Spring 2019 Undergraduate Courses

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AFRICAN HISTORY

 


HISTORY 2302 HISTORY OF MODERN AFRICA, 1800-1960

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course examines major political, social, and economic developments in Africa from 1800 to 1960.  This was one of the most pivotal periods in the history of Africa for it witnessed European colonization of the continent as well as the rise of African nationalism and the end of colonial rule.  The course will begin with a discussion of the conditions in Africa during the nineteenth century and proceeds to examine European colonial conquest and African response, colonial economic and social policies, the transformation of African societies under colonial rule, African nationalism and decolonization, and the legacy of European colonial rule in Africa.  In addition to regular lectures and discussion sections, these topics will be illuminated by films and other audiovisual materials

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
10:20-12:00     MWF                           Sikainga, Ahmad

Assigned Readings:
Robert Harms, Africa in Global History, 2018.
Ada Boahen, African Perspectives on European Colonialism
Dennis Laumann, Colonial Africa: 1884-1994, 1st edition

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
Please note: This is a 2nd session course.
This course fulfills Group Africa, post-1750 for the history major or can fulfill a GE requirement.                                                                                                                                               


HISTORY 3354 ISLAMIC SPAIN & NORTH AFRICA

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will examine the history of Islamic Spain and North Africa from the seventh to the nineteenth century. The course will explore such topics as the establishment of Muslim rule in north Africa and Spain; the development of Muslim civilization in Al-Andalus; cultural and intellectual life, the rise of the Berber empires in north Africa; the interaction between North Africa and Spain; the collapse of Muslim rule in Spain and its consequences; the legacy of Muslim civilization in Spain; Ottoman rule in north Africa, and European imperial expansion in North Africa.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
1:50-3:40         MWF                           Sikainga, Ahmad

Assigned Readings:
Phillip Naylor, North Africa, University of Texas Press, 2009
Richard Fletcher, Moorish Spain, University of California Press, 2006

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
Please note: This is a 2nd session course.
This course fulfills Group Global, pre-1750 for history majors or can fulfill a GE requirement.                                                                                                                                               


HISTORY 3704 HIV: FROM MICROBIOLOGY TO MACROHISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

HIV: From Microbiology to Macrohistory is an interdisciplinary exploration of HIV/AIDs that combines history and virology through team teaching.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
3:00-5:55         MWF                           McDow, T. & J. Kwiek

In 2012, an estimated 35.3 million people around the world were living with HIV, a number startling close to the estimated number of people who have died from AIDs since 1981.  Unlocking the virological secrets of HIV/AIDs has been one of the grand scientific challenges of the last three decades, and the disease remains one of the world’s most serious challenges to human health and development.  The burden of the disease is very uneven globally, and sub-Saharan African, where the disease originated, is home to 69% of those living with HIV today. How did this virus and this global pandemic come to be? The course traces the evolution of the virus at both the molecular level and within its global historical context.  Team-taught by a virologist and a historian, the goal of this class at the broadest level, is to put the sciences and humanities in conversation.

The course will require students to apply the theory of evolution by natural selection to explain the origin of HIV (chimpanzees in Africa) and the ability of HIV to develop drug resistance and evade an effective vaccine. The course will simultaneously put these scientific processes and the effects of disease into historical context. The very scientific revolutions that led to Darwin’s theory of evolution and Koch's postulates of infection transmission helped make European colonialism possible. For example, Social Darwinism justified imperial aims, Pasteurian ideals of contamination influenced notions of racial purity, and the new field of tropical medicine was created to protect colonial administrators and soldiers in their distant postings. Similarly, colonial rule and the creation of the extractive economies of central and southern Africa set in motion population movements, wealth inequalities, and structures of power that amplified the effects—decades later—of HIV and contributed to what would become a global pandemic. Although the academy approaches the medical facts of disease and its social consequences through distinct disciplines, those who have contracted the virus experience all aspects of the disease. This course makes it possible for students to consider the medical, scientific, social, political, and economic causes and consequences of one of the world's most devastating viruses.

This course is cross-listed with Microbiology.

Assigned Readings:
Students will read primary source, scientific findings, and scholarly publications from the humanities, social sciences, and hard sciences.

Assignments:
Students will complete assignments that are typical of both history and microbiology; they will synthesize these approaches in a final capstone project.  Weekly assessments will ask students to either reflect on the reading or lecture for that week or will ask them to analyze and manipulate scientific data.  The course will have a midterm and final examination that will require students to demonstrate both specific knowledge and their abilities to synthesize material across disciplines.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course is cross-listed and thus has two prerequisites: one historical, one scientific, for history it is a 2000 level (or higher) course or instructor permission; and for Biology it is Biology 1101, 1102, 1113 or equivalent or instructor permission. Students who have questions about their preparation should contact the professors.

This course fulfills Group Africa, post-1750 for history the major.

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AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY

 


HISTORY 2080 AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY TO 1877

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course examines the history of black Americans from the beginning of the African slave trade to just after the Civil War.  Obviously, slavery will be an important part of this class.  We will look at diverse sites of slavery, beginning in the early years and in the North when and where small farm and town/city slaves were the norm.  Our examination of plantation slavery recognizes the changes in that system as the nation evolved from “a society with slaves” into “a slave society,” and we will follow that expansion of slavery westward (across the mountains) and southward (into the Deep South & across the Gulf states).  We begin with the assumption that slavery was chosen as a labor system, not inevitable, and, that once chosen, had to be maintained, thus becoming a social and political system as well as an economic system.  We also pay attention to free black people in the North and the South, their diverse efforts to live as free people, and their relationship to those who remained enslaved.  Our most important objective is to see and understand how black people—slave and free—lived. We will also study their interior worlds of family, work, community, culture, and the ways they sought to and often succeeded in shaping a life and a lifestyle that constantly resisted external systems of domination.    

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
3:55-5:15         TR                               Shaw, Stephanie

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group North America, pre-1750 for history the history major or can fulfill a GE requirement.                                                                                                                                               


HISTORY 3080 SLAVERY IN THE UNITED STATES

3 Cr. Hrs.

The African American experience in slavery, focusing on the rise of the slave trade, slavery in the colonial and antebellum eras, the Civil War and abolition.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:45-2:05       TR                               Herschthal, E.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group North America, pre-1750 for history the history major or can fulfill a GE requirement.                                                                                                                               


HISTORY 3083 CIVIL RIGHTS AND BLACK POWER MOVEMENTS

3 Cr. Hrs.

Examines the origins, evolutions, and outcomes of the African American freedom struggle, focusing on the Civil War and Black Power Movements.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:30     TR                               Goings, K.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for history the history major or can fulfill a GE requirement.                                                                                                                                              


HISTORY 3085 AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY THROUGH CONTEMPORARY FILM

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course explores the African American experience through the lens of major motion pictures and documentary films.  The aim is for students to gain an understanding of how and why various historical topics have been depicted in movies, and to what extent the film version of particular events reflect reality. The purpose of the class is to use film to explore and historicize themes such as race and racism, slavery and freedom, oppression and resistance, and to reflect of the meaning of this themes (& films) in today’s society. The films will cover the entirety of the African American experience, from slavery through the present.

This course grapples with a central question: Given the fact that the majority of people in American society rely upon media and film to make sense of the past, to what extent do contemporary films do an adequate job of relaying the “truth” and accuracy of various historical subjects in the African American experience?  As a result, this class examines a variety of topics, including American slavery, African American culture, racial violence, Jim Crow, the civil rights and Black Power movements, and contemporary conflicts between the police and black communities, by examining film that treat these topics in conjunction with historical research.  We will also look closely at a select few recurring issues in films on the African American experience, such as the subordinate role of black women and the use of white characters as the primary narrative vehicles. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
10:20-1:05       Monday                       Jeffries, Hasan

Assigned Readings: In lieu of an assigned text  there will be articles, essays, and/or book chapters distributed online), there are weekly documentary films that students are to view prior to class via OSU’s Secured Media Site online streaming service.

Course Format: One film will be watched and discussed, in class, each week. Films will include: 12 Years A Slave; Glory; Mudbound; The Butler; and Fruitvale Station; Black Panther, among others.

Assignments: Three 7-10-page analytical essay assignments; Group media project.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.          


HISTORY 3086 BLACK WOMEN IN SLAVERY & FREEDOM

3 Cr. Hrs.

Traces the experiences and struggles of African American women from slavery through the Civil Rights/Black Power era.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
3:55-5:15         MW                             Chisebe, D

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.                                                                

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AMERICAN HISTORY

 


HISTORY 2001 LAUNCHING AMERICA, AMERICAN HISTORY TO 1877

3 Cr. Hrs.

Launching America is an intermediate-level overview of American history from its in scattered colonial settlements through the American Revolution to the American Civil War and its aftermath.  Throughout the course, we examine the American story in its wider Atlantic context, focusing on the central problems of power and democracy among a diversity of peoples.  Sketching the larger patterns of American history, we engage with historians’ efforts to understand and interpret the meaning of this past, and introduce some of the key approaches to historical study.  

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
10:20-11:15     MW                             Brooke, John
9:10; 10:20      Friday (recitations)
12:40

Assigned Readings:
Foner, Give Me Liberty: An American History, Vol 1 SEAGULL EDITION ISBN-13: 978-0393920307
Rice, Tales from a Revolution: Bacon's Rebellion and the Transformation of Early America ISBN-13: 978-0195386943
Ellis, Founding Brothers the Revolutionary Generation ISBN-13: 978-0375705243
Murphy, The Jerry Rescue: The Fugitive Slave Law, Northern Rights, and the American Sectional Crisis   ISBN-13: 978-0199913602

Documents to be posted on Carmen

Assignments:
Quizzes in section,
Midterm,
Three short essays
Final

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
English 1110.01/02 either previous or concurrently. Not open to students with credit for History 151 or 1151.  This course fulfills Group North America, pre-1750 for history majors or can fulfill a GE requirement.                                                         


HISTORY 2001H LAUNCHING AMERICA, AMERICAN HISTORY TO 1877

3 Cr. Hrs.
 
The origins and early development of North America have cast a long shadow over the present-day United States, whether one focuses upon the enduring legacy of slavery, considers the earliest struggles for civil rights, or examines the nature of representative government, among other economic, cultural, political, and social aspects of “this grand experiment.” Many of the sharp conflicts that forged the American nation still reverberate today. In order to understand better how the United States came to be and how it survived its first century, class members will grapple with the various artifacts, especially textual, that underscore tension and conciliation among groups and reveal the motivations of common persons and elites alike. Students will also analyze some of the significant and evolving historical interpretations of the major events and trends that marked roughly four centuries, from pre-contact through the rebuilding and reformulation of the United States in the 1870s.
 
Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
8:00-9:20         TR                               Irwin, Raymond
 
Assigned Readings:
The American People, by Gary Nash, et al (7th edition), ISBN 10: 0205805396 / ISBN 13: 9780205805396.
Documents in American History available on Carmen at carmen.osu.edu (login page).
 
Assignments:  
Students are expected to complete weekly quizzes (30%) and short papers (35%) based on readings and class discussions, to participate actively in class (20%), and to turn in a final examination (15%).
 
Prerequisites and Special Comments
Requires completion of or concurrent enrollment in English 1110 and admission to a University Honors program or permission of the instructor. Not open to students with credit for History 151 or 1151. This course fulfills Group North America and pre- and post-1750 for history majors or can fulfill GE historical study and social diversity in the United States requirements.         
 

HISTORY 2002 MAKING AMERICA MODERN

3 Cr. Hrs.

From the aftermath of the Civil War to the 2000s, this course offers a sweeping survey of American history since 1865. The story of America that unfolds is one of perpetual contest between competing cultures, political factions, and institutions, each struggling to define the meaning of freedom and citizenship within the United States and beyond its borders. It is a story filled with contradictions, one featuring moments when economic progress coincided with egregious violations of social justice and progressive reform melded with retrogressive repression. Our primary objectives in this course are the following: to identify key moments when Americans sought to reconcile competing visions of democracy and to catalog the key figures and social and political conflicts that helped shape modern America.

Throughout the semester, you will come to know personalities from the past by reading letters, speeches, and book excerpts from specific time periods. You will also have the opportunity to watch YouTube clips featuring historical footage and radio recordings of key historical moments. Students in the course will evaluate and interpret these primary sources each week and construct historical insights to share with fellow students in discussion section. Often the readings, videos, and radio recordings for the week will offer insights into contemporary issues we face today. Through short essays, each student will make connections between key historical events in the past and present-day issues facing our nation.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:30-12:25     MW                             Elmore, Bart
9:10; 11:30      Friday (recitations)
12:40

Assigned Readings:
Eric Foner, Give Me Liberty! (Volume II)

Assignments:
Midterm/Final
Three short papers (500 words each)
Discussion and participation

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group North American, post-1750 for history majors or can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.                                                                                                                                               


HISTORY 2015 AMERICAN CRIMINAL JUSTICE

3 Cr. Hrs.

Crime and punishment are among the most important issues in contemporary America.  This course offers an introduction to the historical study of crime in the United States from colonial times to the present.  It highlights changes in criminal behavior and in the ways Americans have sought to deter, punish, and rehabilitate.  Primary topics include historical patterns of violence, the role and organization of the police, and the evolution of punishment in theory and practice.  This course also emphasizes differences in crime and punishment by region, class, ethnicity, gender, and age.  Topics will include riots, homicide, capital punishment, organized crime, gangs, prisons, policing, jurisprudence, and official violence.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:35-10:55       WF                              Roth, Randy

Assigned Reading:
Walker, Samuel (1998) Popular Justice: A History of American Criminal Justice, 2nd ed. New York: Oxford University Press. 0-19-507451-3 (paper)
Robert Perkinson (2010) Texas Tough: The Rise of America’s Prison Empire. Picador. ISBN-10: 0312680473 ISBN-13: 978-0312680473 (paper)
Butterfield, Fox (1995) All God's Children: The Bosket Family and the American Tradition of Violence. New York: William Morrow. 0-380-72862-1 (paper)
Michael Massing (1998) The Fix. Berkeley: University of California Press. 0-520-022335-7 (paper) 

Assignments & Grading:
Discussion and Attendance (10% of grade)
Quizzes on the Readings (10% of grade)
Midterm and Final Examinations (40% of grade)
Research Notes (20% of grade) Research Essay (20% of grade):  You will be asked to write a 5 to 6--page paper on a topic in criminal justice history of interest to you (e.g., drugs, embezzlement, homicide). We will use on-line historical newspaper articles as sources. You will be required to turn in your research notes electronically as well as your essay, because the goal is to help you master the skills involved in careful historical research.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for history the history major or can fulfill the historical study GE.                                                                                                                                               


HISTORY 2040 AGRICULTURE AND RURAL AMERICA

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course is a broad survey of the economic, social and political history of agriculture and the countryside from the pre-Columbian period to the present.  Especially in the years before the 1920s, the history of rural America is the history of America.  The rural majority produced the cash crops that floated the American economy.  The conflict over slavery – the Southern agricultural workforce and the plantation economy it supported – led to civil war.  The 19th-century revolutions in transportation and industrial expansion fueled westward agricultural expansion, increased productivity, and political turmoil over railroad rates, credit, and currency. More recently, agriculture has again been at the center of national debates about labor, food safety, and the environment.  The history of agriculture is important in its own right, but it also   introduces major themes and debates in American history.

Since this is a survey, we will cover a lot of ground but focus our attention on a number of key issues -- labor, abundance, public policy, and technology – and trace their interactions and change over time.  We will analyze changes in both agriculture as an industry and in farm households and communities.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-2:55       TR                               Baker, Paula

Assigned Readings:
In addition to articles and primary source material posted on Carmen we will read most of two books:
David B. Danbom, Born in the Country: A History of Rural America (3rd edition)
Maureen Ogle, In Meat We Trust: The Unexpected History of Carnivore America

Assignments:
4 quizzes, 2 in-class essays, final, and one short paper on documents of your choosing.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for history majors or can fulfill a GE requirement.                                                                                                                                                    


HISTORY 2075 INTRODUCTION TO US LATINA/O HISTORY

3 Cr.  Hrs.

According to the U.S. census, people of Hispanic origin are the largest minority in the nation. But who exactly makes up this group? And how have they participated in the formation of the nation-state? This course provides a general survey of the history of Latinx in the United States. It will begin in the pre-colonial period, speaking to Native American histories that inform Latinx issues, and continue through the period of conquest, Western expansion, U.S. imperial ventures, the Cold War, and on to the present. Themes include colonization, gender, immigration, ethnic and racial identity, activism and social movements, film, sports, and popular culture, and exile and asylum. The course will explore Latinx and Latinidad across diverse groups, including Mexican-Americans, Puerto Ricans, Cubans, and Central Americans, among others.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:30     TR                               Flores-Villalobos, Joan

Assigned Readings:
Juan Gonzales, Harvest of Empire: A History of Latinos in America (Penguin, revised edition, 2011)

Assignments:
Weekly Discussion Questions, Film Analyses, Short Essay, Final Essay

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for history majors, or can fulfill GE Historical Study, Social Diversity in the U.S.                                                                                                                                                    


HISTORY 3003 AMERICAN PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course traces the history of American presidential elections because they are interesting, because they are sometimes vitally important, and because they help us understand changing political practices and expectations for government.  In our strange political world, it is especially appropriate to look back.

The framers of the Constitution imagined that the people’s representatives (not the people themselves) would choose the most accomplished man of unblemished character for the presidential office.   The Chief Executive was a check on Congress, which, they assumed, would take the lead on policymaking.  At the same time, a too powerful executive branch was something to be feared.

These expectations proved to be mostly mistaken.  Decisions about who should serve as the Chief Magistrate moved to “the people” rather than the members of the Electoral College.  Contests for the presidency helped structure divisions between contending views of the Republic – and political parties – not an occasion to ratify united agreement about the best man.  By the 20th century, the executive branch took the lead in policy and budget making, leaving the legislative branch (Congress) with an ever-smaller role. That development has been both welcomed and condemned. To account for what changed and why, we need to understand both the wider political, social, and cultural context and the rules that ambitious politicians worked within and remade. 

This course is a seven-week sprint covering events over a more than 200-year span.  While we will focus on a few elections in some detail, time constraints dictate an organizational scheme that can guide us through elections from Washington’s to the present. I’ve organized elections around the rules of the game.  The rules sometimes are formal -- which Americans had the right to vote, for example.   However, they are also a mix of law and custom that determine how campaigns were financed and run, and how candidates were nominated, for example.  The rules reflected both the political calculations of ambitious politicians and parties and political, economic, and cultural change.  The rules also have shaped the candidates we get to choose among.

For all of this discussion of change, we will also note some constants.  Nasty campaigns have been the rule, not a recent development.  Media – from print to radio to television to Twitter – has always mattered in elections.  Candidates and parties have communicated to voters through mass media; sometimes the media has been independent but often not.  Candidates typically balance unity (above partisan statesmanship) and partisanship, which reflects a wider public desire for both unity and party victory.  In some ways, our current political climate is not so strange.

One last note: I have views on a lot of the material we cover.  You’ll hear my views as a historian, but not my personal opinions (except for my fondness for Chester A. Arthur).  You no doubt have personal opinions as well.  That’s all to the good, but the point in this course is to defend and support arguments, and to treat others’ arguments with respect.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
3:55-6:40         TR                               Baker, Paula

Assigned Readings:
Gil Troy, See How They Ran: The Changing Role of the Presidential Candidate, revised and expanded edition, 1996
Additional material (articles, chapters, and documents) on Carmen

Assignments:
3 quizzes, 3 in-class essays, 2 short document papers, final

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for history majors or can fulfill a GE requirement.                                                                                                                                                    


HISTORY 3006 THE UNITED STATES CONSTITUTION & AMERICAN SOCIETY SINCE 1877

3 Cr. Hrs.                                            

Examination of the major developments in American constitutional history since the Civil War.  Emphasis on the new constitutional system created by the Fourteenth Amendment; the rise and decline of laissez-faire constitutionalism; the more moderate constitutionalism of the New Deal era; and the resurgence of judicial activism in the 1960’s, ‘70’s and ‘80’s.  The course will deal in detail with the most influential Supreme Court rulings since 1877, including those in the areas of federal regulation of the economy, limits on freedom of speech and press during wartime, racial segregation, the rights of criminal suspects and defendants, affirmative action, and abortion.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:30     TR                               Stebenne, David

Assigned Readings:
Kermit L. Hall and Timothy S. Huebner, Major Problems in American Constitutional History, 2nd edition, 2010.

Assignments:
Active participation in class discussions, and take-home midterm and final examinations.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.                                                                                                                                               


HISTORY 3011 THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION & NEW NATION

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course examines the passage of American society through the era of the revolution and the early republic.  Most broadly, we will be concerned with the causes of the Revolution, the ideological and social turmoil of the Revolutionary years, and finally the consequences of the extent and limits of this process, as the new republic -- the first modern nation-state -- began to forge stable political structures, a new cultural identity, and a position in the world order.  The issues of colonialism, independence, social revolution, and nation-building will be explored in their specific American context with an eye toward their comparative, world-historical dimensions.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
3:55-5:15         TR                               Brooke, John

Assigned Readings:
The class will read these three books together:
Theodore Draper, A Struggle for Power: The American Revolution
George Van Cleve, A Slaveholder’s Union: Slavery, Politics, and the Constitution in the Early American Republic
Jack Rakove, Declaring Rights: A Brief History with Documents
As well as documents and essays on Carmen.

You will be also responsible for reading two other books of your own choice [from a list provided] that will allow you to explore a range of topics in military, constitutional, gender, racial, cultural and economic history of the period.

Assignments and grading structure [tentative]
Class attendance and participation in discussions    (20%)
Part I in-class exam [IDs, short essay]                      (20%)
First book/document essay (~3 pages)                     (10%)
Part II take-home essay (5-7 pages w/notes)            (20%)
Second book/document essay (~3 pages)                (10%)
Part III in cumulative perspective final                       (20%)

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for the history major or can fulfill a GE requirement.                                                                                                                                               


HISTORY 3013 CIVIL WAR AND RECONSTRUCTION

3 Cr. Hrs.

In this course we will discuss the origins of War, which side won and why, and various attempts to remake Southern society during the Reconstruction era.  We will describe the experiences of Northerners, Southerners, and Westerners, including ordinary people (soldiers, slaves, farmers, women) as well as famous generals and politicians.  Although this course includes military history, that is not the primary focus of the course.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:35-10:05       TR                               Cashin, Joan

Assigned Readings: Several monographs on the period.

Assignments:
Students will write one paper, take a final exam, and discuss the monographs in class.   Students are expected to attend class on a regular basis.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.                                                                                                                                                          


HISTORY 3016 UNITED STATES HISTORY SINCE 1963

3 Cr. Hrs.

In the last sixty-five years the United States has declared “war” on a variety of internal and external problems, including communism, poverty, drugs, AIDS, and terror.  Why have Americans found martial metaphors so appealing?  What, if anything, has abound the country together other than war?  This seminar will attempt to answer these questions by introducing students to some of the major events and trends in United States history since the 1960s.  Over the course of the semester, we will move chronologically and topically to explore some key themes in American politics and culture, including; The Cold War, feminism, civil rights, the Vietnam War, Watergate, the “Reagan revolution,” globalization, and the Obama presidency. Our discussions of these issues should challenge students to think critically about the definition of American national identity and citizenship.  Together, we will examine key primary and secondary sources; compose essays based on the readings, and conduct original historical research.  By the end of the class, students should not only be familiar with significant episodes from the past seventy years, but they also should be able to debate the significance of those events in papers and classroom discussions.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
1:50-2:45         MWF                           Howard, Clayton

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for the history major or can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.       


HISTORY 3030 HISTORY OF OHIO

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will survey the economic, social, and political development of the geographic area that became Ohio from the Native American period to the present. We will explore three themes in particular:  the role of disruptive technology and creative destruction in shaping Ohio’s past; the critical junctures at which Ohio might have become something entirely different from what it became; Ohio’s connection to the wider world through geography, technology, demography, economics, and politics.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
On-line            on-line                         Coil, William R.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.                                                                                                                                                       


HISTORY 3501 U.S. DIPLOMACY, 1900-PRESENT

3 Cr. Hrs.

Since 1920, the United States has played a dominant role in international affairs due to its massive economy, unrivaled military, and global cultural influence. Historians have often referred to this era as “the American century,” a term coined by Time Magazine publisher Henry Luce in February of 1941. However, Luce’s editorial was as much a call to action as it was an accurate description: as late as 1941, the nation was still debating its desired role in world affairs. Far from a dedicated superpower, the United States was and remains a country whose foreign relations are hotly contested. The nation has struggled to discern a consistent path between opposing tendencies of democracy, empire, isolationism, internationalism, national security, and the role of defense in daily life. At the same time, many countries have militantly resisted projections of American power.

In this course, we will explore a sampling of these contests and the sometimes contradictory foreign policies they produced. While focusing on the specific policy history of the United States, we will also assess the impact American actions have had across the globe, foreign responses to the United States, the changing contexts that transformed official thinking, and the decentralization of the international system. The course will ultimately seek to have you engage directly with the ways U.S. foreign policymaking has affected and responded to global and domestic events, and what this means for the future of American foreign affairs. 

Please note, this is an upper level history course and will require your active engagement with a larger amount of regular weekly reading and viewing assignments.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:30     WF                              Parrott, Joe

Assigned Readings:
2-3 books, which may include Specter of Communism (Leffler), Reclaiming American Virtue (Keys), Rise of the Vulcans (Mann)
2-3 Films, which may include Dr. Strangelove (1964) and Red Dawn (1984)
Additional articles available through Carmen
Primary sources

Assignments:
Active Participation
2 Response Papers (about 1000 words)
1 Midterm
1 Final

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 or it can fulfill the historical study GE. 

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ANCIENT HISTORY

 


HISTORY 2210 CLASSICAL ARCHAEOLOGY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course examines the history and methods of Classical Archaeology—the archaeology of ancient Greek and Roman civilizations.  It will investigate how classical archaeology emerged as a discipline and what classical archaeologists actually do.  It will look at a number of the major archaeological sites of classical civilization and how archaeology has contributed to our understanding of the past.  An important feature of this course is that part of it will involve real material and experiences from the Ohio State University Excavations at Isthmia, in Greece!  Students will have a chance to see what the OSU excavation team has been doing and to follow the progress, problems, and successes that make up classical archaeology.

Time                Meeting Days                          Instructor
2:20-3:40         WF                                          Gregory, Timothy

Required Books:
Brian M. Fagan, A Brief History of Archaeology, Classical Times to the Twenty-First Century  (Pearson: Upper Saddle River, NJ 2005).  ISBN 0-13-177698-3

Assignments:
Students will need to read through and view the basic information every week, and they will have opportunities to discuss various issues from the material that is presented each week.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
There are no particular prerequisites for this class although it will be important to keep in mind that in this class we will be studying societies that, for the most part, existed long ago (mainly more than 1000 years ago) and in places far from Columbus, Ohio.

This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.                                                                                                                                


HISTORY 2213 THE ANCIENT MEDITERRANEAN CITY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Cities in the ancient Near East, Greece and Rome, with an emphasis on their physical form and historical importance.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
3:55-5:15        WF                              Yirga, F.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.                                                                                                                                                           


HISTORY 2221 INTRODUCTION TO THE NEW TESTAMENT: HISTORY AND LITERATURE

3 Cr. Hrs.                                                                                                                                 

This course provides students with a basis for critical thinking about the most influential writings in the intellectual and cultural history of Western civilization.  What we call the "New Testament" is a not a single book but an anthology reflecting the work of various ancient authors. We will examine how a small group of Jews connected to a prophet named Jesus of Nazareth became a separate religion with its own rituals and literature about a "Son of God." To this end, we will study the earliest known Christian literature, the letters of the Apostle Paul, the production of "gospels" about the life of Jesus, and the formation of early churches. We will also explore biblical scholarship as an academic field within the study of history, and why every educated person ought to know about its findings.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
10:20-11:15     MWF                           Harrill, J. Albert          

Assigned Readings:

1.  The HarperCollins Study Bible, Revised Edition, edited by H. W. Attridge and W. A. Meeks et al. San Francisco: HarperOne, 2006.
2.  Bart D. Ehrman, A Brief Introduction to the New Testament.  4th edition.  Oxford University Press, 2016.
3.  Burton H. Throckmorton, Jr., Gospel Parallels: A Comparison of the Synoptic Gospels.  5th edition.  Nashville: Thomas Nelson, 1992.

Assignments:  Two (2) unit tests, and a final examination.  Two (2) interpretative essays.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Near East, pre-1750 for the History major or can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 3211 OF CLASSICAL GREECE

3 Cr. Hrs.

The course explores the history of the classical era, the “Golden Age” of ancient Greece.  It traces political and cultural developments in the world of the Greek city-states from the time of the watershed Persian Wars of 480-479 BC down to the death of Alexander the Great in 323 and its immediate aftermath.  Major topics covered include: the rise of Athens as imperialist superpower and “cultural capital” of the Greek world; the escalating tensions between the Athenian empire and the Spartan-led Peloponnesian League that resulted in the cataclysmic Peloponnesian War (431-404 BC); the subsequent attempts by states like Sparta and Thebes to exercise hegemony over their fellow Greeks; the formation of the world’s first complex democracy in Athens; and the ground-breaking innovations that would shape the future course of art, architecture, philosophy, science, literature, and drama in the western world.  The course will conclude by looking at how the relatively sudden emergence of Philip II of Macedon as the dominant player on the Greek stage effectively ended the era of the independent city-states, and at how the conquest of the Persian empire by Philip’s son Alexander the Great transformed the political and cultural fortunes of Greece and the ancient Near East thereafter. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:30     TR                               Anderson, G.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for history majors or can fulfill the historical study GE.
Other than English 1110.xx, there are no prerequisites for this class.                                                                                                                                                    


HISTORY 3215 SEX & GENDER IN THE ANCIENT WORLD

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course explores the history of sex and gender in ancient Greece and Rome, from ca. 700 BCE to 400 CE.  It introduces students to the roles of men and women in ancient Mediterranean society, to the household as a social unit, an economic center and a physical space, to ancient ideals of femininity and masculinity, and to ancient views on a variety of sexual practices that were commonplace in ancient Greece and Rome. These include conjugal relations, same-sex relations, adultery, rape, and prostitution.  The class also aims to teach student show to understand the complex relationship between rhetorical constructions of gender and sexuality in (largely male-authored) literature and more representative social experiences of sex and gender.  The course is divided thematically into three units “Concepts, Sources and Historical Introduction,” “Perceptions, Cultural Expectations, Stereotypes,” and “Experiencing Sex and Gender in Social Life.”  Students are expected to master all three units, as the class builds cumulatively over the course of the semester. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:35-10:55       TR                               Sessa, Tina

Assignments:
Quizzes, two midterms, and a final research paper on a topic of the student’s choice.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Global, pre-1750 for history majors or it can fulfill a GE requirement.                                                                                                                                                    


HISTORY 3218 PAUL AND HIS INFLUENCE IN EARLY CHRISTIANITY

3 Cr. Hrs.                                                                                                                                                                          

This course investigates the Apostle Paul through a historical and critical study of his own letters and the later legends that grew up around the figure.  We look at the significance of Paul's life and the competing ways its story was retold, appropriated, or resisted in late antiquity.  Our historical approach means attention to questions concerning how to interpret the past.  How did Paul create a new religious and social world for his congregations?  What were the conflicts that he aimed to resolve in those nascent communities?  And what kinds of trouble did Paul create for his later interpreters (ancient, medieval, and modern)?  Asking such answers involves careful study of the ancient context of first-century Judaism, Hellenistic culture, and the Roman imperial society in which Paul lived and wrote.  Much of the course will deal with the development of early Christian morality and ethics, including areas of controversy.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:45-2:05       WF                              Harrill, Bert

Assigned Readings:
1.  The HarperCollins Study Bible, Student Edition, fully Revised and Updated, edited by H. W. Attridge and W. A. Meeks et al. (HarperOne, 2006).  You must have this translation.
2.  The Writings of St. Paul, 2nd edition, edited by Wayne A. Meeks and John T. Fitzgerald (W. W. Norton, 2007).
3.  Wayne A. Meeks, The First Urban Christians, 2d Edition (Yale University Press, 2003).
4.  J. Albert Harrill, Paul the Apostle: His Life and Legacy in Their Roman Contexts (Cambridge University Press, 2015).

Assignments:
Two papers, midterm and final exams

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Global, pre-1750 for history majors.                                                                                                                                                    


HISTORY 3223 THE LATER ROMAN EMPIRE

3 Cr. Hrs.

This is an upper-level history course on the final phase of the ancient Roman empire and the transition between antiquity and the early Middle Ages. It will concentrate on the political and military history of the empire and the events that led to the fall of the western half of the empire and survival of the eastern half (which became the “Byzantine” empire). We will also discuss the late Roman economy, life in the cities, and especially the religious changes that took place with the Christianization of the empire. A prime objective of the course will for students to learn a substantial amount about this period; at the same time, we will learn how to handle the different kinds of sources that survive from antiquity and their relevance for today. For this reason, most class meeting will aim to combine ancient literary sources, archaeology and art history, and modern scholarship. We will focus on the development of critical skills for analyzing sources and of informed imagination for what our sources do not tell us.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
2:20-3:40         TR                               Kaldellis, Anthony

Assigned Readings:

  • P. Heather, The Fall of the Roman Empire: A New History (various publishers since 2005). ISBN: 978-0195325416.
  • Ammianus Marcellinus, The Later Roman Empire, trans. W. Hamilton; introduction A. Wallace-Hadrill (Penguin Classics, 2006). ISBN: 978-014044406.
  • Prokopios, The Secret History, with Related Texts, trans. A. Kaldellis (Hackett Publishing, 2010). ISBN: 978-1603841801.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for the history major.
Students who have taken History 3225 might not want to take this course, as there is considerable overlap between them.                                                                                                                                                    


HISTORY 3226 THE LATER BYZANTINE EMPIRE

3 Cr. Hrs.

This class is designed to provide students with a detailed history of the Byzantine Empire, from about A.D. 1000 to the demise of the empire in approximately A.D. 1429 and its overcome by  the Ottoman (a largely Turkic) state. The Byzantine Empire had originally emerged from the old Roman Empire, from the 4th century A.D., and in that period of about 1100 years the inhabitants regarded themselves primarily as “Romans,” even though they were nearly all Christians and they spoke largely the Greek language of that time.

The class will concern itself by investigating the changes in military, religious, economic, intellectual, and artistic phenomena in this long period in the northeastern area of the Eastern Mediterranean, along with the ways in which Byzantine society has influenced our life even now.

Time                Meeting Days                          Instructor
11:10-12:30     WF                                         Gregory, Timothy

Assigned Readings:
Timothy Gregory, A History of Byzantium, 2nd edition (ISBN 978-1-4051-8471-7)
Besides reading the assigned pages in the textbook, we will also normally present small pieces from books written by people of that age, and we will also make good use of photographs of areas that had once been part of the Byzantine Empire.

Assignments:
Students will need to read-through and view the basic information every week, and they will have opportunities to discuss various issues from the material that is presented each week. 

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Europe pre-1750 for the history major  or can fulfill the historical study GE.                                                                                                                                                           


HISTORY 3227 GNOSTICS AND OTHER EARLY CHRISTIAN HERESIES

3 Cr. Hrs.

“Gnosticism” was the first great Christian “heresy”; indeed, it prompted the creation of the idea of “heresy.”  But who were the Gnostics?  And what did they teach?  Manuscripts discovered in the twentieth century now enable us to read works from the Gnostics themselves.  This course will explore the writings and teachings of the Gnostic school of thought and related groups in second- and third-century Christianity.  The Gnostics taught that this world is a mistake, created by an evil and ignorant god, and that Jesus has come to rescue people from it.  They presented their teachings in an elaborate myth that drew from the Bible and Platonist philosophy.  Other groups, like the Valentinians, presented their own variations of the Gnostic myth, and “proto-orthodox” Christians developed their theologies and notions of heresy in response to Gnostic views.  We will read such “heretical” works as The Secret Book According to John, The Gospel of Judas, and The Gospel According to Thomas, as well as writings by opponents of the Gnostics, including Irenaeus of Lyons and Origen of Alexandria.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:30     TR                               Brakke, David

Assigned Readings:
Bentley Layton, The Gnostic Scriptures
Plato, Timaeus and Critias
Robert Grant, Irenaeus of Lyons
Marvin Meyer, The Nag Hammadi Scriptures (recommended)

Assignments: Two or three papers of moderate length, midterm and final exams.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for history majors.


HISTORY 5229 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ANCIENT CHRISTIANITY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Topic: Gnostics and Other Early Christian Heresies

“Gnosticism” was the first great Christian “heresy”; indeed, it prompted the creation of the idea of “heresy.”  But who were the Gnostics?  And what did they teach?  Manuscripts discovered in the twentieth century now enable us to read works from the Gnostics themselves.  This course will explore the writings and teachings of the Gnostic school of thought and related groups in second- and third-century Christianity.  The Gnostics taught that this world is a mistake, created by an evil and ignorant god, and that Jesus has come to rescue people from it.  They presented their teachings in an elaborate myth that drew from the Bible and Platonist philosophy.  Other groups, like the Valentinians, presented their own variations of the Gnostic myth, and “proto-orthodox” Christians developed their theologies and notions of heresy in response to Gnostic views.  We will read such “heretical” works as The Secret Book According to John, The Gospel of Judas, and The Gospel According to Thomas, as well as writings by opponents of the Gnostics, including Irenaeus of Lyons and Origen of Alexandria.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:30     TR                               Brakke, David

Assigned Readings:
Bentley Layton, The Gnostic Scriptures
Plato, Timaeus and Critias
Robert Grant, Irenaeus of Lyons
Marvin Meyer, The Nag Hammadi Scriptures (recommended)

Assignments:
Graduate students will attend the undergraduate section (History 3227) and fulfill its requirements, but also meet separately with the instructor approximately seven times for additional readings.                                                                                 


HISTORY 5229 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ANCIENT CHRISTIANITY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Topic: Paul & His Influence in Early Christianity

Graduate Piggy-Back of HISTORY 3218.  Students will do all the readings and tests for the undergraduate syllabus—midterm and final exams---plus write a research essay of 20 pages. The research essay can be on any topic, in consultation with the instructor.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:45-2:05       WF                              Harrill, Bert

Assigned Readings:
1.  The HarperCollins Study Bible, Student Edition, fully Revised and Updated, edited by H. W. Attridge and W. A. Meeks et al. (HarperOne, 2006).  You must have this translation.
2.  The Writings of St. Paul, 2nd edition, edited by Wayne A. Meeks and John T. Fitzgerald (W. W. Norton, 2007).
3.  Wayne A. Meeks, The First Urban Christians, 2d Edition (Yale University Press, 2003).
4.  J. Albert Harrill, Paul the Apostle: His Life and Legacy in Their Roman Contexts (Cambridge University Press, 2015).
5.   Margaret M. Mitchell, Paul, the Corinthians and the Birth of Hermeneutics (Cambridge University Press, 2010)
6.   Dale B. Martin, The Corinthian Body (Yale University Press, 1995).
7.   Paula Fredriksen, The Pagans’ Apostle (Yale University Press, 2017)

Assignments:
Midterm and final exams. Research paper of 20 pages.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
Graduate standing.  Advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor.                                                                                                                                               

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ASIAN & ISLAMIC HISTORY

                                                                                                                                                    


HISTORY 2353 THE MIDDLE EAST SINCE 1914

3 Cr. Hrs.

An introductory study of the political, social and cultural history and evolution of Islamic civilization since 1914. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
On-line            on-line                         Ozturk, D.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Near East, Middle East, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.                                                                                                                                               


HISTORY 2375 ISLAMIC CENTRAL ASIA

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course is an introductory survey of the political, cultural, religious and economic history of Islamic Central Asia from the eighth-century Arab conquests to the nineteenth-century Russian colonial era.  As there are no prerequisites for the course, we will begin the semester with a brief survey of the historical, anthropological and religious background necessary to navigate this period of Central Asian history.  Students will learn about such major social transformations as the gradual association of Central Asian peoples with the Islamic faith and the “Turkicization” of Central Asia as wave upon wave of Turkic nomads migrated from the northern steppe to the southern sedentary areas.  Other topics to be addressed include: the Silk Road, the Mongol Empire, the rise and rule of Tamerlane; the early modern transformation of the Silk Road caravan trade; and Russian and Chinese colonial expansion into Central Asia, and the Anglo-Russian Great Game.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:30     WF                              Levi, Scott

Assigned Reading: Four books.

Assignments: Coursework includes a map quiz, mid-term, research paper and final exam.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group Central Asia, pre-1750 for history majors.                                                                                                                                              


HISTORY 2402 HISTORY OF EAST ASIA IN THE MODERN ERA, 1600-PRESENT

3 Cr. Hrs.

History 2402 will introduce the histories of the societies of East Asia (China, Korea, Japan) starting in about 1600.  To a higher degree than History 2401, which is useful but certainly not required preparation, History 2402 is organized on a 3-way comparative model (“how do China, Japan, or Korea compare to each other historically?”); one of our goals Is to learn to think comparatively about history and societies.  We will survey key historical phenomena (including political, military, social and intellectual themes) that have distinguished each country in the modern period.  For most of the semester, the course will be organized chronologically and thematically.  It will also seek a balance between examination of particular periods and exploration of patterns of continuity and change across historical period and different societies.  In addition to providing a basic narrative of East Asian Civilization since 1600, the course will introduce students to important written sources and to historical writing.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
1:50-2:45         MW                             Reed, Chris
10:20; 11:30 & 1:40 Friday (recitations)

Assigned Reading:
A textbook, a monograph, primary sources, short films.

Assignments:
Similar to other courses at this level.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
No prerequisites. This course fulfills Group East Asia, post-1750 for history majors.

Special Note:  History 2401 is NOT a prerequisite for History 2402.  History 2402 satisfies the GE Historical Study requirement, Second Historical study option, and Global Studies option; it may also satisfy the 2 open options for the GE.             


HISTORY 3353 JEWISH COMMUNITIES UNDER ISLAMIC RULE

3 Cr. Hrs.

This is a lecture and discussion course focusing on the history of Jewish communities under Islamic rule from the establishment of the first Muslim state at Medina in 622 C.E. through roughly 1800.  We will read a variety of primary and secondary sources related to the changing experiences of Jewish communities during these centuries, including the tensions created by the migration into Islamic lands of new Jewish populations.  We will also consider the historiographical challenges of addressing this topic, notably the competing “interfaith utopia” and “neo-lachrymose” paradigms, and recent efforts to transcend the entire “tolerance vs. persecution” dichotomy.  The course will culminate in the preparation of a research paper employing both primary and secondary sources.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
2:20-3:40         WF                              Hathaway, Jane

Assigned Readings:
Bernard Lewis, The Jews of Islam
Articles, chapters, and primary source excerpts on Carmen

Assignments:
Map exercise, cumulative reading log, in-class midterm, take-home final

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
None.  If the Registrar tries to enforce a prerequisite, please e-mail the instructor.
This course fulfills Group Near East, Middle East, post-1750 for history majors.                                                                                                                                               


HISTORY 3426 HISTORY OF MODERN JAPAN

3 Cr. Hrs.                                                                                                          

This course treats major elements of Japanese history in the 19th to 21st centuries: political developments over three different regimes (late pre-modern, pre-WWII and post-War), socio-cultural transformation, and international contexts. Several themes are emphasized: changing relations between local communities and their governments; commercialization and industrialization of the economy; imperialism (Western and Japanese) and its outcomes; the development of science and technology in Japan; and the environmental contexts of Japanese history.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
10:20-11:15     MWF                           Brown, Phil

Assigned Readings:
Gordon, Andrew, A Modern History of Japan: From Tokugawa Times to the Present
Nakazawa, Kieji, Barefoot Gen: A Cartoon Story of Hiroshima, Vol. I
Terasaki, Gwen, A Bridge to the Sun: A Memoir of Love and War
Tsutsui, William, Godzilla on My Mind: Fifty Years of the King of Monsters
Other books selected by students from a list of possibilities
Several additional articles.

Assignments:
Book review
Course paper employing Nakazawa, Terasaki and/or Tsutsui (no other research required)
Final
Midterm

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group East Asia, post-1750 for history majors.


HISTORY 3436 MODERN KOREAN HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Ever since the establishment of two Korean nation-states after the end of World War II, the history of the two Koreas has been shot through with transformations, dynamism, conflicts, and the unexpected.  In this course, students use feature and documentary films about the Korean War as windows on the fascinating society and politics of South Korea and North Korea from 1945 to recent times.  Key topics include national division and the Korean War, popular memory, family history, and the cultural representation of inter-Korea politics.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
10:30-11:45     TR                               Lerner, Mitch

Assigned Readings:
In a typical week, the assigned materials will consist of approximately 50-60 pages of readings; several video clips; and a feature or documentary film.  Assigned readings and screenings will be reduced for weeks when essay assignments and the group project are due.  The course instructor will make all assigned materials available to students in an electronic format

Assignments:
Course assignments will consist of: (1) 8 homework assignments (1-2 pages in length); (2) a 5-6 page film essay; (3) a 5-6 page reflection essay; and (4) a final group project.
In addition, active participation in discussion is expected every week and will be calculated into the final course grade.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This is a real-time videoconferencing course that will be taught by Professor Charles Kim (University of Wisconsin-Madison).  There are no prerequisites for this course.  However, since this is an upper-division course, previous coursework in East Asian history or culture is recommended

This course fulfills Group East Asian, post-1750 for history majors or can fulfil a GE requirement.

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EUROPEAN HISTORY

 


HISTORY 2204 MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

In this course, we will study fundamental events and processes in European politics, war, economics, intellectual thought, culture, and society from the French and Industrial Revolutions to the present.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
8:00-9:20         TR                               Dreeze, J.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Europe, post-1750 for history majors or it can fulfill a GE requirement.                                                                                                                                               


HISTORY 2270 LOVE IN THE MODERN WESTERN WORLD

3 Cr. Hrs.

Love is a source of intriguing debates about male and female gender roles, courtship practices, and marriage, as well as a number of highly charged issues related to sex--birth control, abortion, pornography, and prostitution. A historical approach deepens understanding of these issues. This course will trace the history of love by responding to the following questions: What were ancient Greek, Roman, Jewish, and Christian love, and how did those legacies play out in Western history? How did courtly love emerge in the medieval world? Why is it that no major love story in the history of the Western world until the twentieth century focused on the love of a married couple? Why does the Marquis de Sade and sadism lurk behind the philosophy of eighteenth-century love? Were the Victorians sexually oppressed by others and sexually repressed by their own inner moral sense, and if so what was the impact on how they loved? Why are women's faces and eyes typically highlighted in courtship imagery, while men are in profile and off center? How has modern feminism shaped love? How was love influenced by new automobiles, telephones, movies, television, and the Internet?

More generally we will be asking: Is love an unchanging instinct or does it have a history? If it has a history what is its logic and meaning? Is it conceivable that love becomes more authentic, more humanizing across history? Or have we rather lost something along the way? Or both? How does reading about love affect the way one loves? How have psychoanalytic theory and existential philosophy influenced love? What do we know about sexuality and love that our parents and grandparents did not? In light of the fact that the past century has brought about major changes in the social, economic, educational, political, medical, and legal status of women, how have they affected love between men and women? How does the history of gay, lesbian, and transsexual love fit into this history? How do wars and sexual transmitted diseases affect love? How is love socially constructed? Do men and women love differently, and if so how do those gender modes of love vary historically?

The readings will be from my book on the subject, selections from Simone de Beauvoir's classic statement of existential feminism, and three representative novels.  A few lectures will be slide presentations exploring love in art, and one will be the famous love duet in Wagner’s opera Tristan and Isolde. Lectures will cover the history of love since antiquity, although the readings and the three assigned papers will concentrate on the last two centuries.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
2:20-3:40         WF                              Kern, Stephen

Assigned Readings:
Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre
D. H. Lawrence, Women in Love
Carol Shields, The Republic of Love
Simone de Beauvoir, The Second Sex (selections).
Stephen Kern, The Culture of Love: Victorians to Moderns
Diana Hacker, A Pocket Style Manual 3rd. Ed.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Europe, post-1750 for history majors or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.                                                                                                                                               


HISTORY 2500 20TH CENTURY INTERNATIONAL HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Examines international political, economic and military relations from the origins of World War I through the break up of the Soviet Union.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
3:00-3:55         MWF                           Fenton, H.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for history majors or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.                                                                                                                                               


HISTORY 3231 CREATING MEDIEVAL MONSTERS

3 Cr. Hrs.

By examining the ideology of community and marginality in the High Middle Ages, an era that has earned the title of a “persecuting society,” students will have the opportunity to view how a community of medieval Christians, feeling threatened by both external and internal forces, protected Christian community by lashing out at those on the margins. The goal of this course is to explore the various ways that minorities were demonized, literally turned into “monsters” in the medieval discourse and artwork, in order to create a strong sense of unity within Christendom. A study of the persecution of minorities will include a wide variety of groups, but focus specifically on: Jews, lepers, Muslims, religious non-conformists, the possessed, sexual nonconformists, and women. By demonstrating that demonization is a common response to unhappiness rooted in our own daily lives, this course hopes to offer a lens to study persecution in later eras.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
2:20-3:40         WF                              Butler, Sara          

General Topics to be Covered:

  1. Christian / Islamic / Jewish relationships
  2. The use of medicine to stigmatize minority groups
  3. Power relationships within marriage and ethnicities
  4. The role of the Church in society and in persecution (especially the Inquisition)
  5. The development of racism as a concept and as a science

Assigned Readings

  • Most readings will appear on Carmen as pdfs. 
  • The only required textbook is:  Joan Young Gregg (ed.), Devils, Women and Jews: Reflections on the Other in Medieval Sermon Stories (New York, 1997). ISBN: 0791434184. (retail price: $31.95).

Assignments:
2 short papers, a mid-term, final, and reading quizzes.

One of the short papers will be a creative assignment.  I will have students reading sermons stories from the medieval era that were used to demonize other ethnicities.  I want students to demonstrate that they have discovered the formulaic nature of these sermons by writing a series of their own.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for history majors or can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.


HISTORY 3239 MEDIEVAL ENGLAND

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course is a study of political, religious, social, and cultural developments in England from the Roman Conquest to the year 1500. This course will attempt to address a variety of subjects, including: England’s mixed cultural heritage, the emergence of Parliament, the development of common law, interaction and exchange with England’s neighbors and invaders (Vikings, Irish, Welsh, Scots, and French), religious transformations and outgrowths, debunking myths about England’s monarchs, and English proto-nationalism. In doing so, we will be reading a good number of primary source material, such as: Bede’s Ecclesiastical History of the English People, the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, the Sagas of Ragnar Lodbrok, the Geste of Robyn Hoode, the Magna Carta, the Statute of Arbroath, the Croxton Play of the Sacrament.  We will also be watching two films: “The Lion in Winter,” (Katherine Hepburn, Peter O’Toole / 1968), and “The Anchoress” (Natalie Morse, Christopher Eccleston / 1993).

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:35-10:55       WF                              Butler, Sara    

Assigned Readings:

  • C. Warren Hollister, Robert C. Stacey, and Robin Chapman Stacey, The Making of England: To 1399, vol. 1, 8th ed. (Cengage, 2001). *In the course schedule this is abbreviated as H/S/S.
  • Ben Waggoner, ed., The Sagas of Ragnar Lodbrok (Troth Publications, 2009).
  • All other readings will appear as pdfs on Carmen.

Assignments:
One short paper on The Sagas of Ragnar Lodbrok; a research essay; a mid-term exam and a final exam.

Prerequisites and Special Comments
This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for history majors or can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.                                                                                                                                               


HISTORY 3250 REVOLUTIONARY & NAPOLEONIC EUROPE, 1750-1815

3 Cr. Hrs.

The French Revolutionaries invented human rights and the metric system. They abolished feudalism and opened up all professions to merit, including the military. The revolutionaries formed one of the first modern republics. Yet when we remember the French Revolution, we also think of the guillotine and the violence of the Reign of Terror. In History 3250, we explore the complexity and contradictions of this key moment in the history of the modern world. Its legacies are still with us today.

This course will equip students to study the origins, processes, and legacies of revolution. The French Revolution could be frightening and destabilizing, but it was also a creative moment when the possibilities for what society and citizenship ought to look like opened up and new voices came to the fore. We will explore how eighteenth- and nineteenth-century men and women thought about the promise and limits of revolution.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:35-10:55       TR                               Bond, Elizabeth

Assigned Readings:
We will analyze primary sources, film, and art throughout the semester. Course readings also include book chapters and scholarly articles written by historians of the revolution. All assigned readings are available on Course Reserve at the OSU Library or on Carmen.

Assignments:
The assignments for this course invite you to consider the experiences of the revolutionaries in new ways. We put King Louis XVI on trial through an in-class debate. We also use social media to consider the competing interests of the revolutionaries in an interactive format. The other assessments are a midterm and final exam.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the following:

  • chronological breadth requirement after 1750 for history majors
  • Europe geographical concentration for history majors and minors
  • Thematic minor in Military History
  • GE requirement                                                                                                                                               

HISTORY 3269 EASTERN EUROPE IN THE 20TH CENTURY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course examines the history of Eastern Europe from the turn of the twentieth century up until today.  For purposes of this class, Eastern Europe is defined as the area between Russia and Germany, including the territories of Greece, Bulgaria, the former Yugoslav republics, Albania, Romania, Hungary, Austria, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, and Poland. To keep the course manageable, we only mention in passing the Baltic states or the former Soviet republics, but students are able to engage those regions through independent work.

This course will present the history of Eastern Europe by exploring several discrete themes: nationalism, state- and nation-building; minorities, immigrants, and refugees; war, society, and violence; communism and the Cold War; and the search for a new identity after the end of the Cold War. The goal is to study the major historical developments that have shaped the history of the region and to scrutinize the evolution of the very notion of Eastern Europe over time.

Each student will complete a final research project on a topic of his/her choice.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:45-2:05       WF                              Dragostinova, Theodora

Assigned Readings:
Aleko Konstantinov, Bai Ganyo: Incredible Tales of a Modern Bulgarian
Bruce Clark, Twice a Stranger: The Mass Expulsions that Forged Modern Greece & Turkey
Heda Margolius Kovaly, Under a Cruel Star. A Life in Prague, 1941-1968
Slavenka Drakulic, How We Survived Communism and Even Laughed
Alexander Hemon, The Book of my Lives
Katherine Verdery, My Life as a Spy: Investigations in a Secret Police File

Assignments:
Discussion posts on Carmen 25%
Two take home exams 30%
One Paper 10%
Final Research project 25%
Discussion and attendance: 10%

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group Europe, post-1750 for history majors.                                                                                                                                               

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JEWISH HISTORY

                                                                                                                                                    


HISTORY 2450 ANCIENT AND MEDIEVAL JEWISH HISTORY, 300BCE -1100CE

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course surveys nearly fifteen centuries of Jewish history, religion, and culture in the Near East from the days of the Maccabees (second century B.C.E.) to the death of Moses Maimonides  (1204 C.E.).  Focusing on key figures and representative subjects, the lectures will seek to offer a balanced picture of the Jewish experience in the ancient and early medieval periods. Special emphasis will be placed upon the evaluation and interpretation of primary sources (in translation). These texts will introduce students to the political, social, intellectual, and spiritual worlds of ancient and medieval Jewry.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:45-2:05       TR                               Frank, Daniel

Assigned Readings:
H.H. Ben-Sasson, A History of the Jewish People.
David Biale, Cultures of the Jews, Volume 1: Mediterranean Origins.
Additional readings will be posted on Carmen or drawn from online resources.

Assessment
10%     Written Assignments (six, 250 words each. Ungraded, but all must be completed in order to earn an “A” for 10% of the course grade)
15%     Quizzes (four; best three grades)
25%     Book Review (1,250 words)
25%     First Examination
25%     Second Examination

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Global, pre-1750 for history majors.                                                                                                                                               


HISTORY 2455 JEWS IN AMERICAN FILM

3 Cr. Hrs.

Jews and Jewish life have often been depicted in American television and film.  We will watch a number of films about Jews and Jewish life while reading about those same topics in primary and secondary historical sources.  We will then analyze the depiction of Jews and Judaism in the films and discuss how that depiction compares with the historical reality.  This will be accomplished through class discussion as well as through reflective writing.  We will come out of the course with both content knowledge (modern Jewish history, Jewish culture, Christian-Jewish relations) and skills (watching film and television critically; detecting attitudes and biases in writing as well as film; writing and speaking articulately about our observations).

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
3:55-5:15         Tuesday                                  Goldish, Matt

Assigned Readings:
Hasia Diner, A New Promised Land: History of Jews in America
Elie Wiesel, Night, trans. Marion Wiesel
Documents and supplemental readings through our CARMEN website

Assignments:
Quizzes, short paper and a final examination.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for history majors. This is a hybrid course.                                                                                                                                               


HISTORY 3465 AMERICAN JEWISH HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course studies American Jewish history from the 1600s until today.  Interested in the meanings and characteristics of modern American Jewish identities, we will study the interaction between America’s ever-growing Jewish population and the political, social, and cultural environment in which Jews found themselves.  Throughout the course, we will ask:  How did the relatively open American setting affect Jewish religious observance? Occupational pursuits? Political allegiances? Family and gender roles?  How did Jews influence their new setting?   We will rely on a wide variety of historical texts, primary sources, films, and works of fiction to shape our conclusions; our sources will include an 1860s cookbook, a late 19th century memoir, letters Jewish soldiers sent to their local synagogues during World War II, 1960s protest literature, and clips from a contemporary depiction of American Jewish life, The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:35-10:55       TR                               Judd, Robin

Assigned Reading (tentative)
Rachel Calof, Rachel Calof's Story: Jewish Homesteader on the Northern Plains (selections only)
Kate Simon, Bronz Primitive
Hasia Diner, The Jews of the United States, 1654-2000

Assignments:
Primary source analysis, reading questions, take home midterm, final project.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.                                                                                                                                               

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LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY

                                                                                                                                                    


HISTORY 2120 REVOLUTIONS & SOCIAL MOVEMENTS IN MODERN LATIN AMERICA

3 Cr. Hrs.

Latin American countries have figured prominently in recent news stories, as headlines highlight immigration, drugs, poverty, populism, and other concerns. But beyond these attention-grabbing themes, a study of Latin America countries also offers an opportunity to understand the creation of different forms of government, impressive cultural contributions, and exciting histories. To analyze the complex issues facing Latin American countries today, this course, “Revolutions and Social Movements in Modern Latin America,” explores the historical foundations from independence to the present. Throughout this class we will consider the history of individual countries, while at the same time analyzing the effects, influences and relevance of various historical events on the region as a whole.

“Revolutions and Social Movements in Modern Latin America” begins with the tumultuous nineteenth century and the Wars of Independence. In focusing on state formation and national identity, the first section of this course aims to understand the dramatic social, cultural, and political impact of Latin America’s post-Independence political conflicts and modernizing growth. Next the course will shift to the twentieth-century, starting with Mexico’s great revolution and then moving forward to analyze other revolutions and social movements in Guatemala, Cuba and Nicaragua. The following section of this class will consider the rise and fall of military dictatorships in South America, including those in Chile, Argentina, and Brazil. In this part of the course students will analyze the search for social justice and reform, and the ways in which ordinary people fought against repression. We also will examine the rise and fall of export economies and industrialization, poverty, and social reform in Venezuela, Haiti, Puerto Rico, and the Dominican Republic. The final weeks of the course will be devoted to issues facing Latin America today, including the complex issue of drugs, immigration, and U.S.-Latin American relations.

Several themes appear throughout the course. An analysis of Latin American revolutionaries is crucial to the study of the region, and this course will examine the legend and myth of Che Guevara. We also will consider the role of the U.S. and international institutions in the politics, economics and culture of Latin America, as well as the narratives used to justify foreign intervention in the region. Additionally, special lectures will explore culture in Latin America, including movies, literature, and artists, such as the painter Frida Kahlo. Gender and ethnicity are important elements as well, and women and race are integrated throughout our studies.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:45-2:05       TR                               Smith, Stephanie

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Group Latin America, post-1750 for history majors.                                                        


HISTORY 3105 HISTORY OF BRAZIL                                

3 Cr. Hrs.                                                                                  

Known for its beaches, carnival, and soccer, Brazilian history is a far deeper story of colonialism, slavery, agricultural wealth, immigration, industrial development, political conflict over authoritarianism and democracy, and more. This course will provide a survey of the deep history of the country from its inception through its struggle to become a modern, developed nation in the 20th century.  It will touch on five key topics that affect Brazil today: economic, political, social, environmental, and popular culture.  

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:30     WF                              Eaglin, J.                                                           

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Latin America, post-1750 for the history major or can fulfill the historical study GE.                                                                                                                                               

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MILITARY HISTORY

                                                                                                                                                           


HISTORY 2550 THE HISTORY OF WAR

3 Cr. Hrs.

The History of War examines the evolution of warfare and its impact on human civilization from antiquity to the present.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
3:55-5:15         WF                              Awasthi, A.
8:00-9:20         TR                               Rogg, J.         

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for the history major, or it can fulfill the historical study GE.                                                                                                                                                           


HISTORY 3552 WAR IN WORLD HISTORY, 1900 - PRESENT

3 Cr. Hrs.       

This lecture course investigates the changing nature of war in the 20th Century, from trench warfare to ethnic cleansing, as well as its effects on individuals and entire societies.  It covers events such as World War I, the Spanish Civil War, World War II, the Korean War and the Vietnam War, and topics such as the experience of captivity, sexual violence in wartime, children in war, or genocide.  We will pay special attention to the blurring of distinction between combatants and non-combatants, as well as the experiences of ordinary men and women who lived through the wars of the 20th Century.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:35-10:55       TR                               Cabanes, Bruno

Assigned Readings:
Primo Levi, Survival in Auschwitz
Anonymous, A Woman in Berlin
Henri Alleg, The Question
Jean Hatzfeld, Machete Season, The Killers in Rwanda Speak

Assignments:
The final grade in the course will be an average of the four grades given for: a short 1000-word paper (20%), the mid-term examination (25%), lecture Quick Writes/Quizzes (20%); the final examination (35%).

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for the history major, or the historical study GE.                                                                                                                                                          


HISTORY 3570 WORLD WAR II

3 Cr. Hours

An introduction to the causes, course, and consequences of the Second World War from a global perspective.  In addition to the study of strategy, operations and tactics, we will also give extended attention to the war’s impact on the societies that waged it; e.g., the mobilization of the home fronts to sustain the war effort, the experience of enemy occupation (including the Holocaust), and the strategic bombing offensives.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
2:20-3:40         TR                               Grimsley, Mark

Assigned Readings:
Williamson Murray & Allan R. Millett, A War to Be Won: Fighting the Second World War
John W. Dower, War Without Mercy.
Gerald F. Linderman, The World Within War: America’s Combat Experience in World War II.

Assignments:
First Midterm exam (25 percent)
Second Midterm exam (35 percent)
Final exam (40 percent)

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement. 


HISTORY 3575 THE KOREAN WAR

3 Cr. Hours

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:45-2:05       TR                               Zach Matusheski

This course examines the course of the Korean War. It focuses on the global roots of the war, situating the conflict within the context of instability in East Asia reaching back to the 19th century. The course will also review how the war was at times both a civil war and an international war. Using oral histories and other texts, readings underscore the experience of the war for both civilians and combatants. While recovering these voices, lectures and discussions will touch on key operations in the war and the ways in which the Korean War shaped the Cold War and post-Cold War world. 

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.                                                                                                                                                     

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NATIVE AMERICAN HISTORY

                                                                                                                                                    


HISTORY 3071 NATIVE AMERICAN HISTORY FROM REMOVAL TO PRESENT

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will introduce students to the history of Native Americans from the 1820s to the present.  We will look at the removal of Native tribes to Indian Territory, the establishment of reservation system, the resurgence of Native cultures and pan-Indian movements in the twentieth century, postwar urban migration and tribal termination policies, the Red Power movements of the 1960s, and Native legal organizing in the late 20th and 21st centuries.  The course will encourage the students to think about intersections of gender, race, sexuality, and class and to consider Native resistance movements and cultural persistence over the last two centuries.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:35-10:55       TR                               Rivers, Daniel

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for the history major or can fulfill a GE requirement.

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THEMATIC COURSE OFFERINGS

                                                                                                                                                           


HISTORY 2702 FOOD IN WORLD HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Survey of the history of food and drink, diet and nutrition in a global context.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
8:00-9:20         WF                              Cahn, D

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for the history major or it can be used to fulfill the historical study GE requirement.                                                                                                                                                                                                                   


HISTORY 2800 INTRODUCTION TO THE DISCIPLINE OF HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will focus on the role of skepticism in the birth of the modern world (16th to early 18th centuries.)  Our study of the nuts and bolts of historical reading, research and writing will use skepticism as its raw material.  We will look at the revival of ancient skepticism as well as the voyages of discovery, the Protestant Reformation, the scientific revolution, and new literary forms, to see how, where, and in what forms skepticism appeared.  We will examine various writings from the period in search of expressions of skepticism in order to analyze its uses or purposes. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
10:20-1:05       Tuesday                      Goldish, Matthew

Assigned Readings:
Richard H. Popkin, “The History of Skepticism”

Assignments:
10 quizzes at 5 points each, two lowest dropped
5 written assignments (bibliography, essays, paper draft, etc.) 10 points each, one lowest dropped
Final paper (8 to 10 pages) at 20 points

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course is required for all students majoring in History students must earn a C or higher to have it count on the Major.  It may not be used for the GE Historical Study requirement.                                                                                                  


HISTORY 2800H HONORS INTRODUCTION TO THE DISCIPLINE OF HISTORY         

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course introduces students to the discipline of history by analyzing in detail three approaches to history based on three highly influential theories about human experience generally—Marxism, psychoanalysis, and phenomenology. The power of these theories derives from the fact that they are grounded in universal aspects of human experience--bodily needs and labor (Marx), sexuality and unconscious mental processes (Freud), and time and space (phenomenology); although all of these universal features also vary historically. To understand the interaction between theory and practice students will read and analyze these theories at their source and then critically evaluate one extended application of them in contemporary historical works—one of which is my own. In addition, students will also read critical appraisals of these approaches to round out the three reading assignments that are the subject of the three assigned papers (1500 words or five pages each). I also run a week-long writing workshop that clarifies mechanics of writing to be used and refined in these papers.

Time               Meetings Days             Instructor
9:35-10:55      TR                                Kern, Stephen

Assigned Readings:
George Lefebvre, The Coming of the French Revolution (Princeton University Press)
Rudolph Binion, Hitler Among the Germans (Northern Illinois University Press)
Stephen Kern, The Culture of Time and Space: 1880-1918 (Harvard University Press)
Selected readings by Marx, Freud, and phenomenology as well as criticisms of the three applications of these theories by Lefebvre, Binion, and Kern (Carmen)

Assignments:
Attendance and participation in discussion of primary and secondary sources.
Three papers.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course is required for all History Majors and must earn a C or higher to have it count on the Major.  This Honors version of History 2800 is open to honors students and non-honors students with permission of instructor. It may not be used for the GE Historical Study requirement.                                                                                                                                                           


HISTORY 2800 INTRODUCTION TO THE DISCIPLINE OF HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

So you want to be a history major? While History 2800 is required for majors to learn the discipline and methods of history, we will also look at different ways that people use sources and make historical arguments.  As such we will dive into rich sources and read unconventional histories (like graphic novels and imagined biographies).  All of these help illuminate what history is and what historians do.  The course will also focus on our own writing, analysis, and historical imagination. History 2800 has limited enrollment and is run in a lively seminar format.  All students are expected to attend and take part in the discussion for every class meeting.  While the course is designed for undergraduate history majors, anyone who is curious about how historians think, do research, and produce historical scholarship is welcome.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:35-10:55       WF                               McDow, T.

Assigned Readings:
Readings will consist of a combination of articles and books, with some analysis of primary sources. The preliminary list of readings (please confirm with instructor before buying)
Conal Furay and Michael Salevouris, The Methods and Skills of History(4th ed.)
John Lewis Gaddis, The Landscape of History: How Historians Map the Past (2002)
Trevor Getz and Liz Clarke, Abina and the Important Men (2nd ed., 2015)
Ryszard Kapuscinski, The Emperor Downfall of an Autocrat (1989)

Assignments:
Students will complete short weekly assignments, two book reviews, and a research portfolio (on the topic of their choice).

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course is required for all students declaring a Major in History; students must earn a C or higher to have it count on the Major.  It may not be used for the GE Historical Study requirement.                                                                                    


HISTORY 2800 INTRODUCTION TO THE DISCIPLINE OF HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course is designed to introduce undergraduate history majors to the discipline and some of the methods of history.  The successful completion of the course will result in your gaining firsthand knowledge of how historians work.  We will achieve this objective by examining and analyzing historical documents, by reading, studying, and dissecting (critiquing) published historical (and fictional) works, by learning the mechanics of historical production, and by writing historical essays.  

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:45-2:05       TR                               Shaw, Stephanie

The specific topic of this class is Nat Turner’s rebellion.   In 1831, Turner, a Southampton County Virginia slave, led a revolt designed to overthrow the institution of slavery.  The revolt has been reconstructed by historians, fictionalized by novelists, and even translated onto film.  Almost every generation recreates Turner anew.  We will look at available documents on this incident, the different interpretations of them, and draw our own intelligent conclusions about what definitely happened, what probably happened, and what we can never really know.  We will also try to account for the different views that exist and the conclusions that cannot be verified (and were probably false).

The point of these analyses is not simply to know all we can about Turner’s revolt, but to think about the discipline of history.  We will examine other primary documents from the period to aid us in this process as well.  We will read and write book reviews, review historical journals, and spend some time looking at new technologies and resources for conducting historical research.  We will also pay attention to problems and pitfalls of historical research and writing.  In the process, we will look at and think about “driving forces” of history, whether history is objective or subjective, and the role of the historian in history.  We will talk about “good” history and “bad” history, how to use sources, what “facts” are, and whether or not history can be scientific.  Altogether, our goal is to become better historians through critical reading and thoughtful analysis of original and interpreted sources.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course is required for all students declaring a Major in history, students must earn a “C” or higher to have it count on the history major. It may not be used for the GEC/GE Historical Study requirement.


HISTORY 3191 HISTORICAL INTERNSHIP

3 Cr. Hrs.

In this course, you’ll have the opportunity to choose from a range of internship possibilities at nearby historical or history-related institutions.  You’ll earn three credit hours for your semester-long work experience and will have the change to reflect with your peers on what you’re learning about history, skills, professional expectations, and future career directions.  By the end of the course, you should have a better sense of who you are and who you want to become in the future as a contributor to the work force.

Time               Meetings Days             Instructor
ARR               ARR                             Irwin, Ray

Assigned Readings:
Selected readings will be posted on CARMEN.

Assignments:
Written assignment request;
At least 60 hours of work at an internship site;
Five discussion posts (and responses to other students’ posts);
Active participation (class meetings arranged);
Public presentation about your internship and your semester’s work;
Final paper (1,000- 1,500 words).

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
Enrollment limited to history majors with ranks 2, 3, or 4 and 3.0 minimum GPA.                                                                                                                                                           


HISTORY 4010 READINGS IN MODERN U.S. HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Sexual Revolutions in the United States
 

Many Americans associate the 1960s and 1970s as an era of sexual freedom and the 1980s as a period of sexual conservatism.  Time magazine, for example, used similar images of Adam and Eve when it announced a “sex explosion” in 1969 and again when it declared “The Revolution is Over” in 1984.  Many historians have analyzed the history of sexuality in the second half of the twentieth century and have raised numerous important questions about it.  How much really changed during the sexual revolution?  Was there a “revolution” at all?  If there was a sexual revolution, when did it begin and end?  Who resisted it and did it have any lasting effects on American culture?  Students in this class will learn how some historians have tried to answer these questions and conduct their own secondary source research on the sexual revolution.  We will explore topics such as the history of marriage, LGBT life and politics, contraception, sex and consumer culture, and the Religious Right.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:35-10:55       WF                              Howard, Clay

Assignments:
This is an upper-level seminar on the reading and writing of history.  Students in this course should expect to do relatively large amounts of reading.  The class will require several writing assignments, including book reviews and a final historiographical essay on a topic of the student’s choosing.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course is designed for junior and senior History majors and fulfills the Readings Seminar requirement for History Majors that began OSU in semesters and it fulfills the 598 seminar requirement for those history majors that began OSU in quarters.                                                                                                                                                           


HISTORY 4015 RESEARCH SEMINAR IN MODERN U.S. HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

In this seminar, we will work extensively with primary documents in U.S. Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender history. In preparation for this work, we will read and discuss selected essays in the field as a way of grounding our own research and writing, which will be the primary focus of the seminar. Using audio, visual, and written primary sources from archives including the Lesbian Herstory Archives, the San Francisco GLBT Historical Society, ONE Institute and Archives, as well as digital collections increasingly available online, students will be asked to come up with a suitable research topic, develop the project through the production of an annotated bibliography of primary and secondary sources and a paper prospectus, and then write a final research paper. Topics explored will cover a wide range of topics in LGBT history, including transgender communities and organizing from the 1950s to the present, bisexual activism, butch/fem lesbian experiences, LGBT social movements in the immediate postwar and post-Stonewall era, the experiences of LGBT people of color from the 1920s to the present, and the beginnings of the HIV/AIDS epidemic.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
2:15-5:00         Thursday                     Rivers, Daniel

Assigned Readings:
The bulk of the work in this seminar will be the development and completion of the research paper, but there will be some reading (15-20 essays/journal articles over the course of the semester). These can also serve as secondary sources for the final paper, but that project may also entail some additional secondary reading in addition to primary research.

Some essays that will be assigned include:

  • John Howard, “The Library, the Park, and the Pervert: Public Space and Homosexual Encounter in Post-World War II Atlanta”
  • Madeline Davis and Elizabeth Lapovsky Kennedy, “Oral History and the Study of Sexuality in the Lesbian Community: Buffalo New York, 1940-1960”
  • John D’Emilio, “Gay Politics and Community in San Francisco since World War II”
  • Allen Drexel, “Before Paris Burned: Race, Class, and Male Homosexuality on the Chicago South Side, 1935-1960”
  • Nan Alamilla-Boyd, “Bodies in Motion: Lesbian and Transsexual Histories"
  • Susan Stryker, “Transgender History, Homonormativity, and Disciplinarity”

Assignments:

  1. A short (1-page) paper prospectus.
  2. A 10-12 page annotated bibliography of possible primary and secondary sources for the final paper.
  3. Attendance at and participation in all weekly meetings of the class:
  4. A 15-20 page final research paper.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the RESEARCH seminar requirement for the history major.                                                                                                                                                           


HISTORY 4100 READINGS IN LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY

“Revolutions and Revolutionaries in Modern Latin America”

What is a revolution? Why are successful revolutions such rare events? Why have so many revolutions failed and so few succeeded? Who are the revolutionaries? What is guerrilla warfare, and why do people resort to guerrilla warfare? What happens after the revolution and how do revolutionaries rebuild/create a new government? What is the difference between a revolution and social movement? And historically, what was the complex relationship between the United States and modern Latin American countries, and why was the U.S. interested in Latin America?

This course examines these and other important questions to analyze the history and meanings of revolutions and revolutionaries in Latin America. Starting with Mexico’s great revolution, we will move forward to analyze other revolutions and social movements in Guatemala, Cuba, Nicaragua, and others. Throughout this class, we will discuss the causes of revolution, their changing historical nature, and revolutionary outcomes. Additionally, we also consider dictatorships in Chile, Argentina, and Brazil to examine the search for social justice and reform.  To better understand the inclusion of various peoples into the revolutionary experience, this course includes a consideration of the concepts of class, gender, and ethnicity. In this manner, we will pay special attention to historical actors to explore participation from the ground level up.  And lastly, we also will look at U.S. involvement in various Latin American countries, including the role of the U.S. in Latin American revolutions and in the creation a post-revolutionary society.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
2:15-5:00         Tuesday                      Smith, Stephanie

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course is designed for junior and senior History majors and fulfills the Readings Seminar requirement for History Majors that began OSU in semesters and it fulfills the 598 seminar requirement for those history majors that began OSU in quarters.                                                                                                                                                           


HISTORY 4255 RESEARCH SEMINAR IN MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This is a course about how media shaped European history. Through reading assignments and a research paper, students will explore the following questions:  how did communication technology change the ways that people interpreted information? How did information go viral in the past, and why? How did readers and listeners determine what was true? How did consensus about shared information shape communities? We will read books and articles that take on these questions at key moments in Modern European history.

We will examine how--and why--news went viral in revolutionary France and Germany. Then, we will focus on nineteenth-century scandals, including the case of Jack the Ripper in England and the Dreyfus Affair in France. In particular, we ask how new media shaped the ways these events were understood by the public, and how they shifted readers' ideas about private life. Next, we will consider how women and men used the media to make more room for previously marginalized voices. In particular, we will study how journalists and amateur writers used newspapers and magazines to speak for themselves--to fashion their own identities and bring their voices into print. Finally, we will reflect on how the information influx of mass media shaped the experience of city life in the years preceding the First World War.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:45-3:30       Tuesday                      Bond, Elizabeth

Assigned Readings:
Peter Fritzsche, Reading Berlin
Mary Louise Roberts, Disruptive Acts:  The New Woman in fin-de-siècle France
Judith R. Walkowitz, City of Dreadful Delight:  Narratives of Sexual Danger in Late-Victorian London
and selections from the following:
Ruth Harris, Dreyfus:  Politics, Emotion, and the Scandal of the Century
Christopher Hilliard, To Exercise our Talents: The Democratization of Writing in Britain
Georges Lefebvre, The Great Fear of 1789
Vanessa R. Schwartz, Spectacular Realities:  Early Mass Culture in Fin-de-Siècle Paris

Assignments:
The major assignment for this course is a research paper (approximately 15-20 pages in length) that relates to the course theme and is on a topic of interest to the student.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the RESEARCH seminar requirement for the history major.                                                                                                                                                           


HISTORY 4285 RESEARCH SEMINAR IN RUSSIAN, EAST EUROPEAN & EURASIAN HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.                    

This research seminar will focus on the Russian Revolution and Stalinism.  In the course, we will read a variety of sources on the political, social, and cultural history of the Soviet Union.  Examples of topics we will cover are the Russian Revolution, the origins of Stalinism, the social consequences of Stalinist industrialization, World War II on the Eastern Front, gender roles in Soviet society, Soviet policies toward ethnic and national minorities, and official and popular culture in the Soviet Union.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:10-11:55       Monday                       Hoffmann, D.

Assigned Readings:
Students will read a number of books and articles that we will discuss in class.  In addition, they will read primary sources related to research projects of their own choosing. 

Assignments:
Students will each select a research project on some aspect of Soviet history between 1917 and 1953.  They will make a class presentation on their topic and write a final research paper.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the research seminar requirement toward a history major for semester students; this fulfills the 598 seminar requirement for quarter students. This course is only open to history majors.                                                          


HISTORY 4400 READINGS IN CHINESE HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

The (Second) Sino-Japanese War, 1937-45

In July 1937, soldiers of the Imperial Japanese Army were involved in what initially seemed to be a minor military skirmish with Republican Chinese soldiers at the Marco Polo Bridge near Beijing.  Since the 19th century, Japanese and other foreign troops had frequently used such events to provide their political leaders at home with rationales to send reinforcements to China.  This time, however, what the Japanese call “The China Incident” grew into a protracted eight-year continental war in which the Japanese goals of establishing an anti-Communist East Asian order, creating “civilization,” a reformed economy, and a stable new Chinese government that was friendly to Japan became ever-more elusive.  In their desperation to end the war by imposing a full embargo on Chiang Kai-shek’s alleged pro-Communist wartime government holed up in Chongqing, the Japanese eventually attacked and invaded the US-controlled Philippines, British-controlled Hong Kong, all of Southeast Asia from French Indochina to Thailand, British Malaya and Burma, the Dutch East Indies, and even parts of Australia.  They also attacked the American-controlled, pre-statehood territory of Hawaii.  In the process, the Japanese added to the China Incident what they call the Pacific War (1941-45) and what the West calls World War II; behind it all, however, the Sino-Japanese War (1937-45) churned on unceasingly and remained the justification for all of Japan’s “sideshows.”

This course taught by a modern Chinese history specialist, will examine the Sino-Japanese War from Chinese and Japanese political, economic, military, and civilian perspectives.  Like all 4000-level courses, we will emphasize reading, discussion, and research rather than lectures.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
2:20-3:40         TR                               Reed, Christopher

Assigned Readings:
Selections from 4 books, a novel, and additional shorter readings.

Assignments:
Maps and writing assignments to help each student understand the war and write a final paper on it.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the READINGS seminar requirement for History Majors.

Special Comments:  Although not required, some background in East Asian history, particularly History 2401 or 2402, as well as some knowledge of World War II, will be useful in a general way.  Students should note that this is a course on the Sino-Japanese War (Japan vs. China), not on the Pacific War (Japan vs. the Rest), and their self-selected papers must reflect that fact.                                                                                                                                                         


HISTORY 4425 READING SEMINAR IN JAPANESE HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Japanese Disasters in Historical Context: Sources, Treatments, Predictions

Situated on the Pacific "Rim of Fire" Japan is tectonically unstable, subject to earthquakes, volcanic activity and the ravages of tsunami such as that which struck Japan on March 11, 2010.  However, disasters in Japan resulting from the unstable earth are not the only natural events that cause disasters in Japan.  Cyclones (hurricanes), long periods of slow rains, heavy snowfall, rapid thaws of accumulated snow and more, combined with the steep slopes of Japan's mountains create a high risk of floods and landslides. While these kinds of natural events are often treated as "acts of god(s)" there is often a human factor responsible in combination with the movements of nature.  Furthermore, there are clearly man-made "disasters" associated with industrial pollution, human construction, and related activities.

Japan's long history of frequent disaster provides a distinctive opportunity to explore the degree to which modern disasters and society's response to them are distinctive. Have technological and scientific understandings improved Japan's ability to ameliorate, prevent or predict disasters? Or are old blinders to risks of human action still in operation?

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
12:45-3:30       Monday                       Brown, Phil

Assigned Readings include the following and others:

  • Atwater, Brian F. The Orphan Tsunami of 1700 : Japanese Clues to a Parent Earthquake in North America
  • Clancey, Gregory K. Earthquake Nation: The Cultural Politics of Japanese Seismicity, 1868-1930.
  • George, Timothy. Minamata: Pollution and the Struggle for Democracy in Post-War Japan
  • Schenking, J Charles. The Great Kanto Earthquake and the Chimera of National Reconstruction in Japan.
  • Walker, Brett. Toxic Archipelago
  • Translated interviews with Japanese university students who experienced the Great Northeast Japan Triple Disaster, interview with a Japanese earthquake mitigation specialist, and (Japanese – for those who can) with a pediatric thyroid specialist in Fukushima.
  • Various journal articles and essays

Assignments:
Short research paper prospectus (3-5 pages) due February 7 [15%]
Draft of fifteen page research paper due Thursday March 22 [25%]
Bibliographic/Historiographic essay Wednesday April 25 [45%]: details below

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
Seminars at this level are designed primarily as a capstone experience for 3rd & 4th year History majors and minors, but no prior experience with Japanese history is required.                                                                                                             


HISTORY 4705 RESEARCH SEMINAR IN ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will explore the human experience of climatic changes and extremes from the Great Famine of the 1310s to the famous “Year without a Summer” in 1816.  We’ll start by examining how scientists and historians have reconstructed past climate, and how they have explained its impact on agriculture, health, and economic and political history.  However, the real emphasis of the course will be how ordinary people lived through the Little Ice Age: their perceptions, experiences, and memories of climatic changes and extremes.  We’ll approach this topic through case studies of historical events, as well as theater, art, and literature.  Throughout this course we’ll discuss how past experiences of natural climate change can (and can’t) help us understand the experience of current global warming.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
2:15-5:00         Wednesday                 White, Sam

Assigned Readings:
There will be article and chapter readings each week to help prepare students for discussion and explore topics for a final paper.

Assignments:
Students will write one substantial research paper about climate and history over the course of the semester.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the research seminar requirement toward a history major. This course is cross-listed with Medieval & Renaissance Studies as MEDREN 5695.

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WOMEN'S HISTORY
 


HISTORY 3642 WOMEN IN MODERN EUROPE FROM THE 18TH CENTURY TO THE PRESENT

3 Cr. Hrs.                 

This course is designed as an introduction to the history of European women from the mid-18th century to the late-20th century.  Several themes will be central to the course.  We will investigate changing ideas about women and the ways in which these ideas influence women’s lives.  We will study the processes of industrial expansion and economic change and the impact of these developments on women’s social and economic position.  We will explore the political reorganization of Europe over the course of these centuries, and we will examine how women strove to shape and improve their lives under changing circumstances.  We will also concentrate on how relationships between women and men developed, and how beliefs about gender changed.  Finally, we will look at how economic position, religion, sexuality, marital status, regional and national differences influenced women’s experiences.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
11:10-12:30     TR                               Søland, Birgitte

Assigned Readings:
The readings for this course include a broad selection of primary and secondary sources.  All readings will be made available on Carmen.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Europe, post-1750 for the history major or can fulfill a GE requirement.

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WORLD HISTORY

                                                                                                                                                    


HISTORY 1682 WORLD HISTORY FROM 1500 TO THE PRESENT

3 Cr. Hrs.

Survey of the human community, with an emphasis on its increasing global integration, from the first European voyages of exploration through the present.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
8:00-9:20         WF                              Whitehead, C.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the historical study GE requirement.  Not open to students that have credit for History 181 or 2641.                                                                                                                                                    


HISTORY 2650 THE WORLD SINCE 1914

3 Cr. Hrs.

The World since 1914 is a course on global history. We will focus on the central themes of global history in the modern world, such as nationalism, globalization, the rise of mass society, and identity and difference, as well as major events, such as the World Wars, the Great Depression, the Cold War, and decolonization. We will also look at major issues in the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, such as food, health, energy, economic development, and the environment.  Our class will focus discussion of primary documents and of competing theories about the causes of historical change. But the ultimate goal of the course is civic: to help us understand better the world and its problems, and to think about how we might address those problems better than people have in the past.

Time               Meetings Days             Instructor
12:40-1:35      WF                               Roth, Randy
10:20; 12:40   Monday (recitations)
1:50

Assigned Readings:
We will read one textbook, but in addition a number of on-line documents, and selections from competing historical interpretations of the past. The following book will be required:
James H. Overfield, Sources of Twentieth Century Global History. Wadsworth, 2002. ISBN 13: 978-0-395-90407-7. Paperback.

The following textbook is also recommended, but not required for the course:
Carter Vaughn Findley and John Alexander Murray Rothney, Twentieth-Century World (7th edition). Wadsworth, 2011. ISBN 13: 978-0-547-21850-2. Paperback.

Assignments (tentative)
Quizzes:  There will be five quizzes on the readings in the course.  The quizzes will ask you to report fully and accurately on the content of readings in the course.
Responses to historical films: You will be asked to write one-page, single-space responses to two films that will be required viewing for the course.  The films will illustrate major themes of the course.
Midterm and final examinations:  There will be a midterm examination and a final examination.  The midterm will ask you to write one comprehensive one-hour essay, the final two.
Essay:  You will be asked to write an essay (5 or 6 pages in length) on an aspect of your family’s history over the past 100 years. Each family history should reflect on a major problem in global history.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for the history major or can fulfill the historical study GE.


HISTORY 2720 BIG HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Big History brings together the cosmic, earth, evolutionary, and human past.  This course provides a consilient, non-technical introduction to the essential state of knowledge about the galaxy, planet, life, and humanity.  The unifying theme throughout the course will be emergence and fragility of complex systems in a universe forever moving toward entropy.  By the end of the course, students will have a basic grounding in some of the major theories that help explain our place in the cosmos, and a better understanding of where we came from and where we might be going.

Time               Meeting Days             Instructor
On-line           online                          White, Sam

Assigned Readings:
David Christian, Cynthia Stokes Brown, and Craig Benjamin, Big History: Between Nothing and Everything (New York: McGraw-Hill, 2013).

Assignments:
Online writing assignments and discussion for each lesson, and one course essay.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course is open to all students and does not assume any prior coursework in history, mathematics, or natural sciences.  This course fulfills Group Global, pre-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill GE Historical Studies.                                                                                                                                                    

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To find course availability and times, please visit the Ohio State Course Catalog and Master Schedule.