"Gods at War: A Roman Inperial Strategy," Lisa Mignone, NYU/Univ. of Cincinnati

January 3, 2019
Monday, April 1, 2019 - 3:30pm to 5:00pm
Dulles Hall, Room 168
The Premodernist Group
Lisa Mignone is a specialist in Roman religion, social history, and archaeology. She has taught at New York University and Brown University and holds degrees in Classical Studies from Radcliffe College of Harvard University (AB), the University of Virginia (MA), and Columbia University (MPhil, PhD). She has also won the Rome Prize at the American Academy in Rome. Currently, she is a Research Affiliate at NYU’s Institute for the Study of the Ancient World and will hold a Margo Tytus Visiting Fellowship at the University of Cincinnati in Spring 2019.
 
The Romans cultivated both their own gods and the gods of their enemies in order to secure Rome's preservation and imperial triumph.  While at war with their bitterest enemies, the Romans turned to Juno with extraordinary acts of collective worship.  This talk draws from my current book, Rome's Juno: religious imperialism and self-preservation (under contract with University of Michigan Press), which examines the role of the foremost goddess in Roman religious culture and practice. Three major military engagements come into focus: the conquest of Veii (396 BCE), the co-management of the cult at Lanuvium (338 BCE), and the destruction of Carthage (146 BCE).  In each of these encounters, the protection of the pantheon's supreme patroness was thought to be at stake on both sides: Etruscan Uni, Latin Juno, and Carthaginian Tinit. Contrary to literary productions, which render the mythical character Juno as forever angry with Rome, and contrary to much historical scholarship, which consistently marks Juno's worship at Rome as an attempt to woo a distinctly foreign/non-Roman goddess, Rome's Juno recognizes these ritual interactions as the propitiation of their own (Roman) tutelary deity. The first major monograph on the Roman goddess, this book also re-examines the evidence for the identification of the tutelary deities at Veii and Carthage, and thus contributes to the study of central Mediterranean religions, inter-cultural history, and ancient imperialism.  "Gods at War: A Roman Imperial Strategy" will present case studies related to the fall of Veii and Roman worship at Rome during the second Punic War.
 
Sponsored by: The Premodernist Group; The Graduate Interdisciplinary Specialization in Religions of the Ancient Mediterranean
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