF                           McDow, T. & J. Kwiek

In 2012, an estimated 35.3 million people around the world were living with HIV, a number startling close to the estimated number of people who have died from AIDs since 1981.  Unlocking the virological secrets of HIV/AIDs has been one of the grand scientific challenges of the last three decades, and the disease remains one of the world’s most serious challenges to human health and development.  The burden of the disease is very uneven globally, and subSaharan African, where the disease originated, is home to 69% of those living with HIV today. How did this virus and this global pandemic come to be? The course traces the evolution of the virus at both the molecular level and within its global historical context. Team-taught by a virologist and a historian, the goal of this class at the broadest level, is to put the sciences and humanities in conversation.

From a historical perspective, this course does world history through the lens of a virus by considering the social, politics, economic, and biomedical aspects of societies that the virus infects and affects.  As such it connects colonization and decolonization in Africa, the Cold War, gay liberation, neoliberalism, and globalization.  Although the academy approaches the medical facts of disease and its social consequences through distinct disciplines, those who had contracted the virus experience all aspects of the disease.  This course makes it possible for students to consider the medical, scientific, social, political, and economic causes and consequences of one of the world’s most devastating viruses.

This course is cross-listed with Microbiology.

Assigned Readings:
In this course we read a wide variety of historical and scientific literature.  In the past we have also read:

Johanna Crane, Scrambling for Africa: AIDs, Expertise, and the Rise of American Global Health Science (2013).

The syllabus changes every year, so please do not purchase books until you have received notice from the instructors.

Assignments:
Students will complete assignments that are typical of both history and microbiology; they will synthesize these approaches in a final capstone project.  Weekly assessments will ask students to either reflect on the reading or lecture for that week or will ask them to analyze and manipulate scientific data.  The course will have a midterm and final examination that will require students to demonstrate both specific knowledge and their abilities to synthesize material across disciplines.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course is cross-listed and thus has two prerequisites: one historical, one scientific, for history it is a 2000 level (or higher) course or instructor permission; and for Biology it is Biology 1101, 1102, 1113 or equivalent or instructor permission. Students who have questions about their preparation should contact the professors.

This course fulfills Group Africa, post-1750 for history the major.     

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AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY


HISTORY 2080 AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY TO 1877

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course examines the history of black Americans from the beginning of the African slave trade to just after the Civil War.  Obviously, slavery will be an important part of this class.  We will look at diverse sites of slavery, beginning in the early years and in the North when and where small farm and town/city slaves were the norm.  Our examination of plantation slavery recognizes the changes in that system as the nation evolved from “a society with slaves” into “a slave society,” and we will follow that expansion of slavery westward (across the mountains) and southward (into the Deep South and across the Gulf states).  We begin with the assumption that slavery was chosen as a labor system, not inevitable, and, that once chosen, had to be maintained, thus becoming a social and political system as well as an economic system.  We will also pay attention to free black people in the North and the South, their diverse efforts to live as free people, and their relationship to those who remained enslaved.  Our most important objective is to see and understand how black people—slave and free—lived.  We will also study their interior worlds of family, work, community, and culture and the ways they sought to and often succeeded in shaping a life and a lifestyle that constantly resisted external systems of domination.     

Time            Meeting Days    Instructor
2:20-3:40     TR                     Shaw, S.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group North America, pre-1750 for history the history major or can fulfill a GE requirement.                                                                 

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AMERICAN HISTORY


HISTORY 2001 LAUNCHING AMERICA, AMERICAN HISTORY TO 1877

3 Cr. Hrs.

Launching America is an intermediate-level overview of American history from its in scattered colonial settlements through the American Revolution to the American Civil War and its aftermath.  Throughout the course we examine the American story in its wider Atlantic context, focusing on the central problems of power and democracy among a diversity of peoples.  Sketching the larger patterns of American history, we engage with historians’ efforts to understand and interpret the meaning of this past, and introduce some of the key approaches to historical study.   

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
10:20-11:15      MW                             Brooke, J.
9:10; 10:20       F (recitations)
12:40

Assigned Readings:

  • Foner, Give Me Liberty: An American History, Vol 1 SEAGULL EDITION ISBN-13: 9780393920307
  • Rice, Tales from a Revolution: Bacon's Rebellion and the Transformation of Early America ISBN-13: 978-0195386943
  • Ellis, Founding Brothers the Revolutionary Generation ISBN-13: 978-0375705243
  • Murphy, The Jerry Rescue: The Fugitive Slave Law, Northern Rights, and the American Sectional Crisis   ISBN-13: 978-0199913602
  • Documents to be posted on Carmen

Assignments:

  • Quizzes in section
  • Midterm
  • Three short essays
  • Final

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
English 1110.01/02 either previous or concurrently. Not open to students with credit for History 151 or 1151.  This course fulfills Group North America, pre-1750 for history majors or can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 2002 MAKING AMERICA MODERN

3 Cr. Hrs.

This class will introduce students to modern United States history from the end of the Civil War to the War on Terror.  Topics will include the Industrial Revolution, racial segregation, the colonization of Western North America and the Philippines, immigration, women’s suffrage, the Great Depression, World Wars I and II, the Atomic Age, the civil rights movement, and the 2008 financial crash.  For each week of the semester, we will specifically focus on three key themes: the changing role of the federal government, the growth of a market economy, and contests over the meaning of “freedom.”  The period after the Civil War witnessed a revolution in the nation’s economy, new understandings of federal power, and ongoing debates about what it meant to be “free” in a modern society.   Students will be expected to not only identify these themes by the end of the semester but also to explain how they evolved over time.  

Since one of the key themes for the course involves the different ways in which Americans have thought about the term “freedom,” the class will also explore the ways in which they have thought about the past.  If Americans have frequently disagreed about what it means to be “free,” they have also bitterly fought over the meanings of United States history.  Remembering the nation’s past, in fact, has often been a proxy for defining freedom.  Students will be asked to consider questions like: What issues warrant inclusion in a national memorial?  What ideas or events should be included in a history class?  Why do Americans celebrate certain events but not others?  And who should decide which issues deserve to be commemorated?  Our conversations about these issues will not only help students better understand key themes in the past, but also the ways in which history is always a contested subject.  

Time                         Meeting Days              Instructor
11:30-12:25                MW                             Howard, C.
9:10; 11:30; 12:40      Friday (recitations)

Assigned Readings:

  • Eric Foner, The Story of American Freedom (New York: W.W. Norton, 1998)
  • Weekly readings posted on Carmen
  • 6-7 films on Secured Media Library

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
Not open to students with credit for History 152 or 1152.  This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for the history major or can fulfill a GE requirement.                             


HISTORY 2002 MAKING AMERICA MODERN

3 Cr. Hrs.

This class will introduce students to modern United States history from the end of the Civil War to the War on Terror.  Topics will include the Industrial Revolution, racial segregation, immigration, women’s suffrage, the Great Depression, World Wars I and II, the Atomic Age, the civil rights movement, and the 2008 financial crash.  

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
4:10-5:05         MWF                              Fenton, H.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
Not open to students with credit for History 152 or 1152.  This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for the history major or can fulfill a GE requirement.                                    


HISTORY 2015 AMERICAN CRIMINAL JUSTICE

3 Cr. Hrs.

Crime and punishment are among the most important issues in contemporary America.  This course offers an introduction to the historical study of crime in the United States from colonial times to the present.  It highlights changes in criminal behavior and in the ways Americans have sought to deter, punish, and rehabilitate.  Primary topics include historical patterns of violence, the role and organization of the police, and the evolution of punishment in theory and practice.  This course also emphasizes differences in crime and punishment by region, class, ethnicity, gender, and age.  Topics will include riots, homicide, capital punishment, organized crime, gangs, prisons, policing, jurisprudence, and official violence.

Time            Meeting Days    Instructor
9:35-10:55   WF                    Roth, R.

Assigned Reading:

  • Walker, Samuel (1998) Popular Justice: A History of American Criminal Justice, 2nd ed. New York: Oxford University Press. 0-19-507451-3 (paper)
  • Butterfield, Fox (1995) All God's Children: The Bosket Family and the American Tradition of Violence. New York: William Morrow. 0-380-72862-1 (paper)
  • Quinones, Sam (2015) Dreamland: The True Tale of America’s Opiate Epidemic. New York: Bloomsbury Press. ISBN-13: 978-1620402504
  • Mark Colvin (1997) Penitentiaries, Reformatories, and Chain Gangs: Social Theory and the History of Punishment in Nineteenth-Century America. New York: St. Martin's Press. ISBN-13: 978-0312221287

Assignments & Grading:

  • Discussion and Attendance (10% of grade) Quizzes on the Readings (10% of grade)
  • Midterm and Final Examinations (40% of grade)
  • Research Project / Notes / Essay (40% of grade):  You will be asked to write a 5 to 6-page paper on a topic in criminal justice history of interest to you (e.g., drugs, embezzlement, homicide). We will use on-line historical newspaper articles as sources. You will be required to turn in your research notes electronically as well as your essay, because the goal is to help you master the skills involved in careful historical research.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for history the history major or can fulfill the historical study GE.                                                        


HISTORY 2705 THE HISTORY OF MEDICINE IN WESTERN SOCIETY [HYBRID DELIVERY]

3 Cr. Hrs.

In this course, we explore the changing intellectual, economic, institutional and cultural relationships that have characterized medicine in the Western world from antiquity to the present. We consider the education of practitioners, locations of healing, and expectations that people had of medicine as ideas about the body and illness shifted with new discoveries and theories about health and disease. We examine the roles both of prominent individuals (Harvey, Pasteur, Ehrlich) and of general trends (industrialization, technology) in shaping medical practice and the medical professions.

This course will be given in hybrid format. A hybrid course combines the advantages of online education with in-person class interactions. This class is scheduled to meet only once a week for most of the semester. More of the content traditionally conveyed during lecture is presented online for independent study and small group work in advance of our meetings in person. All of the in-person meetings are designed to be active learning experiences, centered on discussion and additional work in groups. The in-person meetings also allow students plenty of opportunities to ask questions. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
2:20-3:40         W                                 Lawrence, S.

Assigned Readings:
All of the assigned readings will be available electronically as files posted on the course website, as articles available through OSU Libraries e-journal collections, or as links to websites with particular resources. 

Assignments:
All students write one 2-3-page essay on an assigned topic; take one midterm and a final; complete 9 online quizzes; contribute each week to discussion boards; and create a 3-5-minute video using voice-over presentation software where they explain the main argument of, and sources of evidence for, an academic article in the history of medicine. 

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor.

This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for history majors or can fulfills the GE Historical Study requirement.                                                                                                                                               


HISTORY 3002 U.S. POLITICAL HISTORY SINCE 1877

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course traces change in American politics from Reconstruction to the present. Change was substantial – arguably a different form of government emerged in the United States over the course of the 20th century, particularly after World War II.   Theodore Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilson, the 26th and 27th presidents (1901-1920), would have understood the political world of 1877 – and of 1850.  The scope, responsibilities, and reach of American government, the balance between the federal and state governments, the widened electorate and venues for political participation, a transformed media environment, the place of political parties, and America’s place in the world by 1960 or 1980 would be nearly unintelligible to them.

We will aim to understand what changed and why.  Our main focus will be:  1) governance, or the structures, responsibilities, and reach of government 2) participation, or who has participated in politics and how they have done so 3) ideology, or the ideas that have animated political debate 4) public policy.  To aid in comparison over time, we will develop a few cases dealing with race (the first and second Reconstructions), natural disaster, and key presidential elections.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
3:55-5:15         TR                               Baker, P.

Assigned Readings:

  • Morton Keller, America’s Three Regimes
  • William H. Chafe, ed., The Achievement of American Liberalism (selected chapters available as an e-book)
  • Peri Arnold, Remaking the Presidency: Roosevelt, Taft, and Wilson, 1901-1916
  • Nick Kotz. Judgment Days: Lyndon Baines Johnson, Martin Luther King Jr., and the Laws That Changed America
  • Robert Collins, Transforming America: Politics and Culture During the Reagan Era

Assignments:

  • Two In-Class Essays: 10% each
  • Three Papers: 20% each Two Quizzes: 10% each

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for the history major or can fulfill the historical study GE.                                                                                                                                                 


HISTORY 3011 AMERICAN REVOLUTION AND NEW NATION, 1760-1787

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will examine the social, economic, cultural, and political changes in 18th century America that culminated in revolution and the creation of the republic.  In addition to reviewing key events and themes, we will explore the ways that historians have interpreted the causes and consequences of the Revolution.  

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
On-line             on-line                         Weeks. J.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for the history major or can fulfill a GE requirement. This is a 2nd session, 7 week course.                                                                                                             


HISTORY 3016 UNITED STATES HISTORY SINCE 1963

3 Cr. Hrs.

Examination of the major political, economic, social and cultural changes in the USA since the spring of 1963: mass suburbanization, causes and consequences of the Vietnam War, the civil rights movement, political polarization, the revival of feminism, the counter-culture, the new environmentalism, détente and the decline of East-West tensions, the new world disorder, the rise of a service-based economy, and globalization.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:30      TR                               Stebenne, D.

Assigned Readings:

  • Thomas Hine, Populuxe (1990)
  • Frederik Logevall, The Origins of the Vietnam War (2001)
  • Juan Williams, Eyes on the Prize: America’s Civil Rights Years, 1954-1965 (1988), chaps. 4-8 Bruce Shulman, The Seventies: The Great Shift in American Culture, Society and Politics (2002)
  • Jules Tygiel, Ronald Reagan and the Triumph of American Conservatism, 2nd ed. (2006), chaps. 7-11
  • Barbara Ehrenreich, Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting by in America (2001)
  • David Owen, Green Metropolis: Why Living Smaller, Living Closer and Driving Less are the Keys to Sustainability (2010)

Assignments:
A midterm, a final and a short (5-page) paper based on the assigned reading.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
Students planning to pursue a Master’s in education should note that this course satisfies one of the course requirements in history.  The course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for the history major or can fulfill a GE requirement.     


HISTORY 3017 THE 1960S

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will examine that tumultuous period, which we know as “The Sixties.”  We will consider as broad themes the rise and fall of Cold War liberalism; the Black Freedom struggle and American race relations; the Vietnam War and American society; American culture in the Age of Aquarius; and, finally, the rise of contemporary conservatism and the so-called white backlash.

In the midst of these broad themes, we will have time to consider many other important ingredients of the period, including the radical student movement; the urban crisis; the technological-consumer society; the sexual revolutions; among many others.  

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:30-12:25       MWF                           Steigerwald, D.

Assigned Readings: (Don’t purchase until confirmed)

  • John Lewis, Walking with the Wind: A Memoir of the Movement
  • Alice Echols, Scars of Sweet Paradise: The Life and Times of Janis Joplin Robert McNamara, In Retrospect: The Tragedy and Lessons of Vietnam
  • Assorted Primary Source Readings

Assignments:

  • Two large essay projects
  • Carmen quizzes

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for the history major or can fulfill a GE requirement.                                                                                                             


HISTORY 3030 HISTORY OF OHIO

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will survey the economic, social, and political development of the geographic area that became Ohio from the Native American period to the present. We will explore three themes in particular:  the role of disruptive technology and creative destruction in shaping Ohio’s past; the critical junctures at which Ohio might have become something entirely different than what it became; Ohio’s connection to the wider world through geography, technology, demography, economics, and politics.  Specific topics will include the technological development of Native American civilizations; the international conflict to define and control the region; the role of technology in shaping the state; the role of Ohioans in the world's most important reform movements; the rise and fall of particular Ohio cities as a way to understand national and international economic, social, and political trends; and the challenges/opportunities of the global economy of the late 20th/early 21st century.

Time        Meeting Days     Instructor
On-line    on-line                Coil, W.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for the history major or can fulfill a GE requirement.                                        


HISTORY 3040 THE AMERICAN CITY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Since World War II, suburban growth has dramatically reshaped the ways Americans have related to their government, the physical environment, and to one another.  In this era, many Americans have championed suburbs as important symbols of economic success, sites of marital bliss, and “safe” spaces to raise a family.  At the same time, many critics have derided them as places full of unhappy marriages and overly materialistic, conformity-driven people.  This class will explore the social, cultural, and political history of U.S. suburbs and cities since 1945, and it will pay particular attention to the ways in which Americans have made sense of suburbanization. Topics will include the debates over the government’s role in housing, racial segregation and the “urban crisis,” youth culture, the War on Drugs, gentrification, Wal-Mart and the “new economy,” immigrant suburbs, and the 2008 economic crash.  

This is an upper-level history class, and it will require a significant amount of reading and writing.  Students will be asked to read several scholarly histories of the suburbs; examine numerous primary documents, including films; write several take-home essays; and think critically about the ways in which Americans have thought about cities and suburbs since World War II.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
1:50-2:45         MWF                           Howard, C.

Assigned Readings:

  • Richard Rothstein, The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America 
  • Matthew Desmond, Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City
  • Weekly reading posted on Carmen
  • 5-6 films on Secured Media Library

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for history the major or can fulfill a GE requirement.                                        


HISTORY 3045 AMERICAN RELIGIOUS HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course covers the sweep of American religious history, from the colonial era to the present, focusing on the roles of religious movements and leaders in the development of the United States. Among the topics that we will consider are: spiritual practices and beliefs of indigenous peoples; African religious influences; the impact of religion on European colonization; varieties of Christian expression; Enlightenment ideas about deity; revivalism; evangelicalism and reform movements; the growth of denominations; religion and nativism; American Judaism; church and state; Islam; race and religion; unbelief; liberal theology; the Social Gospel; New Age movements; occultism; and religion and politics, including significant court cases. We will focus on connections between religion and political, social, economic, and cultural developments.

Time            Meeting Days  Instructor
5:30-6:50     Wednesdays   Irwin, R.

Assigned Readings:
Primary documents and articles on digital reserve, between 70 and 100 pages of reading per week.

Assignments:

  • Weekly quizzes.
  • Three short papers (1000 – 1300 words).
  • Final exam.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This is a hybrid course that combines online lectures and weekly in-person discussions. For majors, this course fulfills Group North America, post-1750.                                                                                                                                                        


HISTORY 3080 HISTORY OF SLAVERY IN THE U.S. 

3 Cr. Hrs.           

In this course we will discuss the history of slavery in North America from the colonial era to the Civil War.  We will include material on bondage in other societies, but the focus will be on African-American slavery in what is now the United States.  We will explore various aspects of the slave experience, such as work, religion, family life, resistance, and rebellion.  We will also discuss free blacks, people of mixed race, yeoman whites, and slave owners, as well as the significance of slavery as a culture, economic, and political issues.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:35-10:55       TR                               Cashin, J.

Assignments:
Students will read several monographs, write several short papers, and take one exam.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for history majors.                                            


HISTORY 3501 U.S. DIPLOMACY, 1900-PRESENT

3 Cr. Hrs.

Since 1920, the United States has played a dominant role in international affairs due to its massive economy, unrivaled military, and global cultural influence. Historians have often referred to this era as “the American century,” a term coined by Time Magazine publisher Henry Luce in February of 1941. However, Luce’s editorial was as much a call to action as it was an accurate description: as late as 1941, the nation was still debating its desired role in world affairs. Far from a dedicated superpower, the United States was and remains a country whose foreign relations are hotly contested. The nation has struggled to discern a consistent path between opposing tendencies of democracy, empire, isolationism, internationalism, national security, and the role of defense in daily life. At the same time, many countries have militantly resisted projections of American power. 

In this course, we will explore a sampling of these contests and the sometimes contradictory foreign policies they produced. While focusing on the specific policy history of the United States, we will also assess the impact American actions have had across the globe, foreign responses to the United States, the changing contexts that transformed official thinking, and the decentralization of the international system. The course will ultimately seek to have you engage directly with the ways U.S. foreign policymaking has affected and responded to global and domestic events, and what this means for the future of American foreign affairs.  

Please note, this is an upper level history course and will require your active engagement with a larger amount of regular weekly reading and viewing assignments. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:35-10:55       WF                              Parrott, J.

Assigned Readings:

  • 3 books: Promised Land, Crusader State (McDougall), Specter of Communism (Leffler), Reclaiming American Virtue (Keys)
  • 2 Film viewings: Dr. Strangelove (1964) and Red Dawn (1984)
  • Additional articles available through Carmen Primary sources

Assignments:

  • Active Participation
  • 1 Response Paper (3-4 pages)
  • 1 Midterm
  • 2 Project Updates
  • 1 Final Research Paper Project (8-12 pages)

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 and also the historical study GE.

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ANCIENT HISTORY


HISTORY 2201 ANCIENT GREECE & ROME

3 Cr. Hrs.

Comparative historical analysis of ancient Mediterranean civilizations in the Near East, Greece, and Rome from the Bronze Age to the Fall of Rome.

Time            Meeting Days              Instructor
9:10-10:05   MWF                           McCarthy, B.

Prerequisites and Special Comments
This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for history majors or can fulfill a GE requirement.  


 

HISTORY 2221 INTRODUCTION TO THE NEW TESTAMENT: HISTORY AND LITERATURE

3 Cr. Hrs.                                                                                                                                    

What we call the "New Testament" is a not a single book but an anthology of diverse works by different, mostly unknown authors.  These works disagree on crucial matters of religious faith, community, and discipleship, all of which continue to divide Christians today.  Understanding this past means approaching the primary sources as historians do.  This course thus introduces the New Testament historically, from outside the framework of any particular belief system.  It presupposes no previous study in the Bible or religion, and expands the study of ancient Christianity as an area of focus in the Department of History.  The controversial life and legacy of an apostle named Paul, the production of competing "gospels" about a Jewish messiah named Jesus, and the emerging self-definition of Christian communities in the Roman Empire will occupy the main focus of our attention as historians.  In short, our goal is to understand the diversity of early Christianity.  By the end of the semester, the student should have mastered the art of critical thinking by practicing a close reading of the New Testament and other early Christian writings in their ancient context.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:40-1:50       MWF                             Harrill, J. Albert            

Assigned Readings:

1.   The HarperCollins Study Bible, (Student Edition, fully revised and updated) edited by H. W. Attridge and W. A. Meeks et al. San Francisco: HarperOne, 2006.
2.   Bart D. Ehrman, A Brief Introduction to the New Testament.  4th edition.  Oxford University Press, 2013.
3.   Burton H. Throckmorton, Jr., Gospel Parallels: A Comparison of the Synoptic Gospels.  5th edition.  Nashville: Thomas Nelson, 1992.

Assignments:
Two tests, two papers and a final examination.  

Prerequisites and Special Comments
This course fulfills Group Near East, pre-1750 for the History major or can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 3211 OF CLASSICAL GREECE

3 Cr. Hrs.

The course explores the history of the classical era, the “Golden Age” of ancient Greece.  It traces political and cultural developments in the world of the Greek city-states from the time of the watershed Persian Wars of 480-479 BC down to the death of Alexander the Great in 323 and its immediate aftermath.  Major topics covered include: the rise of Athens as imperialist superpower and “cultural capital” of the Greek world; the escalating tensions between the Athenian empire and the Spartan-led Peloponnesian League that resulted in the cataclysmic Peloponnesian War (431-404 BC); the subsequent attempts by states like Sparta and Thebes to exercise hegemony over their fellow Greeks; the formation of the world’s first complex democracy in Athens; and the ground-breaking innovations that would shape the future course of art, architecture, philosophy, science, literature, and drama in the western world.  The course will conclude by looking at how the relatively sudden emergence of Philip II of Macedon as the dominant player on the Greek stage effectively ended the era of the independent city-states, and at how the conquest of the Persian empire by Philip’s son Alexander the Great transformed the political and cultural fortunes of Greece and the ancient Near East thereafter.  

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:30       TR                               Anderson, G.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for history majors or can fulfill the historical study GE.
Other than English 1110.xx, there are no prerequisites for this class.  


HISTORY 3221 ROME FROM THE GRACCHI TO NERO

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course focuses on Rome’s transform republic to empire.  Topics include the political strife of the late Republic; the rise of Julius Caesar; problem of the Republic’s “fall”; civil war; the Augustan “revolution”; and the Julio-Claudian dynasty.  The course also examines foreign policy and imperial administration, economic and social developments in both Italy and the provinces, family life, women’s status, the impact of slavery, literature, art, and religion.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:45-2:05       TR                               Rosenstein, N.

Assigned Readings:

  • Appian, The Civil Wars
  • Boatwright, Gargola, and Talbert, The Romans, From Village to Empire
  • Catullus, The Poems of Catullus
  • Cicero, Selected Political Speeches
  • Horace, The Complete Odes and Epodes
  • Petronius & Seneca, Satyricon & Apocolocyntosis Plutarch, The Fall of the Roman Republic
  • Sallust, The Jugurthine War and the Conspiracy of Catiline
  • Suetonius, The Twelve Caesars
  • Tacitus, Complete Works
  • Virgil, The Aeneid

Assignments:
Term paper; midterm; final exam.             

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for the history major or can fulfill the historical study GE.


HISTORY 3223 HISTORY OF THE LATER ROMAN EMPIRE

3 Cr. Hrs.

This upper level history course examines one of the most pivotal and dynamic developments in world history: the fragmentation and transformation of the Roman Empire between the third and sixth centuries AD.  The course has two main goals:

1.    To trace political, economic environmental, and military events that led to the empire’s geo-political fragmentation and to the consolidation of imperial power in the East and to the rise of new barbarian kingdoms in the West.
2.    To explore some of the social, religious, and cultural changes that also characterize this transformative period in European history, such as the emergence of the Christian Church as a public institution and the development of new forms of urban and rural life. 

Students will also be introduced to some of the major questions historians ask about this period (e.g. did Rome really fall?) and to some of the primary tools and techniques they use to answer them.  

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:45-2:05       WF                              Sessa, T.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for the history major or can fulfill the historical study GE.                     


HISTORY 3225 THE EARLY BYZANTINE EMPIRE 

3 Cr. Hrs.

One could argue that the period covered in this course (300-800 AD) was the most important in all of history. It witnessed the establishment of Christianity as the official religion of the Roman empire (and therefore of its heirs in western Europe); the rise of monasticism and the consolidation of Christian doctrine; the move of the Roman empire to the east and the foundation of its sister-capital Constantinople (modern Istanbul); the Decline and Fall of the (western) Roman empire; the building of Hagia Sophia; the final consolidation of Roman law; and the rise of Islam and establishment of the Caliphate. “Byzantium” was the only part of the former Roman empire to survive all this and it held out against repeated Arab attacks. Come and find out more.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
2:20-3:40         TR                               Kaldellis, A.

Assigned Readings:
Ancient sources and the basic historical narrative will be posted online.

Required textbooks will be: 

  • The History of the Later Roman Empire by Ammianus Marcellinus ($10, Penguin edition),
  • Peter Heather’s The Fall of the Roman Empire ($10), and
  • The Secret History (and Related Texts) by Prokopios ($15, Hackett edition).

Assignments:
Grades will be based on short quizzes covering basic information; examinations; and short writing assignments (a couple of pages at a time) emphasizing source analysis, how to reconstruct history from partial or contradictory sources, and the application of modern concepts to ancient problems.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for the history major or can fulfill the historical study GE. If the course has official prerequisites “in the system,” they will not be enforced: the instructor will sign anyone into the course who wants to take it.  

ASIAN & ISLAMIC HISTORY


HISTORY 2401 HISTORY OF EAST ASIA IN THE PRE-MODERN ERA

3 Cr. Hrs.

History 2401 is an introduction to the societies and cultures of pre-modern China, Korea, and Japan, the countries that make up the geographical and cultural unit of East Asia. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:10-10:05       MWF                           Schultz, R.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group East Asia, pre-1750 for the History major or can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 2402 HISTORY OF EAST ASIA IN THE MODERN ERA, 1600-PRESENT

3 Cr. Hrs.

History 2402 will introduce the histories of the societies of East Asia (China, Korea, Japan) starting in about 1600.  To a higher degree than History 2401, which is useful but certainly not required preparation, History 2402 is organized on a 3-way comparative model (“how do China, Japan, or Korea compare to each other historically?”); one of our goals is to learn to think comparatively about history and societies.  We will survey key historical phenomena (including political, military, social, and intellectual themes) that have distinguished each country in the modern period.  For most of the semester, the course will be organized chronologically and thematically.  It will also seek a balance between examination of particular periods and exploration of patterns of continuity and change across historical periods and exploration of patterns of continuity and change across historical periods and different societies.  In addition to providing a basic narrative of East Asian civilization since 1600, the course will introduce students to important written sources and to historical writing.

Time                        Meeting Days      Instructor
1:50-2:45                 WF                      Reed, C.
11:30; 1:50; 3:00      Monday (recitations)

Assigned Readings:
A textbook, a monograph, primary sources, short films.

Assignments:
TBA, similar to other courses at this level.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
History 2401 is NOT a prerequisite for History 2402. History 2402 satisfies the GE historical study requirement.  Second Historical study option and global diversity option; it may also satisfy the 2 open options for the GE. For the History department major and minor, Group East Asia, post-1750 with concentrations in Power, Culture, and Society (PCS) & Colonialism and Comparative Empires (CCE).                                                                                                             


HISTORY 3351 INTELLECTUAL & SOCIAL MOVEMENTS IN THE MUSLIM WORLD

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course explores significant intellectual and social movements that have arisen among Muslims from the inception of Islam in 610 C.E. until the present.  These range from the initial split over the caliphate to the great medieval theological debates to 19th – and early 20th-century reformism to ISIS.  Special attention will be given to the development of Shiite Islam, with a focus on the background to the Iranian revolution as portrayed in Roy Mottahedeh’s The Mantle of the Prophet, an account of the experiences and intellectual formation of a young Iranian mullah active during the 1970s.  

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:30       TR                               Hathaway, J.

Assigned Readings:

  • Frederick Matthewson Denny, An Introduction to Islam, 4th edition
  • Roy Mottahedeh, The Mantle of the Prophet:  Religion and Politics in Iran
  • Various excerpts from primary and secondary sources

Assignments:
Map exercise, In-class midterm, paper related to The Mantle of the Prophet, take-home final.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Near Eastern, East Asia, Middle East, South or Central Asia Group, pre-1750 for the history major and fulfills the historical study GE.                                                                                                                                


HISTORY 3375 THE MONGOL WORLD EMPIRE: CENTRAL EURASIA, 1000-1500

3 Cr. Hrs.

At the beginning of the thirteenth century, a small and relatively obscure nomadic people emerged from their isolated homeland in the steppe north of China to forge what would quickly become the largest contiguous empire in the history of the world.  While the Mongol Empire is long gone, it had a profound and undeniable impact on the trajectory of world history.  The destruction of the Mongol conquests was overwhelming, but that relatively short period of trauma was followed by a lengthy recovery under the Pax-Mongolica: the Mongol Peace.  For several decades, Eurasia witnessed an unprecedented rise in the movement of people and a corresponding rise in the transcontinental exchange of commodities, scientific knowledge, religious and cultural traditions, and even disease pathogens.  This course will introduce students to the social, cultural and political history of medieval Central Eurasia, paying special attention to the quite regular, occasionally turbulent, but never dull interactions of pastoralnomadic and sedentary peoples.  

Time               Meeting Days   Instructor
9:35-10:55        TR                     Levi, S.

Assigned Readings:
Four books.

Assignments:
Course work includes a map quiz, midterm, paper assignment and a final exam.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group NE, (specifically Central Asia) pre-1750 for history the major and fulfills the historical study GE.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    


HISTORY 3405 HISTORY OF CONTEMPORARY CHINA, 1921-1990s [HYBRID]

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course provides a general but analytic introduction to the social, political, and intellectual history of contemporary China (from the establishment of the Communist Party to the mid1990s). We will review key historical phenomena that distinguish Contemporary China, particularly the search for wealth, power, and international respect.  We will also examine the roles of various figures such as Sun Yat-sen, Chiang Kai-shek, Mao Zedong, Deng Xiaoping, etc., in the development of contemporary China. Finally, we will analyze key topics in contemporary Chinese history such as Marxism and Maoism; the establishment of New China; the Cultural Revolution; post-Mao economic and political developments, particularly in the legal system; and Chinese women's liberation.

Time            Meeting Days    Instructor
2:20-3:40     TR                     Reed, C.

Assigned Readings:
Four books.

Assignments:
Map assignments, précis (abstract), and take-home exams.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
History 3405 satisfies the GE Historical Study requirement, second historical study category option, as well as GE Global diversity requirement.  History 3405 may also satisfy the two open options category for the GE.  For the History major and minor, History 3405 is East Asia, post1750 with concentrations in Power, Culture and Society (PCS) and Colonialism and Comparative Empires (CCE).   

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EUROPEAN HISTORY


HISTORY 1211 WESTERN CIVILIZATIONS TO 1600: RISE, COLLAPSE & RECOVERY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Ancient Civilizations (Near East, Greece, Rome) barbarian invasions, medieval civilizations (Byzantium, Islam, Europe) Renaissance and Reformation.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
WF                   8:00-9:20                     Green, D.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills a GE requirement. 


HISTORY 2202 INTRODUCTION TO MEDIEVAL HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

The Popular Middle Ages.  This course offers an introduction to Medieval History through the use and critique of popular representations of the period and its people in modern media (including film, television, and historical fiction). We will pair these popular interpretations with the traditional sources of the academic study of the Middle Ages.  Students will learn the basics of Medieval political, social and religious history through both contemporary and modern representations. One highlight of the course is a three-day in-class simulation of the arrival of the Black Death in fourteenth-century Europe and the social transformations that followed it.  An engaging (and fun!) way to fulfill the GE requirement in Historical Study.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
TR                   9:35-10:55                   Beach, A.

Assigned Readings:

Historical Fiction:

  • Bernard Cornwell, The Last Kingdom
  • Lucy Pick, Pilgrimage
  • Connie Willis, The Doomsday Book

Primary Sources:

  • Aberth, The Black Death The Vikings, a Reader
  • Selected primary sources on Christianity, Judaism, and Islam in the Middle Ages

Assignments:

  • 3 Film Critiques
  • 3 Short Writing Assignments
  • 2 Midterm exams
  • 1 Final exam

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for the history major or can fulfill a GE requirement. 


HISTORY 2203 INTRODUCTION TO EARLY MODERN EUROPE

3 Cr. Hrs.

In this survey course, we will study the history of Europe from the Black Death to the Industrial Revolution. This course examines social, cultural, religious, political and economic change from the mid fourteenth to the early nineteenth century. This is primarily a lecture class, but we will also focus on reading and analyzing primary sources through in-class discussions.  Among the questions we will discuss are:  What were the intellectual movements of The Renaissance, the Scientific Revolution, and the Enlightenment? How did states evolve through empire, absolutism, and revolution? How did state evolve through empire, absolutism, and revolution? How did religious belief and practice transform communities during the Reformation, the Wars of Religion, and the witch trials of the seventeenth century?  And how were people’s daily lives shaped by such large-scale changes?

Time            Meeting Days              Instructor
2:20-3:40     TR                               Bond, E.

Assigned Readings:

  • Merry Wiesner-Hanks, Early Modern Europe, 1450-1789, Cambridge University Press, 2013, ISBN 9781107643574
  • Natalie Zemon Davis, The Return of Martin Guerre, Harvard University Press, 1984, ISBN 9780674766914
  • and selections from open-access primary source reader:  Merry Wiesner-Hanks, Early Modern Europe Primary Sources, Cambridge University Press, 2013

Assignments:
Weekly Reading Responses, a short essay on the The Return of Martin Guerre, and a midterm and final exam.  

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

•       GE for historical study and diversity global studies
•       chronological breadth requirement before 1750 for history majors
•       Europe geographical concentration for history majors and minors
•       Thematic Minor in Comparative Studies of Pre-Modern Civilizations 


HISTORY 2204 MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Welcome to the Wonderful World of Modern European History!  In this course, we will study fundamental events and processes in European politics, war, economics, intellectual thought, culture, and society from the French and Industrial Revolutions to the present.  We will attempt to explain how Europeans and the European world have arrived at where they are today.  We will strive to understand how Europeans came to dominate much of the planet; how Europeans introduced revolutions in political ideas, including participatory democracy, liberalism, socialism, communism, fascism/Nazism, and nationalism; why the great industrial transformation began in Europe and what its consequences were; and how Europeans lived and gave meaning to their lives in the “modern” era.  The course is both topically and chronologically organized and emphasizes the common characteristics of European civilization as a whole rather than specific national histories. It traces threads of continuity while also examining the vast changes experienced by European society in these 250 years.  We will focus on particular cases that illustrate important patterns of change and conflict that have shaped the European world as we know it now.  The format of the course will be a combination of lectures, class discussions, and other forms of direct student participation.  

Time                               Meeting Days               Instructor
11:30-12:25                    MW                              Breyfogle, N.
10:20; 11:30; 12:40        Fridays                         (recitations)

Assigned Readings:
(This list is tentative and the specific books may change)

  • Brian Levack, Edward Muir, Michael Maas, Meredith Veldman, The West: Encounters and Transformations, Volume 2, Fifth Edition.
  • Emile Guillaumin, The Life of a Simple Man.
  • Erich Maria Remarque, All Quiet on the Western Front
  • Art Spiegelman, MAUS, vols. I and II.
  • Mary Lynn Rampolla, A Pocket Guide to Writing in History (8th edition)
  • Other shorter readings available on Carmen

Assignments:
This course requires one mid-term exam, one paper, a final exam, various other quizzes and brief writing assignments, and in-class discussion and activities.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
English 1110.xx previous or concurrent. If you already have credit for History 1212 you can’t enroll in this course.
This course fulfills Group Europe, post-1750 for history majors. 
This course fulfills the following GE requirements:  1) “Historical Study,” 2) “Diversity: Global Studies”.


HISTORY 2500 20TH CENTURY INTERNATIONAL HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will examine the political, economic, and military relations between the major countries of the world from the origins of the First World War to the breakup of the Soviet Union.  

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
8:00-9:20am    MW                              Larson, Z.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for the history major or can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 3229 HISTORY OF EARLY CHRISTIANITY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course introduces students to the origins and early history of Christianity.  It aims to provide students with an historical perspective on how men and women living during the first four centuries of the Common Era perceived and/or practiced what was a new and increasingly prominent ancient religion. During this semester, we shall focus primarily on the social, political and intellectual dimensions of early Christianity, with special attention paid to the great diversity of belief and practice among individuals who considered themselves followers of Christ.  This course will have succeeded if students leave in April with an understanding of ancient

Christianity not as a single, unified faith, but as a fluid, complex and sometimes dissonant set of beliefs, practices and experiences.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:35-10:55       WF                              Sessa, T.

Assignments:
Student can expect essay assignment, along with midterm and final exams.           

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Global, pre-1750 for the history major or can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 3230 HISTORY OF MEDIEVAL CHRISTIANITY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Step into the fascinating world of saints and heretics, nuns and monks, scholars, pilgrims, and crusaders! This course offers an in-depth exploration of the development of the beliefs, practices, and institutions of medieval Christianity in the European West from the fourth to the sixteenth century.  Key themes include the notion of Christian kingship, the appropriate use of coercive power by Christian rulers and the Church, the monastic quest for perfection, lay piety and popular belief (as opposed to official church teachings and doctrine), the ‘problem’ of unbelief, and interactions with Jews and Muslims.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:45-2:05       TR                               Beach, A.

Assigned Readings:

  • Augustine, Confessions.
  • The Rule of Saint Benedict.
  • R.I. Moore, The Origins of a Persecuting Society.
  • Nina Caputo, Debating Truth: The Barcelona Disputation of 1263. A Graphic History. 
  • Additional primary sources on Carmen 

Assignments:

  • Short ‘response papers’ that focus on primary sources for discussion
  • Midterm Exam
  • Final Exam
  • Critical Evaluation of R.I. Moore, Origins of a Persecuting Society.
  • Digital storytelling project (with option to work in pairs).

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
There are no prerequisites for this course, and it is accessible to all students, regardless of major or prior courses in medieval history or the history of Christianity. Depending on student interest, the course may include an optional (cost and dates TBA) overnight visit to a Benedictine monastery.

This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for the history major or can fulfill a GE requirement.                                                                                  


HISTORY 3232 SOLVING CRIME IN MEDIEVAL EUROPE

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course explores the interaction between the development of criminal law and social change in the late medieval period (c. 1100-1550) from a comparative perspective, examining primarily the English common law, but also the continental courts of law. Classes will be organized thematically such as: the passing of the trial by ordeal and its replacements; law enforcement; forensic medicine; jurisdictional competition; revenge; homicide and self-killing; women as victims and perpetrators; sex crimes; clerical criminals, treason; domestic violence; sanctuary, and fear-mongering. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
2:20-3:40         WF                              Butler, S.         

•       Robert Bartlett, The Hanged Man: A Story of Miracle, Memory, and Colonialism in the Middle Ages (Princeton, 2004).
•       All other readings for this course are on Carmen. 

Assigned Readings:
Select Readings from Carmen:

•       Daniel Lord Smail, “Violence and Predation in Late Medieval Mediterranean Europe”
•       Katherine Royer, “The Body in Parts: Reading the Execution Ritual in Late Medieval England”
•       William Ian Miller, “In Defense of Revenge”
•       Valentin Groebner, “Losing Face, Saving Face: Noses and Honour in the Late Medieval Town”
•       Helmut Puff, “Localizing Sodomy: the ‘Priest and Sodomite’ in Pre-Reformation Germany and Switzerland”
•       François Soyer, “Living in Fear of Revenge: Religious Minorities and their Right to Bear Arms in 15th-Century Portugal”

Assignments:

Grade Breakdown:

Reading Responses      30%
Book Review                  15% 
Research Essay             30%
Final Exam                     25%

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for the history major or can fulfill the historical study GE.                                                                                                                                                 


HISTORY 3247 MAGIC & WITCHCRAFT

3 Cr. Hrs.

The purposes of this course are: to understand the role of magic and witchcraft in early modern society; to learn about early modern European history more generally; to consider what the implications of this history and mindset might be for our own day; and to practice the analytical and communication skills called for in working with both secondary and primary sources. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:45-2:05       W                                Goldish, M.

Assigned Readings:

  • Brian P. Levack, The Witch Hunt in Early Modern Europe, 4th ed. (Routledge)
  • Keith Thomas, Religion and the Decline of Magic (Oxford and others; any edition)
  • The Trial of Tempel Anneke, ed., P.A. Morton, trans. B. Dähms (Univ. of Toronto Press)
  • Articles, documents and supplemental readings through our CARMEN website

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for the history major or can fulfill a GE requirement. 


HISTORY 3250 REVOLUTIONARY & NAPOLEONIC EUROPE, 1750-1815

3 Cr. Hrs.

In History 3250, we study European, but especially French history from the crisis of the Old Regime to the end of the wars of the Napoleonic Wars.  Through course lectures, small-group discussions, primary source analysis, and film, this course provides students with intellectual tools and information with which to make sense of this period of political, social, and cultural change.  Although this course will focus on France, we will also evaluate the global interactions that shaped the course of the French Revolution in France and abroad.  We will study France in comparison to other European states in order to explain what was unique about the French context, making Revolution possible there.

Time                 Meeting Days    Instructor
11:10-12:30         TR                     Bond, E.

Assigned Readings:

  • Laura Mason and Tracey Rizzo, The French Revolution: A Document Collection
  • David P. Jordan, The King's Trial Tom Reiss, The Black Count 
  • assigned selections from other books will be available via the course website or the OSU Library

Assignments:
In-Class Debate based on your reading of The King's Trial, Short Weekly Reading Responses, a Midterm Exam, and a Final Exam. 

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the following:

  • chronological breadth requirement after 1750 for history majors
  • Europe geographical concentration for history majors and minors
  • Thematic minor in Military History
  • GE requirement                                                                                                              

HISTORY 3263 FRANCE IN THE 20th CENTURY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Images of the broken bodies of the victims of recent terror attacks in France have shocked the world. Many of the perpetrators have attachments to former French colonies. This course will focus on the history of modern France and its overseas empire from the founding of the Third Republic in 1870 until the present, to help make more sense of today’s horrific events. The twentieth century was particularly traumatic for a nation that has always prided itself on its traditions of tolerance and respect for human rights, but which also conquered colonies in Africa and Asia by force and collaborated with the German Occupiers from 1940 to 1945. Topics to be explored include the long history of US-French relations, the Dreyfus Affair, the impact of two World Wars on men and women alike, imperialism and decolonization, the rise of anti-immigrant sentiment, and the particular place of France and French culture in the modern world. Readings include autobiographies, novels and works of history as well as movies.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
2:20-3:40         WF                              Conklin, A.       

Assigned Readings:

  • Alice Conklin, Sarah Fishman, Robert Zaretsky, France and Its Empire since 1870
  • Guy de Maupassant, Bel Ami
  • Henri Barbusse, Under Fire
  • Emilie Carles, A Life of Her Own
  • Alice Kaplan, The Collaborator
  • Henry Alleg, The Question
  • Medhi Charef, Tea in the Harem

Films:

  • Grand Illusion, dir. Jean Renoir
  • The Battle of Algiers, dir. Gillo Pontecorvo Hate, dir. Matheiu Kassovitz.

Assignments:

  • Regular attendance and participation in class (25%)
  • A mid-term (25%), a final (25%), and a 5-7-page book review (25%).

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Europe, post-1750 for the history major or can fulfill a GE requirement. 

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JEWISH HISTORY


HISTORY 2451 MEDIEVAL & EARLY MODERN JEWISH HISTORY, 700-1700 CE

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course surveys nearly a thousand years of Jewish history, religion, and culture in Europe from the Islamic conquest of Spain (711 C.E.) to the rise of the Sabbatian movement in the midseventeenth century.  Focusing on key figures and representative subjects, the lectures will seek to offer a balanced picture of the Jewish experience in the medieval and early modern periods.  Special emphasis will be placed upon the evaluation and interpretation of primary sources (in translation).  These texts will introduce students to the political, social, intellectual, and spiritual worlds of ancient and medieval Jewry.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:45-2:05       TR                               Frank, D.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Global, pre-1750 for the history major or can fulfill a GE requirement.                                                                                                                                                 


HISTORY 2453 HISTORY OF ZIONISM AND MODERN ISRAEL

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course is a survey of the political, social and cultural history of Zionism and the State of Israel since the late 19th century. We will examine the evolution of Zionism as an ideology and a national movement, the background to the establishment of Israel in 1948 and its development up to the present day.  The course will deal with diplomacy, immigration and demography, military history, film, fine arts, dance and literature, social and ethnic groups, religion and international law. An important part of this course will be the history of Zionist-Arab and IsraeliPalestinian conflict and the relationship between Jews and Arabs in the region.

Time             Meeting Days       Instructor
9:35-10:55   TR                         Kaye, A.

Assigned Readings:

  • Two books are required for the course:
  • Shapira, Anita. Israel: A History, Waltham, Mass; Brandeis, 2012.
  • Dowty, Alan. Israel/Palestine. Cambridge, UK; Malden, MA: Polity, 2012.

Assignments:
Occasional in-class quizzes and small assignments; mid-term and final project.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Middle East, post-1750 for the history major or can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 3450 HISTORY OF ANCIENT ISRAEL

3 Cr. Hrs.

Survey of the history of ancient Israel from its origins to the advent of Hellenism (300 BCE). 

Time                 Meeting Days          Instructor
11:10-12:30        WF                            Meier, S.

Assigned Readings:
One required textbook

Assignments:

  • Daily readings
  • One term paper
  • Midterm
  • Final exam

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Near Eastern, pre-1750 for the history major or can fulfill a GE requirement.     

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LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY


HISTORY 2105 LATIN AMERICA AND THE WORLD

3 Cr. Hrs.

Latin America’s relationship with the world since Independence (1825) focusing on causes of direct and indirect U.S. intervention as well as European influences and globalization.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
3:55-5:15         WF                              Schoof, M.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for the history major or can fulfill the historical study GE.                                                                                                                                                 


HISTORY 3105 HISTORY OF BRAZIL                                   

3 Cr. Hrs.                                                                                  

Known for its beaches, carnival, and soccer, Brazilian history is a far deeper story of colonialism, slavery, agricultural wealth, immigration, industrial development, political conflict over authoritarianism and democracy, and more. This course will provide a survey of the deep history of the country from its inception through its struggle to become a modern, developed nation in the 20th century.  It will touch on five key topics that affect Brazil today: economic, political, social, environmental, and popular culture.   

Time             Meeting Days              Instructor
9:35-10:55    WF                              Eaglin, J.                                                             

Assigned Readings:
TBD

Assignments:
TBD

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Latin America, post-1750 for the history major or can fulfill the historical study GE.

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MILITARY HISTORY


HISTORY 3270 WORLD WAR I

3 Cr. Hrs.

In this course, we will focus on the origins, course, and historical implications of one of the most significant turning points in modern world history: The First World War.  Often called “The Great War,” the conflict that broke out in the summer of 1914 and lasted for over four bloody, grinding years altered forever the global balance of power; cultural attitudes both inside and outside of Europe; domestic and international political relationships; and basic economic principles that had governed for centuries. Although the war was a European conflict, fighting took place in the Middle East, Africa, the Atlantic, and Asia. As such, we will examine the war as a global conflict, considering both the specifics aspects of the battles themselves as well as their broader social, political, and cultural context. The course grade will be comprised of attendance, a midterm, a final, and a 5-7-page essay on a topic to be discussed in lecture.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
On-line             on-line                         Douglas, S.

Assignments:

  • Attendance: 15%
  • Midterm: 25%
  • Paper: 25%
  • Final Exam: 35%

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Global, post -1750 for the history major or can fulfill the historical study GE.                                                                                                                                                             


HISTORY 3552 WAR IN WORLD HISTORY, 1900 - PRESENT

3 Cr. Hrs.              

This lecture course investigates the changing nature of war in the 20th Century, from trench warfare to ethnic cleansing, as well as its effects on individuals and entire societies.  It covers events such as World War I, the Spanish Civil War, World War II, the Korean War and the Vietnam War, and topics such as the experience of captivity, sexual violence in wartime, children in war, or genocide.  We will pay special attention to the blurring of distinction between combatants and non-combatants, as well as the experiences of ordinary men and women who lived through the wars of the 20th Century.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:35-10:55       TR                               Cabanes, B.

Assigned Readings:

  • Primo Levi, Survival in Auschwitz
  • Anonymous, A Woman in Berlin
  • Henri Alleg, The Question
  • Jean Hatzfeld, Machete Season, The Killers in Rwanda Speak

Assignments:
The final grade in the course will be an average of the four grades given for: a short 2000-word paper (20%), the mid-term examination (25%), lecture Quick Quizzes (20%); the final examination (35%).

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for the history major, or the historical study GE.                                                                                                                         


HISTORY 3560 AMERICAN MILITARY HISTORY, 1607-1902

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course describes and analyzes the history of American military policy from the colonial period to the end of the Philippine War. It focuses on the creation of American military institutions, the genesis of policy-making and maintenance of civilian control over that process, the interrelationship between foreign and military policy, the conduct of war, and the influence of American society upon the armed forces as social institutions.

Students will achieve an understanding of the main developments in American military history, the ways in which these developments have reflected or shaped developments in general American history, and the main interpretations advanced by scholars who have studied this subject. They will also hone their skills at critical writing and analysis, and will gain greater insight into the way historians explore the human condition.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:45-2:05       WF                              Grimsley, M.

Assigned Readings:

  • Allan R. Millett and Peter Maslowski, For the Common Defense: A Military History of the United States of America., Revised & Expanded Edition.
  • Fred Anderson, A People's Army: Massachusetts Soldiers and Society in the Seven Years' War.
  • James M. McPherson, For Cause and Comrades.
  • Steven E. Woodworth, Beneath a Northern Sky: The Short History of the Gettysburg Campaign.

Assignments: (tentative)

  • First midterm examination (25 percent)
  • Second midterm examination (35percent)
  • Final examination (40 percent)

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
Although there are no prerequisites, a solid grounding in U.S. History is very helpful.
This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for the History major or can fulfill a GE requirement.                                                                                                                                                             


HISTORY 3570 WORLD WAR II

3 Cr. Hours

World War II was the largest and most destructive war in human history.  More than seventy years after it ended, the war continues to shape our world.  This course examines the causes, conduct, and consequences of this devastating conflict.  Through readings, lectures, and video, the class will study the politics that shaped the involvement of the major combatants; military leadership and the characteristics of major Allied and Axis armed services; the national and theater strategies of the various major combatants; the military operations that led to victory or defeat on battlefields spanning the globe; war crimes; and other factors such as leadership, economics, military doctrine and effectiveness, technology, ideology, and racism that impacted the outcome of the war.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:30        WF                              Mansoor, P.

Assigned Readings:

  • Williamson Murray and Allan R. Millett, A War to be Won:  Fighting the Second World War, West Point History of Warfare (online only)
  • Michael Lynch, Hitler
  • E. B. Sledge, With the Old Breed

Assignments:
In-class mid-term and final examinations Two book reviews (2-3 pages each). 

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
AP History credit or successful completion of another college-level history course.
This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for history majors.
This course also fulfills the historical study and global studies category of the GE.

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NATIVE AMERICAN HISTORY   



HISTORY 3071 NATIVE AMERICAN HISTORY FROM REMOVAL TO PRESENT

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will introduce students to the history of Native Americans from the 1820s to the present. We will look at the removal of Native tribes to Indian Territory, the establishment of the reservation system, the resurgence of Native cultures and pan-Indian movements in the twentieth century, postwar urban migration and tribal termination policies, and the Red Power movements of the 1960s. The course will encourage the students to think about intersections of gender, race, and class and to consider Native resistance movements and cultural persistence over the last two centuries.
 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:30       TR                               Rivers, D.

 

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for the history major or can fulfill a GE requirement. 

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THEMATIC COURSE OFFERINGS


HISTORY 2701 HISTORY OF TECHNOLOGY

3 Cr. Hrs.

From fire, stone tools, the wheel and the stirrup and to drones, self-driving cars, social media and automation, human history is inexplicable without understanding technology. This course provides an introductory overview of the multiple ways in which technology has shaped human practices throughout history. It has two halves: the first half provides a history of technology from the earliest human societies to the second Industrial Revolution of the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. The second half explores numerous themes in the history of technology, including war, gender, disaster, information and the environment. 

Time               Meeting Days              Instructor
9:35-10:55      TR                               Otter, C.

Assigned Readings:
All readings posted on CARMEN.

Assignments:
3 response papers and 1 final paper.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for the history major or the historical study GE.


HISTORY 2703 HISTORY OF PUBLIC HEALTH: MEDICINE AND DISEASE

3 Cr. Hrs.

Survey of the history of public health, disease and medicine in a global context.

Time            Meeting Days               Instructor
3:55-5:15     WF                               Harris, J.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for the history major or the historical study GE.



HISTORY 2704 WATER: A HUMAN HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Throughout human history and across this very diverse planet, water defines every aspect of human life: from the molecular, biological, and ecological to the cultural, religious, economic, and political. 

Time         Meeting Days   Instructor
On-line     Online               Harris, J.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for the history major or can fulfil the historical study GE.



HISTORY 2800H HONORS INTRODUCTION TO THE DISCIPLINE OF HISTORY         

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course is designed for Honors history majors and introduces history majors to the practice of history as an academic discipline.  It explores how professionals in the field go about the task of recovering and representing the past.  We will look at the diverse range of histories that are now being written, at the various methods, approaches, skills, and key concepts that are currently employed by historians, and at how they commonly evaluate and deploy different forms of verbal and visual evidence.  Through course readings, written assignments, in-class discussions, and oral presentations, students will be encouraged at all times to think critically and analytically about the study of history and to ponder some of its larger implications: How do societies use history?  Why does the past matter?  Is it always desirable or even possible to write a truly objective history?  Are some forms of history more valuable than others?  Are those who ignore the past doomed to repeat it?

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
2:20-3:40         TR                               Anderson, G.

Assigned Readings:

  • J. W. Davidson and M. H. Lytle, After the Fact: The Art of Historical Detection (McGraw Hill).
  • J. Tey, The Daughter of Time (Simon and Schuster).
  • J. Tosh, The Pursuit of History (Pearson).

Assignments:
3 quizzes; group oral presentation; final paper.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
English 1110.xx, or Honors standing or permission of instructor. This class does not fulfill a GE requirement.



HISTORY 2800 INTRODUCTION TO THE DISCIPLINE OF HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course introduces undergraduate history majors to the methods and skills that historians use to study the past, and it considers some of the problems we face in interpreting evidence, assessing arguments, and presenting our research to others.  We will use a series of exercises to work on our basic skills, and two case studies will enable us to reflect on historical problems in more depth: the puzzling case of a missing and returned soldier in sixteenth-century France, and the murder of Hypatia in fifth-century Alexandria.  Students will identify and analyze primary and secondary sources on specific topics that interest them. This is a seminar, in which students will be expected to prepare work and participate in each class meeting.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:30       TR                               Brakke, D             

Assigned Readings:

  • Conal Furay & Michael Salevouris, The Methods & Skills of History (4th ed)
  • John Lewis Gaddis, The Landscape of History: How Historians Map the Past
  • Natalie Zemon Davis, The Return of Martin Guerre

Recommended Readings:
Mary Lynn Rampolla, A Pocket Guide to Writing in History

Assignments:
Assignments will include exercises from Furay and Salevouris, short written assignments (e.g., précis, a book review, a movie review), and a power-point presentation.  The “final examination” will be a proposal and dossier for a research paper.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course is required for all students declaring a Major in History; students must earn a C or higher to have it count on the Major. It may not be used for the GE Historical Study requirement.


HISTORY 2800 INTRODUCTION TO THE DISCIPLINE OF HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

What is history? In this course, we explore how historians seek to understand the past.  We cover the challenges of finding and interpreting evidence, constructing convincing arguments, and dealing with different ways of thinking about historical questions. Doing history well requires close reading, logical analysis and imagination. It also requires careful writing. We work on improving these skills as you prepare a proposal for a research project in an area of your own choosing.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
Online             online                           Lawrence, S.

Assigned Readings:
Williams, Joseph M. and Bizup, Joseph. Style: Lessons in Clarity and Grace, 12th edition. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Educational, 2016. ISBN- 9780134080413. Available at the OSU Bookstore.
All of the other required readings for this course will be available in electronic format.

Assignments:
Students must:

•       participate in discussions and peer review for an average of at least two hours per week in Canvas
•       spend at least seven hours per week reading, writing, making video presentations and taking quizzes
•       complete 10 check-off assignments (not graded, but 1% credit given for completion on time)
•       take 7 short quizzes 
•       complete 5 short written (3-5 page) or video (4-5 minutes) essays
•       complete a proposal for a research project in history (10 pages minimum)

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. This class does not fulfill a GE requirement.                            


HISTORY 2800 INTRODUCTION TO THE DISCIPLINE OF HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.                         

This course introduces history majors and minors to the academic discipline of history. We will examine the kinds of sources historians use, the various research and writing skills that historians employ, and their methodologies and theories. What are historical archives? How does one do archival research? How do different sources provide insight into different historical questions? In order to answer these questions, we will explore the history of Ohio and visit a number of archival sites in Ohio as well as on OSU’s campus. Through fieldtrips, readings, journal writing, and source analysis, we will explore the range of ways historians can approach particular events, and how they can arrive at very different conclusions by asking different questions and exploring an array of sources. We will also reflect on the powerful role that historical memory plays in shaping our understanding of the present.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:30        WF                              Marino, K.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course is required for all students declaring a Major in history. Students must earn a “C” or higher to have it count on the history major. It may not be used for the GE Historical Study requirement.                         


HISTORY 2800 INTRODUCTION TO THE DISCIPLINE OF HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

So you want to be a history major? While History 2800 is required for majors to learn the discipline and methods of history, we will also look at different ways that people use sources and make historical arguments.  As such we will dive into rich sources (like a trial for piracy and murder) and read unconventional histories (like graphic novels and imagined biographies).  All of these help illuminate what history is and what historians do.  The course will also focus on our own writing, analysis, and historical imagination. History 2800 has limited enrollment and is run in a lively seminar format.  All students are expected to attend and take part in the discussion for every class meeting.  While the course is designed for undergraduate history majors, anyone who is curious about how historians think, do research, and produce historical scholarship is welcome. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:45-2:05       TR                               McDow, T.

Assigned Readings:
Readings will consist of a combination of articles and books, with some analysis of primary sources.

The preliminary list of readings (please confirm with instructor before buying):

  • Trevor Getz, Abina and the Important Men (2nd ed., 2015)
  • Ryszard Kapuscinski, The Emperor Downfall of an Autocrat (1989)
  • Art Spiegelman, Maus I (1986)

Assignments:
Students will complete short weekly assignments in addition to two longer papers. 

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course is required for all students declaring a Major in History; students must earn a C or higher to have it count on the Major.  It may not be used for the GE Historical Study requirement.                                                                                         


HISTORY 3191 HISTORICAL INTERNSHIP

3 Cr. Hrs.

One of the most important experiences you can have as an undergraduate, many experts on higher education say, is the hands-on knowledge you gain from holding an internship.  Most employers now suggest that you have at least one internship experience as an undergraduate, and many recommend more than one.

Why?  An internship will help you explore some of the possibilities in the “real world” for using the skills you’re acquiring.  You’ll have practice in using them, in learning new ones, and in knowing how to describe what you can do for prospective employers   You’ll have the opportunity to network, as well as to learn how organizations work and how work culture takes shape in light of institutional goals.  You’ll get experience you can put on your resumé, along with the confidence that comes from experience.

In this course, you’ll be able to choose from a range of internship possibilities at nearby historical and history-related institutions and agencies.  You’ll receive three credit hours for your semester-long work experience, along with the chance to reflect with your peers on what you’re learning about history, historical skills, and future career directions.  By the end of the course, my hope is that you’ll have a better sense of who you are and who you want to become in the future as a contributor to the work force.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
ARR                ARR                              Cayton, M.

Assigned Readings:
Maybe an occasional short article.   

Assignments/Course Requirements

(1) Three class meetings of 90 minutes each (time to be arranged); 2 individual meetings with the course instructor; 4 meetings with your small group.
(2) Initial assignment request, with rationale (500 words)
(3) 60 hours of work during the semester (or an average of 6 hours per week) in internship assignment
(4) Bi-weekly blog posts in response to prompts.
(5) A final reflection paper of 1000-1500 words.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: History majors preferred, minors are ok too. You must have completed at least one History course at the 2000-level.

Read about the goals and requirements of the History Department Internship Program at https://history.osu.edu/undergrad/internship-guidelines-history-3191.  See what interns did last year at https://history.osu.edu/undergrad/interns-share-their-experiences.  Preliminary list of opportunities for this spring will be posted by mid-October.                                     


HISTORY 3650 FAMILIES IN HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will examine the ways that categories of sexuality, class, race, and gender have intersected and operated in constructions of the American family over the last century. Topics covered will include: changes in the family, youth culture, and women’s rights in the early twentieth century; the family as a critical element of Black political organizing; lesbian and gay parenting from World War Two to the present; families and immigration; Native American families and urbanization; and struggles over the family and welfare policy.
 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
2:20-3:40         TR                               Rivers, D.

Prerequisites & Special Comments: This course fulfills group Global, post-1750 for the history major or can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 4005 RESEARCH SEMINAR IN EARLY AMERICAN HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

The struggle over slavery in the United States between the Revolution and the Civil War is both one of the oldest topics in American historical writing, one of the most dynamic among modern historians, and of ongoing significance in American politics and culture.  This senior seminar will explore some of the central works in this thriving literature and provide students the opportunity to engage in primary research and writing on a wide range of topics on slavery and politics between the 1750s and the 1860s.  Development of research skills [print, manuscript, and electronic] and writing skills will be emphasized.  You will finish this course having written a significant research paper suitable for a writing sample for a graduate or professional school application.  

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
2:15-5:00         Thursday                     Brooke, J.

Assigned Readings:

  • Egerton, Douglas. Gabriel’s Rebellion. The University of North Carolina Press
  • Varon, Elizabeth R. Disunion! The Coming of the American Civil War, 1789-1859. University of North Carolina Press [ISBN: 0-8078-3232-4]
  • Downs, Gregory P. After Appomattox: Military Occupation and the Ends of War.  Harvard University Press
  • Other readings will be made available on Carmen.  

Objectives of 4005.
This course fulfills the major research seminar requirement toward a history major.  This is a capstone course in historical analysis and writing for senior honors history majors.  A major goal of the course is to hone the skills of history majors in historical writing through the exercise of preparing a research paper, using both primary and secondary sources, on a topic related to the course.  In addition, students will benefit from peer and instructor critique of their paper proposals and drafts, and will hone their oral presentation skills by presenting their research proposals and papers to their classmates.    

Assignments:

  • Document searches and comments
  • Written assignments on readings
  • Oral reports on readings, and your research project at various stages,   
  • Research paper [20-25 pages] (drafts reviewed prior to final submission).  

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course will assume a basic background in the period, equivalent to OSU History 1151, and preferably higher-level American History courses and fulfills the Research seminar requirement for the history major.                              


HISTORY 4080 READINGS IN AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Topic: Non-plantation Slavery during the Antebellum Era

It is probably the case that when most people think about antebellum slavery, the image of a plantation comes to mind. It is not an illogical image given the critical participation of slaves in the production of American agricultural products, especially cotton, tobacco, rice, corn, wheat, indigo, hemp, and sugar.  Directly and indirectly, agricultural slave labor generated a substantial (often the largest) portion of American wealth in nineteenth-century America and on some other parts of the world. But this course takes a different tack:  it looks at slavery in nonplantation/agricultural contexts and the slave experience beyond the plantation. These individuals worked in cities, in mines, in factories, on rivers, and in homes, among other places. And they came in contact with town/urban environments in diverse ways, beyond their efforts to earn a wage. In addition to these details, we will also pay especial attention to the diverse ways historians have discussed these slaves, their lives, and their labors, and how these discussions have changed over the last hundred years.  

Time              Meeting Days              Instructor
12:45-3:30     Wednesday                Shaw, S.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the major reading seminar requirement toward a history major.                           


HISTORY 4217 RESEARCH SEMINAR IN LATE ANTIQUITY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Literary Forgery in the Christian Tradition

How do we write a history after we discover our primary sources have been forged?  Historians, after all, are only as good as their sources.  The topic of literary forgery –– falsely claimed and falsely attributed authorship –– thus raises important, and central, questions regarding the very problem of history itself.  This research seminar in the ancient Christian tradition focuses on literary forgery to help senior history majors acquire advanced research and writing skills in using primary sources.  Forgery and literary deceit are well documented in classical and late antiquity, and it is among the most common phenomena of the early Jewish and Christian traditions.  Indeed, nearly half of the New Testament books make a false authorial claim.  We shall examine the historical context of this broad phenomenon, also known as pseudepigraphy, in a wide range of ancient texts: classical works falsely attributed to traditional authorities (e.g., Plato, Aristotle, and the physician Galen), apocalyptic Jewish writings falsely attributed to Moses and the Patriarchs, and works in the New Testament and other early Christian literature that falsely claim the apostles or Jesus Christ himself as the author.  Our goals are large: to ask why so many Christian authors forged what is today sacred scripture to Christians, to explore the critical categories and taxonomies involved in detecting forgeries, and to complicate the very meaning of authorship in the premodern era.  

Time            Meeting Days               Instructor
9:35-10:55   WF                               Harrill, B.

Assigned Readings:

  • Ehrman, Bart.  Forgery and Counterforgery : The Use of Literary Deceit in Early Christian Polemics.  Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012.
  • Grafton, Anthony, Forgers and Critics: Creativity and Duplicity in Western Scholarship.  Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1990.
  • The HarperCollins Study Bible.  Student Edition, fully Revised and Updated.  Edited by H. W.
  • Attridge and W. A. Meeks et al. San Francisco: HarperOne, 2006.
  • 4 Ezra and 2 Baruch: Translations, Introductions, and Notes.  Edited by Michael E. Stone and Matthias Henze.  Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2013.  

Assignments:
Active participation in seminar discussion.  Oral presentations on a forged document from antiquity.  A final research paper (20-25 pages), written in steps, throughout the semester.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the RESEARCH seminar requirement for History Majors.  


HISTORY 4575 RESEARCH SEMINAR IN MILITARY HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

The First World War

This course is a research seminar that explores and analyzes the history of World War I. Students will read and discuss in class several books, articles and documents related especially to the military, social, cultural and gendered aspects of the conflict. A research paper, based on significant primary sources, will be the core requirement of the course. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:35-12:20       Wednesday                 Cabanes, B.

Assigned Readings:

+ Bruno Cabanes, August 1914. France, the Great War and a Month that Changed the World Forever (Yale University Press, 2016)
+ Martha Hanna, Your Death Would be Mine (Harvard University Press, 2006)
+ Jennifer Keene, Doughboys. The Great War and the Remaking of America, (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2003)
+ Jay Winter, Sites of Memory, Sites of Mourning (Cambridge University Press, 1998)

Assignments:
The final grade in the course will be an average of the three grades given for: regular and intensive participation (10%), leading the group discussion (20%), an annotated bibliography (10%); an oral report on the research project (10%); a final research paper (50%)

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the Research seminar requirement for the history major.  


HISTORY 4650 READING SEMINAR IN WORLD HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.                                                                                                                                   

While universal human rights may seem timeless, they have a long and contested global history. This class will introduce students to that history. How has the powerful rhetoric of contemporary human rights developed? What are its origins? How have human rights claims intersected with political, institutional, and legal structures? What are its prospects for the future? The course will place particular emphasis on the emergence of human rights norms from the Enlightenment through the 1940s, the “breakthrough” moment of human rights advocacy since the 1970s, mobilizations around the idea that “women’s rights are human rights” in the 1980s and 90s, and other recent campaigns for global justice. The course addresses the relationship of human rights to feminism, humanitarianism, slavery, non-governmental organizations, and international law. Readings will include both monographs and articles as well as primary sources and film.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
2:15-5:00         Tuesday                      Marino, K.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the major reading seminar requirement toward a history major.    


HISTORY 4700 READING SEMINAR IN ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

The field of Latin American history has a rich environmental history. From its colonial history to today, Latin America has experienced dramatic environmental change behind extractive exportcommodity economies, like silver in Mexico, bananas in Central America to sugarcane and coffee in Brazil. Beyond commodity extraction, major land conflicts and change has been an essential part of social and political conflict in the past and the present.  The green revolution, which allowed the ability to genetically modify agricultural yields for higher yields, had a dramatic impact on humans and the environment as well. The politicization of the environment in recent years is part of an important part of a broader approach to Latin American history as well. This course will introduce students to different methodological approaches to environmental history in the Latin America and provides specific examples of the way environmental history has shaped Latin America today.

Time            Meeting Days               Instructor
12:45-3:30   Wednesday                  Eaglin, J.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the major reading seminar requirement toward a history major.                           


HISTORY 4795 RESEARCH SEMINAR IN HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

The topic of this seminar will be the early Enlightenment (ca. 1650-1730).  We will study figures such as Hobbes, Spinoza, Newton, Locke and Voltaire to see what ideas fed the Enlightenment outlook and what some of its many variations were.  We will also encounter some conflicting views of historians about these matters.  

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
4:10-6:55         Wednesday                 Goldish, M.

Assignments:
This will be a true seminar in which each student will work with the instructor to formulate a research project.  Much of the semester will consist of participants sharing their work.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the research seminar requirement toward a history major.                 

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WOMEN'S HISTORY


HISTORY 3642 WOMEN IN MODERN EUROPE FROM THE 18TH CENTURY TO THE PRESENT

3 Cr. Hrs.                      

This course is designed as an introduction to the history of European women from the mid-18th century to the late-20th century.  Several themes will be central to the course.  We will investigate changing ideas about women and the ways in which these ideas influence women’s lives.  We will study the processes of industrial expansion and economic change and the impact of these developments on women’s social and economic position.  We will explore the political reorganization of Europe over the course of these centuries, and we will examine how women strove to shape and improve their lives under changing circumstances.  We will also concentrate on how relationships between women and men developed, and how beliefs about gender changed.  Finally, we will look at how economic position, religion, sexuality, marital status, regional and national differences influenced women’s experiences.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:30       TR                               Soland, B.

Assigned Readings:
The readings for this course include a broad selection of primary and secondary sources.  All readings will be made available on Carmen.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Europe, post-1750 for the history major or can fulfill a GE requirement. 

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WORLD HISTORY


HISTORY 1681 WORLD HISTORY TO 1500

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course examines the major issues that have shaped the human experience from the beginnings of human civilization (ca. 3500 B.C.E.) to ca. 1500 C.E., when the European voyages of exploration were beginning to tie the world together more tightly than ever before in a new pattern of global interrelatedness.  Before 1500, societies in different parts of the world had far less contact with each other.  In particular, Afro-Eurasia and the Americas remained almost entirely cut off from each other.  For this reason, the main emphasis of History 1681 will be the comparative study of civilizations.  Within that context, religions (belief systems), trade, and technology will be emphasized as factors that differentiated civilizations while also linking different civilizations at regional and hemispheric, if not yet global, levels.

Time               Meeting Days             Instructor
8:00-9:20        TR                              Hathaway, J.

Assigned Readings:
Richard W. Bulliet, et al., The Earth and Its Peoples:  A Global History, vol. 1, 6th ed.  Robert van Gulik, The Chinese Maze Murders:  A Judge Dee Mystery

Assignments:
“past in the present” paragraph, in-class midterm and final, a paper related to The Chinese Maze Murders.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
English 1110.xx concurrent or previous; not open to students with credit for History 181 or 2641. This course meets GE Historical survey; Global diversity. This course also fulfills one of the prerequisites for students applying to OSU’s Master’s degree in Education for social studies licensure.                                      


HISTORY 2650 THE WORLD SINCE 1914

3 Cr. Hrs.

The World since 1914 is a course on global history. We will focus on the central themes of global history in the modern world, such as globalization, the rise of mass society, and identity and difference, as well as major events, such as the World Wars, the Great Depression, the Cold War, and decolonization. We will also look at major issues in the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, such as food, health, energy, economic development, and the environment. Much of our class will involve discussion of primary documents and of competing theories about the causes of historical change. But the ultimate goal of the course is civic: to help us understand better the world and its problems, and to think about how we might address those problems better than people have in the past.

Time                  Meetings Days             Instructor
12:40-1:35           WF                               Roth, R.
10:20; 12:40        Monday (recitations)
1:50 

Assigned Readings:
We will read two books, a number of on-line documents, and selections from competing historical interpretations of the past. The following books will be required:

  • Carter Vaughn Findley and John Alexander Murray Rothney, Twentieth-Century World (7th edition). Wadsworth, 2011. ISBN 13: 978-0-547-21850-2. Paperback.
  • James H. Overfield, Sources of Twentieth Century Global History. Wadsworth, 2002. ISBN 13: 978-0-395-90407-7. Paperback.

Assignments:
Quizzes:  There will be five quizzes on the readings in the course.  The quizzes will ask you to report fully and accurately on the content of readings in the course.
Midterm and final examinations:  There will be a midterm examination and a final examination.  The midterm will ask you to write one comprehensive one-hour essay, the final two.
Essay:  You will be asked to write an essay (5 or 6 pages in length) on an aspect of your family’s history over the past 100 years. Each family history should reflect on a major problem in global history.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for the history major or can fulfill the historical study GE.                                


HISTORY 2700 GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT

3 Cr. Hrs.

In this course, we explore how humans have shaped the environment and how the environment has shaped human history from prehistory to the present.  Our topics will range from fire to deforestation to climate change.  Students will learn the essential background to major environmental issues and consider how history might (or might not) help us confront present environmental challenges.

Time                         Meetings Days             Instructor
10:20-11:15                MW                              White, S.
10:20; 11:30; 1:50      Friday (recitations)

Assigned Readings:
This course has one required textbook:

J. R. McNeill and Peter Engelke, The Great Acceleration: An Environmental History of the Anthropocene since 1945 (Cambridge, MA: Harvard Belknap, 2016).

All other course readings will be posted to Carmen.

Assignments:
Regular short quizzes and exams, weekly recitation activities, and a final paper.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course may be taken to fulfill historical study, social science, or global studies GE requirements.  This course may be counted as Group Global, and either pre- or post-1750 for the major in history.  This course has been recommended for students pursuing degrees in SENR, but students in all degree programs are welcome.                                     


HISTORY 2720 BIG HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Big History is history in the widest possible sense, from the beginning of the universe to the end.  In this course, we’ll explore human story in its evolutionary, geological, and cosmological context.   Along the way, students will get a non-technical introduction to how we know what we know about the galaxy, planet, life, and our species.  The unifying theme throughout the course will be how increasingly complex systems can emerge in a universe forever moving toward entropy.  By the end of the course, students will have a basic grounding in some of the major theories that help explain our place in the cosmos, and a new appreciation of where we came from and where we might be going.

Time        Meeting Days    Instructor
Online     Online                White, S.

Assigned Reading:

Textbook: David Christian, Cynthia Stokes Brown, and Craig Benjamin, Big History: Between Nothing & Everything (NY: McGraw-Hill, 2013). 

Assignments:
Regular quizzes and exams, short writing assignments, including discussion board posts; and one final paper.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the Global, pre-1750 category for the history major or can fulfill the historical study GE.

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