Spring 2021 Undergraduate Courses

HISTORY 1151 AMERICAN HISTORY TO 1877

3 Credit hours, Online

This course provides a survey of American history from the Age of Encounter to the Reconstruction period.  It covers the social, economic, cultural, political, and diplomatic history of the American peoples. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
Online              Asynchronous             Wood, J.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the historical study GE requirement.  Not open to students that have credit for History 151 or 2001.


                                                                                                                                                   

HISTORY 1152 AMERICAN HISTORY 1877- PRESENT

3 credit hours, Online

History 1152 will examine the political, constitutional, social and economic development of the United States from the end of Reconstruction to the present, including, but not limited to, the failure of Reconstruction, immigration, the U.S.'s role abroad, the development of urban centers and industry, progressivism, U.S. involvement in World War I (including the home front), the Depression and the New Deal, U.S. involvement in World War II (including the home front), the Cold War, Korean War, and the war in Vietnam, the Civil Rights movement, the rise of the New Right, the post-Cold War world, and the War on Terrorism.  We will read and analyze the writings of individuals who lived through these events (primary sources) extensively in this course.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
Online              Asynchronous             Susner, L.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the historical study GE requirement.  Not open to students that have credit for History 152 or 2002.



HISTORY 1211 WESTERN SOCIETY TO 1600

3 Credit Hours, Online

For better or worse, Western societies have become extremely prominent in the world today – not just in the West but (thanks to Karl Marx and the Internet) around the world. How did this process begin? What is distinctive about Western values?  These are two of the questions that this course seeks to answer. In addition we will examine How Things Happen:

  • Why did the West develop at such an early stage the right to free speech guaranteed in this country by the First Amendment?
  • Why were 50% of all Western populations in this period under the age of 20?
  • How could 167 Spaniards overthrow the Inca Empire, with perhaps 8 million subjects, and go on to dominate much of South America?

The course also offers strategies on how to identify, among masses of facts, the aberration from the trend, the cause from the contingent, the important from the incidental, and the continuities among the changes.

Assigned Readings

Wiesner-Hanks, Crowston, Perry & McKay, A history of Western society, Volume I: From Antiquity to the Enlightenment, 13th edition (2020)
Wiesner-Hanks, Evans, Wheeler and Ruff, Discovering the Western Past, Volume I: to 1789, 7th edition (2015)

Assignments

  • Watch all materials for the course posted online
  • Read and discuss all assigned readings; attend and participate in all group discussions (25% of total grade)
  • Complete all assigned recitation exercises (25% of total grade)
  • one 5-page term paper (25% of total grade)
  • one final exam (25% of total grade)

Time

Days

Instructor

Asynchronous lectures

Monday recitation sections, 10:20-11:15, 11:30-12:25, 12:40-1:35

Parker, Geoffrey

Prerequisites and Special Comments
No prerequisites. This course fulfills the following GE requirements:  1) “Historical Study,” 2) “Diversity: Global Studies”



HISTORY 1212 WESTERN CIVILIZATION 17TH CENTURY TO THE PRESENT

3 Credit hours, Online

Political, scientific, and industrial revolutions, nationalism, the two World Wars; the decline of empires; the Cold War.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
Online              Online                          Douglas, Sarah
                                                            Limbach, Eric
                                                            Vanderpuy, Peter

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the historical study GE requirement.  Not open to students that have credit for History 112; 2202; 2203; 2204 or 2205.


                                                                                                                                                           

HISTORY 1681 WORLD HISTORY TO 1500

3 credit hours, Online

This course examines the major issues that have shaped the human experience from the beginnings of human civilization (ca. 3500 B.C.E.) to ca. 1500 C.E.

Time               Meeting Days               Instructor
online               online                           Limbach, Eric

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the GE Historical study; Global diversity.  Not open to students that have credit for History 181 or 2641.


 

HISTORY 1682 WORLD HISTORY FROM 1500 TO THE PRESENT

3 Credit hours, Online

Survey of the human community, with an emphasis on its increasing global integration, from the first European voyages of exploration through the present.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
online              online                            White, Samuel
                                                            Sreenivas, Mytheli

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the historical study GE requirement.  Not open to students that have credit for History 182 or 2642.


 

HISTORY 2001 LAUNCHING AMERICA, AMERICAN HISTORY TO 1877

3 credit hours, Online

History 2001 is a one-semester introduction to American Civilization from colonial times through Reconstruction. Our emphasis will be the critical reading of primary sources--diaries, letters, political tracts, poems, songs, stories, paintings, buildings, and other material artifacts--through which we will try to understand the past. We will focus on social history and cultural history, but we will also pay close attention to the political history of the United States

Readings

John Mack Faragher, Out of Many, Vol. 1, Brief Fourth Edition (but any edition, brief or full, will suffice)
Frederick Douglass, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (any edition, although the pagination may not match the one available at local bookstores)
Additional readings on Carmen of on-line documents and selections from competing historical interpretations of the past.

Assignments

            Quizzes: There will be weekly on-line quizzes on Carmen on the readings and lectures in the course. The quizzes will ask you to recall the content of the readings and lectures.
            Discussion posts: There will be a discussion question each week. You will be asked to post a brief response on the Carmen discussion board.
            Midterm and final essays: There will be “take home” midterm and final essays (5 or 6 pages in length) on themes in the course.
            Critical Essay: You will be asked to write a critical essay on one or more primary sources in the course (5 or 6 pages in length).

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
Online              MW                             Roth, R
9:10; 10:20      Friday (recitations)
12:40

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
English 1110.01/02 either previous or concurrently. Not open to students with credit for History 151 or 1151.  This course fulfills Group North America, pre-1750 for history majors or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


 

HISTORY 2001 H: HONORS LAUNCHING AMERICA, AMERICAN HISTORY TO 1877

3 credit hours, Online

In this course, we will examine the social, economic, cultural, and political history of the American people.  We will discuss the experiences of Native Americans, Europeans, and Africans, both men and women, in all parts of the country from the Age of Discovery up to the Civil War era.  We will explore not only the narrative of events, but also the causes and consequences of historical events.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
Online              Online                          Cashin, Joan

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
Honors standing, English 1110.01/02 either previous or concurrently. Not open to students with credit for History 151 or 1151.  This course fulfills Group North America, pre-1750 for history majors or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


 

HISTORY 2002 H: HONORS MAKING AMERICA MODERN, AMERICAN HISTORY SINCE 1877

3 credit hours, In person

This course explores the political and cultural changes in the United States from the end of the Civil War to 2000. Through a combination of primary and secondary documents and films, we will look at how the United States went from being an emerging industrial nation to a major global superpower and how its citizens negotiated and influenced this transformation. Throughout the course, we will ask how major economic and military events, such as the Great Depression and the Second World War, affected people living in the U.S. differently based on categories of race, class, gender, and sexuality. Important topics will include the relationship between industrial capitalism and the era of reform from 1890 to 1920; the ways in which U.S. foreign policy decisions were connected to domestic affairs; the technological and cultural changes associated with broadening affluence; and the effects of the modern African American Freedom Struggle on social change in the 1950s and 1960s. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:35-10:55       TR                               Steigerwald, D

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
Honors standing, English 1110.01/02 either previous or concurrently. Not open to students with credit for History 151 or 1151.  This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for history majors or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


 

HISTORY 2065: COLONIALISM AT THE MOVIES

3 credit hours, Online

In this course, we will examine how American history from the era of colonization through the Civil War era is presented on film. Since history is central to American identity, studying historical movies is especially important because these films reflect and shape popular understandings of what America was, and is. Most commercial movies gain audience by appealing to, rather than challenging, shared myths. But, national myths evolve, and some filmmakers try to revise the story and broaden our definitions of what should be included in American history. Students will delve into popular narratives, attempts at revision, and scholarly views about America's origins and history.

Students will explore Native American societies & the colonial encounter, the Salem Witch trials, the America Revolution, slavery, immigration, the West, and the causes and outcomes of the Civil War. You will gain the background to assess when and how filmmakers get history wrong, as well as to understand how rich and informative some movies and TV series are and what they get right. We will also analyze the construction of historical narratives. Filmmakers face the same challenges that historians do: determining what stories are worth telling and choosing the best way to convey historical information.

Days                Times              Instructor
Online              Online              Newell, M

Assigned Readings:
Past readings have included the following:
Rachel Hope Cleves, Charity and Sylvia: A Same-Sex Marriage in Early America  (Oxford, 2014)
Holger Hoock, Scars of Independence (Penguin/Random House, 2017)
Solomon Northup, Twelve Years a Slave
Alan Taylor, Colonial America: A Very Short History (Oxford, 2012)

Assignments:
Students will write three one-hour, timed, open book essays and complete a final project. This project will consist of both a 6-8 pp. paper or screenplay and a digital component (a Powerpoint/Prezi or a short original film).  Active participation in weekly online discussions and a small group assignment will also be required.


 

HISTORY 2201 ANCIENT GREECE & ROME

3 Credit hours, Online

This class is an introduction to the history of the Ancient Mediterranean Civilizations of Greece and Rome.  It provides a background of the chronological development of ancient Greek and Roman civilizations and then focuses on the broad issues of state-formation, politics, gender, warfare, tyranny, monotheism, and the environment over a period of some two thousand years.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
Online              online                           Vanderpuy, Peter

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


 

HISTORY 2202 INTRODUCTION TO MEDIEVAL HISTORY

3 Credit hours, Online

Survey of medieval history from the late Roman empire to the early 16th century.

Time                Days                Instructor
Online              Online              Shimoda, K

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill a GE requirement.


 

HISTORY 2204: MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY

3 credit hours, Online

This class introduces students to the political, social, and cultural developments that made the fabric of modern Europe. The course adopts a broad understanding of European history, examining developments on the peripheries of Europe and the European colonies overseas. We will explore the main features of the modern period, including the emergence of different models of state- and nation-building in Europe; the birth of representative politics and democratic institutions; scientific innovation, industrialization, and the new technologies; the ideologies of modernity such as conservatism, liberalism, socialism, and nationalism; the effects of European colonialism and imperialism; the new social classes and changing gender roles; the triumph of the nation-state and the limits of self-determination in the interwar period; the challenges to the democratic order and experiments in socialism and fascism; the Holocaust and ethnic cleansing; the divided world during the Cold War and the overthrow of the communist regimes; and decolonization and globalization. Combining a survey textbook with primary sources and fiction, students will learn and debate about the historical developments that created the modern European state, society, and culture.

Time                Days                Instructor       
Online              Online              Dragostinova, T

Required readings:
Optional textbook
Selection of primary sources on Carmen
Lynn Hunt, The French Revolution and Human Rights. A Brief History with Documents
Chinua Achebe, Things Fall Apart
Primo Levi, Survival in Auschwitz

Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 1212 or 312. GE historical study and diversity global studies course.



HISTORY 2221/2221 E: INTRODUCTION TO THE NEW TESTAMENT

3 credit hours, In Person

This course provides students with a basis for critical thinking about the most influential writings in the intellectual and cultural history of Western civilization.  What we call the "New Testament" is a not a single book but an anthology reflecting the work of various ancient authors. We will examine how a small group of Jews connected to a prophet named Jesus of Nazareth became a separate religion with its own rituals and literature about a "Son of God." To this end, we will study the earliest known Christian literature, the letters of the Apostle Paul, the production of "gospels" about the life of Jesus, and the formation of early churches. We will also explore biblical scholarship as an academic field within the study of history, and why every educated person ought to know about its findings.

Times

Days

Instructor

10:20-11:15AM

MWF

Harrill, B

Assigned Readings:
1.  The HarperCollins Study Bible, Revised Edition, edited by H. W. Attridge and W. A. Meeks et al. San Francisco: HarperOne, 2006.
2.  Bart D. Ehrman, A Brief Introduction to the New Testament.  5th edition.  Oxford University Press, 2020.
3.  Burton H. Throckmorton, Jr., Gospel Parallels: A Comparison of the Synoptic Gospels.  5th edition.  Nashville: Thomas Nelson, 1992.

Assignments:  Two (2) unit tests, and a final examination.  Two (2) interpretative essays.

Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for Clas 2221, 2221E, 2401, or 2401E. GE for lit and historical study course.


 

HISTORY 2231: THE CRUSADES

3 credit hours, Online

Many terrorists today feel strongly that attacks on Western society are simply a continuation of the Wars of the Cross begun in the late 11th century.  By contrast, most Westerners today know very little about the Crusades themselves and feel no sense of continuity with the movement.  These distinct attitudes are a legacy of the medieval period.  In March 1095, envoys from the Byzantine emperor Alexios II addressed Pope Urban II at a Church Council in Piacenza, describing Constantinople’s urgent need for soldiers to supplement his existing forces in the fight against the Turks.  This was the spark, fanned several months later by Urban’s call to arms at Clermont, that would ignite the Crusading movement.  In the inception of the First Crusade we see the undertaking of a religiously-sanctioned war, waged to recapture the Holy Land and to free a Christian kingdom from the threat of a common enemy – a war with both material and spiritual rewards.  In its denouement and aftermath – and in subsequent Crusades – we can trace the progressive mutation of the original crusading ideals once confronted with the social, political, religious and culture realities of the medieval Middle East. The impact of the Crusades dramatically transformed all three cultures:  Western Europe, Byzantium, and the Middle East. 

Times

Days

Instructor

2:20-3:40

WF

Butler, S

Books to Purchase:

Breakdown of Grade:
Discussion Boards                                          20%
Book Review                                                   20%                                       
Mid-term Exam                                               10%
Research Project                                            20%
Final Exam                                                     20%

Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study and diversity global studies course.


 

HISTORY 2275: CHILDREN AND CHILDHOOD IN THE WESTERN WORLD

3 credit hours, Hybrid

While the process of developing from infancy through childhood into adult life is a biological phenomenon, the specific ways in which children have been treated and understood vary enormously across time and place.  In this class we will explore the history of children in the Western World from Antiquity to the present.  How has the role of children in Western culture changed across the centuries?  Have relationships between parents and children changed?  How has the understanding and treatment of children changed?  Ultimately, we will seek to define both changes and continuities in the lives of children in the Western world.

Times

Days

Instructor

11:10-12:20

TR

Soland, B

Assigned Readings: Readings will consist of a mixture of primary and secondary sources.  All readings will be available on Carmen.  Students should expect a weekly reading load of approximately 35-50 pages.

Assignments:
One short paper (5 pages), take-home midterm exam and take-home final exam.

Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study and diversity global studies course.


 

HISTORY 2303: HISTORY OF CONTEMPORARY AFRICA, 1960-PRESENT

3 credit hours, Online

Using a multi-disciplinary approach and a variety of teaching materials (including movies and documentary films), this course will explore specific episodes in Africa’s political, social, and economic history from 1960 to the present.  Focusing on African liberation struggles and subsequent emergence of modern nation states, we will attempt to trace the historical roots of Africa’s putative economic stagnation and persistent political conflicts, and how Africans grappled with these challenges.  Our themes will include national liberation struggles, the contributions of African Americans in African liberation struggles in the form of Pan Africanism, the search for continental unity, the formation of regional economic blocs, the cold war and its effects, debt crises, civil wars and Africans’ engagements with China since the end of the Cold War. While Africa has continued to lag behind most of the world in economic development and political stability, it will be historically inaccurate to neglect the continent’s success stories.  We will therefore pay close attention to areas where the continent has made and is still making significant progress.  Students will also be exposed to modern African cultures in the context of globalization. 

Times

Days

Instructor

Online

Online

Kobo, O

Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx. Not open to students with credit for 350. GE historical study course.


 

HISTORY 2353: THE MIDDLE EAST SINCE 1914

3 credit hours, Online

This course presents a foundational overview of the political, social, economic, and cultural history of the Middle East from the late-nineteenth century to the present. It aims to go beyond the simplistic generalizations and stereotypes about the region and its people by introducing students to the complexities of the Middle East’s modern history and its present. The course also aims to enable students to adopt an informed and critical perspective on the region’s current conflicts and challenges. Among other issues, we will pay particular attention to the following topics: nineteenth century reformism; economic dependency, imperialism, and anti-imperialism; nationalism and nation state formation; the Israeli-Palestinian conflict; women’s experiences; U.S. involvement in the region; the Islamic Revolution in Iran; the rise of Islamist movements; and recent upheavals in the Middle East. This course offers students the chance to explore these issues through a variety of media—academic works, film, fiction, and other primary sources.

Times

Days

Instructor

11:10-12:30

TR

Akin, Y

Tentative Readings

  • William L. Cleveland & Michael Bunton, A History of the Modern Middle East, 5th or 6th ed.
  • Sandy Tolan, The Lemon Tree: An Arab, a Jew, and the Heart of the Middle East
  • Other readings will be available on Carmen

Tentative Assignments
Midterm, quizzes, writing assignment, weekly reflections, final exam

Prereq: English 1110.xx or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 3358 or 540.05. GE historical study course.


 

HISTORY 2402: HISTORY OF EAST ASIA IN THE MODERN ERA

3 credit hours, Online

History 2402 will introduce the histories of the societies of East Asia (China, Korea, and Japan) starting in about 1600. To a higher degree than History 2401, which is a useful but certainly not required preparation, History 2402 is organized on a 3-way comparative model (“how do China, Japan, or Korea compare to each other in our historical period?”); one of our goals is to learn to think comparatively about history and these societies. We will survey key historical phenomena (covering political, military, social, and intellectual themes) that have distinguished each country in the long modern era. For most of the semester, the course will be organized chronologically and thematically. In addition to providing a basic narrative of East Asian civilization since 1600, the course will introduce students to important written and film sources and to historical writing.

Times

Days

Instructor

2:20-3:40

TR

Reed, C

Assigned readings: a textbook, a monograph, primary sources, short films

Assignments: TBA, similar to other courses at this level

Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx. Not open to students with credit for 142. GE historical study and diversity global studies course.


 

HISTORY 2450: ANCIENT AND MEDIEVAL JEWISH HISTORY

3 credit hours, Online

This course surveys nearly fifteen centuries of Jewish history, religion, and culture in the Near East from the days of the Maccabees (second century B.C.E.) to the death of Moses Maimonides  (1204 C.E.).  Focusing on key figures and representative subjects, the lectures will seek to offer a balanced picture of the Jewish experience in the ancient and early medieval periods. Special emphasis will be placed upon the evaluation and interpretation of primary sources (in translation). These texts will introduce students to the political, social, intellectual, and spiritual worlds of ancient and medieval Jewry. Since Jewish history is intertwined with the origins and development of both Christianity and Islam, the course also explores interfaith relations during these crucial centuries.

Times

Days

Instructor

12:45-2:05

TR

Frank, D

Assigned Readings:
David Biale, Cultures of the Jews, Volume 1: Mediterranean Origins.
Center for Online Jewish Studies: http://cojs.org
(The website fill furnish most of the primary sources and some of the secondary readings for the course.)
Additional readings will be posted on Carmen or drawn from online resources.

Assessment
10%     Written Assignments (six, 250 words each. Ungraded, but all must be completed in order to earn an “A” for 10% of the course grade)
15%     Quizzes          (four; best three grades)
25%     Book Review (1,250 words)
25%     First Examination
25%     Second Examination

Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 330.01 or JewshSt 2450. GE cultures and ideas and historical study and diversity global studies course. Cross-listed in JewshSt.


 

HISTORY 2455: JEWS IN AMERICAN FILM

3 credit hours, Hybrid

Jews and Jewish life have often been depicted in American television and film. We will watch a number of films about Jews and Jewish life while reading about those same topics in primary and secondary historical sources. We will then analyze the depiction of Jews and Judaism in the films and discuss how that depiction compares with the historical reality. We will come out of the course with both content knowledge (modern Jewish history, Jewish culture, Christian-Jewish relations) and skills (watching film and television critically; detecting attitudes and biases in writing as well as film; writing and speaking articulately about our observations).

Times

Days

Instructor

12:45-2:05

T

Goldish, M

Required Reading
Hasia Diner, A New Promised Land: A History of Jews in America; available at campus B&N or through online retailers
Films, articles, documents and supplemental readings through CARMEN or otherwise online

Assignments
Pop quizzes                             12@5 points (lowest 2 dropped)                                =50%
Writing assignments               3@10 points                                                    =30%
Final exam                              1@20 points                                                    =20%

Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 332 or JewshSt 2455. GE historical study course. Cross-listed in JewshSt.


 

HISTORY 2475: HISTORY OF THE HOLOCAUST

3 credit hours, Hybrid

Despite the fact that it has been over seventy years since the Allies liberated the last of the Nazi camps, we continue to debate the Holocaust’s history.  How did the Nazis rise to power? When did the Nazi government begin to plan for the Final Solution? Who was culpable in planning and executing the genocide?  This course will peel away at some of these questions. Together we will examine the state-sponsored murder of millions of Jews and non-Jews by the Nazis and their collaborators during World War II.  We will study the individuals, institutions, historical events, and ideologies that allowed for the Holocaust to occur; all the while we will be paying attention to what we mean by “the Holocaust.”  

This course is designed as a hybrid course. Most of our classes will meet in person on T/Th at 9:35am. A minority of our meetings will take place by zoom; many of those will revolve around work concerning the collections of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum.

Times

Days

Instructor

11:10-12:30

TR

Judd, R

Tentative Readings
Doris Bergen, War and Genocide:  A Concise History of the Holocaust, Third Edition
Marion Kaplan, Between Dignity and Despair
Gerda Weissman Klein, All But My Life

Tentative Assignments
Midterms,  museum assignment, oral history assignment, weekly reflections

Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 331 or JewshSt 2475. GE historical study course. Cross-listed in JewshSt.


 

HISTORY 2550 HISTORY OF WAR

3 Credit hours, Online

A survey of the main concepts and issues involved in the study of war in world perspective, using case studies from prehistoric times to the present.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
Online              online                           Douglas, Sarah

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the historical study GE & Group Global, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement



HISTORY 2650 THE WORLD SINCE 1914

3 credit hours, Online

The World since 1914 is a course on global history. We will focus on central themes of global history in the modern world – nationalism and the rise of nation-states, globalization, the emergence of mass society, gender, and identity and difference, as well as major events, such as the World Wars, the Great Depression, the Cold War, and the revolutions against colonial rule. We will also look at major issues in the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, such as food, health, energy, economic development, and the environment. Much of our class will involve discussion of primary documents and of competing theories about the causes of historical change. But the ultimate goal of the course is civic: to help us understand better the world and its problems, to develop global historical literacy, and to think about connections between our own lives and events in the past.

Time               Meetings Days             Instructor
Online             MW                              Roth, R
10:20; 12:40   Friday (recitations)
1:50

Readings
We will read two textbooks and a small number of on-line documents and selections from competing historical interpretations of the past on Carmen. The following books will be required:
James H. Overfield, Sources of Twentieth Century Global History. Wadsworth, 2002. ISBN 13: 978-0-395-90407-7. Paperback.
Carter Vaughn Findley and John Alexander Murray Rothney, Twentieth-Century World (7th edition). Wadsworth, 2011. ISBN 13: 978-0-547-21850-2. Paperback.

Assignments

Quizzes: There will be weekly on-line quizzes on Carmen on the readings and lectures in the course. The quizzes will ask you to recall the content of the readings and lectures.
Discussion posts: There will be a discussion question each week. You will be asked to post a brief response on the Carmen discussion board.
Responses to historical films: You will be asked to write one-page, single-space responses to two films that will be required viewing for the course. The films will illustrate major themes of the course.
Midterm and final essays: There will be “take home” midterm and final essays (5 or 6 pages in length) on themes in the course.
Family History Essay: You will be asked to write an essay (5 or 6 pages in length) on an aspect of your family’s history, either recent or over the past 100 years. Each family history should reflect on a major problem in global history.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 597. GE historical study and diversity global studies course.


 

HISTORY 2700: GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY

3 credit hours, Online

In this course, we explore how humans have shaped the environment and how the environment has shaped human history from the paleolithic to the present. Our topics will be diverse in range and scale and range from the earliest uses of fire to plagues to climate change. We will pay particularly close attention to the relationship between humans and the environment and the influence of/impacts on the various “spheres” of our planet: the atmosphere (focusing on climate change and pollution); the biosphere (ecological changes, human-animal interactions, and the role of micro-organisms), the cryosphere (the role of glaciers and ice-ages in the development of civilization); and the hydrosphere (human interactions with oceans, lakes and rivers). Along the way we will focus on how some of the world’s major civilizations changed their environment, how nature limited their development, and how they coped—or failed to cope—with the environmental problems that civilizations inevitably produce. Students will also learn the essential background to major environmental issues and consider how history might (or might not) help us confront environmental challenges in the present and future.

Times

Days

Instructor

Online

Online

Harris, J

Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx. Not open to students with credit for 366.01. GE historical study and soc sci human, nat, and econ resources and diversity global studies course.


 

HISTORY 2703: HISTORY OF PUBLIC HEALTH, MEDICINE AND DISEASE

3 credit hours, Online

Amid the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic there is no greater time than the present to understand how infectious diseases (such as plague, smallpox, cholera, tuberculosis, influenza, and HIV) have shaped the course of human history and the ways in which societies across time and place have responded to these public health crises. Over the course of this semester our goals will be twofold: first, through lectures, discussions, and films, to study these issues in a deep historical and global context with the goal of understanding how studying the history of disease informs our contemporary understanding of public health. Second, we will emphasize how pandemics have been remembered (or forgotten) to engage the critical question of how historians should commemorate and remember the present pandemic.

Times

Days

Instructor

Online

Online

Harris, J

Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study and diversity global studies course.


 

HISTORY 2720: BIG HISTORY

3 credit hours, Online

Big History brings together the cosmic, earth, evolutionary, and human past.  This course provides a non-technical introduction to the essential state of knowledge about the galaxy, planet, life, and humanity.  The unifying theme throughout the course will be emergence and fragility of complex systems in a universe forever moving toward entropy.  By the end of the course, students will have a basic grounding in the history of the historical sciences and a better understanding of where we came from and where we might be going.

Times

Days

Instructor

Online

Online

White, S

Assigned Readings:
David Christian, Cynthia Stokes Brown, and Craig Benjamin, Big History: Between Nothing and Everything (New York: McGraw-Hill, 2013).  Paper or electronic version

Assignments:
Online writing assignments and discussion for each lesson, and one course essay

Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study course.


 

HISTORY 2800: INTRODUCTION TO THE DISCIPLINE OF HISTORY

3 credit hours

This course introduces undergraduate history majors to the methods and skills that historians use to study the past, and it considers some of the problems we face in interpreting evidence, assessing arguments, and presenting our research to others. We will use a series of exercises to work on our basic skills, and two case studies will enable us to reflect on historical problems in more depth: the puzzling case of a missing and returned soldier in sixteenth-century France, and the murder of Hypatia in fifth-century Alexandria. This is a seminar, in which students will be expected to prepare work for and participate in each class meeting

Times

Days

Instructor

11:10-12:20

TR, In person

Brakke, D

This course is designed to introduce undergraduates to the historical method, that is, how historians write history.  We will learn how to distinguish between primary and secondary sources, and we will examine important events in historical context.   We will concentrate on President Abraham Lincoln and the Emancipation Proclamation, and the debate among historians on his role in emancipation.  We will read a short biography of the President, as well as documents generated by Lincoln himself and by other nineteenth-century Americans.  We will also discuss how emancipation has been depicted in popular culture.

Times

Days

Instructor

12:45-2:05

TR, Online

Cashin, J

This course introduces students to the discipline of history by analyzing in detail three approaches to history based on three highly influential theories about human experience generally—Marxism, psychoanalysis, and phenomenology. The power of these theories derives from the fact that they are grounded in universal aspects of human experience--bodily needs and labor (Marx), sexuality and unconscious mental processes (Freud), and time and space (phenomenology); although these universal features also vary historically. To understand the interaction between theory and practice students will read and analyze these theories at their source and then critically evaluate one extended application of them in contemporary historical works, one of which is my own. In addition, students will also read critical appraisals of these approaches to round out the three reading assignments that are the subject of the three assigned papers (1500 words or five pages each). I also run a week-long writing workshop that clarifies mechanics of writing to be used and refined in these papers.

Times

Days

Instructor

2:20-3:40

TR, Online

Kern, S

This course will introduce students planning to major in history to history as a discipline and a major.  The course is designed to give students practice in the analysis of historical sources and in developing logic and clarity in both written and oral assignments.

Times

Days

Instructor

9:35-10:55

WF, Hybrid

Stebenne, D

Assignments and readings vary by instructor. This course is required for the History major, and students must receive a grade of C or higher to continue in the major.


 

HISTORY 2800 H: HONORS INTRODUCTION TO THE DISCIPLINE OF HISTORY

3 credit hours, ONLINE

This course is designed for Honors history majors. History 2800 introduces history majors to the field of history, and particularly to the historian’s craft. We will look at the different purposes for studying history, a wide array of sources that are used in examining the past, and the diverse approaches to the past that historians embrace. Because the best way to learn what historians do is to practice the craft ourselves, we will spend the semester focusing on a global history that is, in fact, close at hand: that of “Ohio and the World.” Our readings will highlight related global and local developments six different dates: 1753, 1803, 1853, 1903, 1953, and 2003. Topics include European settlement of the Ohio frontier and the French-Indian War, German immigrants’ participation in the American Civil War, Karl Marx’s visit to Ohio, Civil Rights struggles at Kent State but also in Paris and Berlin, and more recent ties between Japan and Ohio manufacturing. We will use a combination of primary sources (archives, newspapers, images, political treatises, and maps) available either in digital format or in local museums, the OSU rare book room and archives, the Billy Ireland Cartoon Library, and the Ohio History Connection, as well as secondary sources.

Class attendance will be required. As a seminar, all students will be expected to participate regularly in class discussions. Participation in discussions will count for 25 percent of the final grade.

Times

Days

Instructor

11:10-12:30

WF

Conklin, A

Assigned Readings:
Geoffrey Parker, Richard Sisson, William Russell Coil, ed. Ohio and the World, 1753-2053
Diana Hacker, A Pocket Style Manual
Course packet of materials

Assignments:
Students will be required to complete eight short writing assignments, and one longer research project on Ohio and the World. They will also be assigned a class presentation.

Prerequisites: English 1110.xx, honors standing, or permission of instructor.


 

HISTORY 3001: AMERICAN POLITICAL HISTORY TO 1877

3 credit hours, Online

An overview of the history of American politics from the earliest colonial outposts to Civil War and Reconstruction.  In observance of the quadricentennial of the origins of the North American slave trade, we will focus in particular on the politics of race and slavery with particular attention to slavery and race.  American politics had their origins in the colonial transplantation and transformation of Old World forms on the New World edge of empire, forms reshaped in the Revolution and routinized in the decades of the early republic.  While its institutions, practices, and responsiveness to public opinion made it the first successful model of a modern democratic republic, the structures of American politics before the Civil War were fundamentally threatened by the uncompromisable questions bound up in racial slavery, and then challenged by contested entry of free African-Americans into full citizenship during Reconstruction.  

Times

Days

Instructor

9:35-10:55

WF

Brooke, J

Assigned Readings:
Jack P. Greene, Peripheries and Center: Constitutional Development in the Extended Polities of the British Empire and the United States, 1607-1788
Gary J. Kornblith, Slavery and Sectional Strife in the Early American Republic, 1776-1821
Andrew Shankman, Original Intents: Hamilton, Jefferson, and the American Founding
Sean Wilentz, Andrew Jackson
Bruce Levine, Half Slave and Half Free: The Roots of the Civil War
Eric Foner, The Second Founding: How the Civil War and Reconstruction Remade the Constitution

Assignments:
Class attendance and participation in discussions (15%),
Three short document essays (15%),
Papers on Part I [In-class] (20%),
                 Part II [take-home] (25%),
                 and Part III [option of in-class or take-home] (25%).

Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study and diversity soc div in the US course.


 

HISTORY 3006: THE UNITED STATES CONSTITUTION AND AMERICAN SOCIETY SINCE 1877

3 credit hours, Hybrid

Examination of the major developments in American constitutional history since the Civil War.  Emphasis on the new constitutional system created by the Fourteenth Amendment; the rise and decline of laissez-faire constitutionalism; the more moderate constitutionalism of the New Deal era; and the resurgence of judicial activism in the 1960’s, ‘70’s and ‘80’s.  The course will deal in detail with the most influential Supreme Court rulings since 1877, including those in the areas of federal regulation of the economy, limits on freedom of speech and press during wartime, racial segregation, the rights of criminal suspects and defendants, affirmative action, and abortion.

Times

Days

Instructor

11:10-12:30

TR

Stebenne, D

Assigned Readings:
Kermit L. Hall and Timothy S. Huebner, Major Problems in American Constitutional History, 2nd ed., (2010).

Assignments:
Active participation in class discussions, and take-home midterm and final examinations.

Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study course.


 

HISTORY 3014: GILDED AGE TO THE PROGRESSIVE ERA

3 credit hours, Hybrid

This course examines American politics and society from the later years of Reconstruction until the U.S. entry in World War I.  This is a period historians often overlook, one stuck between the drama of the Civil War and the more familiar developments of the 20th century.  Yet we shouldn’t.  In this period important things seemed up for grabs, within the power of Americans to manage: how industry would be controlled, the character of race relations, the role of government in shaping society, public morals, and the economy, and America's place in the world. 

We will focus on public life – on politics, social and political movements, economic change, and habits of thought that shaped how Americans responded to change.  We will explore two big themes: the working out of the Reconstruction of the South and the varied effects of rapid industrial development. We will examine solutions that various groups of Americans offered to what they saw as the problems of the day, problems that went to the nation's values as well as its economic and social conditions.  How those solutions differed from those offered during the progressive era will concern us in the last third of the course.

Times

Days

Instructor

12:45-2:05

TR

Baker, P

Assigned Readings:  (Tentative)
Charles Calhoun, The Gilded Age: Perspectives on the Origins of Modern America
Eric Rauchway, Murdering McKinley: The Making of Theodore Roosevelt's America
John Milton Cooper, Pivotal Decades: The United States, 1900-1920

Assignments:
Class participation: bonus up to ½ grade
Midterm Essay: 20%
Final Take-Home Essay: 20%
Paper: 20%
Two Quizzes: 10% each
Two Short In-Class Essays: 10% each

Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 564. GE historical study and diversity soc div in the US course.


 

HISTORY 3015: FROM THE NEW ERA TO THE NEW FRONTIER, 1921-1963

3 credit hours, Online

History 3015 is an advanced undergraduate course that will examine U.S. social, political, cultural, and foreign policy history from 1921 to 1963, including the New Era, New Deal, World War II, Cold War, Eisenhower Republicanism, the Civil Rights movement, and the New Frontier.  We will investigate this period through the lens of primary sources, including films, and secondary sources, including books and articles.

Times

Days

Instructor

Online

Online

Susner, L

Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 565. GE historical study course.


 

HISTORY 3030 HISTORY OF OHIO

3 credit hours, Online

This course will survey the economic, social, and political development of the geographic area that became Ohio from the Native American period to the present. We will explore three themes in particular:  the role of disruptive technology and creative destruction in shaping Ohio’s past; the critical junctures at which Ohio might have become something entirely different from what it became; Ohio’s connection to the wider world through geography, technology, demography, economics, and politics.

Times

Days

Instructor

Online

Online

Coil, R

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 310. GE historical study course.


 

HISTORY 3085: AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY THROGUH CONTEMPORARY FILM

3 credit hours, Online

This course explores the African American experience through the lens of major motion pictures and documentary films.  The aim is for students to gain an understanding of how and why various historical topics have been depicted in movies, and to what extent the film version of particular events reflect reality.  The purpose of the class is to use film to explore and historicize themes such as race and racism, slavery and freedom, oppression and resistance, and to reflect of the meaning of this themes (and films) in today’s society. The films will cover the entirety of the African American experience, from slavery through the present.

This course grapples with a central question: Given the fact that the majority of people in American society rely upon media and film to make sense of the past, to what extent do contemporary films do an adequate job of relaying the “truth” and accuracy of various historical subjects in the African American experience?  As a result, this class examines a variety of topics, including American slavery, African American culture, racial violence, Jim Crow, the civil rights and Black Power movements, and contemporary conflicts between the police and black communities, by examining film that treat these topics in conjunction with historical research.  We will also look closely at a select few recurring issues in films on the African American experience, such as the subordinate role of black women and the use of white characters as the primary narrative vehicles. 

Assigned Readings:  In lieu of an assigned text (although there will be articles, essays, and/or book chapters distributed online), there are weekly documentary films that students are to view prior to class via OSU’s Secured Media Site online streaming service.

Assignments: Three 7-10 page analytical essay assignments

Course Format: One film will be watched and discussed, in class, each week. Films will include: 12 Years A Slave; Glory; Mudbound; The Butler; Fruitvale Station, Moonlight; Black Panther among others.

Times

Days

Instructor

12:00-2:45PM

M

Jeffries, H

Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study and diversity soc div in the US course.


 

HISTORY 3105: HISTORY OF BRAZIL

3 credit hours, Online

Known for its beaches, carnival, and soccer, Brazilian history is a far deeper story of colonialism, slavery, agricultural wealth, immigration, industrial development, political conflict over authoritarianism and democracy, and more. This course will provide a survey of the deep history of the country and its struggle to become a modern, developed nation. This course will begin with a history of pre-colonial Brazil and move through the end of the 20th century with a strong focus on modern 20th century Brazil. It will touch on five key topics that affect Brazil today: economic, political, social, environmental, and popular culture. Questions about the influence of development and industrialization on the construction of the nation and its population will drive course analysis. 

Times

Days

Instructor

11:10-12:30

TR

Eaglin, J

Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 534.02. GE historical study course.


 

HISTORY 3211: CLASSICAL GREECE

3 credit hours, Online

The course explores the history of the classical era, the “Golden Age” of ancient Greece.  It traces political and cultural developments in the world of the Greek city-states from the time of the watershed Persian Wars of 480-479 BC down to the death of Alexander the Great in 323 and its immediate aftermath.  Major topics covered include: the rise of Athens as imperialist superpower and “cultural capital” of the Greek world; the escalating tensions between the Athenian empire and the Spartan-led Peloponnesian League that resulted in the cataclysmic Peloponnesian War (431-404 BC); the subsequent attempts by states like Sparta and Thebes to exercise hegemony over their fellow Greeks; the formation of the world’s first complex democracy in Athens; and the ground-breaking innovations that would shape the future course of art, architecture, philosophy, science, literature, and drama in the western world.  The course will conclude by looking at how the relatively sudden emergence of Philip II of Macedon as the dominant player on the Greek stage effectively ended the era of the independent city-states, and at how the conquest of the Persian empire by Philip’s son Alexander the Great transformed the political and cultural fortunes of Greece and the ancient Near East thereafter.

Times

Days

Instructor

Online

Online

Anderson, G

Assigned Readings:
I. Morris and B. Powell, The Greeks: History, Culture, and Society (Prentice Hall, 2010).
Thucydides, History of the Peloponnesian War (Penguin Classics, 1972).
Readings from ancient texts, available on Carmen.

Assignments:
2 exams and a term paper

Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 501.02. GE historical study course.


 

HISTORY 3214: WOMEN, GENDER, AND SEXUALITY IN THE HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY

3 credit hours, In Person

This course will focus on women, gender, and (to a lesser extent) sexuality in Christianity during the first three centuries, before the conversion of Constantine in 312. After a brief look at the roles of women in other religious traditions of the ancient Mediterranean, we will consider the writings of the New Testament and such second- and third-century sources as martyrdom accounts, apocryphal gospels and acts, church orders, and Gnostic mythology. We will study literary depictions of Christian women, the significance of gender in Christian theologies and narratives, the roles that women played in Christian communities, and the debates that these issues provoked.

Times

Days

Instructor

2:20-3:40

TR

Brakke, D

Assigned Readings:
The HarperCollins Study Bible (New Revised Standard Version), Revised and Updated Edition, ed. Harold Attridge and Wayne Meeks
Ross Shepard Kraemer and Mary Rose D’Angelo, eds., Women & Christian Origins
Bart Ehrman, ed., After the New Testament, 100-300 C.E.: A Reader in Early Christianity (2nd edition)

Assignments:
Assignments will include attendance and participation, two short papers, a midterm, and a final exam.

Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study and diversity global studies course.


 

HISTORY 3223: THE LATER ROMAN EMPIRE

3 credit hours, Hybrid

This upper level history course introduces students to the society, politics, and material culture of the late Roman Empire, known also as Late Antiquity.  The course explores developments between the third and seventh centuries CE, from the so-called “Crisis of the Third Century” to the Persian sack of Jerusalem in 614 CE.  The course follows two primary threads: 1) the political and military events that led to the empire’s geo-political fragmentation and to the consolidation of imperial power in the East and to the rise of new barbarian kingdoms in the West; and 2) the social, religious, and material changes that also characterize this transformative period in world history, such as the emergence of the Christian Church as a public institution and the development of new forms of urban and rural life.  To the extent possible, we shall approach these interrelated lines of inquiry from both “the top down” and “the bottom up,” by exploring how history was made and experienced by emperors and everyday inhabitants of Rome.

Times

Days

Instructor

2:20-3:40

TR

Sessa, K

In additional to completing weekly reading assignments of primary (English translation) and secondary sources, students will be asked to write three short analytic essays and generate one longer research project, which can take the form of a written essay, podcast, or webpage.

Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 503.03. GE historical study course.


 

HISTORY 3247: MAGIC AND WITCHCRAFT IN EARLY MODERN EUROPE

3 credit hours, hybrid

Magic has been with us since the dawn of human consciousness and it is with us still. Understanding magical mentalities is therefore an important historical project but also a difficult one. The early modern period, 1450-1750—the period of the European witch hunts—offers an ideal setting in which to study magical thinking and related matters. We will learn why the tumultuous events of this period created a highly fertile and dynamic atmosphere for magic and witchcraft beliefs. We will learn quite a bit about this period in European history generally. We will examine the distinctions between learned and lay magic; natural and demonic magic; and different types of magical practice. We will pay particular attention to witches, witch hunts, and shifting ideas about witchcraft on the eve of the Enlightenment. A second and more practical focus of the course will be on identifying the thesis of a chapter, article or book and on recognizing the main arguments or proofs marshaled to support that thesis. A third focus will be on the close analysis of primary documents.

Times

Days

Instructor

2:20-3:40PM

TR

Goldish, M

Required Reading
Brian P. Levack, The Witch Hunt in Early Modern Europe, 4th ed. (Routledge); available at campus B&N or through online retailers
Articles, documents and supplemental readings through our CARMEN website

Assignments
Pop quizzes                             12@5 points (lowest 2 dropped)                    =50%
Writing assignments               2@10 points                                                    =20%
Final exam                              1@30 points                                                    =30%

Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study and diversity global studies course.


 

HISTORY 3250: REVOLUTIONARY AND NAPOLEONIC EUROPE, 1750-1815

3 credit hours, Online

In this course, we will study the History of Revolutionary and Napoleonic Europe from the crisis of the Old Regime to the end of the Napoleonic Empire. Although this course will focus on France itself, we will also evaluate the continental and global interactions that shaped the course of revolution in France and beyond.

Times

Days

Instructor

Online

Online

Bond, E

Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 512.02. GE historical study course.


 

HISTORY 3273: MODERNIST THOUGHT AND CULTURE

3 credit hours, Online

This course explores what is arguably the most creative period in the entirety of Western cultural history, roughly 1890-1930, which witnessed a spectrum of revolutionary developments in physics, philosophy, psychiatry, visual art, architecture, music, dance, cinema, and literature. This dynamic period also ironically straddles one of the most destructive wars in history, World War I (1914-1918). The team-teaching format ensures that students will be exposed to a dialogue of different disciplinary methods and approaches between a cultural historian and a literary scholar.

The pillars of the course are three of the period’s major thinkers: Friedrich Nietzsche, Sigmund Freud, and Jean-Paul Sartre. In the first weeks we will approach imperialism through Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness. In the middle weeks we will read, view, or listen to avant-gardists such as the Surrealists, Franz Kafka, Pablo Picasso, Gertrude Stein, Igor Stravinsky, and Arnold Schoenberg. The final weeks will address the effects of the Great War dramatized in Virginia Woolf’s novel Mrs. Dalloway, W.B. Yeats’s short lyric “The Second Coming,” and T.S. Eliot’s long poem The Waste Land, which address the hunger for wholeness and repair in postwar European society, shell shock, the practice of psychiatry, new gender roles and feminism, colonization and empire, the Armenian massacre, the influenza pandemic of 1918, and the growing secularization of high culture.

Times

Days

Instructor

12:45-2:05PM

TR

Kern, S
McHale, E (English)

ASSIGNMENTS: Students will write four papers of 4 pages (1200 words) each on assigned topics based on the readings, lectures, and class discussions.

Assigned Readings (books)
Friedrich Nietzsche, Thus Spoke Zarathustra
Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness
Gertrude Stein, Tender Buttons
Franz Kafka, Metamorphosis
Virginia Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway

Short Readings and selections on Carmen
William Butler Yeats, selected poems
Sigmund Freud, Introductory Lectures on Psychoanalysis (selections)
T.S. Eliot, The Waste Land
Jean-Paul Sartre, Being and Nothingness (selections)
Jorge-Luis Borges, “Tlön, Uqbar, Orbis Tertius”

Available film for streaming free from Secured Media Library
Luis Buñuel and Salvador Dalí, An Andalusian Dog

Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for English 3273. Cross-listed in English.


 

HISTORY 3312: AFRICA & WWII

3 credits, Online, Second session

The Second World War was a pivotal event that transformed and shaped the world as we know it today. The war was fought in different regions and led to unprecedented mobilization of human and natural resources from across the globe, including the continent of Africa. In addition to being a major theatre of military operations, Africa provided vital human and natural resources to the war efforts. This course will shed light on the role of Africans as soldiers and producers, as well as the effects of the war on class, race, and gender relations within the continent. It will also illustrate the importance of the war in provoking crises in colonial empires and transforming the nature of political mobilization across the African continent.

Times

Days

Instructor

Online

Online

Sikainga, A

Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study course.


 

HISTORY 3313: CONFLICT IN THE HORN OF AFRICA

3 credits, Online, Second session

The Horn of Africa refers to the geographical region of northeast Africa, which includes the present-day countries of Somalia, Djibouti, Ethiopia, Eritrea, Sudan,  and South Sudan. This region has been embroiled in interlocking civil wars, ethnic and religious conflicts, territorial disputes, and the disintegration of the nation states. The main goal of this course is to examine the root causes, the nature, and the impact of these conflicts on local communities as well as their regional and international implications. The key topics that will be discussed are: the process of state formation and imperial expansion in the nineteenth century, the roots of regional inequalities and marginalization, the advent of European colonial rule and its impact, the post-colonial conflicts and the demands for self –determination in South Sudan and Eritrea, the civil War and the disintegration of Somalia, the rise of Islamism in Sudan and Somalia, the war in Darfur, terrorism and piracy, the emergence of South Sudan as an independent state and its current crises, and the regional and international implications of the Horn of Africa conflicts. In addition to lectures and discussion, these topics will be illustrated by films and audiovisual materials.

Times

Days

Instructor

Online

Online

Sikainga, A

Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study course.


 

HISTORY 3465: AMERICAN JEWISH HISTORY

3 credit hours, Hybrid

In 1654 twenty-three Jewish refugees fled Brazil and landed, by mistake, in New Amsterdam.  More than 300 years later, an American Jew of Ashkenazic descent declared his intent to run for the Democratic Party’s nomination to serve as the next President of the United States.

This course explores topics in American Jewish history from the colonial era to the present using the histories of immigration, acculturation, and race. We will explore the interaction between America’s ever-growing Jewish population and the political, social, and cultural environment in which Jews found themselves.  Throughout the course we will question the following:  How did the American setting affect Jewish religious observance, occupational pursuits, political allegiances and family and gender roles?  How did Jews influence their new setting?   How did different groups of Jews move into positions of privilege? What were the relationships of Jews and other minority groups?

This course is designed as a hybrid course. Most of our classes will meet in person on T/Th afternoons. A minority of our meetings will take place by zoom at the same time; many of those will revolve around work concerning Columbus Jewish history.

Times

Days

Instructor

2:20-3:40

TR

Judd, R

Tentative Readings
Rachel Calof, Rachel Calof's Story: Jewish Homesteader on the Northern Plains (selections only)
Kate Simon, Bronx Primitive
Hasia Diner, The Jews of the United States, 1654-2000

Tentative Assignment
Take home midterm, weekly reflections, oral history assignment, final project

Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for JewshSt 3465. GE historical study course. Cross-listed in JewshSt.


 

HISTORY 3475: HISTORY OF THE ARAB-ISRAELI CONFLICT

3 credit hours, Online

The Arab-Israeli conflict is one of the most enduring and controversial conflicts in the world. This course follows the history of the conflict from its inception in the late 19th century to the early 21st century. The first part of the course will examine the circumstances surrounding the emergence of the Jewish and Palestinian Arab nationalist movements, and the encounter between Jews and Arabs in Palestine during the late Ottoman and British mandate periods. We will then discuss the attainment of Israeli independence and the exodus of Palestinian Arabs in 1948, the succeeding wars between Israel and its Arab neighbors, the two intifadas, and the attempts to achieve a peace settlement. Course materials include secondary historical sources, a variety of primary documents, short stories, memoirs and films. These texts, combined with lectures and class discussions, will provide students with an in-depth understanding of the history of the conflict, taking into account the positions of Palestinian Arabs, Jews, and other regional and global forces involved in the conflict.

Times

Days

Instructor

9:35-10:55am

WF

Yehudai, O

Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor.


 

HISTORY 3506: DIPLOMACY, CONGRESS, AND THE IMPERIAL PRESIDENCY

3 credit hours, Hybrid

This course will explore the historiography of the Cold War, broadly defined, in both the international and U.S. contexts. The course goal will emphasize diplomacy and transnational relations, but we will also explore how the conflict and its ideological components reshaped the domestic systems of the United States and other nations. The goal will be to give you a grounding in the evolving and diverse historiography of the Cold War, which defined much of the 20th century alongside intersecting processes like decolonization, the rise of human/civil rights, globalization, and the nuclear age. The course will highlight the increasingly heterogeneous methodologies that motivate scholarly studies on this topic and should provide food for thought for a variety of individual projects. As the historiography has evolved toward more diverse, global understandings of this conflict, we will consider what this trend means for the process of researching, writing, and teaching national, international, transnational, and military histories. The course will be taught online for the spring and be synchronous at the listed time. Please contact me if there are any partial overlaps with other classes as I am willing to consider an accommodation.

Times

Days

Instructor

11:10-12:30

WF

Parrott, J

Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor.


 

HISTORY 3540: MODERN INTELLIGENCE HISTORY

3 credits, Online

This course will examine the role of diplomatic and military intelligence in the making of policy. The function of intelligence gathering, appraisal and assessment has often been overlooked in the exploration of policy making, especially in times of peace. It will be our undertaking to examine some of the most significant international events of the twentieth century in light of the contribution, or lack thereof, of both covert and overt forms of intelligence. After an introduction to the field and a discussion of the origins of the modern intelligence services, we will analyze the histories of several of the major intelligence organizations in the twentieth century. We will then discuss in depth the influence of the assessment and utilization of intelligence on the perceptions of policy makers and public opinion in both war and peacetime up to the immediate post-war period and the origins of the Cold War intelligence climate. The course will not be concerned with the intricacies of tradecraft, but with the interplay between intelligence and international policy making in the origins and encounters of the First and Second World Wars and the establishment of the intelligence rivalries and relationships which played their part in the Cold War. In our final week, we will consider the correlation between the growth of intelligence communities, their legitimization and delegitimization, and the popular image of spying represented contemporaneously in fiction and film.

Times

Days

Instructor

11:10-12:30

TR

Siegel, J

Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor.


 

HISTORY 3552: WAR IN WORLD HISTORY, 1900-PRESENT

3 credits, online

The past hundred years have changed the nature of war. Industrial warfare and global conflicts led to an inexorable intensification of violence. From trench warfare in World War I to ethnic cleansing in the 1990s, the total number of deaths caused by or associated with war has been estimated at the equivalent of 10% of the world’s population in 1913. In the course of the century, the burden of war shifted increasingly from armed forces to civilians, to the point where non-combatants now comprise some 80 or 90% of war victims. This lecture course investigates the blurring of distinction between combatants and non-combatants, as well as the experiences of ordinary men and women who lived through the wars of the 20th Century. It covers events such as World War I, the Spanish Civil War, World War II, the Korean War and the Vietnam War, and topics such as the experience of captivity, sexual violence in wartime, children in war, or genocide.

Times

Days

Instructor

9:35-10:55

TR

Cabanes, B

Assigned Readings:
Primo Levi, Survival in Auschwitz
Anonymous, A Women in Berlin
Henri Alleg, The Question
Jean Hatzfeld, Machete Season. The Killers in Rwanda Speak

Assignments:
The final grade in the course will be an average of the four grades given for: a short 2000-word paper (20%), the mid-term examination (25%), lecture Quick Writes/Quizzes (20%); the final examination (35%).

Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 580.02. GE historical study course.


 

HISTORY 3560: AMERICAN MILITARY HISTORY, 1607 TO 1903

3 credit hours

This course describes and analyzes the history of American military policy from the colonial period to the end of the Philippine War. It focuses on the creation of American military institutions, the genesis of policy-making and maintenance of civilian control over that process, the interrelationship between foreign and military policy, the conduct of war, and the influence of American society upon the armed forces as social institutions.

Students will achieve an understanding of the main developments in American military history, the ways in which these developments have reflected or shaped developments in general American history, and the main interpretations advanced by scholars who have studied this subject. They will also hone their skills at critical writing and analysis, and will gain greater-insight into the way historians explore the human condition.

The course organization is somewhat unusual in that, throughout the course, we will frequently make reference to the Gettysburg campaign (1863), although chronologically the course runs from 1607 through 1903. The rationale is twofold. First, the Civil War in general represents the culmination of several prominent themes in pre-Civil War US military history (manpower policy, for example); and a major impetus toward the military reforms of the late 19th century. Second, it affords the chance to give extended attention to one military campaign rather than just summary examination of many.

Times

Days

Instructor

12:45-2:05PM

TR

Grimsley, M

Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 582.01. GE historical study course.


 

HISTORY 3570: WORLD WAR II

3 credit hours, Online

World War II was the largest and most destructive war in human history. More than seventy years after it ended, the war continues to shape our world. This course examines the causes, conduct, and consequences of this devastating conflict. Through readings, lectures, and video, the class will study the politics that shaped the involvement of the major combatants; military leadership and the characteristics of major Allied and Axis armed services; the national and theater strategies of the various major combatants; the military operations that led to victory or defeat on battlefields spanning the globe; war crimes; and other factors such as leadership, economics, military doctrine and effectiveness, technology, ideology, and racism that impacted the outcome of the war. This course falls under the GE category of Historical Study and it additionally fulfills the GE Global Studies requirement.

Times

Days

Instructor

11:10-12:30

TR

Mansoor, P

Assigned Readings:
Williamson Murray and Allan R. Millett, A War to be Won: Fighting the Second World War
West Point History of Warfare (selected chapters, online only)
Mark Stoler and Molly Michelmore, eds., The United States in World War II: A Documentary History
Michael Lynch, Hitler
E. B. Sledge, With the Old Breed

Assignments:
In-class mid-term and final examinations
Quizzes
Two book reviews (2-3 pages each)

Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 307. GE historical study and diversity global studies course.


 

HISTORY 3575: THE KOREAN WAR

3 credit hours, Online

The North Korean invasion of South Korea in June 1950 expanded a simmering civil war between the two Koreas into a limited regional war fought between two coalitions. The United Nations (UN) Command primarily consisted of South Korean and United States forces though over a dozen nations contributed combat formations to the Command. The North Korean military secured direct support from the Chinese People’s Liberation Army (PLA) and both armies relied on weapons provided by the Soviet Union. Many observers at the time recognized that the Korean War represented a new way of warfare, specifically marked by large coalitions fighting in support of international objectives. This course will explore the historical, military, political, diplomatic, and wider socio-cultural context of the Korean War, reflecting in conclusion on its outcome’s impact in the decades since.

Times

Days

Instructor

Online

Online

Douglas, S

Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study course.


 

HISTORY 3641: WOMEN AND GENDER IN EARLY MODERN EUROPE, 1450-1750

3 credits, Online

The course lectures and readings are organized around three units:  body, mind, and spirit. In the first unit, we will examine the laws and ideas that influenced women’s material lives. We will study the ways that the early modern life cycle and work shaped their experiences. In the second unit, we turn to the mind—to women’s learning, and their creation of new knowledge and art. We will also learn about the intellectual and social practices that they employed in the expression of their own agency, such as letter writing and patronage. Finally, we consider the spirit in a range of early modern religious, psychological, and social dimensions. In doing so, we will consider how the history of women and gender is inextricably tied to the major transformations of Early Modern Europe, including the Reformation, colonization, and the growth of the modern state.

Times

Days

Instructor

Online

Online

Bond, E

Prereq or concur: English 1110 or equiv, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 523. GE historical study course.


 

HISTORY 3700: AMERICAN ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY

3 Credit hours, Online

This course shows what history can teach us about the future survival of humanity on planet Earth. From August to December, we dive deep into the past, examining how Americans have affected the natural environment over time and how nature has shaped the course of human events. You will learn to think like an environmental historian, mastering a historical sub-discipline first developed in the 1970s that places nature at the heart of our national narrative This course tackles some of the biggest issues hitting headlines today. How bad is climate change? What can we do about it? Are we running out of water? How will we quench our thirst in the years ahead? Looking to the past, we journey across the country (and the globe) to find solutions to these questions and more. You’ll never look at American history the same way again.

Times

Days

Instructor

11:10-12:30

TR

Elmore, B

Assigned Readings:
There are only two assigned books for the course:
Ted Steinberg’s Down to Earth: Nature’s Role in American History (Oxford University Press, 2009).
Marl Fiege Republic of Nature: An Environmental History of the United States (University of Washington Press, 2012).
In addition to these readings, the course features a sprinkling of articles from some of today’s top environmental historians. We’ll also watch a series of films that will help students visualize ecological changes that reshaped America.

Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study course.


 

HISTORY 3704: HIV: FROM MICROBIOLOGY TO MACROHISTORY

3 credit hours, ONLINE

The course traces the evolution of the virus at both the molecular level and within in its global historical context. Team-taught by a virologist and a historian, the goal of the class, at the broadest level, is to put the sciences and humanities in conversation. The course will require students to apply the theory of evolution by natural selection to explain the origin of HIV (chimpanzees in Africa) and the ability of HIV to develop drug resistance and evade an effective vaccine. The course will simultaneously put these scientific processes and the effects of disease into historical context.

Times

Days

Instructor

2:20-3:40

T

McDow, D

Kwiek, J

Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for Micrbio 3704. Cross-listed in Micrbio.


 

HISTORY 3706: COCA-COLA GLOBALIZATION: THE HISTORY OF AMERICAN BUSINESS AND GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE, 1800-PRESENT

3 credit hours, Online

Coca-Cola is everywhere. Today, the company sells over 1.8 billion servings of its products daily to customers in over 190 countries worldwide. The company has bottling plants in every corner of the globe from Australia to Zimbabwe. This is remarkable considering the company started out as a “brain tonic” first sold for just five cents in a small Gilded Age Atlanta pharmacy in 1886 by a sick and cash-strapped businessman named John Pemberton. So how did the company do it? That’s one of the big questions we will ask in this global environmental history course.

History 3706 offers an introduction to the fields of environmental history and business history. It is organized chronologically, beginning with the railroad revolution of the nineteenth century and ending in the twenty-first century. It chronicles the rise of some of America’s biggest multinational corporations and examines how these firms, working with governments and other institutions, shaped global ecological change between 1800 and 2017. It also considers the social and political responses to these environmental changes.

The questions we will ask in this course are not simple, and they will require us to re-imagine well-told stories from a new, ecological perspective. How did Coca-Cola acquire the natural resources it needed to end up all over the world? Can history tell us whether global climate change is real? Are Californians going to run out of water? We will deal with these and other intriguing questions as we explore the history of America in the world through the lens of environmental history.

Times

Days

Instructor

9:35-10:55

TR

Elmore, B

Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. GE historical study and diversity soc div in the US course.


 

HISTORY 4015: SEMINAR IN MODERN US HISTORY

3 credits, Hybrid

This seminar will focus on how and why historians’ interpretations have changed over time and how we might judge conflicting interpretations.

Our subject will be the life and career of Theodore Roosevelt.  A larger-than-life personality, he wrote so much – letters, articles, books – that it’s a wonder he had time to breathe. He filled every room during his lifetime, wishing to be “the corpse at every funeral, the bride at every wedding, and the baby at every christening,” according to his daughter, Alice, an attention hog herself.  And as an amateur naturalist, cowboy, historian, government official, war hero, President, and noisy ex-President, he left a trail that connects with major debates in U.S. history, including the meanings of Progressive-era reform, imperialism and the place of the U.S. in the world, race and racism, gender and masculinity, and westward expansion.

We will track conflicting and changing interpretations of TR’s life and times, and also sample Roosevelt’s writing.  You will write a series of papers that deal with these debates. 

Times

Days

Instructor

3:55-5:15

TR

Baker, P

Assigned Readings:
Edmund Morris, The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt
John Morton Blum, The Republican Roosevelt
Patricia O’Toole, When Trumpets Call
Plus additional readings available on Carmen

Assignments:
4 papers plus short reaction essays.


 

HISTORY 4015: SEMINAR IN MODERN US HISTORY

3 credit hours, In Person

This course will consider the social consequences of World War I, World War II, and the Vietnam War.  We will pay attention to how the nation was mobilized in each case, how armies were raised, how race and class relations were effected in each case, and daily life was reoriented.

Times

Days

Instructor

2:15-5:00

R

Steigerwald, D


 

HISTORY 4085/4085E: SEMINAR IN AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY

3 credit hours, Online

Embedded honors section available

It is probably the case that when most people think about antebellum slavery, the image of a plantation comes to mind.  It is not an illogical image given the critical participation of slaves in the production of American agricultural products, especially cotton, tobacco, rice, corn, wheat, indigo, hemp, and sugar.  Directly and indirectly, agricultural slave labor generated a substantial portion of American wealth in nineteenth-century America and in some other parts of the world.  But this course takes a different tack:  it looks at slavery and the slave experience beyond the plantation.  These men and women worked in cities, in mines, in factories, on rivers, in private homes and commercial enterprises, among other places. In this course, which will focus on urban, industrial, and commercial slavery, will pay especial attention to the these categories of slave labor, and the different life experiences it necessitated and allowed in, for example, family relations, master/slave dynamics, and social and organizational life.

Times

Days

Instructor

11:10-12:20

TR

Shaw, S


 

HISTORY 4125: SEMINAR IN LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY

3 credit hours, Online

What is a revolution? Why are successful revolutions such rare events? Why have so many revolutions failed and so few succeeded? Who are the revolutionaries? What is guerrilla warfare, and why do people resort to guerrilla warfare? What happens after the revolution, and how do revolutionaries rebuild/create a new government? What is the difference between a revolution and social movement? And historically, what was the complex relationship between the United States and modern Latin American countries, and why was the U.S. interested in Latin America?

This course examines these and other questions to analyze the history and meanings of revolutions and revolutionaries in modern Latin America. Starting with Mexico’s great revolution, we will move forward to analyze other revolutions and social movements in Guatemala, Cuba, Nicaragua, and others. Throughout this class we will discuss the causes of revolution, their changing historical nature, and revolutionary outcomes. Additionally, we also will consider dictatorships in Chile, Argentina, and Brazil to examine the search for social justice and reform. To better understand the inclusion of all peoples within the revolutionary experience, the course includes a consideration of the concepts of class, gender, and race and ethnicity. In this manner, we will pay special attention to historical actors to explore participation from the ground level up. We also will look at U.S. involvement in Latin American countries, including the role of the U.S. in revolutions and in the creation of a post-revolutionary society. Through an examination of these various historical factors, this class ultimately will provide a context for many of the major issues facing Latin American today.

Times

Days

Instructor

10:00-12:45

R

Smith, S


 

HISTORY 4217: SEMINAR IN LATE ANTIQUITY

3 credit hours, In person

This upper level history seminar will explore how both modern historians and late ancient observers imagine(d) the “Fall of Rome.”  We will begin by reading some of the most important contributions by historians to the question of the Roman Empire’s history between 400-700 CE, looking closely at debates between those historians who argue for considerable continuity between the classical and late Roman world (the “continuists”) and those who posit sharp ruptures and precipitous decline (the “catastrophists”).  We will then turn to late ancient primary sources, such as the writings of Augustine and Jerome on 410 CE (Alaric’s sack of Rome), and to the observations of people living through catastrophic events (e.g. warfare, new barbarian regimes, the Justinianic plague) as well as those who found themselves operating within new political and/or religious frameworks.

Times

Days

Instructor

9:30-12:15

W

Sessa, K


 

HISTORY 4217: SEMINAR IN LATE ANTIQUITY

3 credits, In Person

This advanced research and writing seminar for history majors examines how to write a history after we discover that our primary sources have been forged. Historians, after all, are only as good as their sources. The topic of literary forgery––falsely claimed and falsely attributed authorship––thus raises important and central questions regarding the very problem of history itself. This seminar in the ancient Christian tradition focuses on literary forgery to help senior history majors acquire advanced research and writing skills in using primary sources. Forgery and literary deceit are well documented in classical and late antiquity, and forgery itself is among the most common phenomena of the early Jewish and Christian traditions. Indeed, nearly half of the New Testament books make a false authorial claim. We shall examine the historical context of this broad phenomenon, also known as pseudepigraphy, in a wide range of ancient texts: classical works falsely attributed to traditional authorities (e.g., Plato, Aristotle, and the physician Galen), apocalyptic Jewish writings falsely attributed to Moses and the Patriarchs, and works in the New Testament and other early Christian literature that falsely claim the apostles or Jesus Christ himself as the author. Our goals are large: To ask why so many Christian authors forged what is today sacred scripture to Christians, to explore the critical categories and taxonomies involved in detecting forgeries, and to complicate the very meaning of authorship in the premodern era.

After reviewing the relevant literature, during which students will take turns leading the seminar, each student will conduct an independent research project culminating in a research paper (25 pages) based primarily upon primary source material (in translation) and written in steps throughout the semester.

Times

Days

Instructor

12:45-2:05

WF

Harril, B

 


 

HISTORY 4475: SEMINAR IN JEWISH HISTORY

3 credits, Online

During the 20th century, millions of Jews were uprooted from their homes as a result of war, persecution and economic distress. This seminar course explores the impact of displacement on Jewish life in Europe, the Middle East and the Americas. It covers the major Jewish refugee and migration flows, starting with the exodus from Eastern Europe in the late 19th and early 20th centuries and concluding with post-soviet emigration. We will begin with a theoretical discussion of basic concepts such as diaspora, exile and refugees and continue with an in-depth look into specific migratory movements. Through these case studies, we will explore the relationships between displacement and such issues as gender, violence, nationalist sentiment, citizenship and Jewish and human solidarity, while also comparing Jewish and non-Jewish migration. Readings and discussions will consider the perspectives of various actors, including states, voluntary organizations and the migrants themselves. 

Times

Days

Instructor

12:45-3:30

W

Yehudai, O


 

HISTORY 4525/4525E: SEMINAR IN INTERNATIONAL HISTORY

3 credits, Online

Times

Days

Instructor

2:15-5:00

T

Siegel, J


 

HISTORY 4625: SEMINAR IN WOMEN’S/GENDER HISTORY

3 credits, Hybrid

This course will offer an intensive introduction to research in the field of Women’s/Gender History.  The first half of the course will feature readings of primary and secondary sources, and discussions. The second half of the course will be devoted to the development of individual research projects and presentations about women’s and gender history. 

Times

Days

Instructor

12:45-3:30

W

Soland, B

Assigned Readings: Students will read a number of books and articles which will be discussed  in class.  In addition, students will read primary sources related to research projects of their own choosing. 

Assignments: Students will each select a research project on some aspect of women’s/gender history.  There are no restrictions on time or place for these research projects, I e. students may choose a topic related to women’s/gender history from any historical era and geographic location.  Students must prepare a 20-page paper based on individual research.


 

HISTORY 4705: SEMINAR IN HISTORY OF ENVIRONMENT, TECHNOLOGY AND SCIENCE

3 credit hours, Online

The field of Latin American history has a rich environmental history. From its colonial history to today, Latin America has experienced dramatic environmental change behind extractive export-commodity economies, like silver in Mexico, bananas in Central America to sugarcane and coffee in Brazil. Beyond commodity extraction, control of land has been an essential part of social and political conflict in the past and the present. The politicization of the environment in recent years is part of an important part of a broader approach to Latin American history as well. This course will introduce students to different methodological approaches to environmental history in Latin America and provides specific examples of the way environmental history has shaped Latin America today. 

Times

Days

Instructor

12:45-3:30

W

Eaglin, J

 

0


To find course availability and times, please visit the Ohio State Course Catalog and Master Schedule.