Spring 2015 Undergraduate Course Descriptions

AFRICAN HISTORY

HISTORY 2301 AFRICAN PEOPLES & EMPIRES IN WORLD HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

A thematic course focusing on African world history, empire building, and commercial and cultural links across the Atlantic, the Indian Ocean, and the Mediterranean worlds before and during the Atlantic slave trade.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
On-line on-line Skabelund

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Africa, pre & post-1750 for history majors.


HISTORY 2302 HISTORY OF MODERN AFRICA, 1800-1960

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will examine Africans' engagements with European colonial rule and how these engagements culminated in ending European rule in the 1960s.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
On-line
On-line
9:10-10:05
on-line
on-line
MWF
Skabelund
Kobo, O.
Miles, D.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Africa, post-1750 for history majors.


HISTORY 3704 HIV: FROM MICROBIOLOGY TO MACROHISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

HIV: From Microbiology to Macrohistory is an interdisciplinary exploration of HIV/AIDs that combines history and virology through team teaching.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
3:55 - 5:15 p.m. T R McDow, T. & J. Kwiek

In 2012, an estimated 35.3 million people around the world were living with HIV, a number startling close to the estimated number of people who have died from AIDs since 1981. Unlocking the virological secrets of HIV/AIDs has been one of the grand scientific challenges of the last three decades, and the disease remains one of the world's most serious challenges to human health and development. The burden of the disease is very uneven globally, and sub-Saharan African, where the disease originated, is home to 69% of those living with HIV today. How did this virus and this global pandemic come to be? The course traces the evolution of the virus at both the molecular level and within its global historical context. Team-taught by a virologist and a historian, the goal of this class at the broadest level, is to put the sciences and humanities in conversation.

This course will require students to apply the theory of evolution by natural selection to explain the origin of HIV (chimpanzees in Africa) and the ability of HIV to develop drug resistance and evade an effective vaccine. The course will simultaneously put these scientific processes and the effects of disease in historical context. The very scientific revolutions that led to Darwin's theory of evolution and Koch's postulates of infection transmission helped make European colonialism possible. For example Social Darwinism justified imperial aims, Pasteurian ideals of contamination influenced notions of racial purity, and the new field of tropical medicine was created to protect colonial administrators and soldiers in their distant postings. Similarly, colonial rule and the creation of the extractive economies of central and southern Africa set in motion population movements, wealth inequalities, and structures of power that amplified the effects - decades later - of HIV and contributed to what would become a global pandemic. Although the academy approaches the medical facts of disease and its social consequences through distinct disciplines, those who had contracted the virus experience all aspects of the disease. This course makes it possible for students to consider the medical, scientific, social, political, and economic causes and consequences of one of the world's most devastating viruses.

Assignments:
Students will complete assignments that are typical of both history and microbiology; they will synthesize these approaches in a final capstone project. Weekly assessments will ask students to either reflect on the reading or lecture for that week or will ask them to analyze and manipulate scientific data. The course will have a midterm and final examination that will require students to demonstrate both specific knowledge and their abilities to synthesize material across disciplines.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Africa, post-1750 for history majors.


AMERICAN HISTORY

HISTORY 1152 AMERICAN CIVLIZATION, 1877 - PRESENT

3 Cr. Hrs.

The political, constitutional, social and economic development of the United States from 1877 to the present.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
On-line on-line Siff, S.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
Not open to students with credit for History 2002.


HISTORY 2001 LAUNCHING AMERICA

3 Cr. Hrs.

History 2001 is a one-semester introduction to American Civilization from colonial Times through Reconstruction. Our emphasis will be the critical reading of primary sources—diaries, letters, political tracts, poems, songs, stories, paintings, buildings and other material artifacts—through which we will try to understand the past. We will focus on social history and cultural history, but we will also pay close attention to the political history of the United States.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
10:20-11:15
9:10; 10:20; 12:40
TR
Friday (recitations)
Roth, R.

Assigned Readings:
John Mack Faragher, Out of Many, Vol. 1, Brief Fourth Edition (but any edition, brief or full, will suffice.

Frederick Douglass, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, (any edition, although the pagination may not match the one available at local bookstores.

Uniprint packet of course materials (UP)

Retrieving the American Past (RTAP)

Assignments:
Essays: We will write one critical essay on primary sources (5-6 pp)
Exams: There will be a midterm, a final exam and five quizzes.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
Not open to students with credit for History 151 or 1151.


HISTORY 2001 LAUNCHING AMERICA

3 Cr. Hrs.

History 2001 is a one-semester introduction to American Civilization from colonial Times through Reconstruction.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
9:10-10:05
3:55 5:15
MWF
TR
Potyondy, P.
Shriver, C.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
Not open to students with credit for History 151 or 1151.


HISTORY 2002 MAKING AMERICA MODERN

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will introduce students to some of the major themes in US history from the Civil War to the Present. We will particularly focus on the rise of the market economy, the changing role of the federal government, and debates over the meaning of "freedom." Course assignments will include extensive reading and writing.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
10:20-11:15
9:10; 10:20
12:40
TR
Friday (recitations)
Friday (recitations)
Conn, S.

Assigned Readings:
2-3 books plus articles on Carmen.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Not open to students with credit for History 152 or 1152.


HISTORY 2002 MAKING AMERICA MODERN

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course explores the political and cultural changes in the United States from the age of industrialization to the present. Through a combination of primary and secondary documents and films, we will look at how the United States went from being an emerging industrial nation to a major global superpower, and how its citizens negotiated and influenced this transformation. The course begins and ends in periods of large-scale social upheaval, and the importance of mass social movements in the U.S., and their relationship to the state, will be a recurring theme in the class. Throughout the course we will ask how major economic and military events, such as the Great Depression and the Second World War, affected people living in the U.S. differently based on categories of race, class, gender and sexuality. Important topics will include: the relationship between industrial capitalism and the era of reform from 1850 to 1920; the ways in which U.S. foreign policy decisions were connected to domestic affairs; and the effects of the modern African American Freedom Struggle on social changes in the 1950s and 1960s.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
11:10-12:30 TR Rivers, D.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Not open to students with credit for History 152 or 1152.


HISTORY 2002 MAKING AMERICA MODERN

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course explores the political and cultural changes in the United States from the age of industrialization to the present.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
3:00-3:55
3:55-5:15
3:55-5:15
MWF
TR
TR
Kami, H.
Fry, Z.
Fernandez, D.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Not open to students with credit for History 152 or 1152.


HISTORY 2045 HISTORY OF AMERICAN RELIGION TO THE CIVIL WAR

3 Cr. Hrs.

History of religion in America from the colonial era through the Civil War.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
On-line on-line Zevorich, L.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group N. America, pre-1750 for history majors.


HISTORY 2080 AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY TO 1877

3 Cr. Hrs.

The study of the African American experience in America from arrival through the era of Reconstruction, focusing on slavery, resistance movements, and African American culture.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
3:15-5:15 TR Nevius, M.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group N. America, pre-1750 for history majors.


HISTORY 2752 SOCIAL REFORM MOVEMENTS IN U.S. HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will ask students to consider historically contentious social issues through the lens of religious history. In debates over social roles, civic rights, and political change, Americans have often drawn upon their own understandings of religious morality to buttress their claims. Advocates of slavery and proponents of abolition, for example, both employed religious arguments. In the many years of debate surrounding female suffrage, devout Christians point to their readings of Biblical teachings to bolster arguments for both the support and rejection of giving women the vote. In recent years, we have seen individuals both defend and decry gay marriage on the basis of their religious beliefs. Looking to a series of social issues that particularly inspired religious individuals to voice their opinions, this course will ask you to read both primary sources and secondary sources that help you better understand the worldviews of earlier (as well as some contemporary) Americans.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
11:10-12:30 WF Barstow, Eliza

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group N. America, post-1750 for history majors.


HISTORY 3002 U.S. POLITICAL HISTORY SINCE 1877

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course provides an overview of major trends in U.S. political history from Reconstruction to the present. We will trace topics including the expansion of federal government responsibilities, the relationships among the courts, parties and political branches of government (the presidency and Congress), the ideological distance (polarization) between the parties, and the interplay between foreign and domestic politics. While we will necessarily deal with political leaders - presidents Congressmen, and party officials - we will also examine how ordinary people and popular movements worked for change. Is our own Time especially divided and contentious?

Time Meeting Days Instructor
5:30-6:50 TR Baker, P.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group N. America, post-1750 for history majors.


HISTORY 3013 CIVIL WAR AND RECONSTRUCTION

3 Cr. Hrs.

In this course we will discuss the origins of War, which side won and why, and various attempts to remake Southern society during the Reconstruction era. We will describe the experiences of Northerners, Southerners, and Westerners, including ordinary people (soldiers, slaves, farmers, women) as well as famous generals and politicians. This is not a military history course.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
12:45-2:05 TR Cashin

Assigned Readings:
Several monographs on the period.

Assignments:
Students will write one paper, take a final exam, and discuss the monographs in class. Students are expected to attend class on a regular basis.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group N. America, pre-1750 for history majors.


HISTORY 3015 FROM THE NEW ERA TO THE NEW FRONTIER: THE UNITED STATES 1921-1963

3 Cr. Hrs.

History 3015, "From the New Era to the New Frontier," considers the United States from 1920 to 1963, essentially America through the Modern Age. We will ponder modernity at its broadest through examining the following issues: technological and economic change; the rise of a bureaucratic society, public and private; urbanization and suburbanization; cultural modernism and the rise of commercialized culture; persistent ethno-racial conflict that issued finally in the Civil Rights movement; and the rise of the United States as the world's foremost power. We will see that the main pivot point, after which the major developments of the twentieth century were locked into American life, was World War II.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
10:20-11:15 MWF Steigerwald


Assigned Readings:
Edward Larson, Summer for the Gods.
Timothy Egan, The Worst Hard Time: The Untold Story of Those Who Survived the Great American Dust Bowl.
Denise Kiernan, Girls of Atomic City.
David Hajdu, The Ten-Cent Plague: The Great Comic Book Scare and How It Changed America.

Assignments:
Carmen Quizzes (30%): Four Carmen quizzes, 20 multiple-choice questions covering lecture material and assigned readings, each worth 5% of final grade.

Book Synopses (30%): Two 500-750 word synopses: one on Larson, Summer for the Gods, the other on Kiernan, Girls of Atomic City. Each synopsis is worth 15% of the final grade.See Carmen for prompts.

Conceptual Essays (40%): Two 1000-1200-word essays that bring together all relevant course material. Each is worth 25% of the final grade. See Carmen for the essay prompts.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group N. America, post-1750 for history majors.


HISTORY 3016 THE CONTEMPORARY UNITED STATES SINCE 1963

3 Cr. Hrs.

Examination of the major political, economic, social and cultural changes in the USA since the spring of 1963: mass suburbanization, causes and consequences of the Vietnam War, the civil rights movement, political polarization, the revival of feminism, the counter-culture, the new environmentalism, détente and the decline of East-West tensions, the new world disorder, the rise of a service-based economy, and globalization.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
11:10-12:30 TR Stebenne

Assigned Readings:
Thomas Hine, Populuxe (1990)
Frederik Logevall, The Origins of the Vietnam War (2001)
Juan Williams, Eyes on the Prize: America's Civil Rights Years, 1954-1965 (1988), chs. 4-8
Bruce Shulman, The Seventies: The Great Shift in American Culture, Society & Politics 2002
Jules Tygiel, Ronald Reagan and the Triumph of American Conservatism, 2nd ed. (2006), chaps. 7-11
Barbara Ehrenreich, Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting by in America (2001)

Assignments:
A midterm, a final and a short (5-page) paper based on the assigned reading.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
Students planning to pursue a master's in education should note that this course satisfies one of the course requirements in for History majors, Group North America, post-1750. This course also fulfills a GE requirement.


HISTORY 3071 NATIVE AMERICAN HISTORY FROM REMOVAL TO PRESENT

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will introduce students to the history of Native Americans from the 1820s to the present. We will look at the removal of Native tribes to Indian Territory, the establishment of reservation system, the resurgence of Native cultures and pan-Indian movements in the twentieth century, postwar urban migration and tribal termination policies, the Red Power movements of the 1960s, and Native legal organizing in the late 20th and 21st centuries. The course will encourage the students to think about intersections of gender, race, sexuality, and class and to consider Native resistance movements and cultural persistence over the last two centuries.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
3:55-5:15 TR Rivers, D.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group N. America, post-1750 for history majors.


HISTORY 3075 MEXICAN AMERICAN HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Most Americans mark the beginning of U.S. history with the first achievement of our Anglo forebears - the founding of Jamestown, Virginia in 1607. Yet what it we began instead with the first settlements of Spanish explorers, such as colonial New Mexico nearly four decades earlier? What legacy has Spanish exploration and conquest left our American heritage? Specifically, where do Mexican Americans fit into U.S. history? Are they newcomers and recent immigrants to U.S. society? What is the historical legacy of Mexican Americans in the U.S.?

This course will answer these questions and
Explore the Spanish colonial conquest of the territory that later became Mexico/the Southwestern U.S.
Examine dynamics of labor, migration, race, class, gender, sexuality
Cover topics such as popular culture, education and social movements
Help place contemporary events related to Mexican American in historical context.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
12:45-2:05 TR Fernandez

Assigned Readings: (tentative)
Jose Alamillo, Making Lemonade out of Lemons: Mexican American Labor and Leisure in a California Town, 1880-1960, (Univ. of Illinois Press, 2006).
Zaragosa Vargas, Major Problems in Mexican American History (Houghton Mifflin, 1999)
Additional readings on Carmen

Assignments:
Three quizzes, two papers and a final project.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
Students should have completed a 2000-level history course prior to enrolling in this course.
This course fulfills Group N. America, post-1750 for history majors.


HISTORY 3080 HISTORY OF SLAVERY IN THE U.S.

3 Cr. Hrs.

In this course we will discuss the history of slavery in North America from the colonial era to the Civil War. We will include material on bondage in other societies, but the focus will be on African-American slavery in what is now the United States. We will explore various aspects of the slave experience, such as work, religion, family life, resistance, and rebellion. We will also discuss free blacks, people of mixed race, yeoman whites, and slave owners, as well as the significance of slavery as a culture, economic, and political issues.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
9:35-10:55 TR Cashin, J.

Assignments:
Students will read several monographs, write several short papers, and take one exam.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group N. America, post-1750 for history majors.


HISTORY 3082 BLACK AMERICANS DURING THE PROGRESSIVE ERA

3 Cr. Hrs.

The Progressive Era in American history, roughly 1890 to 1920, is generally characterized as a period of major changes in American social, political, and economic life.  Americans were becoming increasingly urban; urban areas became more industrial and more socio-culturally diverse, and politics became more complex.  The seemingly rapid and sometimes haphazard changes that accompanied (sometimes spawned and sometimes resulted from) this reorganization also led to major reform movements in many areas of life.   Reformers believed that whether in politics, public health, child welfare, government, housing, urban development, work, or any other area of life, the problems generated by rapid urbanization, industrialization, and immigration could be addressed and corrected.  People from all walks of life went to work in ways they thought would improve society.  Implicit in the intellectual/scholarly construct of "the Progressive Era" is the idea of progress, modernization, and improvement. 

The same period in African-American history has been labeled "the Nadir"—the lowest point in the history of American race relations.  It was a period of increasing segregation, discrimination, and racial terror, symbolized most especially by lynching and race riots involving white attacks on black communities and individuals.  Despite those horrors, it was also a period of intense and successful organizing and advancements among black Americans:  black clubs, beneficial and benevolent societies were formed; the NAACP, the Urban League, The Negro Business League, the National Association of Colored Women were a few of the national organizations that worked for the advancement of the race.  And these institutions, along with black migration from the country to the city and from the South to the North and West contributed to the creation of a racial/cultural identity that would undergird the Harlem Renaissance and shape a black political consciousness that would lead to the beginning of the modern Civil Rights Movement. 

This course is a study of this rich, interesting, and complex period in African-American history. The course combines lectures and discussions, primary and secondary sources, in order to bring out the most important issues, organizations, episodes in the history of African America during the Progressive Era/Nadir.    

Time Meeting Days Instructor
12:45-2:05 TR Shaw, S.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group N. America, post-1750 for history majors.


HISTORY 3701 HISTORY OF AMERICAN MEDICINE

3 Cr. Hrs.

From the early colonial period to the present, American medicine has been full of tensions between the comforts of traditional practices (whether Old World or New World) and the tantalizing promises of new discoveries and reform, both personal and social, through health. We explore these tensions through intensive reading and discussion, along with opportunities for students to pursue individual and group projects of particular interest to them.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
9:35-10:55 TR Lawrence, S.

Assigned Readings:
James Cassedy, Medicine in America: A Short History, (1991).
Two other books will be added. They are yet to be determined.
All of the rest of the readings are drawn from book chapters and scholarly articles. These are available on the Carmen website or are available in electronic format from the OSU Library.

Assignments:
Two short discussion essays
Civil War case history analysis
Midterm exam
Group project presentation and individual essay
Final Exam

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group N. America, post-1750 for history majors.


ANCIENT HISTORY

HISTORY 2201 ANCIENT GREECE & ROME

3 Cr. Hrs.

Comparative historical analysis of ancient Mediterranean civilizations in the Near East, Greece, and Rome from the Bronze Age to the Fall of Rome.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
8:00-9:20
9:10-10:05
3:00-3:55
3:55-5:15
TR
MWF
MWF
TR
McCarthy, B.
Tadlock, K.
Marmor, L.
Sutherland, S.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for history majors.


HISTORY 2210 CLASSICAL ARCHAEOLOGY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Introduction to the principles, methods, and history of archaeological investigation in the ancient Greek and Roman world, illustrated through a selection of major classical sites.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
3:00-3:55 MWF Shimoda, K.


Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for history majors.


HISTORY 3211 HISTORY OF CLASSICAL GREECE

3 Cr. Hrs.

The course explores the history of the classical era, the "Golden Age" of ancient Greece. It traces political and cultural developments in the world of the Greek city-states from the time of the watershed Persian Wars of 480-479 BC down to the death of Alexander the Great in 323 and its immediate aftermath. Major topics covered include: the rise of Athens as imperialist superpower and "cultural capital" of the Greek world; the escalating tensions between the Athenian empire and the Spartan-led Peloponnesian League that resulted in the cataclysmic Peloponnesian War (431-404 BC); the subsequent attempts by states like Sparta and Thebes to exercise hegemony over their fellow Greeks; the formation of the world's first complex democracy in Athens; and the ground-breaking innovations that would shape the future course of art, architecture, philosophy, science, literature, and drama in the western world. The course will conclude by looking at how the relatively sudden emergence of Philip II of Macedon as the dominant player on the Greek stage effectively ended the era of the independent city-states, and at how the conquest of the Persian empire by Philip's son Alexander the Great transformed the political and cultural fortunes of Greece and the ancient Near East thereafter. Completion of 3210 (Archaic Greece) is NOT a prerequisite for taking History 3211.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
11:10-12:30 TR Anderson

Assignments:
Two exams and a term paper.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for history majors.


HISTORY 3216 WAR IN THE ANCIENT MEDITERRANEAN WORLD

3 Cr. Hrs.

An advanced survey of military history from the Bronze Age in Greece (ca. 1200 D.C.) to the fall of the Roman Empire in the West (A.D. 476). The lectures will proceed chronologically and six interconnected themes will comprise their focus: tactical and technological developments in warfare; military strategy and interstate diplomacy; the reciprocal effects of war and political systems upon one another; the social and economic bases of military activity; conversely, the impact of war on society, particularly its role in the economy and its effect upon the lives of both participants and non-combatants; finally, the military ethos and the ideological role of war. In addition, students will be introduced to some of the basic problems which historians of the period are currently attempting to solve as well as to some of the most important hypotheses their work has produced.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
3:55-5:15 TR Rosenstein


Assigned Readings (tentative):
Caesar, The Gallic Wars
D. Engles, Alexander the Great & the Logistics of the Macedonian Army.
A. Ferrill, The Fall of the Roman Empire: The Military Explanation
V. Hansen, The Western Way of War.
Herodotus, The Persian Wars
Livy, The War with Hannibal
E. Luttwak, The Grand Strategy of the Roman Empire
Tacitus, The Complete Works
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War and a Xeroxed packet

Assignments:
Students in this course will be required to take a midterm and a final examination and to turn in a term paper, all of which must be completed in order to pass the class.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: Group Europe, pre-1750 for history majors.


HISTORY 3223 HISTORY OF THE LATER ROMAN EMPIRE

3 Cr. Hrs.

The course will concentrate on the political and military history of the later Roman empire and the events that led to the "fall" of the West and survival of the East (which went on to become "the Byzantine empire"). We will also discuss the late Roman economy, life in the cities, and especially the religious change that took place with the Christianization of the empire. A prime objective of the course will for students to learn a substantial amount about this period of history and also learn about how to handle the very different kinds of sources that have survived from antiquity. For this reason, most sessions will aim to combine ancient literary sources, archaeology and art history, and modern scholarship.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
10:20-11:15 MWF Kaldellis


Assigned Readings:
A number of primary sources (in translation) and articles will be placed on the Carmen site for the course. The following two texts will be assigned in addition to one or two more TBA:
P. Heather, The Fall of the Roman Empire: A New History (various publishers since 2005). ISBN: 978-0195325416.
Ammianus Marcellinus, The Later Roman Empire, trans. W. Hamilton; introduction A. Wallace-Hadrill (Penguin Classics, 2006). ISBN: 978-014044406.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for history majors.


ASIAN & ISLAMIC HISTORY

HISTORY 2350 ISLAM, POLITICS, AND SOCIETY IN HISTORY

3 Cr.Hrs.

Introduction to the manner in which Islam has interacted with politics in the Middle East and vicinity from the rise of Islam through the present.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
3:00-3:55 MWF Hunt, C.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Middle East, pre-1750 for history majors.


HISTORY 2393 CONTEMPORARY INDIA & SOUTH ASIA

3 Cr. Hrs.

Many observers have noted the seeming paradoxes of modern India; the world's largest democracy has also developed an increasingly authoritarian state; the country's grinding poverty continues amidst the gleaming office parks of the new global economy; powerful movements for social justice contend with the rise of repressive religious nationalisms. Despite some differences in politics and economy, we may find similar themes and historical forces at work in Pakistan and Bangladesh as well. Situating South Asian history in its local, regional, and global contexts, this course examines these paradoxes in a survey of the tumultuous events of the last sixty years. We utilize a wide range of materials, including scholarly articles, films, literature, journalism, and more. This course does not assume prior knowledge about South Asia.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
11:10-12:30 WF Sreenivas, M.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Near East, East Asia, Middle East, South or Central Asia Group, post-1750 for history majors.


HISTORY 2402 HISTORY OF EAST ASIA IN THE MODERN ERA, 1600-PRESENT

3 Cr. Hrs.

History 2402 will introduce the histories of the societies of East Asia (China, Korea, Japan) starting in about 1600. To a higher degree than History 2401, which is useful but certainly not required preparation, History 2402 is organized on a 3-way comparative model ("how do China, Japan, or Korea compare to each other historically?"); one of our goals is to learn to think comparatively about history and societies. We will survey key historical phenomena (including political, military, social, and intellectual themes) that have distinguished each country in the modern period. For most of the semester, the course will be organized chronologically and thematically. It will also seek a balance between examination of particular periods and exploration of patterns of continuity and change across historical periods and different societies. In addition to providing a basic narrative of East Asian civilization since 1600, the course will introduce students to important written sources and to historical writing.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
1:50-2:45
10:20; 11:30; 12:40
WF
Monday (recitations)
Reed, C.

Assigned Readings:
A textbook, a monograph, primary sources, short films.

Assignments:
TBA, similar to other courses at this level.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
History 2401 is NOT a prerequisite for History 2402. History 2402 satisfies the GE historical study requirement, second historical study option, and Global studies option; it may also satisfy the two open options for the GE. For the History Department major and minor, History 2402 is Group East Asia, post-1750 with concentrations in Power, Culture, and Society (PCS) & Colonialism and Comparative Empires (CCE).

Please note: A new study tour will be offered in May Term 2015
Shanghai, 1750 to 2050: Chinese Hub Port, Treaty Port, & Global Mega-City, a History-, Culture-, and Language Learning Program. All students interested in participating in the program, are expected to have prepared for the study tour by having taken at least one Humanities course in Chinese Studies (e.g. History 2402 will fulfill that requirement). For more information about this study tour, please contact Prof. Christopher Reed, reed.434@osu.edu.


HISTORY 2402 HISTORY OF EAST ASIA IN THE MODERN ERA, 1600-PRESENT

3 Cr. Hrs.

History 2402 will introduce the histories of the societies of East Asia (China, Korea, Japan) starting in about 1600 to the present.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
3:00:3:55
3:55-5:15
MWF
TR
Dean, A.
Schultz, R.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
History 2402 satisfies the GE historical study requirement, second historical study option, and Global studies option; it may also satisfy the two open options for the GE. For the History Department major and minor, History 2402 is Group East Asia, post-1750 with concentrations in Power, Culture, and Society (PCS) & Colonialism and Comparative Empires (CCE).


HISTORY 3351 INTELLECTUAL & SOCIAL MOVEMENTS IN THE MUSLIM WORLD

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course explores significant intellectual and social movements that have arisen among Muslims from the inception of Islam in 610 C.E. until the present. These range from the initial split over the caliphate to the great medieval theological debates to 19th - and early 20th-century reformism to ISIS. Special attention will be given to the development of Shiite Islam, with a focus on the background to the Iranian revolution as portrayed in Roy Mottahedeh's The Mantle of the Prophet, an account of the experiences and intellectual formation of a young Iranian mullah active during the 1970s.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
9:35-10:55 TR Hathaway

Assigned Readings:
Frederick Matthewson Denny, An Introduction to Islam, 4th edition (or 3rd ed. in a pinch)
Roy Mottahedeh, The Mantle of the Prophet: Religion and Politics in Iran
Various excerpts from primary and secondary sources

Assignments:
In-class midterm, exercise on the roots of current events, paper related to The Mantle of the Prophet, take-home final.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Near Eastern, East Asia, Middle East, South or Central Asia Group, pre-1750 for history majors.


HISTORY 3356 THE OTTOMAN EMPIRE

3 Cr. Hrs.

The Ottoman Empire was the longest-lasting Islamic empire and the only one to figure as a major power in the history of Europe as well as of the Islamic world. This course examines the origins of the empire in an obscure band of frontier warriors, its florescence as a major world power of the sixteenth century, and its further development down to the time when European expansionism began to undermine its autonomy, opening a new era of rapid change. This course considers not only the Ottomans' political power, but also economic, social, and cultural factors that helped explain that power and gave the empire such a distinctive place in Islamic and world history.

Time Meeting Days Instructor

11:10-12:30
TR Findley

Assigned Readings:
The reading list will include works such as the following:

Esposito, John, Islam, the Straight Path, Oxford, 1991
Evliya, The Intimate Life of an Ottoman Statesman: Melek Ahmed Pasha (1588-1662) as Portrayed in Evliya Çelebi's Book of Travels, trans. Robert Dankoff, Albany, 1991
Imber, Colin, The Ottoman State: The Structure of Power 2002
Hathaway, Jane, The Arab Lands under Ottoman Rule, 1516-1800, Pearson Longman, 2008
Peirce, Leslie, The Imperial Harem: Women and Sovereignty in the Ottoman Empire, Oxford pb, 1993
Tucker, Judith, In the House of the Law: Gender & Islamic Law in Ottoman Syria & Palestine, University of California Press 1998

Assignments:
There will be one midterm, a paper assignment, and a comprehensive final examination. The paper assignment will probably be based on the Dankoff translation of Evliya, The Intimate Life of an Ottoman Statesman. Graduate students may be asked to prepare a term paper on a suggested topic and may also be asked to do extra reading.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course (formerly History 2352) is a sequel to courses pertaining to earlier periods of Islamic history. Courses on Islamic History at the 2000-level, such as 2350 or 2375, would also be good preparation for the course, however, at least one 2000 level course is required prior to enrolling in at 3000 level history course. Although no specific course is listed as a prerequisite for History 3356, it is not designed to serve as an introduction to the basics of Islam or Islamic civilization. Students lacking background on those subjects will need to do additional background reading before the beginning of the semester or during the first week. Such students are urged to contact the Instructor for recommendations: findley.1@osu.edu. This course fulfills Group Near Eastern, pre-1750 for history majors.


HISTORY 3375 THE MONGOL WORLD EMPIRE: CENTRAL EURASIA, 1000-1500

3 Cr. Hrs.

At the beginning of the thirteenth century, a small and relatively obscure nomadic people emerged from their isolated homeland in the steppe north of China to forge what would quickly become the largest contiguous empire in the history of the world. While the Mongol Empire is long gone, it had a profound and undeniable impact on the trajectory of world history. The destruction of the Mongol conquests was overwhelming, but that relatively short period of trauma was followed by a lengthy recovery under the Pax-Mongolica: the Mongol Peace. For several decades, Eurasia witnessed an unprecedented rise in the movement of people and a corresponding rise in the transcontinental exchange of commodities, scientific knowledge, religious and cultural traditions, and even disease pathogens. This course will introduce students to the social, cultural and political history of medieval Central Eurasia, paying special attention to the quite regular, occasionally turbulent, but never dull interactions of pastoral-nomadic and sedentary peoples.

Time Meeting Days Instructor

11:10-12:30
TR Levi

Assigned Readings: Four books.

Assignments: Course work includes a map quiz, midterm, paper assignment and a final exam.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group NE, (specifically Central Asia) pre-1750 for history majors.


HISTORY 3403 CHINA IN THE EARLY MODERN ERA: THE MING AND QING

3 Cr. Hrs. DYNASTIES

This course surveys early-modern Chinese history, roughly 14th-18th century. We begin with the transition from the Mongol Yuan dynasty to the Ming, and end with the establishment of another "alien dynasty," the Manchu Qing. We will look at political institutions and culture, socio-economic changes, the social, cultural and spiritual lives of people of different classes, environmental issues, and gender system during this period. The survey aims to help you understand some of the most important traditions in Chinese imperial history: their origins, how they shaped the course of early-modern China, and how they were contested and modified in new historical conditions, especially in a new era of globalization in trade, culture, and religion as well as climate change. By the end of the course you will form your own views on: 1) what features define a Chinese empire? 2) How did early-modern patterns of development emerge in China and differ from those of other parts of the world? 3) How did early-modern China and its location in the global transformation shape the world that we live in today?

Time Meeting Days Instructor
9:35-10:55 TR Zhang

Assigned Readings:
Readings will be exclusively in English.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
No prior knowledge in Chinese language or Chinese history required. This course fulfills group East Asia, pre & post-1750 for history majors.


HISTORY 3405 HISTORY OF CONTEMPORARY CHINA, 1921-2000

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course provides a general but analytic introduction to the social, political, and intellectual history of contemporary China (from the rise of the Communist Party to approximately the present). We will review key historical phenomena that distinguish Contemporary China, particularly the search for wealth, power, and international respect. We will also examine the roles of various figures such as Sun Yat-sen, Chiang Kai-shek, Mao Zedong, Deng Xiaoping, etc., in the development of contemporary China. Finally, we will analyze key topics in contemporary Chinese history such as Marxism and Maoism; the establishment of New China; the Cultural Revolution; post-Mao economic and political developments, particularly in the legal system; and Chinese women's liberation.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
2:20-3:40 WF Reed

Assigned Readings:
Four books.

Assignments:
Map assignments, précis (abstract), and take-home exams.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
History 3405 satisfies the GE Historical Study requirement, second historical study category as well as GE Global Studies requirement. History 3405 may also satisfy the two open options category for the GE. For the History major and minor, History 3405 is East Asia, post-1750 with concentrations in Power, Culture and Society (PCS) and Colonialism and Comparative Empires (CCE). This course assumes that students have taken at least one 2000-level History course. Please note: A new study tour will be offered in May Term 2015 Shanghai, 1750 to 2050: Chinese Hub Port, Treaty Port, & Global Mega-City, a History-, Culture-, and Language Learning Program. All students interested in participating in the program, are expected to have prepared for the study tour by having taken at least one Humanities course in Chinese Studies (e.g. History, 3405 will fulfill that requirement). For more information about this study tour please contact Prof. Christopher Reed, reed.434@osu.edu.


EUROPEAN HISTORY

HISTORY 1212 WESTERN CIVILIZATION FROM THE 17th CENTURY TO MODERN TIMES

3 Cr. Hrs.

A sampling of important developments in European history from the Enlightenment and French Revolution to Hitler and the Holocaust with two distinctive features: (1) a strong emphasis on clear writing on assigned papers for which I will conduct a week-long writing workshop, and (2) psychohistorical approach to Hitler's role in the Holocaust in preparation for which we will study Freud's theory of psychoanalysis.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
3:00-3:55 MWF Kern, S.

Assigned Readings:
Emile Zola, Germinal
Robin W. Winks & Joan Neuberger, Europe and the Making of Modernity, 1815-1914
Rudolph Binion, Hitler Among the Germans
Diana Hacker, A Pocket Style Manual (any edition)
On Carmen
Readings by Karl Marx, Sigmund Freud, Jackson Spielvogel and Ian Kershal.

Assignments:
Students will take one in-class test and write two papers on the assigned readings. The papers should be 1200 words (4 pages, double-spaced).


HISTORY 1212 WESTERN CIVILIZATION FROM THE 17th CENTURY TO MODERN

3 Cr. Hrs.

The focus of this course is on Political, scientific, and industrial revolutions; nationalism; the two World Wars; the decline of empires and the Cold War.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
3:55-5:15 TR Kadric, S.

HISTORY 2202 INTRODUCTION TO MEDIEVAL HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Survey of medieval history from the late Roman Empire to the early sixteenth century.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
9:10-10:05 MWF McGough, F.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for history majors.


HISTORY 2204 MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course offers a social, political, economic, and cultural overview of modern Europe. It will be presented as a large lecture format, together with smaller sections.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
10:20-11:15
9:10; 10:20; 12:40
WF
Thursdays (recitations)
Davis, R.

Assigned Readings:
Levack, et al., The West, Encounters and Transformations vol. 2, 1550-present, 4th ed
Mark Kishlansky, Sources of the West: Readings in Western Civilization, vol. 2, 1600-present, 8th ed.

Assignments: Midterm, final and section attendance and quizzes.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
Prerequisite - English 1110.01 previous or concurrent and if you already have credit for History 1212 you can't enroll in this course. This course fulfills Group Europe, post-1750 for history majors.


HISTORY 2204 MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

In this course, we will study fundamental events and processes in European politics, war, economics, intellectual thought, culture, and society from the French and Industrial Revolutions to the present.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
3:00-3:55 MWF Henry, L.
On-line on-line Niebrzydowski, P.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Europe, post-1750 for history majors.


HISTORY 2251 EMPIRES & NATIONS IN EASTERN EUROPE, 1500 - PRESENT

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course provides a survey of the history of Eastern Europe from the fifteenth century until the present.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
3:00-3:55 MWF Miller, B.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Europe, pre & post-1750 for history majors.


HISTORY 2275 CHILDREN & CHILDHOOD IN THE WESTERN WORLD

3 Cr. Hrs.

While the process of developing from infancy through childhood into adult life is a biological phenomenon, the specific ways in which children have been treated and understood vary enormously across time and place. In this class we will explore the history of children in the Western World from Antiquity to the present. How has the role of children in Western culture changed across the centuries? Have relationships between parents and children changed? How has the understanding and treatment of children changed? Ultimately, we will seek to define both changes and continuities in the lives of children in the Western world.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
11:10-12:30 TR Soland

Assigned Readings: Readings will consist of a mixture of primary and secondary sources. All readings will be available on Carmen.

Assignments: 2 short papers (3-5 pages) plus final paper (15 Pages)

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group Europe, pre or post-1750.


HISTORY 2280 INTRODUCTION TO RUSSIAN HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Selected topics introducing students to the history of Russian politics, society and culture.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
9:35-10:55
9:10-10:05
TR
MWF
Sokolsky, M.
Johnson, J.


Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Europe, post-1750 for history majors.


HISTORY 3229 HISTORY OF EARLY CHRISTIANITY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course introduces students to the origins and early history of Christianity. It aims to provide students with an historical perspective on how men and women living during the first four centuries of the Common Era perceived and/or practiced what was a new and increasingly prominent ancient religion. During this semester, we shall focus primarily on the social, political, institutional, and intellectual dimensions of early Christianity, with special attention paid to the great diversity of belief and practice among individuals who considered themselves followers of Christ. This course will have succeeded if students leave in December with an understanding of ancient Christianity not as a single, unified faith, but as a fluid, complex and sometimes dissonant set of beliefs, practices and experiences.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
9:35-10:55 TR Sessa

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for history majors.


HISTORY 3236 MEDIEVAL EUROPE II

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will examine the major economic, social, and spiritual changes that transformed Western Europe during the High and Late Middle Ages. Topics include forms of violence (including the Crusades), heresy, the development of the papacy, the economic takeoff, the re-emergence of cities, the transformation of lay piety, and the impact of the Black Death.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
12:45-2:05 TR Beach, A.

Assignments:
Requirements are a midterm examination, a final examination, several map quizzes, short weekly written response to the course readings, and a media-based "object project" focusing on an object of medieval material culture of the student's choosing.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for history majors.


HISTORY 3260 MODERN BRITISH HISTORY, 1775-1920

3 Cr. Hrs.

This lecture course will provide a survey of British history, including imperial history, from the late eighteenth to the twentieth century. It covers many dimensions of British history: political, economic, social, religious, medical, technological, and environmental. The central themes of the course are the rise of liberalism as a political and economic theory, the development of industrial and urban society, the dramatic growth of the British empire, the Irish famine and its aftermath, and the emergence of a set of 'social questions' - poverty, disease, irreligion - which liberalism by itself proved unable to solve. The course will explore how Britain and its governments attempted to generate economic strength while simultaneously ameliorating the 'social question'. The tensions between economic freedom and social protection remain central to British politics, just as they do in America.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
12:45-2:05 TR Otter

Assigned Readings: None; readings are posted weekly on Carmen.

Assignments: Midterm, final paper, final examination

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills: Group Europe, post-1750 for history majors.


HISTORY 3263 FRANCE IN THE 20th CENTURY

3 Cr. Hrs.

In the fall of 2005, people all over the world were shocked to see images broadcast on television of young men and boys in France—many of them born to parents of immigrant origin from former French colonies —burning cars and schools and battling with police on the outskirts of French cities. This course will concentrate on analyzing the history of modern France, from the founding of the Third Republic in 1870 until the present, to try to make sense of these current events. The twentieth century was particularly traumatic for a nation that has always prided itself on its traditions of tolerance and respect for human rights, but which also created an overseas empire by force and collaborated with the German Occupiers from 1940 to 1945. Topics to be explored include US-French relations, the rise of socialism and nationalism, feminism and modernism, the two World Wars, imperialism and decolonization, and the particular place of France and French culture in the modern world. Readings include autobiographies, novels and works of history written by people who lived in metropolitan France, as well as authors from former French colonies in Senegal and Algeria.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
11:10-12:30 TR Conklin

Assigned Readings:
Alice Conklin, Sarah Fishman, Robert Zaretsky, France and Its Empire since 1870
Guy de Maupassant, Bel Ami
Michael Burns, France and the Dreyfus Affair
Alice Kaplan, The Collaborator
Vercors, The Silence of the Sea
Excerpts from Andrew Feenberg & Jim Freedman, When Poetry Ruled the Streets: The French May Events of 1968.

Films:
Grand Illusion, dir. Jean Renoir
The Battle of Algiers, dir. Gillo Pontecorvo
Hate, dir. Matheiu Kassovitz.

Assignments: Regular attendance and participation in class (25%)
A mid-term (25%), a final (25%), and a 5-7 page book review (25%).

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group Europe, post-1750 for history majors.


HISTORY 3266 HISTORY OF SPAIN, 1469-PRESENT

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course provides a broad survey of Spanish history from the 15th century to the present. In order to understand the late modernization and the changing role of Spain in the world, we will examine the interactions between geography, society, politics, ideology and the economy, and compare the evolution of Spain with other European countries. The historical experience of Spain will allow us to analyze historical problems such as the rise and fall of empires, the origins of globalization, economic and social modernization, the long term effects of civil war and dictatorship, or the impact of foreign capital and knowhow on late developing countries.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
9:35-10:55 TR Puig, N.

Assigned Readings:
The narrative background for this course is provided by Phillips, William D. & Rahn Phillips, Carla (2010). A Concise History of Spain, Cambridge University Press, 245 pp. Students are also expected to read selected chapters from Elliott, John H. (1990). Imperial Spain, 1469-1716; Penguin Books; Carr, Raymond (ed.) (2000) Spain: A History Oxford University Press; and Tortella, Gabriel (2000), The Development of Modern Spain, An Economic History of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Harvard Univ. Press. Selected chapters, contemporary texts, graphs, maps and other visual resources used in the classroom will be available through Carmen.

Assignments:
Class participation and individual study are crucial to make the most, enjoy and pass this course. Grading will be based on class participation and presentations (25%), a midterm exam (25%); a 5-10 page long paper (25%); and a take-home final exam 5-10 pages long (25%). We shall work together on your presentation/s and paper in class and during office hours before you work on them individually.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Europe, pre- and post- 1750 for history majors.

Students majoring in Spanish, History, International Studies, Political Science, Business and Economics are welcome to this course. Knowledge of the Spanish language is not required. However, students fluent in Spanish and interested in developing their language skills and deepening their understanding of Spain will be offered the opportunity to read additional texts and write and discuss their papers in Spanish.


HISTORY 3273 MODERNIST THOUGHT AND CULTURE, 1880-1945

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course surveys one of the most dynamic spans of Western cultural history, which witnessed a spectrum of revolutionary developments in physics, philosophy, psychiatry, visual art, architecture, music, dance, cinema, and literature. The team-teaching format ensures that students will have the opportunity to approach modernist ideas and forms of expression from the perspectives of intellectual history as well as literature and fine-arts criticism. They will acquire valuable experience not only in reading, thinking, talking and writing about great works of modernist culture, but also in hearing, seeing and experiencing them.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
2:20-3:40 TR Kern, S. (History) & McHale, Brian (English)

Assigned Readings:
Friedrich Nietzsche, Nietzsche and the Death of God, edited by Peter Fritzsche
Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness
Gertrude Stein, Tender Buttons
Stephen Kern, The Culture of Time and Space: 1880-1918
Franz Kafka, Metamorphosis
Virginia Woolf, A Room of One's Own

Short Readings and selections on Carmen:
Guillaume Apollinaire, Zone
Blaise Cendrars, Prose of the Transsiberian
Sigmund Freud, Introductory Lectures on Psychoanalysis (selections)
James Joyce, Ulysses (selections)
T.S. Eliot, The Waste Land
Jean-Paul Sartre, Being and Nothingness (selections); No Exit
Virginia Woolf, "The Mark on the Wall"

Assignments:
Students will write three papers of about 4 pages (1200 words) each on assigned topics based on the readings, lectures, and class discussions, and a final paper of about 5 pages (1200).

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
None. The history department prerequisite that students must have taken a 2000-level history course before enrolling in a 3000-level course is waived for all students.


JEWISH HISTORY

HISTORY 2450 ANCIENT AND MEDIEVAL JEWISH HISTORY, 300BCE -1100CE

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course surveys nearly fourteen centuries of Jewish history, religion, and culture in the Near East from the days of the Maccabees (second century B.C.E.) to the death of Moses Maimonides (1204 C.E.). Focusing on key figures and representative subjects, the lectures will seek to offer a balanced picture of the Jewish experience in the ancient and early medieval periods. Special emphasis will be placed upon the evaluation and interpretation of primary sources (in translation). These texts will introduce students to the political, social, intellectual, and spiritual worlds of ancient and medieval Jewry.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
12:45-2:05 TR Frank

Assigned Readings:
1. H.H. Ben-Sasson, A History of the Jewish People.
2. David Biale, Cultures of the Jews, Vol. I: Mediterranean Origins
2. Lawrence H. Schiffman, Texts and Traditions: A Source Reader for the Study of
Second Temple and Rabbinic Judaism.
Additional required readings will be posted on the CARMEN website for this course or will be found via the links provided on the course syllabus.

Assignments:
1. All assigned reading is required.
2. There will be five written assignments. Each will consist of a 250 word response to an assigned question (there will be a choice). The assignments will be discussed in class on the specified dates. Written assignments will be collected and checked, but not individually graded. All assignments must be completed on time.
3. There will be five quizzes. Quizzes will be drawn directly from the short-answer questions posted on CARMEN. The lowest grade will be dropped.
4. There will be a midterm examination and a final examination. Detailed study guides will be distributed in advance of each examination.
5. There will be one essay in the form of a book review (five pages).

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Global, pre-1750 for history majors.


HISTORY 2453 HISTORY OF ZIONISM AND MODERN ISRAEL

3 Cr. Hrs.

Zionism (Jewish nationalism) and Israel, the state that it created, are pivotal for a full understanding of the history of modernity, of the modern Middle East and of the Jewish people. This course will be a comprehensive overview of Zionism and Israel through the lens of political, religious, military, cultural and intellectual history. We will use diplomatic documents, poetry, music, film, and other sources. The goal of the course will be to understand Zionism Israel in all of their vibrancy and complexity. We will deal with Israel's many cultural and religious groups, the Arab-Israeli conflict, the significance of Zionism in American politics and culture and more.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
9:35-10:55 TR Kaye, A.

Assigned Readings:
Selections from four books, plus articles.

Assignments:
2 short papers; occasional in-class quizzes; mid-term and final exams.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Middle East, post-1750 for history majors.


HISTORY 3455 JEWISH LIFE FROM THE RENAISSANCE TO THE EARLY

3 Cr. Hrs. ENLIGHTENMENT

This lass will seek to investigate Jewish life during the early modern period (15th to 18th centuries), emphasizing the Jews'; interactions with majority Christian and Muslim cultures. We will treat various aspects of cultural, social, religious and political life using autobiographies and other primary sources as well as secondary sources. Among the subjects we may investigate are: Jews in humanistic culture, Kabbalah and Renaissance occultism, the rise of historical consciousness, the expulsion from Spain in 1492 and its impact in Europe and the Ottoman Empire, the impact of Converso mentalities, the creation of the ghetto, Jews at court, heretics, Jewish communities in many regions, and the Jewish role in early Enlightenment thought. An interdisciplinary approach will help students integrate the material in the context of world events such as the voyages of discovery, the rise of the Ottomans, and the Protestant Reformation. A second aim for the course is to offer students practice in analyzing primary source documents. These will be discussed intensely in connection with secondary readings. Discussions on topics such as genre, rhetoric, bias, historical consciousness, attitude to the "Other" and awareness of contemporary discoveries will sharpen students' approach to primary sources in general.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
2:20-3:40 TR Goldish

Assigned Readings:
I have recommended that everyone buy their books online. They are also available on 2-hour reserve at Thompson Library. Further readings will be available on Carmen.

Miriam Bodian, Hebrews of the Portuguese Nation: Conversos & Community in Early Modern Amsterdam
David B. Ruderman, Early Modern Jewry
Mark R. Cohen (ed.), The Autobiography of a Seventeenth-Century Venetian Rabbi: Leon
Modena's Life of Judah.
The Memoirs of Gluckel of Hameln

Assignments:
Quizzes or short written assignments (10 (5 pts each; 12 given, lowest two dropped) 50%
Paper 25%
Final 25%

Each assignment is worth a specific number of points, each point worth 1% of your class grades, so don't miss them!

Daily quizzes contain questions on the readings assigned for that day. The lowest two grades of the 12 will be dropped, so if you are out for any reason and miss a quiz don't worry - it will disappear and will not affect your grade. If you miss more than two quizzes, though, you will start to lose points, so try hard not to miss class. The paper and final will be explained in class.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Europe, pre-1750 for history majors.


HISTORY 3470 MESSIANISM AND CHANGE IN THE JEWISH WORLD

3 Cr. Hrs.

Messianism is the key to understanding Jewish ideas and social movements as diverse as rationalism and mysticism, apocalypticism and nationalism. Its importance also reach far beyond Judaism, Christianity, for example, began as Jewish messianic sect. We will trace Jewish messiahs and messianism from the Biblical Hebrew prophets, through the turbulent sectarianism at the time of Jesus to movements of Jews under medieval Islam and Christianity, into the modern period with Enlightenment, Emancipation and 20th century Zionism. Because of the wide historical scope of this seminar - we will cover over 2000 years of history - it will serve as a window onto Jewish history as a whole. This course is relevant to anyone interested in social, religious, and intellectual history, religious anthropology, and the history of Judaism.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
12:45-2:05 TR Kaye, A.

Assigned Readings:
Selections from four books, plus articles.

Assignments:
2 short papers; occasional in-class quizzes; midterm and final exams.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfils Group Global, pre & post-1750 for history majors.


LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY

HISTORY 1101 LATIN AMERICAN CIVILIZATIONS TO 1825

3 Cr. Hrs.

Latin American political, social, economic and cultural history from Pre-Columbian times to Independence (1825) focusing on imperialism, religion, minorities, war and rebellion.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
3:00-3:55 MWF Tyce, S.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
English 1110.01 previous or concurrent; not open to students with credit for History 171.


HISTORY 2100 INTRODUCTION TO THE SPANISH ATLANTIC WORLD

3 Cr. Hrs.

Introductory survey of the Spanish Empire in the Americas to 1825.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
3:00-3:55 MWF Anthony, D.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Latin America, pre-1750 for history majors.


HISTORY 2120 REVOLUTIONS AND MOVEMENTS IN MODERN LATIN AMERICA

3 Cr. Hrs.

Latin America has experienced many of the world's most historically significant revolutions, including the great Mexican revolution, the Cuban revolution, the Nicaraguan revolution, and others. The course "Revolutions and Social Movements in Modern Latin America" analyzes these revolutions, as well as dictatorships, and political and social movements from independence to the present. Throughout this class we will consider the history of individual countries, while at the same time analyzing the effect, influence and relevance of various historical events on the region as a whole.

"Revolutions and Social Movements in Modern Latin America" begins with the tumultuous nineteenth century and the Wars of Independence. In focusing on state formation and national identity, the first section of this course aims to understand the dramatic social, cultural, and political impact of Latin America's post-Independence political conflicts and modernizing growth. Next the course will shift to the twentieth-century, starting with Mexico's great revolution and then moving forward to analyze other revolutions and social movements in Guatemala, Cuba and Nicaragua. The following section of this class will consider the rise and fall of military dictatorships in South America, including those in Chile, Argentina, and Brazil. In this part of the course students will analyze the search for social justice and reform, and the ways in which ordinary people fought against repression. We also will examine the rise and fall of export economies and industrialization, poverty, and social reform in Venezuela, Haiti, Puerto Rico, and the Dominican Republic. The final weeks of the course will be devoted to issues facing Latin America today, including the complex issue of drugs in Colombia and Mexico, and immigration.

Several themes appear throughout the course. An analysis of Latin American revolutionaries is crucial to the study of the region, and this course will examine the legend and myth of Che Guevara. We also will consider the role of the U.S. and international institutions in the politics, economics and culture of Latin America, as well as the narratives used to justify foreign intervention in the region. Additionally, special lectures will explore culture in Latin America, including movies, literature, and artists, such as the painter Frida Kahlo. Gender and ethnicity are important elements as well, and women and race are integrated throughout our studies.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
11:30-12:25
8:00; 10:20; 11:30
TR
Wednesday (recitations)
Smith, S.

Assignments:
Attendance/Participation, Midterm, paper and a final examination.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Latin America, post-1750.


MILITARY HISTORY

HISTORY 2550 THE HISTORY OF WAR

5 Cr. Hrs.

A survey of the main concepts and issues involved in the study of war in world perspective, using case studies from prehistoric times to the present.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
9:10-10:05 MWF Curzon, D.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Global, post -1750 for history majors.


HISTORY 3552 WAR IN WORLD HISTORY, 1900 - PRESENT

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course is an introduction to new approaches in the history of war. We will examine the actors, forms of violence, ideological stakes, and memories of modern war, from World War I to the present.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
10:20-11:15
9:10; 10:20; 12:40
MW
Friday (recitations)
Cabanes, B.

Assigned Readings:
Primo Levi, The Drowned and the Saved
Anonymous, A Women in Berlin
E. B. Sledge, With the Old Breed at Peleliu and Okinawa
Henri Alleg, The Question
Jean Hatzfeld, Machete Season, The Killers in Rwanda Speak

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for history majors.


HISTORY 3560 AMERICAN MILITARY POLICY, 1607-1903

3 Cr. Hrs.


This course describes and analyzes the history of American military policy from the colonial period to the end of the Philippine War. It focuses on the creation of American military institutions, the genesis of policy-making and maintenance of civilian control over that process, the interrelationship between foreign and military policy, the conduct of war, and the influence of American society upon the armed forces as social institutions.

Students will achieve an understanding of the main developments in American military history, the ways in which these developments have reflected or shaped developments in general American history, and the main interpretations advanced by scholars who have studied this subject. They will also hone their skills at critical writing and analysis, and will gain greater insight into the way historians explore the human condition.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
12:45-2:05 TR Grimsley

Assigned Readings:
Allan R. Millett and Peter Maslowski, For the Common Defense: A Military History of the United States of America. Revised and Expanded Edition.
Fred Anderson, A People's Army: Massachusetts Soldiers & Society in the Seven Years' War.
James M. McPherson, For Cause and Comrades.

Assignments:
The course grade is based on weekly quizzes administered through Carmen, a take home midterm examination, a final examination, and class participation. These requirements are weighted as follows:

Quizzes 40%
Midterm 20%
Final Exam 30%
Class Participation 10%

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group N America, post-1750 for history majors. Although there are no prerequisites, a solid grounding in U.S. History is very helpful.


HISTORY 3561 AMERICAN MILITARY POLICY, 1914 - PRESENT

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course examines the history of American military policy from the aftermath of the Spanish-American War through the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq after the terrorist attack on the U.S. homeland on 9/11/2001. The course will focus on the interrelationship of foreign and military policy, the conduct of war, the genesis of national security policy and civilian control of the decision-making process, the experience of American service members at war, and the influence of American society upon the armed forces as social institutions. The course covers U.S. participation in World War I, the interwar period, World War II, the Cold War, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, the Gulf War, and the ongoing wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Through readings, lectures and in-class discussion, the class will study the growth of the United States and its armed forces from insular nation to global superpower.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
2:20-3:40 TR Mansoor

Assigned Readings:
- Allan R. Millett and Peter Maslowski, For the Common Defense: A Military History of the United States of America
- West Point History of Warfare, selected chapters
- E.B. Sledge, With the Old Breed
- Peter Mansoor, Surge: My Journey with General David Petraeus and the Remaking of the Iraq War.

Assignments:
In-class mid-term and final examinations
Three review essays (2-3 pages each) of E. B.Sledge, With the Old Breed; Peter Mansoor, Surge: My Journey with General David Petraeus and the Remaking of the Iraq War; and one additional book chosen by the student with Instructor permission.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group N. America, post-1750 for history majors.


HISTORY 3570 WORLD WAR II

3 Cr. Hours

An introduction to the causes, course, and consequences of the Second World War from a global perspective. In addition to the study of strategy, operations and tactics, we will also give extended attention to the war's impact on the societies that waged it; e.g., the mobilization of the home fronts to sustain the war effort, the experience of enemy occupation (including the Holocaust), and the strategic bombing offensives.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
12:45-2:05 TR Guilmartin

Assigned Readings:
Michael J. Lyons, World War II: A Short History.
John W. Dower, War Without Mercy.
Gerald F. Linderman, The World within War: America's Combat Experience in World War II.

Assignments:
Quizzes (45 percent)
1 midterm exam (25 percent)
1 final exam (30 percent)

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for history majors.


THEMATIC COURSE OFFERINGS

HISTORY 2701 HISTORY OF TECHNOLOGY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Survey of the history of technology in global context from ancient times.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
9:10-10:05 MWF Perry, J.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the Global, post-1750 category for history majors.


HISTORY 2703 PUBLIC HEALTH, MEDICINE & DISEASE

3 Cr. Hrs.

Survey of public health, medicine & disease in a global context.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
3:55-5:15 TR Harris, J.

Prerequisites & Special Comments: This course fulfills the Global, post-1750 category for history majors.


HISTORY 2800 INTRODUCTION TO THE DISCIPLINE OF HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course introduces undergraduate history majors to the methods and skills that historians use to study the past, and it considers some of the problems we face in interpreting evidence, assessing arguments, and presenting our research to others. We will use a series of exercises to work on our basic skills, and three case studies will enable us to reflect on historical problems in more depth: an early crisis among the first believers of Jesus in the first century, the puzzling case of a missing and returned soldier in sixteenth-century France, and the murder of Hypatia in fifth-century Alexandria. This is a seminar, in which students will be expected to prepare work and participate in each class meeting.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
11:10-12:30 TR Brakke, D


Assigned Readings:
Conal Furay & Michael Salevouris, The Methods & Skills of History
John Lewis Gaddis, The Landscape of History: How Historians Map the Past
Natalie Zemon Davis, The Return of Martin Guerre
Recommended Reading: Mary Lynn Rampolla, A Pocket Guide to Writing in History

Assignments:
Assignments will include exercises from Furay and Salevouris, short written assignments (e.g., précis, a book review, a movie review), and a power-point presentation. The "final examination" will be a proposal and dossier for a research paper.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course is required for all students declaring a Major in History; students must earn a C or higher to have it count on the Major. It may not be used for the GE Historical Study requirement.


HISTORY 2800 INTRODUCTION TO THE DISCIPLINE OF HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will introduce students to historiography and historical methodology - that is, to different interpretations of history and to different methods of studying it. Among the themes to be covered in the course are gender and history, historical commemorations, and cultural representations of historical events. Topics will include student unrest in the 1960s, including the feminist movement, the civil rights movement, and the anti-war movement.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
On-line On-line Hoffmann


Assigned Readings:
Students will be required to read several articles or a book every week - the equivalent of ten books during the semester.

Assignments:
Students will have weekly written assignments based on the course readings. These assignments will amount to roughly 7 short papers. In addition, students will be required to participate regularly in online discussions. They will also conduct historical research which will culminate in 3 longer papers or projects.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course is required for all students declaring a Major in history, students must earn a "C" or higher to have it count on the history major. It may not be used for the GE Historical Study requirement.


HISTORY 2800H INTRODUCTION TO THE DISCIPLINE OF HISTORY (HONORS)

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course introduces students to the discipline of history by analyzing four approaches based on four theories about human experience generally - Marxist, psychoanalytic, phenomenological, and narratological. To that end students will read and analyze these theories at their source and then critically evaluate one extended application of them in contemporary historical works - two of them my own. These evaluations will concentrate on what these methods reveal about the past and what they are unable to reveal. In addition to some short readings of pure theory, students will also read assigned works that illustrate these respective approaches in practice and are the subject of the students' written evaluations. I also run a week-long writing workshop that clarifies mechanics of writing to be refined in these four papers.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
10:20-11:15 MWF Kern, S.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
Honors standing or permission of the Instructor.
This course is required for all students declaring a Major in history, students must earn a C or higher to have it count on the Major.


HISTORY 2800 INTRODUCTION TO THE DISCIPLINE OF HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course introduces history majors and minors to the academic discipline of history, and writing skills necessary to be a historian, and the kinds of methodologies and theories developed by historians. What are historical archives? How does one do archival research? How do different sources provide insight into different historical questions? In order to examine these questions, we will explore the history of Ohio and visit a number of archival sites in Ohio as well as on OSU's campus. Through fieldtrips, readings, journal writing, and source analysis, we will explore the range of ways historians can approach particular events, the variety of sources they uses, the kinds of questions they can ask, and the sorts of conclusions they can reach. We will also reflect on the powerful role that historical memory plays in shaping our understandings of the present.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
9:10-12:25 M Marino, K.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course is required for all students declaring a Major in history, students must earn a "C" or higher to have it count on the history major. It may not be used for the GE Historical Study requirement.


HISTORY 2800 INTRODUCTION TO THE DISCIPLINE OF HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

The course introduces students to contemporary historical methods. We will begin with the "art of historical detection": the ad hoc methods that historians use to solve historical mysteries, such as the fate of the nephews of King Richard III of England. We will then study critical methods, the analytical tools that historians use to interpret historical evidence, from diaries and autobiographies to photographs, songs, paintings, and court records. We will look at evidence on slavery and on the experiences of workers during the Industrial Revolution. The third section of the course will examine the disciplinary tools that historians use to interpret the past, drawn from fields as diverse as psychology, environmental science, economics, and feminist studies. The final section of the course will introduce students to historiography: the study of the history of historical writing. We will examine the ways in which historical interpretations of the past are themselves influenced by the historical circumstances in which they are written, and by the moral, political, and cultural concerns of their authors. We will study in particular how interpretations of slavery and of the American frontier changed over the course of the twentieth century in response to changes in American society and culture.

The course emphasizes the need for logic and clarity in written and oral exercises. We will practice writing and oral presentation every week, and we will work together in class through the lessons in Joseph Williams's Style, in hopes of improving the clarity, concision, coherence, and elegance of our writing. The success of the class depends upon the quality of class discussions, which will occupy most meetings during the quarter, and on the commitment of the students, individually and collectively, to improving their writing and critical skills

Time Meeting Days Instructor
12:45-2:05 TR Roth, R.

Assigned Readings:
Tey, Daughter of time
Frederick Douglass, A Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass
Joseph M. Williams, Style: Ten Lessons in Clarity and Grace (6th ed.).

Assignments:
Attendance, participation, conferences, and quizzes 20%
One précis 15%
Two critical analyses 30%
Bibliographical exercises 15%
Historiographical essay 20%

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course is required for all students declaring a Major in history, students must earn a "C" or higher to have it count on the history major. It may not be used for the GE Historical Study requirement.


HISTORY 2800 INTRODUCTION TO THE DISCIPLINE OF HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course, designed for students planning to major in history, presents some of the main elements of historical methodology: how historians do their work. We shall study how historians gather information, organize and analyze their data, and write up their research and conclusions. In short, we will learn how history is produced. Students will gather experience in dealing with primary and secondary historical sources, interpreting events within their historical context, and developing a comparative understanding of historical phenomenon. This is a required course for all History majors.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
2:20-3:40 TR Staley, D.

Assigned Readings:
John Tosh, The Pursuit of History, 5th edition
Getz & Clarke, Abina and the Important Men
Michel-Rolph Trouillot, Silencing the Past: Power and the Production of History

Assignments:
1) Attendance: worth 10% of final grade.
2) Participation: worth 25% of final grade
3) Creating an archive: worth 15% of the final grade
4) History and Wikipedia 15% of the final grade
5) Digital history project: worth 15% of the final grade
6) Final essay worth 20% of the final grade

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course is required for all students declaring a Major in History. Students must earn a C or higher to have it count on the Major. It may not be used for GE requirements.


HISTORY 3540 MODERN INTELLIGENCE HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.
This course will examine the role of diplomatic and military intelligence in the making of policy. The function of intelligence gathering, appraisal and assessment has often been overlooked in the exploration of policy making, especially in times of peace. It will be our undertaking to examine some of the most significant international events of the twentieth century in light of the contribution, or lack thereof, of both covert and overt forms of intelligence. After an introduction to the field and a discussion of the origins of the modern intelligence services, we will analyze the histories of several of the major intelligence organizations in the twentieth century. We will then discuss in depth the influence of the assessment and utilization of intelligence on the perceptions of policy makers and public opinion in both war and peacetime up to the immediate post-war era and the origins of the Cold War intelligence climate. The course will not be concerned with the intricacies of tradecraft, but with the interplay between intelligence and international policy making in the origins and encounters of the First and Second World Wars and the establishment of the intelligence rivalries and relationships which played their part in the Cold War. In our final week, we will consider the correlation between the growth of intelligence communities, their legitimization and delegitimization, and the popular image of spying represented contemporaneously in fiction and film.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
11:10-12:30 TR Siegel

Assigned Readings: (tentative)
The reading list may include:
Exploring Intelligence Archives: Enquiries into the Secret State. R. Gerald Hughes, Peter Jackson and Len Scott, eds. London: Routledge, 2008.
Krivitsky, Walter G. MI5 Debriefing & Other Documents on Soviet Intelligence. Gary Kern, ed. Riverside, CA: Xenos Books, 2004.
Philby, Kim. My Silent War: The Autobiography of a Spy. New York: Random House, 2002.
Shulsky, Abram N., and Gary J. Schmitt. Silent Warfare: Understanding the World of Intelligence. Washington, DC: Brassey's Inc., 2002.

Assignments:
Weekly readings and class discussions
Midterm and comprehensive final
Two short analytical papers.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills requirements in the International Studies Intelligence and National Security concentration. Within the history major, it is a Group Global, Post-1750, Human Conflict, Peace and Diplomacy, and Power, Culture and State.


HISTORY 4005 RESEARCH SEMINAR IN EARLY AMERICAN HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

The field of American history has produced many exciting debates and new approaches to old topics in the past ten years. Native American history, the history of slavery, the causes and consequences of the Revolution, Caribbean and Atlantic history, and a new focus on "Continental" history - that is, a recognition of the activities of various Native American and Euro-American peoples in the larger North American continent, as opposed to a focus on the English settlements along east coast - have all become exciting new areas for research and discussion. This senior seminar will explore some of the central works in these thriving topics and provide students the opportunity to engage in primary research and writing on a wide range of subjects. Development of research skills [print, manuscript, and electronic] and writing skills will be emphasized. You will finish this course having written a significant research paper and having prepared a poster presentation.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
2:15-5:15 M Newell, M.


Assignments:
Document searches and comments
Written assignments on readings
Oral reports on readings and your research project at various stages
Research paper (drafts reviewed prior to final submission

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the research seminar requirement toward a history major for semester students; this fulfills the 598 seminar requirement for quarter students. This course is only open to senior history majors.


HISTORY 4010 READINGS IN MODERN U.S. HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Sex, Youth and Moral Panic

In the early twenty-first century, conflicts over sexuality, race, drugs, and gender are central components of U.S. politics and culture. From the Daily Show to presidential campaigns, concerns about issues such as sex and violence in the media, same-sex marriage, or crime have periodically divided and united different groups of Americans. This class will explore the origins of these debates, moving from the early twentieth century to the present. In particular, we will discuss the powerful role of the market in shaping Americans' cultural identities and producing "moral panics" over youth and family. We will cover topics such as racial segregation, the entertainment industry, youth culture, gay and lesbian life, dating, pornography, drug prohibition, and social conservatism. Over the course of the semester, we will ask: Why have Americans periodically expressed chronic anxiety about children and youth? Are these concerns entirely new and what are their root origins? How has Americans' understanding of sexuality and race changed over Time?

This course is an upper-level seminar, designed to encourage critical analysis of scholarly articles and books and primary source research. Like all 4000-level courses, this seminar is reading and writing intensive, and students should come to class prepared to discuss their work. By the end of the semester, they should be able to explain the role of race, gender, sexuality, and the market in perpetuating some of the nation's "culture wars," think critically about scholarly texts, and write papers that analyze primary sources about race, gender, and sexuality

Time Meeting Days Instructor
11:10-12:30 TR Howard

Assigned Readings:
Texts: 3 books plus readings posted on Carmen.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the reading seminar requirement toward a history major for semester students; this fulfills the 598 seminar requirement for quarter students. This course is only open to junior and senior history majors.


HISTORY 4015 RESEARCH SEMINAR IN MODERN U.S. HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This senior research seminar will guide students through completing a history research project using primary and secondary sources. Topics will include immigration, women's history, and social history.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
2:15-5:00 Monday Fernandez, L.

Assignments:
Research paper; portions of the research paper (bibliography, list of primary sources, thesis statement, outline) will be due throughout the semester.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the reading seminar requirement toward a history major for semester students; this fulfills the 598 seminar requirement for quarter students. This course is only open to senior history majors.


HISTORY 4100 READINGS IN LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY

Prostitutes and Patriots: Gender, Nation, and State in Modern Latin America

How are nations constructed? How are states formed? Who counts as a citizen and how does this change over time? What is the connection between citizenship and state regulation of human bodies? How does the state manifest its power? How do citizens challenge the state's power or harness it for their own purposes? And how do historians understand and interpret these questions across time and space? Although these questions can be examined from a variety of perspectives, one thing is clear - gender mediates all of them. Understanding the gendered dimensions of nation and state in Latin American history is the goal of this course. This is particularly important considering the centrality of these questions in Latin American historiography. In the post-independence period, Latin American countries struggled to form nations and states. At the turn of the twentieth century, export-led growth, urban expansion, nascent industrialization, and increased immigration generated new anxieties regarding citizenship and modernity. Social revolution, populism, and labor movements in the twentieth century ensured that questions of social identity and the state remained contentious. Gender played a role in all of these questions, anxieties, and transformations throughout this two hundred year time period. In recent decades, scholars have developed various forms of analysis of these important dimensions of Latin American history. In this course, we broadly survey this literature, examining both theoretical debates and underpinnings of this scholarship, as well as specific case studies and historicized analyses.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
2:20-5:15 Tuesday Tally, R.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the reading seminar requirement toward a history major for semester students; this fulfills the 598 seminar requirement for quarter students. This course is only open to senior history majors.


HISTORY 4217 RESEARCH SEMINAR IN LATE ANTIQUITY

3 Cr. Hrs.

War, Crisis, and Trauma in the Late Roman Empire, ca. 400-600 CE

This course will offer students an opportunity to research and write a substantial research paper (20-25 pages) on a topic relating to the general theme of the course: war, crisis, and trauma in the late Roman Empire, ca. 400-600 CE. Students will be free to pursue this theme from a number of different angles (cultural, religious, economic, environmental, social, political, and military). The first part of the course will involve weekly class meetings, where we will study a few thematically-related events in late antiquity (as case studies) and learn about the various types of late ancient evidence for investigating instances and experiences of war, crisis, and trauma. Students will spend the remainder of the semester pursuing independent research projects with individualized supervision provided by the Instructor.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
9:35-12:30 Wednesday Sessa, K.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course is designed for senior History majors and fulfills the Research Seminar requirement for History Majors in semesters and the History 598 requirement for majors who started in quarters.


HISTORY 4245H HONORS EARLY MODERN RESEARCH SEMINAR

3 Cr. Hrs.

Aaargh Pirates! Aaargh!

This course will introduce students to the burgeoning field of Pirate Studies. We will be investigating two primary sources, from the 1680s and 1720s. We will also be reading two modern works that analyze the whole pirate phenomenon, socially, politically, and economically. There will be additional training in how to talk like a pirate. Students will be expected to write a research paper involving pirates, using these and other primary sources.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
9:35-12:30 T Davis, R.

Assigned Readings:
Alexander O. Exquemelin, The Buccaneers of America ((Dover, 2000)
"Capn. Charles Johnson" (aka Daniel Defoe): A General History of the Pyrates (Dover, 1999)
Robert C. Davis, Christian Slaves, Muslim Master (Palgrave/Macmillan, 2004)
Peter Earle, The Pirate Wars (St. Martin's 2003)
Marcus Rediker, Villains of All Nations (Beacon Press, 2004)

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
Students must have taken at least one course in either Early-modern European, Early American, Early Latin American, or Atlantic history. Eye patches are optional.


HISTORY 4400 SEMINAR IN CHINESE HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

Gender & Sexuality in Chinese History
This seminar introduces the students to historical research on women, gender, and sexuality in Chinese history through several central topics, such as powerful women, female literacy, the gendered body, foot binding, and girlhood. Through these topics, we will look into a cluster of interlocking questions: gendered aspects of the political system; changes and continuities in the Confucian gender system; the intersection of gender, sexuality, ethnicity, religion, and class; meanings of liberation, oppression, victim, and agency; the politics of writing women's history in transcultural and global contexts; the particularities of Chinese masculinity, etc. We will also think about how our own gender politics and temporal location shape our reading of the history of Chinese women, as well as how a gendered approach changes the way we examine historical evidence and interpret historical events. Throughout the course a few translated primary sources will be introduced as well.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
12:40-3:55 W Zhang, Y.

Assigned Readings:
Readings will be exclusively in English: monographs and articles; primary sources

Assignments:
Writing assignments: a variety of genres that history students should aspire to master. A research paper at the end of the term.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course is designed for senior History majors and fulfills the Research Seminar requirement for History Majors. Although students are not expected to have knowledge in Chinese, some prior exposure to Chinese history, East Asian history, OR women and gender studies will be very helpful in this course.


HISTORY 4425 READINGS IN JAPANESE HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

"Toxic Archipelago?: Explorations in the Environmental History of Modern Japan"

The environment has been both a contributor and impediment to the growth of modern Japan, a factor in its imperialism, and an object of human destruction. The dramatic impacts of the March 11 triple disaster in Northeastern Japan (earthquake, tsunami and nuclear radiation release) revealed the power of natural forces to shape Japanese society, but its forests have also brought bounty and beauty to the land for centuries. Its industrialization has brought pollution and death to animal and plant communities as well as human populations. That same technological transformation opened opportunities for Japan to exploit, benefit from and transform the ecologies of other Asian lands and the seas around Japan.

We will explore a broad array of case studies in which Japanese society's interaction with the environment have both shaped its development and that development has simultaneously re-configured the Japanese environment.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
12:40-3:55 M Brown, P.

Tentative texts:
Brett Walker, Toxic Archipelago
Timothy George, Minamata and the Struggle for Democracy in Post-War Japan
Conrad Totman, Green Archipelago: Forestry in Pre-Industrial Japan
Miller, Thomas, and Walker, eds., Japan at Nature's Edge: The Environmental Context of a Global Power
Ian Miller, The Nature of the Beasts: Empire and Exhibition at the Tokyo Imperial Zoo
Gergory Smits, When the Earth Roars: Lessons from the History of Earthquakes in Japan
Additional readings on 3-11, the Kobe earthquake, Fukushima, etc.

Assignments:
Two book reviews
Research paper and presentation
One or two smaller assignments

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
All students are required to have had a 3000-level course in History (any field). Background in Japanese/East Asian history helpful but not required. This course is designed for junior or senior History majors and fulfills the Readings Seminar requirement for History Majors that started in semesters and the 598 seminar requirement for those history majors that started in quarters.


HISTORY 4600 SEMINAR IN WOMEN'S HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

New Perspectives on European Women's History, 1750-1950
This upper level history seminar will explore the history of European women and gender relations in the Modern era (approximately 1750-1950). We will begin by examining the impact of political, economic and ideological changes in the 18th century. Subsequently, we will explore gender arrangements in the 19th century, focusing on the lives and experiences of women from a broad range of national, ethnic and class backgrounds. We will also study the rise of women's movements in the second half of the 19th century and their impact on women's legal and political status. Finally, we will examine the role of women and gender in 20th century warfare.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
3:55-5:15 TR Soland, B.

Assignments:
Class meetings will be devoted to discussion of writings by historians. Students should expect approximately 100-150 pages of reading per week. In addition, each student must prepare a research paper (20-25 pages), which will be due at the end of the semester.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the reading seminar requirement toward a history major for semester students; this fulfills the 598 seminar requirement for quarter students. This course is only open to junior and senior history majors.


WORLD HISTORY

HISTORY 2630 HISTORY OF MODERN SEXUALITIES

3 Cr. Hrs.

In-depth analysis of particular topics in the history of modern sexualities throughout the world.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
3:55-5:15
On-line
TR
on-line
George, A.
Torunoglu, G.

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for history majors.


HISTORY 2642 WORLD HISTORY, 1500-PRESENT

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course will explore the emergence of the modern world. From the late fifteenth century, the world witnessed a rapid progression in the mobility of people and information, and an unprecedented tightening of the bonds connecting far-flung civilizations. This is most apparent in the European maritime explorations and conquests of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, which led to the establishment of European colonies across much of the Americas, Africa and Asia.

In addition to examining European colonialism and imperialism in various manifestations across the globe, students enrolled in this course will be challenged to think critically about the global repercussions of such historical phenomena as the Scientific Revolution, the Enlightenment and the Industrial Revolution. In the final weeks of the course we will turn to more recent global historical issues. These include the rise of nationalism, its relationship to the collapse of the European colonial empires, and its turbulent legacy today.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
2:20-3:40 TR Levi, S.

Assigned Readings:
Textbook and two additional short books

Assignments:
Coursework includes a map quiz, mid-term, research paper and final exam

Prerequisites and Special Comments: This course fulfills Group Global, post-1750 for history majors.


HISTORY 2650 THE WORLD SINCE 1914

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course looks from a global perspective at major issues that have made, or are making, the world we live in today. The lectures explore major themes or examples illustrative of those issues.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
3:55-5:15 TR Hildonen, K.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Global, pre-1750 for history majors and also fulfills one the content requirements for Integrated Social Studies licensure.


HISTORY 2700 GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course explores the long history of the earth and humanity from an environmental/earth systems perspective, focusing on the changing relationship of human societies and global ecologies and the problem of the sustainability of the human condition. A brief introduction to climate and the biosphere in geological time establishes the background for a comparative overview of three broad "human revolutions": the origin of the human species, the agricultural revolution, and the industrial revolution. Themes of particular importance include issues in human evolution, demography, subsistence, and technology, debates over gradual and catastrophic change in climate and the biosphere, and the prospects for a sustainable future.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
9:35-10:55 TR Brooke

Assigned Books:
Alfred Crosby, The Children of the Sun
Dorothy Crawford, Deadly Companions: How Microbes Shaped Our History
Ruth DeFries, The Big Ratchet
John Brooke, Climate Change & the Course of Global History [author's income will be donated to the History Undergraduate Fund.]

Assignments: Class participation (20%), papers on Parts I (25% in class), II (25% take home), and III (30% in-class or take home option). There will be drop-box comments throughout the course, which will count toward the participation grade. These written assignments are designed to allow you to demonstrate your understanding of the significance and interconnection of various topics and themes developed in the readings, lectures, and discussions.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
Undergraduate Program Credit:
History: This course may be counted as Group Global, and either "pre-1750" or "post-1750."
International Studies: This course may be taken as a part of the Minor in Globalization Studies offered by the Program in International Studies, to fulfill part of the requirement in "Economic, Environmental, and Political Dimensions."
Public Health: This course may be taken as an elective in the Minor in Public Health.
GE: This course may be taken to fulfill one [but only one] of three GE Requirements: 3. Historical Study; 4C: Social Science: Human, Natural, and Economic Resources; 6B: Diversity Experiences: International Issues (Global or Non-Western). Students taking the course for either 4C or 6B need to plan their projects in consultation with the Instructor so as to meet the requirement guidelines.

Graduate credit: Graduate students preparing for fields in World History or Global Material History may attend the lectures in conjunction with enrollment in 7193.

Recommendation: High school-level science background is assumed; university courses in history, archaeology, anthropology, biology, geology, or technology will all be useful background.


HISTORY 2702 FOOD IN WORLD HISTORY

3 Cr. Hrs.

This course explores food in world history from prehistory to present. We will explore the roles that food and drink have played in all aspects of our lives from human evolution to religion, politics, commerce, class and national identity. The readings span a range of disciplines, including history, anthropology, biology and sociology. Students will develop an awareness and understanding of the place of food in history and the origins of modern diets and cuisines.

Time Meeting Days Instructor
9:35-10:55 TR White, S.

Assigned Readings:
Readings will come from several surveys of food history, articles and chapters from academic and popular histories, and sometimes news items, podcasts and videos.

Assignments:
The course will have many in-class quizzes but no midterm or final exam. There will be one class essay with required submission rough drafts.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills the Global, post-1750 category for history majors.

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