The Clio Society

Welcome to the Clio Society!

We are friends of the History Department at The Ohio State University. Some of us are current and former students of the university; some of us earned degrees in history; others are current and former faculty members of the department; some of us have an interest in the History Department and its continued growth in excellence; and all of us love to read and talk about history. We range in ages from 18 to 88 and from history specialists to business people, lawyers, and other professionals who never lost their interest in history.

If you liked history as an undergrad, then you are going to love it now.


Please check back for information about our Autumn 2017 presentations.

 

Video from our April 13th presentation, "Post-Truth" Moments in History:

A panel discussion by John Brooke (History), Greg Anderson (History), Melissa Curley (Comparative Studies) and Bert Harrill (History)
Ohio State University Professors
 
The Oxford English Dictionary has named “post-truth” the word of 2016. Post-truth is defined as, "relating to or denoting circumstances in which objective facts are less influential in shaping public opinion than appeals to emotion and personal belief." Our panel hopes to look at different historical contexts/cases where generally accepted “truths” were somehow rendered unimportant, whether deliberately or unintentionally, thereby providing historical context for our more recent “post-truth” moments.
 
 
 

Clio

In Greek mythology, Clio (Greek: Κλειώ, English: /ˈklaɪ.oʊ/) or Kleio, was the muse of history. Her name is related to the Greek word for "fame" or "renown" (kleos), since she oversaw the recording of the illustrious deeds of the past. Like all the muses, she was a goddess, a daughter of Zeus and Mnemosyne. According to different traditions, she was mother to Hyacintha, Hymenaeus, and Ialemus.

The Clio Society Logo.