Spring 2021 Graduate Courses


HISTORY 5650/7650: SPECIAL TOPICS IN WORLD/GLOBAL/TRANSNATIONAL HISTORY

3 credit hours, hybrid

Times

Days

Instructor

9:30-12:15

M

McDow, T

Van Beurden, S



HISTORY 5700: SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY

3 credit hours, Hybrid

In an era of climate change and climate crisis, mitigation and adaptation strategies are among some of the most pressing issues of our times. Indigenous nations have long struggled with questions of environmental degradation through the processes of settler colonialism and have taken actions accordingly to try and adapt and mitigate effects of climate change. In many cases, this has taken the form of struggle and resistance.

These acts of struggle have captured the public consciousness in recent years. However, these actions are simply part of a long arc of Indigenous resistance and struggle surrounding the environment that stretches back decades. These actions, both performative and quotidian, are part of the long arc of Indigenous resistance against settler colonialism.

In this course, we will trace the history of settler colonialism in North America, exploring the ways in which colonization has wrought tremendous changes to Indigenous environments in what is now the United States and Canada. We then will turn our attention to the role of Indigenous environmental activism amidst the rise of broader Indigenous activism in the 1960s and 1970s, and efforts of tribes in the 1980s, 1990s and 2000s to secure and assert treaty rights related to the environment. Finally, we return to the current upswelling of Indigenous environmental activism, contemplating what this may mean for the environment, including both humans and more-than-human kin, as we look towards the future and what it will look like in this era of climate crisis.

Times

Days

Instuctor

9:35-10:55

TR

Smiles, D


 

HISTORY 7087: BLACK WOMEN IN THE UNITED STATES

3 credit hours, online

A study of historical and related scholarship on the history and experience of black women in the United States. Cross-listed in AfAmASt.

Times

Days

Instructor

2:20-5:05

R

Shaw, S


HISTORY 7350: STUDIES IN ISLAMIC HISTORY

3 credit hours, online

This readings seminar is designed to introduce graduate students to the field of early modern Central Asian history, or, in our terms, Central Asia from the late Timurid era to the onset of the Russian colonial period in the nineteenth century. Seminar participants will meet weekly to discuss the assigned readings, analyze the methodological approaches that scholars have employed, and identify some newer approaches and emerging debates in the field.

Times

Days

Instructor

12:30-3:15

W

Levi, S


HISTORY 7411: STUDIES IN MODERN CHINESE HISTORY

3 credit hours, online

This graduate readings course will survey a range of topics in modern Chinese history, defined for Spring 2021 as the 19th & 20th centuries up through mid-century, as seen through comparative, national, and local studies. Readings will include both classics in the field and newer historical works. Students are welcome to suggest book- or article-length readings for inclusion in the shared reading, but should please do so by emailing the professor prior to mid-November 2021.

Times

Days

Instructor

2:15-5:00PM

T

Reed, C


HISTORY 7500: STUDIES IN INTERNATIONAL HISTORY

3credit hours, online

This course will explore the historiography of the Cold War, broadly defined, in both the international and U.S. contexts. The course goal will emphasize diplomacy and transnational relations, but we will also explore how the conflict and its ideological components reshaped the domestic systems of the United States and other nations. The goal will be to give you a grounding in the evolving and diverse historiography of the Cold War, which defined much of the 20th century alongside intersecting processes like decolonization, the rise of human/civil rights, globalization, and the nuclear age. The course will highlight the increasingly heterogeneous methodologies that motivate scholarly studies on this topic and should provide food for thought for a variety of individual projects. As the historiography has evolved toward more diverse, global understandings of this conflict, we will consider what this trend means for the process of researching, writing, and teaching national, international, transnational, and military histories. The course will be taught online for the spring and be synchronous at the listed time. Please contact me if there are any partial overlaps with other classes as I am willing to consider an accommodation.

Times

Days

Instructor

2:15-5:00

F

Parrott, J


HISTORY 7550: STUDIES IN MILITARY HISTORY

3 credit hours, hybrid

Wars do not end with peace treaties. They end when survivors succeed in turning away from the presence of war in their everyday lives. This seminar explores the transition from war to peace in the 20th Century from a number of perspectives: soldiers’ homecomings, disabled veterans in postwar societies, witnesses of war and their narratives, reconstructing communities after a civil war or a genocide…

Times

Days

Instructor

5:30-8:15

W

Cabanes, B


HISTORY 7550: STUDIES IN MILITARY HISTORY

3 credit hours, online

This graduate readings course will examine various aspects of the history of World War I and World War II – the largest and most destructive wars in human history. Through readings and small group discussion, the class will study the military leadership and characteristics of major adversaries; the national and theater strategies of the various major combatants; the military operations that led to victory or defeat on battlefields spanning the globe; war crimes; and other factors such as leadership, economics, military doctrine and effectiveness, technology, ideology, and racism that impacted the outcome of the wars.

Times

Days

Instructor

5:30-8:15

T

Mansoor, P

Assigned Readings: (tentative)

Isabel V. Hull, Absolute Destruction: Military Culture and the Practices of War in Imperial Germany
Dennis E. Showalter, Tannenberg: Clash of Empires, 1914
Robert A. Doughty, Pyrrhic Victory: French Strategy and Operations in the Great War
Andrew Gordon, The Rules of the Game: Jutland and British Naval Command
Lee Kennett, The First Air War, 1914-1918
Ernst Jünger, Storm of Steel
Robert A. Doughty, The Breaking Point: Sedan and the Fall of France, 1940
Robert Citino, Death of the Wehrmacht
Marc Milner, Battle of the Atlantic
Tami Davis Biddle, Rhetoric and Reality in Air Warfare
Peter Mansoor, The GI Offensive in Europe
Eric Bergerud, Touched with Fire
Clark G. Reynolds, The Fast Carriers The Forging of an Air Navy
Richard Frank, Downfall

Assignments:

Weekly short (2 page) book reviews on assigned readings.
One 10-15 page research paper that examines some aspect of World War I or World War II. The topic will be chosen in consultation with the instructor.


HISTORY 7750: THE HISTORY OF THE IDEA OF RACE IN EUROPE

3 credit hours, hybrid

This seminar examines state- and nation-building in modern Europe in comparative perspective. It interrogates key ideas associated with the emergence of the modern territorially-based nation-state in Europe, such as the rise of nationalism, the development of ideas of inclusion and exclusion, the evolution of the notion of citizenship, the invention of passports and identity papers, the creation of border controls, the policing of the movement of people and the integrity of national territories, as well as the general evolution of notions of national, religious, racial, and cultural differences.

Times

Days

Instructor

2:15-5:00

R

Dragostinova, T


HISTORY 7900: COLLOQUIUM IN THE PHILOSOPHY OF HISTORY, HISTORIOGRAPHY, AND THE HISTORIANS’ SKILLS I

3 credit hours, In person

The course is an advanced critical introduction to the thought and practice of history at the professional level.  Its primary aim is to provide students with a functional literacy in the various bodies of theory which have informed the ways historians try to recover and represent past experiences.  Following a broadly chronological scheme, it traces the evolution of history as a discipline, from its formation as a professional field in the early nineteenth century up to the present day.  Course readings (both theoretical and applied) will focus in particular on methodological developments since World War II, exploring the nature and influence of e.g., Marxist historiography, the various Annales paradigms, and approaches informed by anthropology, postmodernist critical theory, postcolonial theory, and new materialism.  Along the way, important questions raised include: Why does the past matter? How do societies use history? Is it possible to write a truly objective historical account? Does history need to be "relevant" to present-day concerns?

Times

Days

Instructor

2:15-5:00

R

Anderson, G


HISTORY 7910: PROSPECTUS WRITING AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

3 credit hours, online

This seminar is dedicated to researching and writing your dissertation prospectus. Throughout the semester we will focus on the craft of historical writing, strategies, and the practicalities of launching a research project. As we move through the class, you will analyze various issues, including your topic/questions/significance; your argument/thesis; historiography; method and theory; primary (including archival) and secondary sources; organization; time table; research plan; funding; and your bibliography. We also will consider such matters as grammar and style. By the end of this course you will have produced a dissertation prospectus that you will present to your committee members.

In preparing your prospectus you will draw particularly on three areas of support:

  • First, your fellow students are a valuable source for feedback. In this course you will help each other launch your projects.
  • Second, I will read your drafts and offer advice.
  • Third, your advisor and members of your dissertation committee are the experts to whom you will turn for substantive advice about archives, resources, and the feasibility of your project.

Please note that HIST 7910 will be online this spring. But it will meet via zoom.

Times

Days

Instructor

2:15-5:00

R

Smith, S


HISTORY 8250: SEMINAR IN MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY

3 credit hours, hybrid

This research/writing seminar provides an opportunity to begin and complete a major research project (such as an M.A. paper, dissertation chapter, or article) in the field of Modern History broadly defined. Our course will begin by examining a selection of writings selected by seminar members to help us conceptualize a viable research topic, identify appropriate sources, and develop methodological approaches to analyze these materials.  The remainder of the course will allow time for research, writing, rewriting, and for engaging with practical issues in academic life. Students will gain the benefit of receiving regular constructive feedback from a supportive and collegial intellectual community. 

Times

Days

Instructor

12:45-3:30

M

Conklin, A

Course Assignments:

1.  5-10 page, double-spaced prospectus/research proposal
2.  Papers 1 and 2 (each approximately 10 pages doubled–spaced):  They will constitute roughly the first third and the second third of your proposed chapter/article/thesis.
3. Draft (approximately 30 pages, double–spaced, made up of Papers 1 and 2 and ten new pages)
4.  Three constructive critiques of your fellow scholars’ works and active participation in class discussion


HISTORY 8630: SEMINAR IN HISTORY OF SEXUALITY

3 credit hours, online

Times

Days

Instructor

12:30-3:15

W

Rivers, D


 

HISTORY 8801: SPECIAL TOPICS IN WORLD/GLOBAL/TRANSNATIONAL HISTORY

 Advanced course in World/Global/Transnational History. 

Instructor: D. Staley
Meeting Times: Online, Asynchronous

 

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To find course availability and times, please visit the Ohio State Course Catalog and Master Schedule.