Summer 2018 Undergraduate Courses

12-week Summer Term (May 9 – July 27)
American History (2015)
Thematic (4675)

May session 1 (May 9 – June 4)
African History (3301)
American History (1151, 1152)
Ancient History (2210)
European History (1211, 1212, 2213, 2275)
Military History (2550)
Thematic (2704, 2800)
World History (2650, 2700)

June session 2 (June 5 – June 29)
European History (2211)
Latin American History (1102)
World History (1682)

July session 3 (July 2 – July 27)
American History (1152, 3014)
World History (1681)

 

Six-week Session 1 (May 9 – June 18)
Asian History (2401)
European History (1211)

Six-week Session 2 (June 19 – July 27)
African History (3306) 
Military History (3270) 
World History (2231) 

Eight-week Session 1 (May 9 – June 29)
American History (3030) 
Ancient History (3211) 

Eight-week Session 2 (June 5 – July 27)
No classes

TWELVE-WEEK SESSION – May 9 – July 27, 2018

 

AMERICAN HISTORY 


HISTORY 2015 AMERICAN CRIMINAL JUSTICE

3 Cr. Hrs.

Crime and punishment are among the most important issues in contemporary America.  This course offers an introduction to the historical study of crime in the United States from colonial times to the present.  It highlights changes in criminal behavior and in the ways, Americans have sought to deter, punish, and rehabilitate.  Primary topics include historical patterns of violence, the role and organization of the police, and the evolution of punishment in theory and practice.  This course also emphasizes differences in crime and punishment by region, class, ethnicity, gender, and age.  Topics will include riots, homicide, capital punishment, organized crime, gangs, prisons, policing, jurisprudence, and official violence.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
9:50-11:25       MW                             Roth, Randolph

Walker, Samuel (1998) Popular Justice: A History of American Criminal Justice, 2nd ed. New York: Oxford University Press. 0-19-507451-3 (paper)

Butterfield, Fox (1995) All God's Children: The Bosket Family and the American Tradition of Violence. New York: William Morrow. 0-380-72862-1 (paper)

Quinones, Sam (2015) Dreamland: The True Tale of America’s Opiate Epidemic. New York: Bloomsbury Press. ISBN-13: 978-1620402504

Mark Colvin (1997) Penitentiaries, Reformatories, and Chain Gangs: Social Theory and the History of Punishment in Nineteenth-Century America.  New York: St. Martin's Press. ISBN-13: 978-0312221287

Assignments & Grading:
Discussion and Attendance (10% of grade)
Quizzes on the Readings (10% of grade)
Midterm and Final Examinations (40% of grade)
Research Project / Notes / Essay (40% of grade):  You will be asked to write a 5 to 6-page paper on a topic in criminal justice history of interest to you (e.g., drugs, embezzlement, homicide). We will use on-line historical newspaper articles as sources. You will be required to turn in your research notes electronically as well as your essay, because the goal is to help you master the skills involved in careful historical research.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for history the history major or can fulfill the historical study GE.


                                                                                                                                                       

THEMATIC HISTORY

                                                                                                                                                           

HISTORY 4675 RESEARCH SEMINAR IN WORLD/GLOBAL/TRANSNATIONAL HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

The History of Violence

Histories of violent crime and violent death have proliferated over the past forty years, as historians have tried to understand the causes and consequences of violence, and the ways in which rates of violence have varied across time and space. Some of these histories are "microhistories."  They focus on particular crimes in an effort to understand the social and cultural circumstances that produced particular acts of violence in the past. Other studies examine nations, regions, communities, or ethnic groups over longer periods. These studies look for broader patterns in violent crime and violent death (including homicides, sexual assaults, domestic violence, accidents, suicides, genocides, and terrorism), in an effort to understand when, where, and why aggressive, self-destructive, or reckless behavior has been more common.

Students will have the opportunity to write a research paper from primary sources on a topic of their choice, exclusive of military history, since other seminars cover that topic. They may conduct their research in any period or geographical region. Although most students will probably choose to study the history of violence in the United States, students who are proficient in languages other than English will be encouraged to work with primary sources in those languages, as long as appropriate sources are available on-line or through the Ohio State University Library. Students might work with a particular crime, or with a coroner's book from a particular county, or with a local newspaper and its accounts of crime and violence.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
2:50-6:00         W                                 Roth, Randolph

Assigned Readings will include:
Steven Pinker, The Better Angels of Our Nature: Why Violence Has Declined. New York: Viking, 2011. (ISBN-10: 0670022950, ISBN-13: 978-0670022953)

Assignments:
Written Assignments:  Research prospectus, research bibliography, research notes, progress reports, and research paper (20-25 pp., two drafts).
Exams:  quizzes on the reading in Pinker.
Grading:

            Discussion, participation, and quizzes             10%
            Research bibliography                                     10%
            Research prospectus                                       15%
            Research notes                                                15%
            First draft of research paper                             15%
            Second draft of research paper                        35%

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the research seminar requirement toward a history major for semester students; this fulfills the 598-seminar requirement for quarter students. This course is only open to junior and senior history majors.  


                                                                                                                                                           

FOUR-WEEK SESSION 1 – May 9 – June 4, 2018

 

AFRICAN HISTORY

                                                                                                                                           

HISTORY 3301 HISTORY OF MODERN WEST AFRICA POST 1800

3 Cr. Hrs.

This intensive reading and discussion course on modern West Africa focuses on important themes that are crucial for understanding the transformation of the region from the period of European colonial rule to the independence era.  These themes include the process of decolonization, nation-building, post-independent political and economic crises, and issues of regional economic integration, current engagements with China and the U.S. and the process of democratization.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
On-line            on-line                         Kobo, Ousman

Assignments:
Assignments will include a number of multiple-choice quizzes, weekly discussions, a 3-page historical analyses paper; and a final project.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Africa, post-1750 for history the history major or can fulfill the historical study GE.


                                                                                                                                                        

AMERICAN HISTORY



HISTORY 1151 AMERICAN HISTORY TO 1877

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course provides a survey of American history from the Age of Encounter to the Reconstruction period.  It covers the social, economic, cultural, political, and diplomatic history of the American peoples. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
On-line            On-line                        Vrevich, K.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the historical study GE requirement.  Not open to students that have credit for History 151 or 2001.



HISTORY 1152 AMERICAN HISTORY 1877- PRESENT

3 Cr. Hrs.

From the aftermath of the Civil War to the 2000s, this course offers a sweeping survey of American history since 1865.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
On-line            On-line                        Schoof, M.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the historical study GE requirement.  Not open to students that have credit for History 152 or 2002.


                                                                                                                                                           

ANCIENT HISTORY


HISTORY 2210 CLASSICAL ARCHAEOLOGY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Note: This course will be offered ONLY in this online version.  There will be no class meetings and all assignments will be done on the Internet; that means you do not have to come to campus for classes or examinations, but that you must feel comfortable doing the work with your computer.  You must, however, read the assigned books (that you need to purchase) and you may want to visit a library to do some of the assignments.

This course examines the history and methods of Classical Archaeology—the archaeology of ancient Greek and Roman civilizations.  It will investigate how classical archaeology emerged as a discipline and what classical archaeologists actually do.  It will look at a number of the major archaeological sites of classical civilization and how archaeology has contributed to our understanding of the past.  An important feature of this course is that part of it will involve real material and experiences from the Ohio State University Excavations at Isthmia, in Greece!  Students will have a chance to see what the OSU excavation team has been doing and to follow the progress, problems, and successes that make up classical archaeology.

Required Books (print versions):
Brian M. Fagan, A Brief History of Archaeology, Classical Times to the Twenty-First Century
  (Pearson: Upper Saddle River, NJ 2005).  ISBN 0-13-177698-3
Various online readings, available on the class website, will also be required.

Assignments:
Regular graded online discussion, and a choice of other assignments from a list of examinations and various short projects.  You should expect to spend at least as much time on this course as you would in a regular classroom course.  You will need to be online at least 3-4 times a week for 1-2 hours each time, since much of the material will be delivered this way (but there will be no specific time each week when you must do these assignments—you can choose the time, as long as you get the assignments done when they are due).  In other words, most of the assignments will be done by handing something in, through a tool within the program software, or by posting discussion points on the class site.  Students who are not comfortable using the computer and who do not have access to a fast Internet connection should probably not take the course. 

All students in the class must successfully complete an online Course Organization quiz requiring an understanding of how the class is set up along with several beginning of class activities. This is designed to help you use the tools and requirements of the class before you get started. 

Prerequisites:
There are no special prerequisites for this course and no knowledge of archaeology is presumed. Since this is an online course, with no regular class meetings, students who sign up for the course should feel comfortable using a computer to do their schoolwork (see below).

This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for the history major or can fulfill a GE requirement.

Special Features:
As mentioned above, this course will bring material directly from Greece for student use.  It will do so with photographs, graphics, and nearly “live” video prepared just for this course.  We have made an online glossary to help you with new words, and there are many new visual displays to help you understand the basic ideas of classical archaeology.  We hope these features will make this an enjoyable experience for you. For further information, contact Professor Gregory at, gregory.4@osu.edu.


                                                                                                                           

EUROPEAN HISTORY

                                                                                                                                                            

HISTORY 1211 WESTERN CIVILIZATION TO THE 17TH CENTURY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Ancient Civilizations (Near East, Greece, Rome) barbarian invasions, medieval civilizations (Byzantium, Islam, Europe); Renaissance and Reformation.
 
Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
On-line            On-line                        McCarthy, B.
 
Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the historical study GE requirement.  Not open to students that have credit for History 111 or 2201; 2202; 2203 or 2205.


 

HISTORY 1212 WESTERN CIVILIZATION 17TH CENTURY TO THE PRESENT

3 Cr.  Hrs.
 
Political, scientific, and industrial revolutions, nationalism, the two World Wars; the decline of empires; the Cold War.
 
Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
On-line            On-line                        Powell, J.
 
Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the historical study GE requirement.  Not open to students that have credit for History 112; 2202; 2203; 2204 or 2205.


 

HISTORY 2213 THE ANCIENT MEDITERRANEAN CITY

3 Cr. Hrs.
 
Cities in the ancient Near East, Greece and Rome, with an emphasis on their physical form and historical importance.
 
Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
On-line            On-line                        Tadlock, Kyle
 
Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.


 

HISTORY 2275 CHILDREN & CHILDHOOD IN THE WESTERN WORLD

3 Cr. Hrs.
 
While the process of developing from infancy through childhood into adult life is a biological phenomenon, the specific ways in which children have been treated and understood vary enormously across time and place.  In this class, we will explore the history of children in the Western World from Antiquity to the present.  How has the role of children in Western culture changed across the centuries?  Have relationships between parents and children changed?  How has the understanding and treatment of children changed?  Ultimately, we will seek to define both changes and continuities in the lives of children in the Western world.
 
Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
3-5:05              TR                               Soland, Birgitte
This course is a hybrid (taught 50% in person and 50% online).
 
Assigned Readings: Readings will consist of a mixture of primary and secondary sources.  All readings will be available on Carmen.
 
Assignments: To be determined.
 
Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group Europe, pre or post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.


                                            

MILITARY HISTORY
                                                                                              

HISTORY 2550 THE HISTORY OF WAR

3 Cr. Hrs.

A survey of the main concepts and issues involved in the study of war in world perspective, using case studies from prehistoric times to the present.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
On-line             on-line                         Douglas, Sarah

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the historical study GE & Group Global, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.


                                                                                                                                                    

THEMATIC HISTORY


HISTORY 2704 WATER: A HUMAN HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

History of human use and understandings of water from ancient to modern times, with case studies taken from different geographic locations.

Time               Meetings Days             Instructor
On-line           on-line                          Harris, James

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills historical study GE & Group Global, post-1750 requirement for the history major.                                                                                                                                                           



HISTORY 2800 INTRODUCTION TO THE DISCIPLINE OF HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course is an introduction to the craft of history.  The primary goal of the course is to provide students with insight into the nature of historical inquiry and the historical profession.  Through this online course, we will consider several broader questions confronting the historian; the nature of historical evidence, the boundaries of the discipline of history, and the possibility of historical objectivity.  The course comprises several written assignments and projects that you will be asked to complete and share with your peers via Carmen.  In these assignments, you will be asked to explore and assess different approaches to history, and consider the validity and use of a variety of sources and methods for historical research.

Time               Meetings Days             Instructor
On-line           on-line                          Beach, Alison

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course is required for all students declaring a Major in history, students must earn a “C” or higher to have it count on the history major. It may not be used for GE Historical Study requirement.



                                                                                                                                                      

WORLD HISTORY

 

HISTORY 2650 WORLD SINCE 1914

3 Cr. Hrs.

The World since 1914 is a course on global history. We will focus on the central themes of global history in the modern world, such as globalization, the rise of mass society, and identity and difference, as well as major events, such as the World Wars, the Great Depression, the Cold War, and decolonization.

Time               Meetings Days             Instructor
On-line           On-line                         Kadric, S.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course may be taken to fulfill historical study GE requirement.  This course may be counted as Group Global and post-1750 for the major in history.                                                                                                                                                            



HISTORY 2700 GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT

3 Cr. Hrs.

In this course, we explore how humans have shaped the environment and how the environment has shaped human history from prehistory to the present.  Our topics will range from fire to deforestation to climate.  Students will learn the essential background to major environmental issues and consider how history might (or might not) help us confront present environmental challenges.

Time               Meetings Days             Instructor
11:25-2:35      MWF                            White, Sam

Assigned Readings:
There course has one required textbook
J. R. McNeill and Peter Engelke, The Great Acceleration: An Environmental History of the Anthropocene since 1945 (Cambridge, MA: Harvard Belknap, 2016).
All other course readings will be posted to Carmen.

Assignments:
Regular short quizzes and exams, and a final paper.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course may be taken to fulfill historical study, social science, or global studies GE requirements.  This course may be counted as Group Global, and either pre- or post-1750 for the major in history.  This course has been recommended for students pursuing degrees in SENR, but students in all degree programs are welcome.



                                                                                                                                                         

FOUR WEEK SESSION 2 – June 5 – June 29, 2018

 

EUROPEAN HISTORY

                                                                                                                                                            

HISTORY 2211 THE ANCIENT NEAR EAST

3 Cr. Hrs.

The ancient history of Mesopotamia, Egypt, Anatolia, Persia, Israel and the Levant to the establishment of the Persian Empire.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
On-line            on-line                         Beshay, M.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for the history major.  It can also fulfill the historical study GE requirement.  Not open to students that have credit for History 500.
 


                                                                                                                

LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY

                                                                                                                                                            

HISTORY 1101 LATIN AMERICAN CIVILIZATIONS TO 1825

3 Cr. Hrs.

Latin American political, social, economic and cultural history from Pre-Columbian times to Independence.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
On-line            on-line                         Anthony, D.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the historical study GE requirement. 
 



WORLD HISTORY

                                                                                                                                                             

HISTORY 1682 WORLD HISTORY FROM 1500 TO THE PRESENT

3 Cr. Hrs.

Survey of the human community, with an emphasis on its increasing global integration, from the first European voyages of exploration through the present.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
On-line            on-line                         Lang, K.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the historical study GE requirement.  Not open to students that have credit for History 181 or 2641.

 


                                                                                                                                                           

FOUR WEEK SESSION 3 – July 2 – July 27, 2018

 

AMERICAN HISTORY

                                                                                                                                                            

HISTORY 1152 AMERICAN HISTORY 1877- PRESENT

3 Cr. Hrs.

From the aftermath of the Civil War to the 2000s, this course offers a sweeping survey of American history since 1865.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
On-line            On-line                        Larson, Z.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the historical study GE requirement.  Not open to students that have credit for History 152 or 2002.                                                                                                                                                    



HISTORY 3014 GILDED AGE TO PROGRESSIVE ERA, 1877-1920

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course examines American politics and society from the later years of Reconstruction until the U.S. entry in World War I.  This is period historians often overlook, one stuck between the drama of the Civil War and the more familiar developments of the 20th century.  Yet we should not.  In this period, important things seemed up for grabs, within the power of Americans to manage: how industry would be controlled, the character of race relations, the role of government in shaping society, public morals, and the economy, and America's place in the world.  

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
On-line            on-line                         Pawlikowski, Melissah

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for the history major or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement. Not open to students with credit for History 151 or 2001.


WORLD HISTORY


HISTORY 1681 WORLD HISTORY TO 1500

3 Cr. Hrs.

Comparative survey of the world’s major civilizations and their interconnections from the beginnings of civilization through 1500.

Time               Meetings Days             Instructor
On-line           on-line                          Shimoda, Kyle

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the GE Historical Study requirement, not open to students with credit for History 181 or 2641.


                                                                                                                                                           

SIX WEEK SESSION 1 – May 9 – June 18, 2018

 

ASIAN HISTORY

                                                                                                                                                            

HISTORY 2401 HISTORY OF EAST ASIA IN THE PRE-MODERN ERA 

3 Cr. Hrs.

Simply put, in this course we will explore one question together: How were the civilizations of China, Korea, and Japan connected but different in the pre-modern period (to 1800)?

History 2401 is an introduction to the societies and cultures of pre‑modern China, Korea, and Japan, the countries that make up the geographical and cultural unit of East Asia. One goal of this course is to consider what is distinctive about "East Asian civilization." A second goal is the study of the relationship between the evolution of China, Korea, and Japan as distinct cultures themselves. We will examine how Korea and Japan, despite considerable linguistic, intellectual, and political borrowing from China, diverged from the Chinese pattern of development to form cultures with their own very distinctive artistic and literary traditions, political organizations, and social and economic structures. We also consider how Korea and Japan influenced Chinese civilization as well. The course will end with exploring China, Korea, and Japan in their encounters with the West. 

The lectures are devoted to the major themes and developments of Chinese, Korean, and Japanese political systems, thought and religious belief, art and literature, and society. Discussions allow us to examine historical sources together to deepen our understanding of the issues covered in the lectures.  

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
On-line            On-line                        Zhang, Y.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
No prior knowledge in any of the East Asian languages is required.  This course fulfills Group East Asia, pre-1750 for history majors or can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.

 


                                                                                                                                                  

EUROPEAN HISTORY

                                                                                                                                                    

HISTORY 1211 WESTERN CIVILIZATION TO THE 17TH CENTURY

3 Cr. Hrs.

 Ancient Civilizations (Near East, Greece, Rome) barbarian invasions, medieval civilizations (Byzantium, Islam, Europe); Renaissance and Reformation.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
On-line            On-line                        Vanderpuy, P.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the historical study GE requirement.  Not open to students that have credit for History 111 or 2201; 2202; 2203 or 2205.
 


                                                                                                                                                  

SIX WEEK SESSION 2 – June 19 – July 27, 2018

 

AFRICAN HISTORY


HISTORY 3306 HISTORY OF AFRICAN CHRISTIANITY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This intensive reading and writing class will examine the origins and spread of Christianity in Africa, with a specific focus on the processes by which the interactions between Christian doctrines and indigenous African belief systems produced what we call, African expressions of Christianity.  We will attempt to explain, in the words of Terr Haar, “How [the Christian] God became African.”  Historians once studied Christianity in Africa either as a tool of colonial oppression & alienation, or as a platform for cultural appropriation and resistance against colonial rule.  Today, most historians approach the study of African Christianity as a genuine spiritual expression and the site for mutual cultural borrowing and appropriations between African and Western cultures.  This new approach stemmed from the increasing presence of Pentecostal Churches and Born-again Christianity across sub-Saharan Africa.  These faiths have reformulated the Christian doctrine to conform to the need of Africans without violating orthodoxy, and in the process undermined the influence of the established mission-oriented churches such as the Catholic Church & the various Protestant faiths that seemed too concerned about putative syncretism encouraged by the Pentecostals.  The faith-based and miracle-centered Pentecostal movement emerged from local initiatives as well as external impetus, thus producing a hybrid African Christianity that appealed to urban masses.  Today, Christianity is growing faster in Africa than in the Western world, and Africans are taking Christianity back to the Western world.  The course will therefore not only help students understand the history of Christianity in Africa, but also the transformation of the faith across the globe.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
On-line            on-line                         Kobo, Ousman

Assignments:
Lectures and assignments will be online. Assignments will include a number of multiple-choice quizzes, weekly discussions, a 3-page historical analyses paper, and a final project.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Africa, pre and post-1750 for history majors or it can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.
 


                                                                                                                                                         

MILITARY HISTORY

                                                                                                                                                           

HISTORY 3270 WORLD WAR I

3 Cr. Hrs.

In this course, we will focus on the origins, course, and historical implications of one of the most significant turning points in modern world history: The First World War.  Often called “The Great War,” the conflict that broke out in the summer of 1914 and lasted for over four bloody, grinding years altered forever the global balance of power; cultural attitudes both inside and outside of Europe; domestic and international political relationships; and basic economic principles that had governed for centuries. Although the war was a European conflict, fighting took place in the Middle East, Africa, the Atlantic, and Asia. As such, we will examine the war as a global conflict, considering both the specifics aspects of the battles themselves as well as their broader social, political, and cultural context. The course grade will be comprised of attendance, a midterm, a final, and a 5-7-page essay on a topic to be discussed in lecture.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
On-line            on-line                         Douglas, S.

Assignments:TBD

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Global, post -1750 for the history major or can fulfill the historical study GE.
 


                                                                                                                                                         

WORLD HISTORY
                                                                                                                                                          

HISTORY 2231 THE CRUSADES

3 Cr. Hrs.

Examines the various European crusades – in the Holy Land, Spain, Eastern Europe, and southern France, from their origins to the late 15th century.

Time               Meeting Days             Instructor
online              on-line                         Yirga, F.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for the history major or can fulfill the historical study GE.
 


                                                                                                                                                   

EIGHT-WEEK SESSION 1 – May 9 – June 29, 2018

 

AMERICAN HISTORY

                                                                                                                                                           

HISTORY 3030 HISTORY OF OHIO

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will survey the economic, social, and political development of the geographic area that became Ohio from the Native American period to the present. We will explore three themes in particular:  the role of disruptive technology and creative destruction in shaping Ohio’s past; the critical junctures at which Ohio might have become something entirely different from what it became; Ohio’s connection to the wider world through geography, technology, demography, economics, and politics.  Specific topics will include the technological development of Native American civilizations; the international conflict to define and control the region; the role of technology in shaping the state; the role of Ohioans in the world's most important reform movements; the rise and fall of particular Ohio cities as a way to understand national and international economic, social, and political trends; and the challenges/opportunities of the global economy of the late 20th/early 21st century.

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
On-line            on-line                         Coil, William R.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group North America, post-1750 for the history major, or can fulfill the historical study GE requirement.   

                                                                                                           


 

ANCIENT HISTORY

                                                                                                                                                           

HISTORY 3211 OF CLASSICAL GREECE

3 Cr. Hrs.

The course explores the history of the classical era, the “Golden Age” of ancient Greece.  It traces political and cultural developments in the world of the Greek city-states from the time of the watershed Persian Wars of 480-479 BC down to the death of Alexander the Great in 323 and its immediate aftermath.  Major topics covered include: the rise of Athens as imperialist superpower and “cultural capital” of the Greek world; the escalating tensions between the Athenian empire and the Spartan-led Peloponnesian League that resulted in the cataclysmic Peloponnesian War (431-404 BC); the subsequent attempts by states like Sparta and Thebes to exercise hegemony over their fellow Greeks; the formation of the world’s first complex democracy in Athens; and the ground-breaking innovations that would shape the future course of art, architecture, philosophy, science, literature, and drama in the western world.  The course will conclude by looking at how the relatively sudden emergence of Philip II of Macedon as the dominant player on the Greek stage effectively ended the era of the independent city-states, and at how the conquest of the Persian empire by Philip’s son Alexander the Great transformed the political and cultural fortunes of Greece and the ancient Near East thereafter. 

Time                Meeting Days              Instructor
1:30-3:45         MW                             Anderson, Greg

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for history majors or can fulfill the historical study GE.
Other than English 1110.xx, there are no prerequisites for this class.
 



EIGHT WEEK SESSION 2 – June 5 – July 27, 2018

 

No Classes

 

 

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To find course availability and times, please visit the Ohio State Course Catalog and Master Schedule.