Spring 2020 Undergraduate Courses

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AFRICAN HISTORY

                                                                                                                                                    

HISTORY 2303 HISTORY OF CONTEMPORARY AFRICA, 1960 – PRESENT

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course takes a closer look at the history of the African continent from the process of decolonization until today.  We will study and discuss broad historical developments, such as the origins and histories of independence movements, the rise of development ideology, military rule and dictatorships, debt accumulation, and the economic struggles and successes of the continent. In addition, we will focus on a number of important locations and events, including the Algerian Revolution, the fall of the apartheid system in South Africa, the Congo crisis, the Rwanda genocide and the following Great War of Africa.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

12:40-1:35       MWF                           Van Beurden, Sarah

Assigned Readings:

Cooper, Frederick. Africa Since 1940. The Past of the Present. (Cambridge University Press, 2002)

Mary Ingouville Burton, The Truth and Reconciliation Commission (Ohio University Press, 2017)

Marie Beatrice Umutesi, Surviving the Slaughter The Ordeal of a Rwandan Refugee in Zaire. (University of Wisconsin Press 2004)- available as an e-book from the library website

Other reading materials placed on Carmen/Canvas.

Assignments:

Midterm, final, two position papers, map quiz, reading quizzes, attendance and participation

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Africa, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


                                                                                                                                                    

HISTORY 3308 HISTORY OF U.S.-AFRICA RELATIONS, 1900-PRESENT        

3 Cr. Hrs.

Following the September 11 terrorists, the United States began to develop new foreign policy toward Africa that would allow a more active engagement between the U.S. and Africa.  This new policy clearly shaped by the US war on terror, as illustrated by the establishment of the United States Africa Command Force (AFRICOM), and the emergence of Africa as an oil exporting continent. Using a variety of sources, this course explores the history of U.S.-African relations since early 19th century.  We will examine the various factors that shaped US interests or lack of interests, in Africa, and how various African leaders perceived developed strategies for engaging with U.S. interests.  We will pay close attention to specific themes that shaped U.S. African engagements, human rights; politics of HIV/AIDS; democratization; international trade and foreign investments; China-Africa relations; and the new war on terrorism.  We will consider the dynamics of Africa-U.S. relations in these areas in order to assess the degree of continuity and divergence and that factors that shaped these relations.  As former President Bill Clinton remarked in 2000, “There are a thousand reason Africa and the United States should work together for the 21st century, reasons buried deep in our past, reason apparent in the future just ahead.  It is the right thing to do, and it is in the self-interest of all the peoples.  Africa matters to all Americans.”  What are these “thousand reasons”? 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

Online             Online                          Kobo, Ousman

Assignments:

Assignments will include a midterm exam, a number of quizzes, group discussions and short research papers that will be revised and re-submitted as the final assignment.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Africa, post-1750 for history majors or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


                                                                                                                                              
HISTORY 3704 HIV: FROM MICROBIOLOGY TO MACROHISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

HIV: From Microbiology to Macrohistory is an interdisciplinary exploration of HIV/AIDs that combines history and virology through team teaching.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

2:20-3:40         TR                               McDow, T. & J. Kwiek

In 2012, an estimated 35.3 million people around the world were living with HIV, a number startling close to the estimated number of people who have died from AIDs since 1981.  Unlocking the virological secrets of HIV/AIDs has been one of the grand scientific challenges of the last three decades, and the disease remains one of the world’s most serious challenges to human health and development.  The burden of the disease is very uneven globally, and sub-Saharan African, where the disease originated, is home to 69% of those living with HIV today. How did this virus and this global pandemic come to be? The course traces the evolution of the virus at both the molecular level and within its global historical context.  Team-taught by a virologist and a historian, the goal of this class at the broadest level, is to put the sciences and humanities in conversation.

The course will require students to apply the theory of evolution by natural selection to explain the origin of HIV (chimpanzees in Africa) and the ability of HIV to develop drug resistance and evade an effective vaccine. The course will simultaneously put these scientific processes and the effects of disease into historical context. The very scientific revolutions that led to Darwin’s theory of evolution and Koch's postulates of infection transmission helped make European colonialism possible. For example, Social Darwinism justified imperial aims, Pasteurian ideals of contamination influenced notions of racial purity, and the new field of tropical medicine was created to protect colonial administrators and soldiers in their distant postings. Similarly, colonial rule and the creation of the extractive economies of central and southern Africa set in motion population movements, wealth inequalities, and structures of power that amplified the effects—decades later—of HIV and contributed to what would become a global pandemic. Although the academy approaches the medical facts of disease and its social consequences through distinct disciplines, those who have contracted the virus experience all aspects of the disease. This course makes it possible for students to consider the medical, scientific, social, political, and economic causes and consequences of one of the world's most devastating viruses from the nineteenth century to the twenty-first.

Assigned Readings:

Students will read primary source, scientific findings, and scholarly publications from the humanities, social sciences, and hard sciences.

Assignments:

Students will complete assignments that are typical of both history and microbiology; they will synthesize these approaches in a final capstone project.  Weekly assessments will ask students to either reflect on the reading or lecture for that week or will ask them to analyze and manipulate scientific data.  The course will have a midterm and final examination that will require students to demonstrate both specific knowledge and their abilities to synthesize material across disciplines.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course is cross-listed and thus has two prerequisites: one historical, one scientific, for history it is a 2000 level (or higher) course or instructor permission; and for Biology it is Biology 1101, 1102, 1113 or equivalent or instructor permission. Students who have questions about their preparation should contact the professors.

This course fulfills Group Africa, post-1750 for the history major.


                                                                                                                                              

AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY

                                                                                                                                             
HISTORY 2080 AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY TO 1877

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course examines the history of black Americans from the beginning of the African slave trade to just after the Civil War.  Obviously, slavery will be an important part of this class.  We will look at diverse sites of slavery, beginning in the early years and in the North when and where small farm and town/city slaves were the norm.  Our examination of plantation slavery recognizes the changes in that system as the nation evolved from “a society with slaves” into “a slave society,” and we will follow that expansion of slavery westward (across the mountains) and southward (into the Deep South and across the Gulf states).  We begin with the assumption that slavery was chosen as a labor system, not inevitable, and, that once chosen, had to be maintained, thus becoming a social and political system as well as an economic system.  We will also pay attention to free black people in the North and the South, their diverse efforts to live as free people, and their relationship to those who remained enslaved.  Our most important objective is to see and understand how black people—slave and free—lived.  We will also study their interior worlds of family, work, community, and culture and the ways they sought to an often succeeded in shaping a life and a lifestyle that constantly resisted external systems of domination.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

12:45-2:05       TR                               Shaw, Stephanie

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group North America, pre-1750 for history the history major or can fulfill a GE requirement.

History 2080 is recommended for those interested in the interdisciplinary program:

1619 and Beyond: Explorations in Atlantic Slavery and its American Legacy

An Ohio State University Series, 2019-2020                                                                                                                                              


AMERICAN HISTORY

                                                                                                                                                    

HISTORY 1151 AMERICAN HISTORY TO 1877

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course provides a survey of American history from the Age of Encounter to the Reconstruction period.  It covers the social, economic, cultural, political, and diplomatic history of the American peoples. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

On-line            On-line                        Wood, J.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills the historical study GE requirement.  Not open to students that have credit for History 151 or 2001.


                                                                                                                                                    

HISTORY 1152 AMERICAN HISTORY 1877- PRESENT

3 Cr. Hrs.

From the aftermath of the Civil War to the 2000s, this course offers a sweeping survey of American history since 1865.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

On-line            On-line                        Larson, Z.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills the historical study GE requirement.  Not open to students that have credit for History 152 or 2002.


                                                                                                                                                    

HISTORY 2001 LAUNCHING AMERICA

3 Cr. Hrs.

History 2001 is a one-semester introduction to American Civilization from colonial times through Reconstruction.  Our emphasis will be the critical reading of primary sources--diaries, letters, political tracts, poems, songs, stories, paintings, buildings, and other material artifacts--through which we will try to understand the past.  We will focus on social history and cultural history, but we will also pay close attention to the political history of the United States.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

10:20-11:15     MW                             Roth, Randy

9:10; 10:20      F (recitations)

12:40

Assigned readings:

John Mack Faragher, Out of Many, Vol. 1, Brief Fourth Edition (but any edition, brief or full, will suffice)

Frederick Douglass, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (any edition, although the pagination may not match the one available at local bookstores)

Various additional readings on Carmen

Assignments:

Essays:  We will write one critical essay on primary sources (5-6 pp.).

Exams:  There will be a midterm, a final exam, and five quizzes.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

English 1110.01/02 either previous or concurrently. Not open to students with credit for History 151 or 1151.  This course fulfills Group North America, pre-1750 for history majors or can fulfill a GE requirement.


                                                                                                                                                  

HISTORY 2002 MAKING AMERICA MODERN      

3 Cr. Hrs.

This class will introduce students to modern United States history from the end of the Civil War to the War on Terror.  Topics will include the Industrial Revolution, racial segregation, the colonization of Western North America and the Philippines, immigration, women’s suffrage, the Great Depression, World Wars I and II, the Atomic Age, the civil rights movement, and the 2008 financial crash.  For each week of the semester, we will specifically focus on three key themes: the changing role of the federal government, the growth of a market economy, and contests over the meaning of “freedom.”  The period after the Civil War witnessed a revolution in the nation’s economy, new understandings of federal power, and ongoing debates about what it meant to be “free” in a modern society.   Students will be expected to not only identify these themes by the end of the semester but also to explain how they evolved over time. 

Since one of the key themes for the course involves the different ways in which Americans have thought about the term “freedom,” the class will also explore the ways in which they have thought about the past.  If Americans have frequently disagreed about what it means to be “free,” they have also bitterly fought over the meanings of United States history.  Remembering the nation’s past, in fact, has often been a proxy for defining freedom.  Students will be asked to consider questions like: What issues warrant inclusion in a national memorial?  What ideas or events should be included in a history class?  Why do Americans celebrate certain events but not others?  And who should decide which issues deserve to be commemorated?  Our conversations about these issues will not only help students better understand key themes in the past, but also the ways in which history is always a contested subject. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

11:30-12:25     MW                             Howard, Clay
11:30; 12:40   Friday (recitations)
& 1:50

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.   


                                                                                                                                                   
HISTORY 2065 COLONIALISM AT THE MOVIES: AMERICAN HISTORY IN FILM

3 Cr. Hrs.

Since history is central to American identity, studying movies are especially important because films reflect and shape people’s understanding of history. In this course, students will examine how American history from the era of colonization through the Civil War era is presented in commercial films.

Comparing films with historical writing about the same subject, we will evaluate the accuracy (or inaccuracy) of the films we watch. We will also analyze the construction of historical narratives. Filmmakers face the same challenges that historians do:  what stories are worth telling, and what is the best way to convey historical information? 

We will explore why certain topics appeal to filmmakers, (i.e. the American West, Native American encounters), while others do not—including abolitionism and reform movements, religion, and the American Revolution itself, especially the nuts and bolts of creating the republic and drafting and ratifying the Constitution. Slavery has attracted considerable recent attention from filmmakers.

Historical movies can say as much about the moment in which they are made and viewed as they do about the past. Filmmakers often rely on stereotypes or iconic characters as shorthand for expressing larger themes, so we will explore how stereotypes influence the presentation of Indians, women, and other groups in American film.  Sometimes, films are even more complicated and historically rich than audiences know.  Understanding the history behind a film may reveal just how informative it really is.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

Online              Online                          Newell, Margaret

Assigned Readings:

Past readings have included the following, although the list will change:

Solomon Northup, Twelve Years a Slave

Tyler Anbinder,  Five Points: The 19th Century New York Neighborhood that Invented Tap Dance, Stole Elections, and Became America's Most Notorious Slum

Alan Taylor, American Colonies

Assignments:

Students will write three one-hour, timed, open book essays and complete a final project. This project will consist of both a 6-8 pp. paper or screenplay and a digital component (a Powerpoint/Prezi or a short original film).  Active participation in weekly online discussions and a small group assignment will also be required.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group North American, pre or post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


                                                                                                                                                    

HISTORY 2750 NATIVES AND NEWCOMERS: IMMIGRATION & MIGRATION IN US HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.                

General survey of (im)migration history in the U.S. from precolonial times to the present.  Topics include cultural contact, economic relations, citizenship, politics, family and sexuality.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

Online              Online                          Haydar, M.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group North American, pre or post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


                                                                                                                                                    

HISTORY 3001 AMERICAN POLITICAL HISTORY TO 1877

3 Cr. Hrs.

An overview of the history of American politics from the earliest colonial outposts to Civil War and Reconstruction.  In observance of the quadricentennial of the origins of the North American slave trade, we will focus in particular on the politics of race and slavery with particular attention to slavery and race.  American politics had their origins in the colonial transplantation and transformation of Old World forms on the New World edge of empire, forms reshaped in the Revolution and routinized in the decades of the early republic.  While its institutions, practices, and responsiveness to public opinion made it the first successful model of a modern democratic republic, the structures of American politics before the Civil War were fundamentally threatened by the uncompromisable questions bound up in racial slavery, and then challenged by contested entry of free African-Americans into full cititzenship during Reconstruction.  

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

9:35-10:55       WF                              Brooke, John

Assigned Readings [tentative]:

Jack P. Greene, Peripheries & Center: Constitutional Development in the Extended Polities

  of the British Empire and the United States, 1607-1788.

Gary J. Kornblith, Slavery and Sectional Strife in the Early American Republic, 1776-1821

Andrew Shankman, Original Intents: Hamilton, Jefferson, and the American Founding

Sean Wilentz, Andrew Jackson

Bruce Levine, Half Slave and Half Free: The Roots of the Civil War

Eric Foner, A Short History of Reconstruction

Assignments:

Class attendance and participation in discussions (15%),

Three short document essays (15%),

Papers on Part I [In-class] (20%),

Part II [take-home] (25%),

and Part III [option of in-class or take-home] (25%).

Prerequisites and Special Comments: American or European history background useful. This course fulfills Group North America, pre & post-1750 for history majors or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.

History 3001 is recommended for those interested in the interdisciplinary program:

1619 and Beyond: Explorations in Atlantic Slavery and its American Legacy

An Ohio State University Series, 2019-2020


                                                                                                                                               

HISTORY 3014 GILDED AGE TO PROGRESSIVE ERA, 1877-1920

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course examines American politics and society from the later years of Reconstruction until the U.S. entry in World War I.  This is period historians often overlook, one stuck between the drama of the Civil War and the more familiar developments of the 20th century.  Yet we shouldn’t.  In this period, important things seemed up for grabs, within the power of Americans to manage: how industry would be controlled, the character of race relations, the role of government in shaping society, public morals, and the economy, and America's place in the world. 

We will focus on public life – on politics, social and political movements, economic change, and habits of thought that shaped how Americans responded to change.  We will explore two big themes: the working out of the Reconstruction of the South and the varied effects of rapid industrial development. The trauma of the Civil War and the difficulties of Reconstruction continued to shape American politics and social life. It carried through in arguments about citizenship, what it meant to be an American, and the right to vote. The continuing relevance of Reconstruction issues turned up in the stalemate that characterized late-nineteenth-century-politics.  That stalemate, in turn, conditioned the ability of government to respond to the expansion of industry.  Industrialization also provides the context for understanding the movement of people to and around the United States.  We will examine solutions that various groups of Americans offered to what they saw as the problems of the day, problems that went to the nation's values as well as its economic and social conditions.  How those solutions differed from those offered during the progressive era will concern us in the last third of the course.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

3:55-5:15         TR                               Baker, Paula

Assigned Readings:

3 or 4 books and documents on Carmen

Assignments: (tentative)

Midterm, Final and Paper: 20 points each

Three quizzes 10 points each

Five short assignments through the semester 2 points each

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement. This course also fulfills one of the integrated social studies prerequisites for the OSU M.ED.


                                                                                                                                               

HISTORY 3016 UNITED STATES HISTORY SINCE 1963

3 Cr. Hrs.

Riots, hippies, and rock n’ roll. That’s where we’ll start in this course as we examine American history since the death of John F. Kennedy. It gets more exciting from there as we talk about Black Power, Vietnam, and atomic war with the Soviet Union. We’ll meet some of the most radical activists pushing for civil rights in this country and travel to the arid West where we’ll discuss eco-terrorists plans to blow up dams. As you can see, we’ll be detailing a time of revolution, but we’ll also document how these changes bred backlash. The course will tackle Reaganomics and examine how our economy has changed over time, and in our final weeks of class, we will devote time to a conversation about the most pressing issues of our day—climate change, for example—as we discuss how history can make us better citizens in the twenty-first century. Hang on, because it’s going to be a magical mystery tour. 

Throughout the semester, you will come to know personalities from the past by reading speeches and primary source documents. You will also get to hear these historical actors express themselves in their own words, as we’ll watch a lot of films featuring historical footage of America. Students in the course will evaluate and interpret these primary sources each week and construct historical insights to share with fellow students in our sessions. Often the readings and videos for the week will offer insights into contemporary issues we face today. Through short essays, each student will make connections between key historical events in the past and present-day issues facing our nation.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

11:10-12:30     TR                               Elmore, Bart

Assigned Readings:

None.  All course readings and screenings will be made available to students online.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for history majors or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


                                                                                                                                              

HISTORY 3030 HISTORY OF OHIO

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will survey the economic, social, and political development of the geographic area that became Ohio from the Native American period to the present. We will explore three themes in particular:  the role of disruptive technology and creative destruction in shaping Ohio’s past; the critical junctures at which Ohio might have become something entirely different from what it became; Ohio’s connection to the wider world through geography, technology, demography, economics, and politics.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

On-line            on-line                         Coil, William R.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.   


                                                                                                                                                    

HISTORY 3080 HISTORY OF SLAVERY IN THE U.S.

3 Cr. Hrs.       

In this course, we will discuss the history of slavery in North America from the colonial era to the Civil War.  We will include material on bondage in other societies, but the focus will be on African-American slavery in what is now the United States.  We will explore various aspects of the slave experience, such as work, religion, family life, resistance, and rebellion.  We will also discuss free blacks, people of mixed race, yeoman whites, and slave owners, as well as the significance of slavery as a culture, economic, and political issues.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

9:35-10:55       TR                               Cashin, Joan

Assignments: Students will read several monographs, write several short papers, and take one exam.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.         

History 3080 is recommended for those interested in the interdisciplinary program:

1619 and Beyond: Explorations in Atlantic Slavery and its American Legacy

An Ohio State University Series, 2019-2020


                                                                                                                                                    

HISTORY 3501 U.S. DIPLOMACY, 1920-PRESENT

3 Cr. Hrs.

Since 1920, the United States has played a dominant role in international affairs due to its massive economy, unrivaled military, and global cultural influence. Historians have often referred to this era as “the American century,” a term coined by Time Magazine publisher Henry Luce in February of 1941. However, Luce’s editorial was as much a call to action as it was an accurate description: as late as 1941, the nation was still debating its desired role in world affairs. Far from a dedicated superpower, the United States was and remains a country whose foreign relations are hotly contested. The nation has struggled to discern a consistent path between opposing tendencies of democracy, empire, isolationism, internationalism, national security, and the role of defense in daily life. At the same time, many countries have militantly resisted projections of American power.

In this course, we will explore a sampling of these contests and the sometimes contradictory foreign policies they produced. While focusing on the specific policy history of the United States, we will also assess the impact American actions have had across the globe, foreign responses to the United States, the changing contexts that transformed official thinking, and the decentralization of the international system. The course will ultimately seek to have you engage directly with the ways U.S. foreign policymaking has affected and responded to global and domestic events, and what this means for the future of American foreign affairs. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
online                online                          Larson, Z.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 or it can fulfill the historical study GE.                                                                                                                                                     


HISTORY 3506 DIPLOMACY, CONGRESS, AND THE IMPERIAL PRESIDENCY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will emphasize the application of historical thinking, meaning we will explore historical ideas and precedents with the goal of using them to make sense of recent events. The focus will be the role Congress plays in international diplomacy in relation to the executive branch. The extent to which the separation of powers has shaped foreign policy is a complex story that reveals Congress has been both complicit in the rise of what some scholars have called the imperial presidency and intermittently committed to placing limits on executive power.
 
The course will explore the creation of contemporary traditions of foreign policy through four sets of historical case studies from the last century: the treaty powers, trade policy, military funding, and presidential war powers. We’ll debate why the Congress has chosen to invest extensive, unilateral powers in the executive branch and whether this structure is necessary to protect and promote national interests. For each case study, students will use our historical discussions to reflect and analyze contemporary issues from the last twenty-five years, ranging from NAFTA to the War on Terror. By the end of the class, students will explain how the separation of powers shape the foreign policy process and hopefully develop a methodology for using historical context to better analyze the news cycle.
 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

12:45-2:05       WF                              Parrott, Joseph

Assignments:

Discussion/Participation; Group Case Study Written Component; Group Case Study Presentation and a final paper.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.          


                                                                                                                                                        

ANCIENT HISTORY

 

HISTORY 2201 ANCIENT GREECE & ROME

3 Cr. Hrs.

This class is an introduction to the history of the Ancient Mediterranean Civilizations of Greece and Rome.  It provides a background of the chronological development of ancient Greek and Roman civilizations and then focuses on the broad issues of state-formation, politics, gender, warfare, tyranny, monotheism, and the environment over a period of some two thousand years.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

Online              online                           Vanderpuy, Peter

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


                                                                                                                                                    

HISTORY 2213 THE ANCIENT MEDITERRANEAN CITY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Cities in the Ancient Near East, Greece and Rome, with an emphasis on their physical form and historical importance.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

3:55-5:15         WF                              Green, D.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.


                                                                                                                                                           

HISTORY 2221 INTRODUCTION TO THE NEW TESTAMENT: HISTORY AND LITERATURE

3 Cr. Hrs.                                                                                                                                   

This course provides students with a basis for critical thinking about the most influential writings in the intellectual and cultural history of Western civilization.  What we call the "New Testament" is a not a single book but an anthology reflecting the work of various ancient authors.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

9:10-10:05       MWF                           Beshay, M.

Prerequisites and Special Comments

This course fulfills Group Near East, pre-1750 for the History major or can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 3211 OF CLASSICAL GREECE

3 Cr. Hrs.

The course explores the history of the classical era, the “Golden Age” of ancient Greece.  It traces political and cultural developments in the world of the Greek city-states from the time of the watershed Persian Wars of 480-479 BC down to the death of Alexander the Great in 323 and its immediate aftermath.  Major topics covered include: the rise of Athens as imperialist superpower and “cultural capital” of the Greek world; the escalating tensions between the Athenian empire and the Spartan-led Peloponnesian League that resulted in the cataclysmic Peloponnesian War (431-404 BC); the subsequent attempts by states like Sparta and Thebes to exercise hegemony over their fellow Greeks; the formation of the world’s first complex democracy in Athens; and the ground-breaking innovations that would shape the future course of art, architecture, philosophy, science, literature, and drama in the western world.  The course will conclude by looking at how the relatively sudden emergence of Philip II of Macedon as the dominant player on the Greek stage effectively ended the era of the independent city-states, and at how the conquest of the Persian empire by Philip’s son Alexander the Great transformed the political and cultural fortunes of Greece and the ancient Near East thereafter. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

11:10-12:30     TR                               Anderson, Greg

Assigned Readings:

I. Morris and B. Powell, The Greeks: History, Culture, and Society (Prentice Hall, 2010).

Thucydides, History of the Peloponnesian War (Penguin Classics, 1972).

Readings from ancient texts, available on Carmen.

Assignments:

2 exams and a term paper

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for history majors or can fulfill the historical study GE.

Other than English 1110.xx, there are no prerequisites for this class.


                                                                                                                                                    

HISTORY 3221 ROME FROM GRACCHI TO NERO

3 Cr. Hrs.

Rome from Gracchi to Nero.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

Online              online                           Vanderpuy, Peter

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.                                                                                                                                                    


ASIAN & ISLAMIC HISTORY

                                                                                                                                                    

HISTORY 2351 EARLY ISLAMIC SOCIETY, 610-1258

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will introduce you to the major religious, political, social, and economic structures that developed during the first six centuries of Islam, from its advent around 610 of the Common Era through the Mongol sack of Baghdad in 1258. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

online               online                           Ozturk, D.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Near East, Middle East, pre-1750 for the history major or can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.


                                                                                                                                               

HISTORY 2353 THE MIDDLE EAST IN THE 20TH CENTURY

3 Cr. Hrs.

An introductory study of the political, social and cultural history and evolution of Islamic civilization since 1914. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

On-line            on-line                         Altuntas, Selcuk

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Near East, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.


                                                                                                                                               

HISTORY 2401 HISTORY OF EAST ASIA IN THE PRE-MODERN ERA

3 Cr. Hrs.

Simply put, in this course we will explore one question together: How were the civilizations of China, Korea, and Japan connected but different in the pre-modern period (to 1800)?

History 2401 is an introduction to the societies and cultures of pre‑modern China, Korea, and Japan, the countries that make up the geographical and cultural unit of East Asia

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

Online              online                           Schutz, R.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

No prerequisites. This course fulfills Group East Asia, pre-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


                                                                                                                                               

HISTORY 2402 HISTORY OF EAST ASIA IN THE MODERN ERA, 1600-PRESENT

3 Cr. Hrs.

History 2402 introduces the histories of the societies of East Asia (China, Korea, Japan) starting in about 1600.  To a higher degree than History 2401, which is useful but certainly not required preparation, History 2402 is organized on a 3-way comparative model (“how do China, Japan, or Korea compare to each other historically?”); one of our goals Is to learn to think comparatively about history and societies.  We will survey key historical phenomena (including political, military, social and intellectual themes) that have distinguished each country in the modern period.  For most of the semester, the course will be organized chronologically and thematically.  In addition to providing a basic narrative of East Asian Civilization since 1600, the course will introduce students to important written and film sources and to historical writing.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

2:20-3:40         TR                               Reed, Chris

Assigned Reading: A textbook, a monograph, primary sources, short films.

Assignments:

TBA, similar to other courses at this level, including take home midterm and final.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

No prerequisites. This course fulfills Group East Asia, post-1750 for history majors.

Special Note:  History 2401 is NOT a prerequisite for History 2402.  History 2402 satisfies the GE Historical Study requirement, Second Historical study option, and Global Studies option; it may also satisfy the two open options for the GE. 


                                                                                                                                               

HISTORY 3351 INTELLECTUAL & SOCIAL MOVEMENTS IN THE MUSLIM WORLD

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course explores significant intellectual and social movements that have arisen among Muslims from the inception of Islam in 610 C.E. until the present.  These range from the initial split over the caliphate to the great medieval theological debates to 19th- and early 20th-century reformism to the Arab Spring and the Islamic State.  Special attention will be given to the development of Shia Islam, with a focus on the background to the Iranian revolution as portrayed in Roy Mottahedeh’s The Mantle of the Prophet, an account of the experiences and intellectual formation of a young Iranian mullah active during the 1970s. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

11:10-12:30     TR                               Hathaway, Jane

Assigned Readings:

Frederick Matthewson Denny, An Introduction to Islam, 4th edition

Roy Mottahedeh, The Mantle of the Prophet:  Religion and Politics in Iran

Various excerpts from primary and secondary sources

Assignments:

Map exercise, In-class midterm, paper related to The Mantle of the Prophet, take-home final.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Near Eastern, East Asia, Middle East, South or Central Asia Group, pre-1750 for the history major and fulfills the historical study GE.


                                                                                                                                               

HISTORY 3403 HISTORY OF EARLY MODERN CHINA, 14TH-18TH CENTURIES

3 Cr. Hrs.                                           

This course surveys early-modern Chinese history, roughly 14th-18th century. During this period, many countries were going through drastic transformations in this phase of globalization. The Chinese empire helped shape and was shaped by these transformations. It went through two dynastic changes, during which the ruling house changed between Chinese and non-Chinese ones, with the latter governing China as part of a Eurasian, multi-ethnic empire. We will think about how dynamics of globalization intersected with the traditional political institutions, society, culture, socio-economics, and religion in these centuries. We will examine a few important themes in depth to explore some of the historical processes mentioned above. Students will learn by “doing.” The course is comprised of the following components:

1) Online lectures, their topics already listed in this syllabus, provide useful background information. It is recommended that students watch them before doing the reading assignments.

2) Exercises with reading assignments (historical scholarship and historical material) allow students to cultivate analytical and presentation skills.

3) In-class lectures and discussion are opportunities for the instructor and students to work closely in person on historical examples and key issues. In-class lectures will be posted on Carmen after class.

4) Written assignments (formal and informal writings) help students improve their ability to articulate sophisticated ideas.

It is natural, given the intensity and hybrid format of the class, that students might feel a bit overwhelmed at the beginning. Please talk to the instructor about time management and reading strategy if you need help in these areas. In the meantime, as you will see in the syllabus, in the last week of this semester, you will have some time to revisit and revise some earlier assignments.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

12:45-2:05       Wednesday                 Zhang, Ying   

*This is a hybrid course

Prerequisites and special comments:

This course fulfills group East Asia, pre-1750 for history the major or can fulfill a GE requirement.


                                                                                                                                               

HISTORY 3410 THE CHINESE CITY, 1750-1990

3 Cr. Hrs.

China today has more than 100 cities with populations over 1 million. Shanghai alone has 22 million residents. More than 50% of Chinese live in these urban centers, yet this level of urban growth has occurred mostly since 1978. As a result, many of China’s cities today are almost completely new, founded or rebuilt thoroughly since 1949, yet China’s past reveals a strikingly ambivalent history with regard to urbanization. Until 1978, for example, the Chinese city was considered both the crucible of modernity (Westernization, technological advance, industrialization, revolution) and the bulwark of conservatism and decadence (imperialism, capitalism, gangsterism, materialism). To understand how these contradictory realities and views developed, this course will begin with a comparative view of urbanization. We will then move on to examine topics such as the late imperial Chinese city, 19th- and 20th-century treaty port cities, and urban hinterlands. Well-known cities like Beijing, Wuhan, Nanjing and/or Shanghai, each with its respective culture, both high and low, will come into view from multiple perspectives. Finally, the effects of the 2nd Sino-Japanese War and Communist revolution on Chinese cities will be considered. The course’s goal is to teach students ways to interrogate China’s present-day embrace of urbanization from within its historical continuities and discontinuities.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

11:10-12:30     WF                              Reed, Chris

Assigned Readings:

This new course will emphasize readings (historical and fictional), films, and discussions rather that lectures.

Assignments: Attendance, participation, map assignment, short take-home essays.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: There are no prerequisites for this course. Almost any humanities or social science course you’ve taken will help you succeed in it.


                                                                                                                                               

HISTORY 3411 GENDER AND SEXUALITY IN CHINESE HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This class introduces students to historical developments in gender and sexuality in Chinese history (ancient period to 1950s). Through a few central topics, we will look into a cluster of interlocking questions: gendered aspects of the political system; changes and continuities in the Confucian gender system; the intersection of gender, sexuality, ethnicity, religion, and class; meanings of liberation, oppression, victim, and agency; the politics of writing women’s history in transcultural and global contexts; the discourse of and about Chinese masculinity; gender and science, etc. We will also think about how our own gender politics and temporal location shape our reading of the history of Chinese women, as well as how a gendered approach changes the way we examine historical evidence and interpret historical events.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

9:35-10:55       Weds                           Zhang, Ying

*This is a hybrid course

Assignments:

In this hybrid class, students will learn by “doing.” The course is comprised of the following components:

1) Online lectures, their topics already listed in this syllabus, provide useful background information. It is recommended that students watch them before doing the reading assignments.

2) Exercises with reading assignments (historical scholarship and historical material) allow students to cultivate analytical and presentation skills.

3) In-class lectures and discussion are opportunities for the instructor and students to work closely in person on historical examples and key issues. In-class lectures will be posted on Carmen after class.

4) Written assignments (formal and informal writings) help students improve their ability to articulate sophisticated ideas.

It is natural, given the intensity and hybrid format of the class, that students might feel a bit overwhelmed at the beginning. Please talk to the instructor about time management and reading strategy if you need help in these areas. In the meantime, as you will see in the syllabus, in the last week of this semester, you will have some time to revisit and revise some earlier assignments.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: 

This course fulfills Group East Asia, pre or post-1750 for history majors or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.


 

EUROPEAN HISTORY

                                                                                                                                                          

HISTORY 1211 WESTERN CIVILIZATION TO THE 17TH CENTURY

3 Cr. Hrs.

 Ancient Civilizations (Near East, Greece, Rome) barbarian invasions, medieval civilizations (Byzantium, Islam, Europe); Renaissance and Reformation.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

On-line            On-line                        Shimoda, K.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills the historical study GE requirement.  Not open to students that have credit for History 111 or 2201; 2202; 2203 or 2205.


                                                                                                                                                          

HISTORY 1212 WESTERN CIVILIZATION 17TH CENTURY TO THE PRESENT

3 Cr.  Hrs.

Political, scientific, and industrial revolutions, nationalism, the two World Wars; the decline of empires; the Cold War.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

On-line            On-line                        Douglas, Sarah

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills the historical study GE requirement.  Not open to students that have credit for History 112; 2202; 2203; 2204 or 2205.


                                                                                                                                                            

HISTORY 2202 INTRODUCTION TO MEDIEVAL HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Survey of medieval history from the late Roman Empire to the early sixteenth century.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

9:35-10:55       TR                              Shimoda, Kyle

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for the history major or can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 2203 INTRODUCTION TO EARLY MODERN EUROPE

3 Cr. Hrs.

In this survey course, we will study the history of Europe from the Black Death to the Industrial Revolution. This course examines social, cultural, religious, political and economic change from the mid fourteenth to the early nineteenth century. This is primarily a lecture class, but we will also focus on reading and analyzing primary sources through in-class discussions.  Among the questions we will discuss are:  What were the cultural movements of The Renaissance, the Scientific Revolution, and the Enlightenment? How did states change through absolutism, revolution, and empire? How did religious belief and practice transform communities during the Reformation, the Wars of Religion, and the witch trials of the seventeenth century?  And how were people’s daily lives shaped by such changes?

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

11:10-12:30     TR                               Bond, Elizabeth

Assigned Readings:

Merry Wiesner-Hanks, Early Modern Europe, 1450-1789, Cambridge University Press, 2013, ISBN 9781107643574

Natalie Zemon Davis, The Return of Martin Guerre, Harvard University Press, 1984, ISBN 9780674766914

Linda Colley, The Ordeal of Elizabeth Marsh, Harper, 2008, ISBN 9780007192199

and selections from the open-access primary source reader:  Merry Wiesner-Hanks, Early Modern Europe Primary Sources, Cambridge University Press, 2013 http://www.cambridge.org/features/wiesnerhanks/primary_sources.html

All assigned readings are available on Carmen or on Course Reserve at the OSU Library (and at the University Bookstore).

Assignments:

Two short response essays (one in response to Davis, one in response to Colley) a midterm exam and final exam. 

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

  • GE for historical study and diversity global studies
  • chronological breadth requirement before 1750 for history majors
  • Europe geographical concentration for history majors and minors
  • Thematic Minor in Comparative Studies of Pre-Modern Civilizations

HISTORY 2204 MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This class introduces students to the political, social, and cultural developments that made the fabric of modern Europe.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

8:00-9:20         TR                               Awasthi, Arjun

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Europe, post-1750 for history majors or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.


                                                                                                                                              

HISTORY 2240 ELIZABETHAN ENGLAND

3 Cr. Hrs.

The social, political, cultural and religious history of England during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I, 1558-1603, including the darker side of the Golden Age.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

9:10-10:05       MWF                           Schoonover, Jordan

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for history majors or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.


                                                                                                                                               

HISTORY 2270 LOVE IN THE MODERN WESTERN WORLD      

3 Cr. Hrs.

Love is a source of intriguing debates about gender roles, courtship practices, and marriage. This course will respond to the following questions: What were ancient Jewish and Christian ideas about love, and how did those legacies play out in Western history? Why does no major love story until the twentieth century focus on the love of a married couple? Were the Victorians sexually repressed, and if so, how did it influence the way they loved? Why are women's faces featured in courtship imagery, while men are in profile and off center? How has modern feminism shaped love? How have automobiles, telephones, movies, television, the Internet, and search engines shaped love?

Is it conceivable that love becomes more humanizing across history? Or have we rather lost something along the way? How does reading about love affect how one loves? How have psychoanalytic psychiatry and existentialist philosophy influenced love? What do we know about sexuality and love that our parents and grandparents did not? In light of the fact that the past century has brought about major changes in the social, economic, educational, political, medical, and legal status of women, how have those changes affected love? How do wars affect love?

The readings will be primarily on three historically distinctive novels about love from 1847, 1920, and 1992. Students also read selections from Simone de Beauvoir's classic statement of existential feminism, chapters from my book on the subject, and a few pages by Sigmund Freud. We will also interpret images of love in art and listen to the famous romantic love duet from Richard Wagner’s opera Tristan and Isolde. Lectures will cover the history of love since antiquity, although the readings and the three assigned papers will concentrate on the last two centuries.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

2:20-3:40         TR                               Kern, Stephen

Assigned Readings:

Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre

D. H. Lawrence, Women in Love

Carol Shields, The Republic of Love

Simone de Beauvoir, The Second Sex (selections).

Stephen Kern, The Culture of Love: Victorians to Moderns

Sigmund Freud, Introductory Lectures On Psychoanalysis (selections)

Zoe Lewis, “Madonna Syndrome: I should have ditched feminism for love, children, and baking” (handout)

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Europe, post-1750 for history majors or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.


                                                                                                                                               

HISTORY 2275 CHILDREN & CHILDHOOD IN THE WESTERN WORLD

3 Cr. Hrs.

While the process of developing from infancy through childhood into adult life is a biological phenomenon, the specific ways in which children have been treated and understood vary enormously across time and space.  In this class, we will explore the history of children in the Western World from antiquity to the present.  How has the role of children in Western culture changes across centuries?  Have relationships between parents and children changed?  How has the understanding and treatment of children changed? Ultimately, we will seek to define both changes and continuities in the lives of children in the Western world.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

11:10-12:30     TR                               Soland, Birgitte

Assigned Readings:

Readings will consist of a mixture of primary and secondary sources.  All readings will be available on Carmen.  Students should expect a weekly reading load of approximately 35-50 pages.

Assignments:

One short paper (5 pages), take home midterm exam and take home final exam.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Europe, pre or post-1750 for history majors or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.


                                                                                                                                               

HISTORY 2475 THE HOLOCAUST

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will examine the state-sponsored murder of millions of Jews and non-Jews by the Nazis and their collaborators during World War II.  Together we will trace the interrelated individuals, institutions, historical events, and ideologies that allowed for the Holocaust to occur.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

9:10-10:05       MWF                           Freeman, Nicole

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Europe, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


                                                                                                                                               

HISTORY 3247 MAGIC & WITCHCRAFT

3 Cr. Hrs.

Magic has been with us since the dawn of human consciousness and it is with us still. Understanding magical mentalities is therefore an important historical project but also a difficult one. The early modern period, 1450-1750—the period of the European witch hunts—offers an ideal setting in which to study magical thinking and related matters. We will learn why the tumultuous events of this period created a highly fertile and dynamic atmosphere for magic and witchcraft beliefs. We will learn quite a bit about this period in European history generally. We will examine the distinctions between learned and lay magic; “white” and “black” magic; and different types of magical practice. We will pay particular attention to witches, witch hunts, and shifting ideas about witchcraft on the eve of the Enlightenment. A second and more practical focus of the course will be on identifying the thesis of a chapter, article or book and on recognizing the main arguments or proofs marshaled to support that thesis. A third focus will be on the close analysis of primary documents.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

9:35-10:55       WF                              Goldish, Matthew

Assigned Readings: (tentative)

Brian P. Levack, The Witch Hunt in Early Modern Europe, 4th ed. (Routledge)

Keith Thomas, Religion and the Decline of Magic (Oxford and others; any edition)

The Trial of Tempel Anneke, ed., P.A. Morton, trans. B. Dähms (Univ. of Toronto Press)

Articles, documents and supplemental readings through our CARMEN website

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for the history major or can fulfill a GE requirement.


HISTORY 3250 REVOLUTIONARY & NAPOLEONIC EUROPE, 1750-1815

3 Cr. Hrs.

The French Revolutionaries invented human rights and the metric system. They abolished feudalism and opened up all professions to merit, including the military. The revolutionaries formed one of the first modern republics. Yet when we remember the French Revolution, we also think of the guillotine and the violence of the Reign of Terror. In History 3250, we explore the complexity and contradictions of this key moment in the history of the modern world. Its legacies are still with us today.

This course will equip students to study the origins, processes, and legacies of revolution. The French Revolution could be frightening and destabilizing, but it was also a creative moment when the possibilities for what society and citizenship ought to look like opened up and new voices came to the fore. We will explore how eighteenth- and nineteenth-century men and women thought about the promise and limits of revolution.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

12:45-2:05       TR                               Bond, Elizabeth

Assigned Readings:

We will analyze primary sources, film, and art throughout the semester. Course readings also include book chapters and scholarly articles written by historians. All assigned readings are available on Course Reserve at the OSU Library (and at the University Bookstore).

Assignments:

The assignments for this course invite you to consider the experiences of the revolutionaries in new ways. We put King Louis XVI on trial through an in-class debate. We also use social media to consider the competing interests of the revolutionaries in an interactive format. The other assessments are a midterm and final exam.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills the following:

  • chronological breadth requirement after 1750 for history majors
  • Europe geographical concentration for history majors and minors
  • Thematic minor in Military History
  • GE requirement

                                                                                                                                               

HISTORY 3253 20TH CENTURY EUROPE TO 1950

3 Cr. Hrs.

Exploration of the major historical events and issues from approximately 1900 to 1950.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

online               online                           Harris, James

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Europe, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.                                                                                                                                               



HISTORY 3265 20TH CENTURY GERMANY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will examine the history of Germany from the First World War to the present, considering three interconnected points of tension that are central to understanding Germany and the Germans in the 20th and 21st centuries: dictatorship/democracy, guilt/innocence, and Germans/foreigners. The past hundred-plus years has been an era of immense political shifts, of war, genocide, internal confrontation and mass migration, as well as a period of constant debate over what it means to call oneself “German” and which territories and landscapes constitute “Germany”. Throughout, Germans have also had to come to terms with their collective past and their place within the broader European context.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

11:10-12:30     TR                               Limbach, Eric

Assigned Readings:

Alina Bronsky, Broken Glass Park (Europa Editions, 2010)

Mary Fulbrook, A Concise History of Germany 3rd Ed. (Cambridge, 2019)

Jana Hensel, After the Wall (PublicAffairs, 2008)

Bernhard Schlink, Guilt About the Past (House of Anansi Press, 2008)

Primary source reader (provided on Carmen Canvas)

Selected scholarly articles (provided on Carmen Canvas)

Assignments:

Three 1000-word (4-5 page) essays: article analysis, document analysis, and argumentative essay

One in-class article presentation

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Europe, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


                                                                                                                                               

HISTORY 3269 EASTERN EUROPE IN THE 20TH CENTURY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course examines the history of Eastern Europe from the turn of the twentieth century up until today.  For purposes of this class, Eastern Europe is defined as the area between Russia and Germany, including the territories of Greece, Bulgaria, the former Yugoslav republics, Albania, Romania, Hungary, Austria, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, and Poland. To keep the course manageable, we only mention in passing the Baltic states or the former Soviet republics, but students are able to engage those regions through independent work.

This course will present the history of Eastern Europe by exploring several discrete themes: nationalism, state- and nation-building; minorities, immigrants, and refugees; war, society, and violence; communism and the Cold War; and the search for a new identity after the end of the Cold War. The goal is to study the major historical developments that have shaped the history of the region and to scrutinize the evolution of the very notion of Eastern Europe over time.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

12:45-2:05       WF                              Dragostinova, Theodora

Assigned Readings:

Aleko Konstantinov, Bai Ganyo: Incredible Tales of a Modern Bulgarian

Bruce Clark, Twice a Stranger: The Mass Expulsions that Forged Modern Greece & Turkey

Heda Margolius Kovaly, Under a Cruel Star. A Life in Prague, 1941-1968

Slavenka Drakulic, How We Survived Communism and Even Laughed

Alexander Hemon, The Book of my Lives

Katherine Verdery, My Life as a Spy: Investigations in a Secret Police File

Assignments:

Map quizzes 5%

Weekly short response papers 30%

Two 4-to- 5-page take home exams 30% (15% each)

Research project 25% (proposal 5%; final project submission 20%)

Discussion and attendance: 10%

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group Europe, post-1750 for history majors or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


                                                                                                                                                           

JEWISH HISTORY

                                                                                                                                                    

HISTORY 2451 MEDIEVAL & EARLY MODERN JEWISH HISTORY, 700-1700 CE

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course surveys nearly a thousand years of Jewish history, religion, and culture in Europe from the Islamic conquest of Spain (711 C.E.) to the rise of the Sabbatian movement in the mid-seventeenth century.  Focusing on key figures and representative subjects, the lectures will seek to offer a balanced picture of the Jewish experience in the medieval and early modern periods.  Special emphasis will be placed upon the evaluation and interpretation of primary sources (in translation).  These texts will introduce students to the political, social, intellectual, and spiritual worlds of ancient and medieval Jewry.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

12:45-2:05       TR                               Frank, Daniel

Assigned Readings:

1. Biale, David. Cultures of the Jews, Volume 2: Diversities of Diaspora. (Schocken, 2002)

2. Gerber, Jane S. The Jews of Spain: A History of the Sephardic Experience. (Free Press, 1994)

3. Marcus, Jacob R. and Marc Saperstein, The Jews in Christian Europe. (Hebrew Union College, 2015)

4. Ruderman, David B. Early Modern Jewry. (Princeton, 2010; electronic resource)

Assignments:

Homework: five 250-word essays. Not letter-graded. Full credit for completion. 10%

Quizzes: six quizzes drawn directly from posted questions on reading. (lowest grade dropped) 15%

Book Review: five pages 25%

First Examination: Covers first half of course. Drawn directly from study-guide. 25%

Second Examination: Covers second half of course. Drawn directly from study-guide. 25%

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Global, pre-1750 for the history major or can fulfill a GE requirement.


                                                                                                                                              

HISTORY 2453 HISTORY OF ZIONISM AND MODERN ISRAEL

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course explores the history of the Jewish state from the rise of the Zionist movement to the present. It begins by examining the social and ideological roots of Zionism in late 19th-century Europe, proceeds with the development of the Jewish community in Palestine under Ottoman and British rule, and then turns to the period following the establishment of the State of Israel in 1948. Among the issues to be discussed are Jewish-Arab relations, immigration, the encounter between European and Middle Eastern Jews, the creation of a new Hebrew identity, the interaction between religion and state, and the impact of the Holocaust. Course materials include secondary historical sources, a variety of primary documents, short stories and films.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

9:35-10:55       WF                              Yehudai, Ori

Assigned Readings:

Main textbook: Anita Shapira, Israel: A History (Brandeis University Press, 2012)

Assignments:

Three reading response papers (1-2 pp.): 15% (5% each)

Book review (3-4 pp.): 20%

Primary source analysis (5 pp.), 25%, due November 12

Final exam: 40%

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Near Eastern, pre-1750 for the history major or can fulfill a GE requirement.


                                                                                                                                               

HISTORY 2455 JEWS IN AMERICAN FILM

3 Cr. Hrs. - Second Session Course

Jews and Jewish life have often been depicted in American television and film.  We will watch a number of films about Jews and Jewish life while reading about those same topics in primary and secondary historical sources.  We will then analyze the depiction of Jews and Judaism in the films and discuss how that depiction compares with the historical reality.  This will be accomplished through online discussion as well as through reflective writing.  We will come out of the course with both content knowledge (modern Jewish history, Jewish culture, Christian-Jewish relations) and skills (watching film and television critically; detecting attitudes and biases in writing as well as film; writing and speaking articulately about our observations).

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

Online                                                 Goldish, Matt

Assigned Readings:

Hasia Diner, A New Promised Land: History of Jews in America

Elie Wiesel, Night, trans. Marion Wiesel

Documents and supplemental readings through our CARMEN website

Assignments:

Quizzes, short paper and a final examination.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for history majors or it can fulfill a GE requirement. This is a hybrid course.


                                                                                                                                               

HISTORY 3450 HISTORY OF ANCIENT ISRAEL

3 Cr. Hrs.

Survey of the history of ancient Israel from its origins to the advent of Hellenism (300 BCE).

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

11:10-12:30     WF                              Meier, Sam

Assigned Readings: One required textbook

Assignments:

Daily readings

One term paper

Midterm

Final exam

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Near Eastern, pre-1750 for the history major or can fulfill a GE requirement.


                                                                                                                                               

LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY

                                                                                                                                                    

HISTORY 1102 LATIN AMERICAN CIVILIZATIONS SINCE 1825

3 Cr. Hrs.

Latin American political, social, economic and cultural history from Independence (1825) to the present focusing on neo-colonialism, instability, underdevelopment, militarism, and minorities.

 Time               Meeting Days              Instructor

online               online                           Schoof, Marcus

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Latin America, post-1750 for the history major or can fulfill the historical study GE and fulfills Global diversity.


                                                                                                                                               

HISTORY 2125 HISTORY OF LATIN AMERICA THROUGH FILM

3 Cr. Hrs.

HIST 2125, the History of Latin America Through Film, explores the history of Latin America as represented through the media of film, as well as how film has portrayed the people, politics, and cultures of Latin America in return. The class considers how and why various historical topics have been depicted in movies, how the historical events were interpreted through the filmmaker’s imagination, and to what extent the film version reflected the reality of the historical episode. When used in conjunction with the textbook, primary sources, monographs, articles, lectures, and discussions, films are a useful tool to analyze themes such as the constructed nature of history, and the interpretation and contextualization of historical sources.

Each week students will view a film that explores a variety of topics, including a brief discussion of Latin America’s colonial background, independence, society, women, social movements, resistance, dictatorships and military regimes, revolutions, neo-liberalism, politics, and contemporary matters in Latin America. Through their weekly response papers, discussions, and final paper, students will sharpen their analytical skills by comparing the lectures, textbook, primary sources, and articles with the films to uncover possible biases as presented in the films. An analysis of the historical events as depicted in the films also provides students with the opportunity to consider the origins of crucial contemporary issues and recognize how past events influence today’s world.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

On-line            on-line                         Smith, Stephanie

Assigned Readings:

1. John Charles Chasteen, Born in Blood and Fire: A Concise History of

Latin America, 4th Edition, W.W. Norton & Company, Inc., 2016.

 (ISBN: 9780393283051)

2. John Charles Chasteen, Born in Blood and Fire: Latin American Voices,

A Reader. 2nd Edition, W.W. Norton & Company, Inc., 2016.

(ISBN: 9780393283068)

Assignments:

Weekly discussion posts, weekly film response papers, final paper proposal, final paper.                                                           

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Latin America, post-1750 for the history major or can fulfill the historical study GE and fulfills Global diversity.


                                                                                                                                               

HISTORY 3100 COLONIAL LATIN AMERICA

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course looks at the dynamic history of Latin America from immediately prior to the arrival of Europeans in the late 15th century to the beginning of the mainland Independence movements in the early 19th century. We will look at social and cultural changes throughout this era, especially through the lenses of religious change and evolving ideas and practices related to race, gender, sexuality, and economically-based social status. Ongoing topics of discussion will include: people’s daily struggles and negotiations with colonial authorities; the development of colonial institutions; differences between central and frontier regions; changing concepts and forms of political authority; the complex relationship between the church and the colonial “state”; changes in indigenous cultures, communities, and language; transcultural exchange between the Americas,  Europe, and Africa;  and the development of Latin American identities that continue beyond the colonial era. The scale of focus will move between general patterns and specific, regional examples that either illustrate or complicate these patterns.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

11:10-12:30     TR                               Delgado, Jessica

Assigned Readings:

  • Kenneth Mills, William Taylor, and Sandra Lauderdale Graham, Colonial Latin America: A Documentary History
  • Selected chapters, essays and additional primary documents to be posted electronically.

Assignments:

  • 3 short primary document analysis essays
  • In class midterm
  • In class final.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Latin America, pre-1750 for the history major or can fulfill the historical study GE.


 

MILITARY HISTORY

                                                                                                                                                           

HISTORY 2550 HISTORY OF WAR

3 Cr. Hrs.

A survey of the main concepts and issues involved in the study of war in world perspective, using case studies from prehistoric times to the present.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

On-line             on-line                         Douglas, Sarah

3:55-5:15         WF                              von Bargen, Max

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills the historical study GE & Group Global, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.


                                                                                                                                                           

HISTORY 3270 WORLD WAR I

3 Cr. Hrs.

In this course, we will focus on the origins, course, and historical implications of one of the most significant turning points in modern world history: The First World War.  Often called “The Great War,” the conflict that broke out in the summer of 1914 and lasted for over four bloody, grinding years altered forever the global balance of power; cultural attitudes both inside and outside of Europe; domestic and international political relationships; and basic economic principles that had governed for centuries. Although the war was a European conflict, fighting took place in the Middle East, Africa, the Atlantic, and Asia. As such, we will examine the war as a global conflict, considering both the specifics aspects of the battles themselves as well as their broader social, political, and cultural context. The course grade will be comprised of attendance, a midterm, a final, and a 5-7-page essay on a topic to be discussed in lecture.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

On-line            on-line                         Douglas, Sarah

Assignments:

Attendance: 15%; Midterm: 25%; Paper: 25%; Final Exam: 35%

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Global, post -1750 for the history major or can fulfill the historical study GE.


                                                                                                                                                           

HISTORY 3551 WAR IN WORLD HISTORY, 1651-1899

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course is an introduction to the salient concepts and problems involved in the study of military history from the mid-17th century to the turn of the 20th century.  The most significant development during this period was the rise of the West (Europe and its settler societies, such as the United States) to global dominance. Consequently, it will be a prominent course theme.  We will also give extended attention to the ways in which the Age of Democratic Revolution (circa 1760-1800) and the Napoleonic Wars (1803-1815) profoundly influenced military affairs in Europe and the United States.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

12:45-2:05       WF                              Grimsley, Mark

Assigned Readings (tentative):

Geoffrey Parker, The Military Revolution

Victor Davis Hanson, Carnage and Culture:  Landmark Battles in the Rise of Western Power.

Gunther E. Rothenberg, The Napoleonic Wars.

Geoffrey Wawro, The Franco-Prussian War

Assignments:

Two midterm examinations and a final examination, each with an essay-based take home portion and an in-class “objective question” portion.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

There are no prerequisites, but a basic knowledge of Western Civilization or World History is helpful. This course fulfills Group Global, post -1750 for history majors or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


                                                                                                                                               

HISTORY 3552 WAR IN WORLD HISTORY, 1900 - PRESENT

3 Cr. Hrs.       

The Experience of War in the 20th Century

The past hundred years changed the nature of war. Industrial warfare and global conflicts led to an inexorable intensification of violence. From trench warfare in World War I to ethnic cleansing in the 1990s, the total number of deaths caused by or associated with war has been estimated at the equivalent of 10% of the world’s population in 1913. In the course of the century, the burden of war shifted increasingly from armed forces to civilians, to the point where non-combatants now comprise some 80 or 90% of war victims. This lecture course investigates the blurring of distinction between combatants and non-combatants, as well as the experiences of ordinary men and women who lived through the wars of the 20th Century. It covers events such as World War I, the Spanish Civil War, World War II, the Korean War and the Vietnam War, and topics such as the experience of captivity, sexual violence in wartime, children in war, or genocide.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

9:35-10:55       TR                               Cabanes, Bruno

Assigned Readings:

Primo Levi, Survival in Auschwitz

Anonymous, A Women in Berlin

Henri Alleg, The Question

Jean Hatzfeld, Machete Season. The Killers in Rwanda Speak

Assignments:

The final grade in the course will be an average of the four grades given for: a short 2000-word paper (20%), the mid-term examination (25%), lecture Quick Writes/Quizzes (20%); the final examination (35%).

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for the history major, or it can fulfill the historical study GE.


                                                                                                                                                           

HISTORY 3560 AMERICAN MILITARY HISTORY, 1607-1902

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course describes and analyzes the history of American military policy from the colonial period to the end of the Philippine War. It focuses on the creation of American military institutions, the genesis of policy-making and maintenance of civilian control over that process, the interrelationship between foreign and military policy, the conduct of war, and the influence of American society upon the armed forces as social institutions.

Students will achieve an understanding of the main developments in American military history, the ways in which these developments have reflected or shaped developments in general American history, and the main interpretations advanced by scholars who have studied this subject. They will also hone their skills at critical writing and analysis, and will gain greater insight into the way historians explore the human condition.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

12:45-2:05       TR                               Grimsley, Mark

Assigned Readings:

Allan R. Millett and Peter Maslowski, For the Common Defense: A Military History of the United States of America., Revised & Expanded Edition.
Earl J. Hess, The Rifle Musket in the Civil War.
James M. McPherson, For Cause and Comrades.
Steven E. Woodworth, Beneath a Northern Sky:  The Short History of the Gettysburg Campaign.

Assignments: (tentative)

First midterm examination (25 percent); Second midterm examination (35percent);
Final examination (40 percent).

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

Although there are no prerequisites, a solid grounding in U.S. History is very helpful.

This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for the History major or can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.


                                                                                                                                                           

HISTORY 3570 WORLD WAR II

3 Cr. Hours

World War II was the largest and most destructive war in human history.  More than seventy years after it ended, the war continues to shape our world.  This course examines the causes, conduct, and consequences of this devastating conflict.  Through readings, lectures, and video, the class will study the politics that shaped the involvement of the major combatants; military leadership and the characteristics of major Allied and Axis armed services; the national and theater strategies of the various major combatants; the military operations that led to victory or defeat on battlefields spanning the globe; war crimes; and other factors such as leadership, economics, military doctrine and effectiveness, technology, ideology, and racism that impacted the outcome of the war.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

2:20-3:40         WF                              Mansoor, Pete

Assigned Readings:

Williamson Murray and Allan R. Millett, A War to be Won:  Fighting the Second World War

West Point History of Warfare (online only)

Michael Lynch, Hitler

E. B. Sledge, With the Old Breed

Assignments: In-class mid-term and final examinations and Two book reviews (2-3 pages each).

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

AP History credit or successful completion of another college-level history course.

This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for history majors. This course also fulfills the historical study and global studies category of the GE.


                                                                                                                                                           

HISTORY 3575 THE KOREAN WAR

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course examines the course of the Korean War. It focuses on the global roots of the war, situating the conflict within the context of instability in East Asia reaching back to the 19th century. The course will also review how the war was at times both a civil war and an international war. Using oral histories and other texts, readings underscore the experience of the war for both civilians and combatants. While recovering these voices, lectures and discussions will touch on key operations in the war and the ways in which the Korean War shaped the Cold War and post-Cold War world.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

Online              online                           Matusheski, Zachary

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.


                                                                                                                                                           

HISTORY 3670 STUDIES IN THE TRANSNATIONAL HISTORY OF WWII IN EUROPE

3 Cr. Hrs.

History 3670, Studies in the Transnational History of WWII in Europe, is the capstone seminar for the undergraduate “Program in the Transnational History of WWII.”  The syllabus is shaped to match the travel itinerary of the May travel component of the program.  As we move our focus from London to France and then Central and Eastern Europe, we will focus on three core issues that the war raised: the erasure of the distinction between combatants and non-combatants; the ethical questions embedded in collaboration and resistance and the “gray zone” in the middle; and racism, genocide, and human rights. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

1:30-4:30         Monday                       Steigerwald, David

Assigned Readings:

Istvan Deak, Europe on Trial

Weekly Carmen assignments and Individualized readings

Assignments:

Weekly writing assignments and presentations.  Each student will also choose a particular subject, loosely associated with one of our site visits in Europe, about which they will develop a personal expertise.  They will read at least one monograph and at least two associated sources, and from that material prepare a review essay of 1750-2500 words, or roughly 5-7 pages. 

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

History 3670 is reserved for those students accepted into the WWII Program during the October registration period. 


 

THEMATIC COURSE OFFERINGS

                                                                                                                                                           

HISTORY 2800 INTRODUCTION TO THE DISCIPLINE OF HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will introduce students to the historical method, that is, how historians write history.

We will focus on a specific issue, Abraham Lincoln and the Emancipation Proclamation.  The class will discuss the debate among scholars on this topic.  Students will also explore primary sources created by historical figures who lived through the Civil War, such as journalists, soldiers, slaves, and politicians.  We will examine newspapers, military records, narratives from ex-slaves, memoirs by ex-soldiers, and political cartoons.  We will discuss the different perspectives these historical figures had on Lincoln and Emancipation.

Time               Meetings Days             Instructor

12:45-2:05      TR                                Cashin, Joan

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course is required for all students declaring a Major in history, students must earn a “C” or higher to have it count on the history major. It may not be used for the GEC/GE Historical Study requirement.

 


                                                                                                                                                          

HISTORY 2800 INTRODUCTION TO THE DISCIPLINE OF HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This is the “gateway” course for history majors.  It will introduce you to the academic discipline of history and to the methods that professional historians use to investigate the past, including different kinds of primary and secondary sources.  A key goal of the course is to hone your historical writing skills; you will prepare rough drafts and final versions of both major written assignments while completing shorter weekly assignments.  You will also get the opportunity to engage in peer review of your classmates’ work while receiving their reviews of yours; this sort of constructive critique is a key part of the professional historian’s career.  In addition to honing your critical writing skills, this course will enable you to practice oral presentation.  We will also take several field trips to various historical collections.

Time               Meetings Days             Instructor

9:35-10:55      TR                                Hathaway, Jane

Assigned Readings:

Mary Lynn Rampolla, A Pocket Guide to Writing in History, 8th ed. (7th or 6th ed. is also acceptable.)

Assignments:

Chapter summaries of the Rampolla book; critical book review; research essay; oral presentations of book review and final essay.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course is required for all students declaring a Major in history, students must earn a “C” or higher to have it count on the history major. It may not be used for the GEC/GE Historical Study requirement.


                                                                                                                                                           

HISTORY 2800 INTRODUCTION TO THE DISCIPLINE OF HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course is designed to introduce you to what historians do and how they do it. Unlike other history classes, this course does not treat a specific topic or period in history, but rather focuses on historical methodology. 

Some of the issues we will explore include:

            *What are some of the methods historians use to explore the past?

*What constitutes an historical source?

*How do we collect, select, and evaluate historical evidence, and what kinds of evidence best answer certain kinds of questions?

*What are the best ways to present our data and interpretations?

*Can historians be objective?  What sorts of professional ethics and considerations guide the conscientious historian?

*What is the difference between history and opinion?

*Is the writing of history a science or an art?

*How does the present shape our understanding of the past?

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

9:35-10:55       WF                              Sessa, Tina

Assignments:

Assignments include a library exercise, oral presentations, a critical review essay, and a short research essay based on primary sources.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course is required for all students declaring a Major in History. Students must earn a C or higher to have it count on the Major. It may not be used for the GE Historical Study requirement.


                                                                                                                                                           

HISTORY 2800 INTRODUCTION TO THE DISCIPLINE OF HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course is an introduction to the study of history, and to the concepts and skills necessary to study the past. Our concern throughout the course will be to examine critically the nature of history as a discipline and the writing of history as an academic project.  Through readings, discussions, in-class activities, and written assignments, we will explore the purposes of studying history, the types of sources available to reconstruct the past, and different methods and approaches for examining and interpreting history.

Unlike other history courses, this course does not treat a specific topic or period; instead it focuses on historical methodology.  We will practice a series of fundamental skills, including critical thinking, analytical reading, accurate research, public speaking, and effective writing, all critical for your success in the history major, and for life and work beyond your undergraduate years. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

11:10-12:30     TR                               Sreenivas, Mytheli

Assignments:

Our assignments will focus on the research and writing skills necessary for the history major, and in your college course work overall.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course is required for all students declaring a Major in history, students must earn a “C” or higher to have it count on the history major. It may not be used for the GEC/GE Historical Study requirement.

Please contact Professor Sreenivas (Sreenivas.2@osu.edu) if you have questions about readings and assignments.


                                                                                                                                                           

HISTORY 2800H HONORS INTRODUCTION TO THE DISCIPLINE OF HISTORY         

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course introduces students to the discipline of history by analyzing in detail three approaches to history based on three highly influential theories about human experience generally—Marxism, psychoanalysis, and phenomenology. The power of these theories derives from the fact that they are grounded in universal aspects of human experience--bodily needs and labor (Marx), sexuality and unconscious mental processes (Freud), and time and space (phenomenology); although all of these universal features also vary historically. To understand the interaction between theory and practice students will read and analyze these theories at their source and then critically evaluate one extended application of them in contemporary historical works—one of which is my own. In addition, students will also read critical appraisals of these approaches to round out the three reading assignments that are the subject of the three assigned papers (1500 words or five pages each). I also run a week-long writing workshop that clarifies mechanics of writing to be used and refined in these papers.

Time               Meetings Days             Instructor

11:10-12:30    WF                               Kern, Stephen

Assigned Readings:

George Lefebvre, The Coming of the French Revolution (Princeton University Press)

Rudolph Binion, Hitler Among the Germans (Northern Illinois University Press)

Stephen Kern, The Culture of Time and Space: 1880-1918 (Harvard University Press)

Selected readings by Marx, Freud, and phenomenology as well as criticisms of the three applications of these theories by Lefebvre, Binion, and Kern (Carmen)

Assignments:

Attendance and participation in discussion of primary and secondary sources.

Three papers.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course is required for all History Majors and must earn a C or higher to have it count on the Major.  This Honors version of History 2800 is open to honors students and non-honors students with permission of instructor. It may not be used for the GE Historical Study requirement.


                                                                                                                                                           

HISTORY 3191 HISTORICAL INTERNSHIP

3 Cr. Hrs.

In this course, you will have the opportunity to choose from a range of internship possibilities at nearby historical or history-related institutions.  You will earn credit for your semester-long work experience and will have the chance to reflect on what you’re learning about history, skills, professional expectations, and future career directions.  By the end of the course, you should have a better sense of who you are and who you want to become in the future as a contributor to the work force.

Time               Meetings Days             Instructor

ARR               ARR                             Irwin, Ray

Assigned Readings: Selected readings will be posted on CARMEN.

Assignments:

Written assignment request;

At least 20 hours of work at an internship site;

Discussion posts;

Active participation (class meetings arranged);

Presentation about your internship and your semester’s work;

Final paper (1,000- 1,500 words).

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

Enrollment limited to history majors with ranks 2, 3, or 4 and 3.0 minimum GPA.


                                                                                                                                                           

HISTORY 3540 MODERN INTELLIGENCE HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will examine the role of diplomatic and military intelligence in the making of policy.  The function of intelligence gathering, appraisal and assessment has often been overlooked in the exploration of policy making, especially in times of peace.  It will be our undertaking to examine some of the most significant international events of the twentieth century in light of the contribution, or lack thereof, of both covert and overt forms of intelligence.  After an introduction to the field and a discussion of the origins of the modern intelligence services, we will analyze the histories of several of the major intelligence organizations in the twentieth century.  We will then discuss in depth the influence of the assessment and utilization of intelligence on the perceptions of policy makers and public opinion in both war and peacetime up to the immediate post-war era and the origins of the Cold War intelligence climate.  The course will not be concerned with the intricacies of tradecraft, but with the interplay between intelligence and international policy making in the origins and encounters of the First and Second World Wars and the establishment of the intelligence rivalries and relationships which played their part in the Cold War.  In our final week, we will consider the correlation between the growth of intelligence communities, their legitimization and delegitimization, and the popular image of spying represented contemporaneously in fiction and film.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

11:10-12:30     TR                               Siegel, Jennifer

Assigned Readings: (tentative)

The reading list may include:

Exploring Intelligence Archives:  Enquiries into the Secret State. R. Gerald Hughes, Peter Jackson and Len Scott, eds.  London: Routledge, 2008.

Krivitsky, Walter G. MI5 Debriefing & Other Documents on Soviet Intelligence. Gary Kern, ed.  Riverside, CA: Xenos Books, 2004.

Philby, Kim.  My Silent War:  The Autobiography of a Spy.  New York: Random House, 2002.

Shulsky, Abram N., and Gary J. Schmitt.  Silent Warfare:  Understanding the World of Intelligence.  Washington, DC: Brassey’s Inc., 2002.

Assignments:

Weekly readings and class discussions

Midterm and comprehensive final

Two short analytical papers. 

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills requirements in the International Studies Intelligence and National Security concentration.  Within the history major, it is a Group Global, Post-1750, Human Conflict, Peace and Diplomacy, and Power, Culture and State. 


                                                                                                                                                         

HISTORY 3712 SCIENCE & SOCIETY IN MODERN EUROPE

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course explores the history of science from the seventeenth through to the late twentieth century. The primary geographical focus is Western Europe (France, Germany and Britain), and there will be some focus on developments elsewhere in Europe (Italy, Russia), and in America. Throughout the course, the history of science will be related to broader developments in European history, notably social ones.

The course begins by looking at the scientific revolution and enlightenment science, and ends by examining current debates surrounding human-made climate change. En route, students will study major developments in the physical, geological, biological and chemical sciences, such as thermodynamics, uniformitarian theory, evolutionary biology, germ theory, the creation of the periodic table of the elements, quantum theory and the discovery of the human genome. The course does not only study “successful” scientific ideas, but also ones which are now held open to ridicule, like catastrophism, phrenology and Lamarckianism. Students will learn to comprehend the socially-embedded nature of science, the complex relations between science and politics, the vast efforts that are made to divide science from pseudoscience, and the historical origins of skepticism towards scientific theories like evolution and climate change.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

9:35-10:55       TR                               Otter, Chris

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group Europe, post-1750 for history majors or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


                                                                                                                                                           

HISTORY 4015 SEMINAR IN MODERN U.S. HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This seminar will focus on how and why historians’ interpretations have changed over time and how we might judge conflicting interpretations.

Our subject will be the life and career of Theodore Roosevelt.  A larger-than-life personality, he wrote so much – letters, articles, books – that it’s a wonder he had time to breathe.  He filled every room during his lifetime, wishing to be “the corpse at every funeral, the bride at every wedding, and the baby at every christening,” according to his daughter, Alice, an attention hog herself.  And as an amateur naturalist, cowboy, historian, government official, war hero, President, and noisy ex-President, he left a trail that connects with major debates in U.S. history, including the meanings of Progressive-era reform, imperialism and the place of the U.S. in the world, race and racism, gender and masculinity, and westward expansion.

We will track conflicting and changing interpretations of TR’s life and times.  You will write a series of papers that deal with these debates.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

12:45-2:05       TR                               Baker, Paula

Assigned Readings:

Edmund Morris, The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt

John Morton Blum, The Republican Roosevelt

Patricia O’Toole, When Trumpets Call

Plus, additional readings available on Carmen and your research in online archives

Assignments:

4 papers plus short discussions of documents you’ve selected and short in-class essays.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills the seminar requirement toward a history major for semester students; this fulfills the 598 seminar requirement for quarter students. This course is only open to junior and senior history majors.  


                                                                                                                                                           

HISTORY 4015 SEMINAR IN MODERN U.S. HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

 

The Sexual Revolution and Its Legacies

Many Americans associate the 1960s and 1970s as an era of sexual freedom and the 1980s as a period of sexual conservatism.  Time magazine, for example, used similar images of Adam and Eve when it announced a “sex explosion” in 1969 and again when it declared “The Revolution is Over” in 1984.  Many historians have analyzed the history of sexuality in the second half of the twentieth century and have raised numerous important questions about it.  How much really changed during the sexual revolution?  Was there a “revolution” at all?  If there was a sexual revolution, when did it begin and end?  Who resisted it and did it have any lasting effects on American culture?  Students in this class will learn how some historians have tried to answer these questions and conduct their own secondary source research on the sexual revolution.  We will explore topics such as the history of marriage, LGBT life and politics, feminism, contraception, consumer culture, and the Religious Right.

This is an upper-level seminar on the reading, researching, and writing of history.  It will treat the topic of the Sexual Revolution thematically, surveying different examples instead of attempting to tell a comprehensive history of it.  The in-class and homework assignments will push students to think critically about how historians craft an argument, organize their ideas, collect primary sources, periodize their work, and think about evidence. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

9:35-10:55       WF                              Howard, Clay

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills the seminar requirement toward a history major for semester students; this fulfills the 598 seminar requirement for quarter students. This course is only open to junior and senior history majors.  


                                                                                                                                                           

HISTORY 4015H HONORS SEMINAR IN MODERN U.S.  HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

An examination of the leading legal-historical controversies in the United States since 1830.  Emphasis on the judiciary’s role in resolving major legal and political disputes, such as those arising out of government support for industrialization and a modern market economy, anti-slavery, pacifist agitation during wartime, efforts to achieve equality before the law for black people and women, reproductive rights, privacy, the rights of criminal suspects and defendants, legislative redistricting, church-state relations, the death penalty, and mass incarceration.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

9:35-12:20       Tuesday                      Stebenne, David

Assigned Readings:

Weekly reading assignments delve into the above topics in depth; approximately 125-150 pages per week.

Assignments:

Attendance at, and lively participation in, all class meetings; a 3-5-page research paper prospectus; and a first draft and a final draft of a 15-page research paper.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

History 3005 and/or 3006 recommended. This course fulfills the seminar requirement toward a history major for semester students; this fulfills the 598 seminar requirement for quarter students. This course is only open to junior and senior history majors.   


                                                                                                                                                           

HISTORY 4085 SEMINAR IN AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

 

The Urbanization of African Americans

This course has two primary aims.  The first is to provide a basic factual understanding of the urbanization of African Americans from the mid-nineteenth through the late twentieth century.  The second is to provide an intensive reading experience in scholarly (primarily historical) literature that is aimed explicitly at historiographical development.

Specific topics we will explore include but are not limited to work, migration, urban geography (spatial relations), inter- and intra-racial relations, industrialization, community development and destruction.  We will explore the history of some of the most contentious characterization of these urban sites:  the idea of the ghetto, the nature of the underclass, the rise of “the welfare state,” “urban renewal,” and others.  Most important for this class regarding these and other issues is how and why the historians’ discussions and interpretations have developed, changed over time and why.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

12:45-3:30       Wednesday                 Shaw, Stephanie

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course is designed for junior and senior History majors and fulfills the seminar requirement for History Majors. This course is cross-listed with History 5080, open to graduate students.


                                                                                                                                                           

HISTORY 4217 SEMINAR IN LATE ANTIQUITY

3 Cr. Hrs.

The Fall of Rome in Modern and Ancient Perspectives

This upper level history seminar will explore how both modern historians and late ancient observers imagine(d) the “Fall of Rome.”  We will begin by reading some of the most important contributions by historians to the question of the Roman Empire’s history between 400-700 CE, looking closely at debates between those historians who argue for considerable continuity between the classical and late Roman world (the “continuists”) and those who posit sharp ruptures and precipitous decline (the “catastrophists”).  We will then turn to late ancient primary sources, such as the writings of Augustine and Jerome on 410 CE (Alaric’s sack of Rome) and the observations of people living through catastrophic events (e.g. warfare, plague) as well as those who found themselves operating within new political and/or religious frameworks.

 Time               Meeting Days              Instructor

12:45-3:30       Wednesday                 Sessa, Tina

Assignments:

Assignments include a critical book review and an extensive research paper (20-25 pages) on a topic of the student’s choice that integrates analysis of primary and secondary sources.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course is designed for junior and senior History majors and fulfills the seminar requirement for History Majors.


                                                                                                                                                           

HISTORY 4285 SEMINAR IN RUSSIAN, EAST EUROPEAN & EURASIAN HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.                   

This research seminar will focus on the Russian Revolution and Stalinism.  In the course, we will read a variety of sources on the political, social, and cultural history of the Soviet Union.  Examples of topics we will cover are the Russian Revolution, the origins of Stalinism, the social consequences of Stalinist industrialization, World War II on the Eastern Front, gender roles in Soviet society, Soviet policies toward ethnic and national minorities, and official and popular culture in the Soviet Union.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

9:35-12:20       Wednesday                 Hoffmann, David

Assigned Readings: Students will read a number of books and articles that we will discuss in class.  In addition, they will read primary sources related to research projects of their own choosing. 

Assignments: Students will each select a research project on some aspect of Soviet history between 1917 and 1953.  They will make a class presentation on their topic and write a final research paper.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills the seminar requirement toward a history major for semester students; this fulfills the 598 seminar requirement for quarter students. This course is only open to junior and senior history majors.  


                                                                                                                                                           

HISTORY 4475 SEMINAR IN JEWISH HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Jewish Migration and Displacement in the 20th Century

During the 20th century, millions of Jews were uprooted from their homes as a result of war, persecution and economic distress. This seminar course explores the impact of displacement on Jewish life in Europe, the Middle East and the Americas. It covers the major Jewish refugee and migration flows, starting with the exodus from Eastern Europe in the late 19th and early 20th centuries and concluding with post-soviet emigration. We will begin with a theoretical discussion of basic concepts such as diaspora, exile and refugees and continue with in-depth look into specific migratory movements. Through these case studies, we will explore the relationships between displacement and such issues as gender, violence, nationalist sentiment, citizenship and Jewish and human solidarity, while also comparing Jewish and non-Jewish migration. Readings and discussions will consider the perspectives of various actors, including states, voluntary organizations and the migrants themselves.    

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

12:45-3:30       Wednesday                 Yehudai, Ori

Assigned Readings: Rather than one textbook, a variety of journal articles and book chapters.

Assignments:

Class attendance and participation: 25%

In-class presentation: 15%

Two reading response papers (1 p.): 15% (7.5% each)

Proposal and annotated bibliography for final paper: 10%

Final paper (10-15 pp.): 35%

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills the seminar requirement toward a history major for semester students; this fulfills the 598 seminar requirement for quarter students. This course is only open to junior and senior history majors.  


                                                                                                                                                           

HISTORY 4575 SEMINAR IN MILITARY HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Life and Death in World War

This seminar explores and analyzes the human experience of World War I. Students will read and discuss books, articles and documents related especially to the military, social, cultural and gendered aspects of the conflict. Primary sources and secondary literature will be approached as windows into the experiences of soldiers and civilians in a time of total war. A research paper, based on significant primary sources, will be the core requirement of the course.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

9:35-12:20       Wednesday                 Cabanes, Bruno

Assigned Readings:

Bruno Cabanes, August 1914, France, the Great War and a Month that Changes the World Forever

Martha Hanna, Your Death Would be Mine

Jennifer Keene, Doughboys. The Great War and the Remaking of America

Jay Winter, Sites of Memory, Sites of Mourning

Assignments:

The final grade in the course will be an average of the six grades given for book presentation and leading group discussion (20%); regular and intensive participation in class discussions (10%), leading the group discussion (10%), an annotated bibliography (10%); first draft of final paper (10%); oral report (10%); a final research paper (40%).

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills the seminar requirement toward a history major. This course is only open to junior and senior history majors.  


                                                                                                                                                           

HISTORY 4625 SEMINAR IN WOMEN’S/GENDER HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

The course is devoted to advanced research and writing in the field of Women’s/Gender History.  The first half of the course will feature readings of primary and secondary sources.  The second half of the course will be devoted to the development of individual research projects and presentations.  Please note that the course will cover material from across historical eras and geographic regions.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

11:30-2:15       Wednesday                 Soland, Birgitte

Assigned Readings:

Students will read a number of books and articles which will be discussed in class.  In addition, students will read primary sources related to research projects of their own choosing.

Assignments:

Students will each select a research project o some aspect of women’s/gender history.  There are no restrictions on time or place for these research projects, i.e., students may choose a topic related to women’s/gender history from any historical era and geographic location. Students must prepare a 20-page paper based on individual research.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills the seminar requirement toward a history major. This course is only open to junior and senior history majors.  


                                                                                                                                                           

HISTORY 4675 SEMINAR IN WORLD HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course examines perspectives on mobility and migration in a global perspective from the twentieth century until today. The class explores human mobility in the context of political struggles, wars and border changes, economic conditions, demographic shifts, family structures, gender roles, and cultural expectations, comparing and contrasting developments throughout the world. Students study the interdisciplinary literature on human mobility and analyze different methodological approaches to the study of migration from the fields of history, anthropology, sociology, political science, and literature.

After reviewing the relevant literature in the first half of the semester, during the second half of the seminar each student will write a historiographical or research paper on one case study of his/her choice. The students will make extensive use of the OSU Library print and electronic resources and visit the library for presentations and hands-on experiences on how to use these resources in historical research.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

9:35-12:20       Friday                          Dragostinova, Theodora

Assigned Readings (this list might change slightly):

Khalid Koser, International Migration: A Very Short Introduction (Oxford University Press, 2016).

Deborah Dwork and Robert Jan van Pelt, Flight from the Reich: Refugee Jews, 1933-1948 (Norton, 2012).

Eva Hoffman, Lost in Translation: A Life in a New Language (Penguin Books, 1990).

Liisa Malkki, Purity and Exile: Violence, Memory, and National Cosmology among Hutu Refugees in Tanzania (University of Chicago Press, 1995).

Mae M. Ngai, Impossible Subjects: Illegal Aliens and the Making of Modern America (Princeton University Press, 2nd edition, 2014).

Urvashi Butalia, The Other Side of Silence: Voices from the Partition of India (Duke University Press, 2000).

Rita Chin, The Crisis of Multiculturalism in Europe: A History (Princeton University Press, 2017).

Assignments:

Short papers and bibliographies: 20%

Discussion and participation: 30%

Final long 16-to-18-page paper: 50%

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills the seminar requirement toward a history major. This course is only open to junior and senior history majors. 


                                                                                                                                                           

HISTORY 4795 SEMINAR IN HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

The Historical Imagination: History, Historical Fiction, and Counterfactuals

How much imagination are historians permitted to exercise? How do historians use their imaginations, and what are the limits of that imagination?  How far are we able to extend our methods into the realm of the imaginary?  Why explore the imaginary? What are the reasons for doing so?  In this seminar, we will use the tools of the historian to explore various types of “what ifs?” (like “What if  Hitler had been assassinated?” or “What if the South had won the Civil War?”) and in doing so, determine (and transgress) the boundaries between “what happened?”, “what if something else happened?”, “what might have happened?”, and even “what might happen?”  This seminar is an exploration of the “real” and “unreal” in history.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

12:45-2:05       TR                               Staley, Dave

Assigned Readings: (not exhaustive)

  • Natalie Zemon Davis, The Return of Martin Guerre
  • Steve F. Anderson “Introduction” and “Fantastic  History” from Technologies of History: Visual Media and the Eccentricity of the Past
  • R.G. Collingwood, “Historical Imagination,” from The Idea of History
  • Umberto Eco, “Possible Woods,” from Six Walks in the Fictional Woods
  • Mary Fulbrook, “Categories and Concepts” from Historical Theory
  • Niall Ferguson, “Virtual history: Towards a ‘Chaotic’ Theory of the Past,” from Virtual History: Alternatives and Counterfactuals
  • John Lewis Gaddis, “Structure and Process,” from The Landscape of History:  How Historians Map the Past
  • Geoffrey Hawthorn, “Counterfactuals, explanation and understanding,” from Plausible Worlds: Possibility and Understanding in History and the Social Sciences
  • David Kimmel, “Boundaries: Texts, Authors, Readers and the Continuum of Historical Narrative and Historical Fiction”
  • Philip E. Tetlock and Geoffrey Parker, “Counterfactual Thought Experiments,” from “Unmaking the West: “What if?” Scenarios that Rewrite World History

Assignments:

Students will write short reflective paragraphs on the class readings.  Students will also research and compose three types of history, each with differing degrees of “imagination:” a research paper, an historical fiction and a counterfactual history.  Students will write a final reflective essay on the question “How much imagination are historians permitted to exercise?”

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills the seminar requirement toward a history major. This course is only open to junior and senior history majors. 


                                                                                                                                               

WOMEN'S HISTORY

 

HISTORY 2610 INTRODUCTION TO WOMEN & GENDER IN THE U.S.

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course surveys the history of women and gender in the United States. The course will examine the experiences of Native, European, African, Mexican, and Asian American women within the contexts of historical change in the U.S. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

8:00-9:20         TR                               Wagenhoffer, Maxine

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for history majors or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement and the GE social diversity requirement.
 


                                                                                                                                                          

WORLD HISTORY

                                                                                                                                                    

HISTORY 1682 WORLD HISTORY FROM 1500 TO THE PRESENT

3 Cr. Hrs.

Survey of the human community, with an emphasis on its increasing global integration, from the first European voyages of exploration through the present.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor

online               online                           Limbach, Eric

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course fulfills the historical study GE requirement.  Not open to students that have credit for History 182 or 2642.


                                                                                                                                                    

HISTORY 2650 THE WORLD SINCE 1914

3 Cr. Hrs.

The World since 1914 is a course on global history. We will focus on the central themes of global history in the modern world, such as nationalism, globalization, the creation of mass societies, and identity and difference, as well as major events, such as the World Wars, the Great Depression, the Cold War, and decolonization. We will also look at major issues in the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, such as food, health, energy, economic development, and the environment.  Our class will focus discussion of primary documents and of competing theories about the causes of historical change. But the ultimate goal of the course is civic: to help us understand better the world and its problems, and to think about how we might address those problems better than people have in the past.

Time               Meetings Days             Instructor

12:40-1:35      MW                              Roth, Randy

10:20; 12:40   Friday (recitations)

1:50

Assigned Readings:

We will read two textbooks, but in addition a number of on-line documents, and selections from competing historical interpretations of the past. The following books will be required:

James H. Overfield, Sources of Twentieth Century Global History. Wadsworth, 2002. ISBN 13: 978-0-395-90407-7. Paperback.

Carter Vaughn Findley and John Alexander Murray Rothney, Twentieth-Century World (7th edition). Wadsworth, 2011. ISBN 13: 978-0-547-21850-2. Paperback.

Assignments (tentative)

Quizzes:  There will be five quizzes on the readings in the course.  The quizzes will ask you to report fully and accurately on the content of readings in the course.

Responses to historical films: You will be asked to write one-page, single-space responses to two films that will be required viewing for the course.  The films will illustrate major themes of the course.

Midterm and final examinations:  There will be a midterm examination and a final examination.  The midterm will ask you to write one comprehensive one-hour essay, the final two.

Essay:  You will be asked to write an essay (5 or 6 pages in length) on an aspect of your family’s history, either recent or over the past 100 years. Each family history should reflect on a major problem in global history.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for the history major or can fulfill the historical study GE.


                                                                                                                                                    

HISTORY 2700 GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT

3 Cr. Hrs.

In this course, we explore how humans have shaped the environment and how the environment has shaped human history from the paleolithic to the present. Our topics will be diverse in range and scale and range from the earliest uses of fire to plagues to climate change. We will pay particularly close attention to the relationship between humans and the environment and the influence of/impacts on the various “spheres” of our planet: the atmosphere (focusing on climate change and pollution); the biosphere (ecological changes, human-animal interactions, and the role of micro-organisms), the cryosphere (the role of glaciers and ice-ages in the development of civilization); and the hydrosphere (human interactions with oceans, lakes and rivers).

Along the way we will focus on how some of the world’s major civilizations changed their environment, how nature limited their development, and how they coped—or failed to cope—with the environmental problems that civilizations inevitably produce. Students will also learn the essential background to major environmental issues and consider how history might (or might not) help us confront environmental challenges in the present and future.

Time               Meetings Days             Instructor

online              online                            Harris, James

Prerequisites and Special Comments:

This course may be taken to fulfill historical study, social science, or global studies GE requirements.  This course may be counted as Group Global, and either pre- or post-1750 for the major in history.  This course has been recommended for students pursuing degrees in SENR, but students in all degree programs are welcome.                                                                                                                                                    

 

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To find course availability and times, please visit the Ohio State Course Catalog and Master Schedule.