"Slavery after the Civil War: The Slow Death and Many Afterlives of Bondage," Christina Snyder, Penn State

July 10, 2017
Friday, February 23, 2018 - 3:00pm to 4:30pm
Dulles Hall, Room 168
Early American Seminar

Abstract: Recent scholarship has uncovered slavery in surprising places: colonial Santa Fe, Ivy League campuses, St. Louis trading houses, Montreal kitchens, Cherokee plantations. This emerging historiography demonstrates that slavery was neither monolithic nor safely quarantined in the South; rather, colonialism brought disparate, ever-changing slaveries into contact with one another. In this new project, I argue that the Civil War was not the end of American slavery, but rather a major turning point leading to slavery’s decline in North America. In extending its postbellum empire, the United States claimed moral authority by fashioning itself as a liberator and civilizer, while fostering a range of near-slaveries. Indigenous slave trades persisted in the Southwest and Alaska, while California’s gold rush resulted in a population boom as well as a plurality of slaveries, including, until the 1880s, the legal debt bondage of Native Americans. Even as federal authorities attempted to eradicate some of these practices, the United States tolerated and even embraced other forms of bondage, including indentured servitude, orphan binding, and carceral labor. Slavery after the Civil War offers new vantage points on U.S. imperialism as well as slavery’s geography, periodization, development, and legacy. This talk will focus specifically on the relations between Mormon settlers and Indigenous peoples of the Great Basin, exploring how and why settlers sought to incorporate Native youth into their households as servants and/or foster children.    

S M T W T F S
 
 
 
1
 
2
 
3
 
4
 
5
 
6
 
7
 
8
 
9
 
10
 
11
 
12
 
13
 
14
 
15
 
16
 
17
 
18
 
19
 
20
 
21
 
22
 
23
 
24
 
25
 
26
 
27
 
28
 
29
 
30